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Nyheder2018december09

Bioenergy crops could be as bad for biodiversity as climate change

A large scale expansion in bioenergy crop production could be just as detrimental to biodiversity as climate change itself, according to new research.

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'Dropout' rate for academic scientists has risen sharply in past 50 years, study finds

Half of the people pursuing careers as scientists at higher education institutions will drop out of the field after five years, according to a new analysis from researchers at Indiana University Bloomington.

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Ocean fertilization by unusual microbes extends to frigid waters of Arctic Ocean

Microbes that provide natural fertilizer to the oceans by "fixing" nitrogen from the atmosphere into a form useable by other organisms were once thought to be limited to warm tropical and subtropical waters. Now, however, researchers have documented nitrogen fixation by an unusual type of cyanobacteria in the cold waters of the Bering and Chukchi Seas.

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Humans may be reversing the climate clock, by 50 million years

Our future on Earth may also be our past. In a study published Monday (Dec. 10, 2018) in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, researchers show that humans are reversing a long-term cooling trend tracing back at least 50 million years. And it's taken just two centuries.

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Earth's Mysterious 'Deep Biosphere' Is Home to Millions of Undiscovered Species, Scientists Say

Should we search for life on other planets, or begin searching deep inside our own?

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UA-led OSIRIS-REx discovers water on asteroid, confirms Bennu as excellent mission target

Spectral observations made by the OSIRIS-REx spacecraft identified hydrated minerals across the asteroid, confirming that Bennu, a remnant from early in the formation of the solar system, is an excellent specimen for the OSIRIS-REx mission to study the composition of primitive volatiles and organics.

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Physicists edge closer to controlling chemical reactions

A team of researchers has developed an algorithm for predicting the effect of an external electromagnetic field on the state of complex molecules. The new algorithm, presented in a paper in The Journal of Chemical Physics, enables researchers to look inside large polyatomic molecules, observe and potentially control electron motion therein.

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Effects of Antidepressants Span Three Generations in Fish

Fluoxetine dampened stress responses in zebrafish embryos exposed to the drug–and their descendants.

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Voyager 2 can finally probe the rarified plasma surrounding our solar systemNASA Voyager 2 Space

Space It's now one of two working spacecraft in interstellar space. Voyager 2 has become the second active spacecraft to enter interstellar space, and the first to measure the interstellar plasma.

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Watch an explosive showdown between lab-made lava and water

Explosive experiments with human-made lava are helping to answer the question “What happens when lava and water meet?” By cooking up 10-gallon batches of molten rock and injecting them with water, scientists are shedding light on the basic physics of lava-water interactions, which are common in nature but poorly understood. The scientists caution that the number of tests so far is small, so the t

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Your brain on imagination: It's a lot like reality, study shows

New brain imaging research shows that imagining a threat lights up similar regions as experiencing it does. It suggests imagination can be a powerful tool in overcoming phobias or post traumatic stress.

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Millions of low-risk people with diabetes may be testing their blood sugar too often

For people with Type 2 diabetes, testing blood sugar levels becomes part of everyday life. But a new study suggests that some of them test more often than they need to. Fourteen percent of people with Type 2 diabetes who don't require insulin are buying enough test strips to test their blood sugar two or more times a day — when they don't need to test nearly that frequently according to medical g

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Study identifies a key cellular mechanism that triggers pneumonia in humans

Researchers have demonstrated that influenza virus impairs the immune response to pneumococcus, especially monocyte activity. A software tool developed with FAPESP's support was used to interpret the data.

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Coping skills program for disaster survivors tested with children living in chronic poverty

An emotional coping skills program developed for natural disaster survivors appears to help young children deal with the traumatic experiences associated with living in chronic poverty, a new study found.University of Illinois social work professor Tara M. Powell pilot tested the program, Journey of Hope, with more than 100 children attending high-poverty elementary schools in Tennessee.

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Why Trump Can’t Find Anyone to Be His Chief of Staff

Donald Trump is, infamously , not the sort of man used to getting no for an answer. And while the frequent demurrals from candidates for administration jobs must have started to accustom the president to rejection, Nick Ayers’s decision not to take the White House chief-of-staff position must still come as a bitter shock. Ayers has been the presumptive top presidential aide for as long as the inc

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Blocking messages between cancer cells may stop their spread

New research may answer some key questions about how cancer spreads. Researchers looked at a gene called EGFRvIII, which is present in patients with glioblastoma—a highly aggressive form of brain cancer that spreads quickly and that is difficult to treat. Glioblastoma multiforme is most prevalent in adults aged 45 to 70 and has one of the poorest survival rates of any cancer. The exact causes of

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Voyager 2 Spacecraft Enters Interstellar Space

After a journey of more than four decades, Voyager 2 has passed beyond the sun’s influence — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Dopamine's yin-yang personality: It's an upper and a downer

Dopamine has a reputation as the key player in the brain's reward circuits, making us seek out pleasurable experiences, but growing evidence points to a multipronged role for the neurotransmitter. In particular, dopamine may also reinforce avoidance of painful experiences. Researchers have now mapped dopamine neurons in the brain with fiber photometry and discovered two parallel dopamine circuits

5h

Editing consciousness: How bereaved people control their thoughts without knowing it

A new study shows that avoidant grievers unconsciously monitor and block the contents of their mind-wandering, a discovery that could lead to more effective psychiatric treatment for bereaved people. The researchers, who studied 29 bereaved subjects, are the first to show how this unconscious thought suppression occurs.

5h

Physicist creates tiny sensors to assist in cancer detection

A physicist hopes to improve cancer detection with a new and novel class of nanomaterials.

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Key players in the marine nitrogen cycle can utilize cyanate and urea

The ammonia oxidizing archaea, or Thaumarchaeota, are amongst the most abundant marine microorganisms. Yet, we are still discovering which factors allow them to thrive in the ocean: A new publication reveals that marine Thaumarchaeota have a broader metabolism than previously thought.

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Personalized medicine tool for inherited colorectal cancer syndrome

An international team of researchers has developed, calibrated, and validated a novel tool for identifying the genetic changes in Lynch syndrome genes that are likely to be responsible for causing symptoms of the disease.

5h

Providers show interest in prescribing therapeutic cannabinoids

Researchers have found many dermatologists are interested in learning more about and recommending therapeutic cannabinoids to their patients.

5h

Google+ Exposed Data of 52.5 Million Users and Will Shut Down in April

A month after Google had already decided to shut down Google+, a new bug made its problems much, much worse.

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One of the planets around TRAPPIST-1 may have an ocean

New research gives updated climate models for the seven planets around the star TRAPPIST-1. The work could help astronomers more effectively study planets around stars unlike our sun, and better use the limited, expensive resources of the James Webb Space Telescope, now expected to launch in 2021. “We are modeling unfamiliar atmospheres, not just assuming that the things we see in the solar syste

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Watch the New 'Godzilla: King of the Monsters' Trailer Now

Plus: Aquaman just made a big splash in China, and Netflix is getting closer to an Oscar.

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In the Universe of Equations, Virtually All Are Prime

Prime numbers get all the love. They’re the stars of countless popular stories, and they feature in the most celebrated open questions in mathematics. But there’s another mathematical phenomenon that’s almost as foundational, yet receives far less attention: prime equations. These are equations — polynomial equations in particular — that can’t be divided by any other equations. Like prime numbers

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Topological material switched off and on for the first time

Australian study just out in Nature represents a significant advance in topological transistors and beyond-CMOS electronics.First time that the topological state in a topological insulator has been switched on and off using an electric field. Researchers proved this is possible at room temperature, which is necessary for any viable replacement to CMOS technology in everyday applications.

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Some brain tumors may respond to immunotherapy, new study suggests

A new study suggests that a slow-growing brain tumor arising in patients affected by neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) may be vulnerable to immunotherapy, which gives the immune system a boost in fighting cancer.

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Sprayable gel could help the body fight off cancer after surgery

A UCLA-led research team has developed a spray gel embedded with immune-boosting drugs that could help lower the risk of cancer recurrence after surgery.

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Study points to optimal blood pressure treatment for stroke patients

Aggressive treatment of hypertension in stroke patients could do more harm than good in the long term, according to a new study from researchers at the University of Georgia.

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Penn team uses gene editing to personalize clinical care for family with cardiomyopathy

More and more, through sequencing done for medical reasons or done by direct-to-consumer companies, people learn they have variants of disease genes with uncertain significance to their health. With a new assay, researchers have a way to determine the potential impact of these cardiomyopathy variants on the health of patients and their family members.

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Smelling the forest not the trees: Why animals are better at sniffing complex smells

Animals are much better at smelling a complex 'soup' of odorants rather than a single pure ingredient, a new study by the University of Sussex has revealed.

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Photos of the Week: State Funeral, Mass Marriage, Krampus Parade

A prison beauty contest in Brazil, a 3-D-printed e-motorcycle in Germany, the state funeral of former President George H. W. Bush, a light show in Guangzhou, a successful rocket launch from the Baikonur Cosmodrome, SantaCon in New York City, “yellow vest” protests in Paris, a chili-eating contest in China, and much more

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Mind control using sound waves? We ask a scientist how it works.

At the moment, non-invasive neuromodulation – changing brain activity without the use of surgery – looks poised to usher in a new era of healthcare. Breakthroughs could include the better management of Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease, reducing the pain of migraines or even reversing cognitive disorders caused by brain injury. But what happens if this technique for altering our brain waves esc

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Imaging atomic structure of important immune regulator

A new study provides a biophysical and structural assessment of a critical immune regulating protein called human T-cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain containing protein-3 (hTIM-3). Understanding the atomic structure of hTIM-3 provides new insights for targeting this protein for numerous cancer and autoimmune therapeutics currently under clinical development.

6h

Two compounds in coffee may team up to fight Parkinson's

Scientists have found a compound in coffee that may team up with caffeine to fight Parkinson's disease and Lewy body dementia — two progressive and currently incurable diseases associated with brain degeneration.

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Antenna evaluation method could help boost 5G network capacity and cut costs

Researchers have developed a method for evaluating and selecting optimal antenna designs for future fifth-generation (5G) cellphones, other wireless devices and base stations.

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Predicting leaky heart valves with 3D printing

Researchers have created a novel 3D printing workflow that allows cardiologists to evaluate how different valve sizes will interact with each patient's unique anatomy, before the medical procedure is actually performed. This protocol uses CT scan data to produce physical models of individual patients' aortic valves, in addition to a 'sizer' device to determine the perfect replacement valve size.

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Smelling the forest not the trees: Why animals are better at sniffing complex smells

Animals are much better at smelling a complex "soup" of odorants rather than a single pure ingredient, a new study by the University of Sussex has revealed.

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Last week in tech: Tumblr got boring, Apple captured your heart, and everyone watched the Avengers trailer

Technology Tumblr's AI is on the search for nipples. So, how about that Avengers trailer?

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Dueling U.S. Agendas As U.N. Climate Change Summit Enters Crucial Final Week

The U.S. hosted an event on coal and refused to endorse the findings of a dire climate science report. And yet, in official negotiations, the U.S. is working out how to implement the Paris agreement. (Image credit: Frank Jordans/AP)

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When Elon Musk Switches on ‘Insane Mode’

In August, Elon Musk suggested on Twitter that he was considering taking Tesla, his publicly traded electric-car company, private. The tweet took many by surprise, including regulators at the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, who responded by suing Musk , accusing the entrepreneur of misleading investors and agitating financial markets. The two sides eventually reached a settlement that re

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The Radical Helplessness of the New Doctor Who

Commercials and subway ads for the latest season of Doctor Who , which ended Sunday, bore a straightforward slogan: “It’s about time.” The show is, literally, about time, specifically time travel, but the joke was in the tagline’s second meaning: The Doctor, for the first time in the sci-fi series’ 55-year history, was played this season by a woman. The sentiment underlying the show’s promotional

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How does screen time affect kids’ brains? The first results of a landmark study are alarming.

The study uses MRI scans to track the changes in the brains of children who use screens at varying amounts. Early results revealed that kids who use screens for more than 7 hours per day show physical changes to the brain in the form of premature thinning of the cortex. It will likely be decades before scientists truly understand how smartphones and other technologies affect the brain. None How d

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Spray-on gel slows down the regrowth of tumours after cancer surgery

A spray applied to the wound left by cancer surgery encourages the immune system to attack any cancer cells the surgeons left behind, a study in mice has found

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Buridan's donkey: Neuroscience resolves medieveal decision-making conundrum

The brain updates its preferences in real-time in order to choose between two equally attractive options, reveals a human neuroimaging and eye-tracking study published in JNeurosci. The research shows how we avoid becoming paralyzed by indecision like the starving donkey in a famous thought experiment.

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What We Know About Diet and Weight Loss

After decades of research, there are shockingly few firm conclusions.

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Is Screen Time Bad for Kids’ Brains?

A study featured on “60 Minutes” is sure to alarm parents. Here’s what scientists know, and don’t know, about the link between screens, behavior, and development.

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Global Health: In Remote Villages, Surprising New Measures Save Children With Malaria

Malaria quickly kills toddlers. But rapid diagnostic tests, a new suppository drug and bicycle ambulances can buy enough time to get stricken children to hospitals.

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Voyager 2 spacecraft enters interstellar space

Voyager 2 just became the second probe ever to enter interstellar space, and the first with a working plasma instrument.

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Inequality in homicide rates in Chicago neighborhoods increased over 20-year period

While nearly all neighborhoods in Chicago benefited from reductions in homicide, relative inequality in crime between the city's safest and most dangerous neighborhoods actually increased by 10 percent over recent years, according to a new Northwestern University study.

7h

Dopamine's yin-yang personality: It's an upper and a downer

Dopamine has a reputation as the key player in the brain's reward circuits, making us seek out pleasurable experiences, but growing evidence points to a multipronged role for the neurotransmitter. In particular, dopamine may also reinforce avoidance of painful experiences. UC Berkeley researchers have now mapped dopamine neurons in the brain with fiber photometry and discovered two parallel dopami

7h

Females prefer city frogs' tunes

Urban sophistication has real sex appeal — at least if you're a Central American amphibian. Male frogs in cities are more attractive to females than their forest-frog counterparts, according to a new study.

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Early career choices appear to influence personality

In the state of Baden-Wurttemberg, Germany, 16-year-old students in middle-track schools decide whether to stay in school to pursue an academic career or enroll in a vocational training program. A new study offers evidence that the path they choose influences their personality years later.

7h

Unexpected impact of hurricanes on Puerto Rico's watershed

Researchers have found unprecedentedly high levels of nitrate, an essential plant nutrient, in streams and watersheds of Puerto Rico for a year after two consecutive major hurricanes in 2017. This high amount of nitrate may have important climate change implications that could harm forest recovery and threaten ecosystems along Puerto Rico's coastline by escalating algal blooms and dead zones.

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A glimmer of hope for the world's coral reefs

The future of the world's coral reefs is uncertain, as the impact of global heating continues to escalate. However, according to a new study, the response of the Great Barrier Reef to extreme temperatures in 2017 was markedly different to one year earlier, following two back-to-back bouts of coral bleaching.

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Two compounds in coffee may team up to fight Parkinson's

Rutgers scientists have found a compound in coffee that may team up with caffeine to fight Parkinson's disease and Lewy body dementia — two progressive and currently incurable diseases associated with brain degeneration.

7h

Researchers image atomic structure of important immune regulator

A new study by investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital provides a biophysical and structural assessment of a critical immune regulating protein called human T-cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain containing protein-3 (hTIM-3). Understanding the atomic structure of hTIM-3 provides new insights for targeting this protein for numerous cancer and autoimmune therapeutics currently under clinica

7h

GoPro to move production out of China over tariff concerns

Action-camera maker GoPro says it will move production of U.S.-bound cameras out of China by the summer over tariff-related concerns.

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Brazil court overturns suspension of Boeing-Embraer tie-up

An appeals court in Brazil on Monday overturned an order blocking a proposed $4.75 billion tie-up between US aerospace giant Boeing and the civilian business of Brazilian plane-maker Embraer.

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Verizon cuts 10,000 workers through buyouts as part of restructuring

US telecomm group Verizon announced Monday it would slash its workforce through a voluntary buyout plan as the company strives to better position itself for the coming of new cellular technology.

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Researchers image atomic structure of important immune regulator

A new study by investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital provides a biophysical and structural assessment of a critical immune regulating protein called human T-cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain containing protein-3 (hTIM-3). Understanding the atomic structure of hTIM-3 provides new insights for targeting this protein for numerous cancer and autoimmune therapeutics currently under clinica

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Urban frogs are bringing sexy back—and threatening frogs of the woods

Animals In Panama, city slicker frogs are singing complex new tunes. Like humans, frogs love a good song, though our amphibious friends have a lot more at stake when they croon.

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Review Preview

Hear Scientist to Watch Prachee Avasthi describe the preprint journal review club she started at the University of Kansas Medical Center.

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City Frogs Are the Sexiest Frogs

For years, the Darién Gap, a narrow strip of pristine rain forest connecting Central and South America, was occupied by the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia–People’s Army, or FARC , making it far too dangerous for any scientist to visit. But in 2016, after FARC negotiated a cease-fire with the Colombian government, the gap became far safer, and Wouter Halfwerk , an ecologist from Vrije Univ

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Review Preview

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Venki Ramakrishnan Talks About Brexit

Watch as Nobel laureate Venki Ramakrishnan, who wrote the December Reading Frames essay, discusses Brexit and the importance of sharing scientific insights with the public.

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Why being busy is a modern sickness

Constantly being busy is neurologically taxing and emotionally draining. In his new book, Jon Kabat-Zinn writes that you're doing a disservice to others by always being busy. Busyness is often an excuse for the discomfort of being alone with your own thoughts. None Of all the books from last century we can turn back to for guidance, Alan Watts's The Wisdom of Insecurity: A Message for an Age of A

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Evidence for carbon-rich surface on Ceres

Astronomers have concluded that the surface of dwarf planet Ceres is rich in organic matter. Data from NASA's Dawn spacecraft indicate that Ceres's surface may contain several times the concentration of carbon than is present in the most carbon-rich, primitive meteorites found on Earth.

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Topological matters: Toward a new kind of transistor

An experiment has demonstrated, for the first time, electronic switching in an exotic, ultrathin material that can carry a charge with nearly zero loss at room temperature. Researchers demonstrated this switching when subjecting the material to a low-current electric field.

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Tiny droplets of early universe matter created

Researchers have created tiny droplets of the ultra-hot matter that once filled the early universe, forming three distinct shapes and sizes: circles, ellipses and triangles.

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Novel laser technology for microchip-size chemical sensors

A special laser system has been developed, using two slightly different frequency combs. This allows for chemical analysis on tiny spaces — it is a millimeter-format chemistry lab. With this new patent-pending technology, frequency combs can be created on a single chip in a very simple and robust manner.

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Marianne Bronner on Video

Meet Caltech cell and molecular biologist Marianne Bronner, this month’s profilee, and hear her take on encouraging the next generation of researchers.

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Providers show interest in prescribing therapeutic cannabinoids

A team from the GW School of Medicine and Health Sciences found many dermatologists are interested in learning more about and recommending therapeutic cannabinoids to their patients.

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Researchers develop personalized medicine tool for inherited colorectal cancer syndrome

An international team of researchers led by Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah (U of U) has developed, calibrated, and validated a novel tool for identifying the genetic changes in Lynch syndrome genes that are likely to be responsible for causing symptoms of the disease. The results were published this week in the journal Genetics in Medicine.

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Editing consciousness: How bereaved people control their thoughts without knowing it

A new study from Columbia Engineering and Columbia University Irving Medical Center shows that avoidant grievers unconsciously monitor and block the contents of their mind-wandering, a discovery that could lead to more effective psychiatric treatment for bereaved people. The researchers, who studied 29 bereaved subjects, are the first to show how this unconscious thought suppression occurs.

7h

Nasa's Voyager 2 probe reaches interstellar space

Spacecraft becomes second human-made object to reach space between stars Nasa’s Voyager 2 has become only the second human-made object to reach the space between stars. Nasa said that the spacecraft left the region of the sun’s influence last month and is now beyond the outer boundary of the heliosphere, about 11 billion miles from Earth. It is trailing Voyager 1, which reached interstellar space

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Video games and the paradox of failure

When we fail at video games, we discover an inadequacy (however small) in ourselves — yet a growing number of people continue to seek out these digital challenges. Game designer Jesper Juul calls this the paradox of failure and argues it offers a unique space for personal growth. By using the paradox of failure as a tool, video games could teach us to develop open mindsets and evade the pitfalls

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Researchers find unexpected impact of hurricanes on Puerto Rico's watershed

Researchers at the University of New Hampshire have found unprecedentedly high levels of nitrate, an essential plant nutrient, in streams and watersheds of Puerto Rico for a year after two consecutive major hurricanes in 2017. This high amount of nitrate may have important climate change implications that could harm forest recovery and threaten ecosystems along Puerto Rico's coastline by escalatin

7h

Solar activity research provides insight into sun's past, future

Scientists have developed a new technique for looking at historic solar data to distinguish trustworthy observations from those that should be used with care. This work is critical to understanding the sun's past and future as well as whether solar activity plays a role in climate change.

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New insights into childhood cancer

Peripheral nervous system tumors, known as neuroblastoma, are one of the most common types of childhood tumors. Researchers have now studied the genetic factors behind different tumor subtypes and their prognoses. Their findings enable clinicians to predict the precise clinical course of the disease, and to adapt their treatment regimens accordingly.

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New method to treat life-threatening heart arrhythmias in dogs

Researchers have developed a new treatment for dogs with a rare, but life-threatening, arrhythmia caused by atrioventricular accessory pathways (APs). The minimally invasive technique, which uses radiofrequencies, is modified from a human cardiology procedure and has a more than 95 percent success rate in treating dogs with this type of arrhythmia.

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Life in Deep Earth totals 15 to 23 billion tons of carbon — hundreds of times more than humans

Barely living 'zombie' bacteria and other forms of life constitute an immense amount of carbon deep within Earth's subsurface — 245 to 385 times greater than the carbon mass of all humans on the surface, according to Deep Carbon Observatory scientists nearing the end of a 10-year international collaboration to reveal Earth's innermost secrets.

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How Rising Temperatures Suffocated 96 Percent of Sea Life in Earth's Biggest Extinction

Here's the horrifying way these sea creatures met their end more than 250 million years ago.

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NASA-NOAA satellite sees Tropical Cyclone Owen's remnants reorganizing

The remnants of Tropical Cyclone have been lingering in the Southern Pacific Ocean for days. On Dec. 10, the storm finally appeared more organized on satellite imagery providing forecasters with a strong indication that it may be reborn as a tropical cyclone. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the Gulf of Carpentaria and saw the storm.

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Marianne the Mentor

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Treatment of hypertension induced albuminuria

Patients with albuminuria will usually need more than one drug to achieve blood pressure control, particularly if the aim is also to reduce albuminuria.

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Interplay between MicroRNAs and targeted genes in cellular homeostasis of adult zebrafish

The objective of study was to understand the damages induced by toxins in the liver and the intestine as well as the interplay between the miRNome and transcriptome baseline characterization in these tissues in healthy animals under cellular homeostasis.

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U.S. Stands with Russia and Saudi Arabia Against Climate Science

At a meeting to coordinate climate action, the nations thwarted recognition of a recent report expressing the urgency of reducing emissions — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Beyond the "Human" in Human Rights: The Universal Declaration at 70

Let us give fresh consideration to the moral status of animals, nature and machines — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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What Keeps Black Holes From Expanding Everywhere?

Leonard Susskind , a pioneer of string theory , the holographic principle and other big physics ideas spanning the past half century, has proposed a solution to an important puzzle about black holes . The problem is that even though these mysterious, invisible spheres appear to stay a constant size as viewed from the outside, their interiors keep growing in volume essentially forever. How is this

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NASA's Voyager 2 probe enters interstellar spaceNASA Voyager 2 Space

For the second time in history, a human-made object has reached the space between the stars. NASA's Voyager 2 probe now has exited the heliosphere — the protective bubble of particles and magnetic fields created by the Sun.

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Cancer cells distinguished by artificial intelligence-based system

A research team has created a system that uses a convolutional neural network to learn the features distinguishing different cancer cells, based on images from a phase-contrast microscope. This system accurately differentiated human and mouse cancer cells, as well as their radioresistant clones. This novel approach can improve the speed and accuracy of cancer diagnosis by avoiding the laboriousnes

8h

Hair color gene study sheds new light on roots of redheads' locks

Scientists have discovered eight additional genes linked to red hair, helping to solve a mystery of how redheads inherit their flaming locks.

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Plants as antifungal factories

Researchers have developed a biotechnological tool to produce, in a very efficient manner, antifungal proteins in the leaves of the plant Nicotiana benthamiana. These proteins are promising biomolecules that could be used to develop new antifungals whose properties and mechanisms of action represent improvements on the existing ones, and which can be applied in diverse fields, including crop and p

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Ozone depletion increases Antarctic snowfall, partially mitigates ice sheet loss

Ozone layer depletion has increased snowfall over Antarctica in recent decades, partially mitigating the ongoing loss of the continent's ice sheet mass, new research finds.

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Proteins for making tough rubber

Inspired by nature, scientists have produced a synthetic analogue to vulcanized natural rubber. Their material is just as tough and durable as the original. They reveal the secret to their success: short protein chains attached to the side-chains of the polymer backbone ensure stable physical cross-linkage and give the material a "self-reinforcing" effect under strain. In contrast to conventiona

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Scientists Find Some Hope for Coral Reefs: The Strong May Survive

Global warming is ravaging coral, including at the Great Barrier Reef. But it may serve as “one enormous natural selection event,” a researcher said.

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'Doc, sometimes I'm in pain!': How do patients want to discuss symptoms with clinicians?

A new Regenstrief Institute study has found that patients want to tell their doctors about their symptoms and would be willing to do so via a formal reporting system, but patients are reluctant to report symptoms if they perceive busy clinicians will not use that information to improve care.

8h

NASA-NOAA satellite sees Tropical Cyclone Owen's remnants reorganizing

The remnants of Tropical Cyclone Owen have been lingering in the Southern Pacific Ocean for days. On Dec. 10, 2018 the storm finally appeared more organized on satellite imagery providing forecasters with a strong indication that it may be reborn as a tropical cyclone. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the Gulf of Carpentaria and saw the storm.

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The Great Barrier Reef is fighting back by losing weak species

Australia’s Great Barrier Reef appears to be getting better at coping with heatwaves overall, as stronger species take over where vulnerable ones get wiped out

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City living makes urban male frogs far more attractive to females

Urban male túngara frogs have evolved more elaborate mating calls than their rural brothers, which make them much better at attracting a mate

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The most comfortable running shoes may actually increase injury risk

Shoes with extra padding are meant to prevent impact-related injuries, but they may do the opposite by making our legs stiffer when we run

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Theresa May Is Running Out of Options

LONDON—British Prime Minister Theresa May announced on Monday that she was postponing a scheduled parliamentary vote on her proposed Brexit deal. The 11th-hour decision follows weeks of speculation that the agreement was doomed to suffer an overwhelming defeat at the hands of British lawmakers in its current form. What remains unclear is how long the vote will be delayed and, with the end of Marc

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Genetic study of epilepsy points to potential new therapies

The largest study of its kind, led by international researchers has discovered 11 new genes associated with epilepsy. It greatly advances knowledge of the underlying biological causes of epilepsy and may inform the development of new treatments for the condition.

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Scientists brew lava and blow it up to better understand volcanoes

What happens when lava and water meet? Explosive experiments with humanmade lava are helping to answer this important question. This long-term, ongoing study aims to shed light on the basic physics of lava-water interactions, which are common in nature but poorly understood.

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New light on blocking Shiga and ricin toxins — And on an iconic biological process

Researchers, setting their sights on Shiga toxin (player in the current E. coli outbreak from romaine lettuce) and ricin (a bioterrorism agent), have now identified potential protective strategies. Their study also sheds new light on glycosylation, the attachment of sugars to large molecules, key to cells' ability to create more diverse molecules beyond what's encoded in the genome.

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How glial cells develop in the brain from neural precursor cells

A research team studied how glial cells develop in the brain from neural precursor cells. They discovered that differentiation involves three stages and that three proteins in the cell nucleus, so-called transcription factors, play a key role in organizing glia-specific transcription of the genes in the cell nucleus.

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New look at Puerto Rico post-Hurricane Maria

Two new research efforts delve into Hurricane Maria's far-reaching effects on the island's forests and on its residents' energy and electricity access.

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Memory tests predict brain atrophy and Alzheimer's disease

Use of two episodic memory tests help in predicting brain atrophy and Alzheimer's disease, as indicated by a study. Researchers suggest that comprehensive use of memory tests could improve the diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment due to Alzheimer's disease.

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City frogs have sexier calls than country frogs, study finds

Researchers discover urban male túngara frogs call more, and with more complex vocalisations, than rural peers Living in a forest might sound romantic, but city life makes males more attractive to the opposite sex – at least if you are a túngara frog. Researchers have discovered that urban males of the species have more attractive calls than their rural peers. Continue reading…

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UNH researchers find unexpected impact of hurricanes on Puerto Rico's watershed

Researchers at the University of New Hampshire have found unprecedentedly high levels of nitrate, an essential plant nutrient, in streams and watersheds of Puerto Rico for a year after two consecutive major hurricanes in 2017. This high amount of nitrate may have important climate change implications that could harm forest recovery and threaten ecosystems along Puerto Rico's coastline by escalatin

8h

Study: Early career choices appear to influence personality

In the state of Baden-Wurttemberg, Germany, 16-year-old students in middle-track schools decide whether to stay in school to pursue an academic career or enroll in a vocational training program. A new study offers evidence that the path they choose influences their personality years later.

8h

Ezogabine treatment shown to reduce motor neuron excitability in ALS patients

Brian Wainger, MD, PhD, of the Healey Center for ALS at Massachusetts General Hospital presented initial, top-level results of a recently completed phase 2 clinical trial of ezogabine at the Motor Neurone Disease Association annual meeting. The trial met its primary goal of measuring a reduction in motor neuron excitability in people with ALS.

8h

Predicting leaky heart valves with 3D printing

Researchers at the Wyss Institute have created a novel 3D printing workflow that allows cardiologists to evaluate how different valve sizes will interact with each patient's unique anatomy, before the medical procedure is actually performed. This protocol uses CT scan data to produce physical models of individual patients' aortic valves, in addition to a 'sizer' device to determine the perfect rep

8h

Novel laser technology for microchip-size chemical sensors

At TU Wien (Vienna), a special laser system has been developed, using two slightly different fequency combs. This allows for chemical analysis on tiny spaces — it is a millimeter-format chemistry lab. With this new patent-pending technology, frequency combs can be created on a single chip in a very simple and robust manner.

8h

Small but versatile

The ammonia oxidizing archaea, or Thaumarchaeota, are amongst the most abundant marine microorganisms. Yet, we are still discovering which factors allow them to thrive in the ocean: A new publication reveals that marine Thaumarchaeota have a broader metabolism than previously thought.

8h

A glimmer of hope for the world's coral reefs

The future of the world's coral reefs is uncertain, as the impact of global heating continues to escalate. However, according to a study published today in Nature Climate Change, the response of the Great Barrier Reef to extreme temperatures in 2017 was markedly different to one year earlier, following two back-to-back bouts of coral bleaching.

8h

Big datasets pinpoint new regions to explore the genome for disease

Researchers develop a model that explores more than 100,000 healthy humans to identify regions of our genes that are intolerant to change.

8h

Females prefer city frogs' tunes

Urban sophistication has real sex appeal — at least if you're a Central American amphibian. Male frogs in cities are more attractive to females than their forest-frog counterparts, according to a new study published in Nature Ecology and Evolution.

8h

Researchers create tiny droplets of early universe matter

Researchers have created tiny droplets of the ultra-hot matter that once filled the early universe, forming three distinct shapes and sizes: circles, ellipses and triangles.

8h

SwRI-led team finds evidence for carbon-rich surface on Ceres

A team led by Southwest Research Institute has concluded that the surface of dwarf planet Ceres is rich in organic matter. Data from NASA's Dawn spacecraft indicate that Ceres's surface may contain several times the concentration of carbon than is present in the most carbon-rich, primitive meteorites found on Earth.

8h

Estimates of ASD, ADHD risk in siblings born after older children with those disorders

Siblings born in a family after other children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) or attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) were more likely to be diagnosed with the same disorder or the other disorder.

8h

Study examines risk of stroke by sex among black and white women, men

This study examined the risk of stroke by sex among more than 25,000 black and white women and men. White women had lower risk of stroke than white men and black women had lower risk than black men between the ages of 45 and 64; from 65 to 74 white women still had lower risk than white men but that difference didn't persist among black women and men; and there was no difference by sex for either r

8h

MD Anderson study shows key enzyme linked to therapy resistance in deadly lung cancer

Researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have identified a link between an enzyme tied to cancer formation and therapy resistance in patients with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-mutant non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). They believe two existing therapies may hold promise for clinical studies for this deadly and common lung cancer for which relapse often occurs wi

8h

Topological matters: Toward a new kind of transistor

An experiment has demonstrated, for the first time, electronic switching in an exotic, ultrathin material that can carry a charge with nearly zero loss at room temperature. Researchers demonstrated this switching when subjecting the material to a low-current electric field.

8h

Houses in hurricane strike zones are built back bigger

A study of hurricane-hit areas of the United States has revealed a trend of larger homes being built to replace smaller ones in the years following a storm.

8h

Compelling evidence for small drops of perfect fluid

Nuclear physicists analyzing data from the PHENIX detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) have published additional evidence that collisions of miniscule projectiles with gold nuclei create tiny specks of the perfect fluid that filled the early universe.

8h

Strep bacteria compete for 'ownership' of human tissue

A new study shows how whatever strain of Streptococcus pneumoniae establishes itself first in a mammal's tissues is more likely to thrive than Strep 'latecomers.'

8h

SwRI solar activity research provides insight into sun's past, future

A team led by Southwest Research Institute has developed a new technique for looking at historic solar data to distinguish trustworthy observations from those that should be used with care. This work is critical to understanding the sun's past and future as well as whether solar activity plays a role in climate change.

8h

Siblings of children with autism or ADHD are at elevated risk for both disorders

Later-born siblings of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) or attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are at elevated risk for both disorders, a new study led by Meghan Miller, assistant professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and at the UC Davis MIND Institute, has concluded. The findings appear today in JAMA Pediatrics.

8h

Syracuse physicist creates tiny sensors to assist in cancer detection

A Syracuse University physicist hopes to improve cancer detection with a new and novel class of nanomaterials.

8h

Frog sex in the city

How do animals adapt to urban environments? In the case of the Tungara frog, city males put on a more elaborate mating display than males in forested areas.

8h

How catnip makes the chemical that causes cats to go crazy

Researchers at John Innes Centre have shed light on how catnip — also known as catmint — produces the chemical that sends cats into a state of wanton abandon.

8h

Small but versatile: Key players in the marine nitrogen cycle can utilize cyanate and urea

The ammonia oxidizing archaea, or Thaumarchaeota, are amongst the most abundant marine microorganisms. Yet, we are still discovering which factors allow them to thrive in the ocean. A research team from the Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology in Bremen and the University of Vienna was now able to show that marine Thaumarchaeota have a broader metabolism than previously thought. The result

8h

Held i uheld: Fejlslagne Galileo-satellitter tester Einsteins generelle relativitetsteori

To satellitter havnet i et utilsigtet elliptisk kredsløb efterviser den generelle relativitetsteoris beskrivelse af den gravitationelle rødforskydning bedre end tidligere eksperimenter.

8h

It's Official! NASA's Famed Voyager 2 Spacecraft Reaches Interstellar Space

It's time to say goodbye to one of the most storied explorers of our age: Voyager 2 has entered interstellar space.

9h

Scientists discover how birds and dinosaurs evolved to dazzle with colourful displays

Iridescence is responsible for some of the most striking visual displays in the animal kingdom. Now, thanks to a new study of feathers from almost 100 modern bird species, scientists have gained new insights into how this color diversity evolved.

9h

The fauna in the Antarctica is threatened by pathogens humans spread in polar latitudes

The fauna in the Antarctica could be in danger due the pathogens humans spread in places and research stations in the southern ocean.

9h

Social media tops print as news source for Americans: study

Social media has overtaken print newspapers as a news source for Americans, researchers said Monday, highlighting the growing importance of services such as Facebook and Twitter as well as the troubled state of legacy news organizations.

9h

How storytelling helps parents in prison stay connected to their kids | Alan Crickmore

When a parent is sent to prison, the unintended victims of their crimes are their own children — without stability and support, kids are at higher risk for mental health and development issues. In a heartfelt talk, Alan Crickmore explains how the charity Storybook Dads is keeping families connected through the simple act of storytelling.

9h

NASA provides new look at Puerto Rico post-Hurricane Maria

When Hurricane Maria struck Puerto Rico head-on as a Category 4 storm with winds up to 155 miles per hour in September 2017, it damaged homes, flooded towns, devastated the island's forests and caused the longest electricity black-out in U.S. history.

9h

NIST's antenna evaluation method could help boost 5G network capacity and cut costs

Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have developed a method for evaluating and selecting optimal antenna designs for future fifth-generation (5G) cellphones, other wireless devices and base stations.

9h

Topological matters: Toward a new kind of transistor

Billions of tiny transistors supply the processing power in modern smartphones, controlling the flow of electrons with rapid on-and-off switching.

9h

Team finds evidence for carbon-rich surface on Ceres

A team led by Southwest Research Institute has concluded that the surface of dwarf planet Ceres is rich in organic matter. Data from NASA's Dawn spacecraft indicate that Ceres's surface may contain several times the concentration of carbon than is present in the most carbon-rich, primitive meteorites found on Earth.

9h

Physicists create tiny sensors to assist in cancer detection

A physicist in the College of Arts and Sciences at Syracuse University hopes to improve cancer detection with a new and novel class of nanomaterials.

9h

How catnip makes the chemical that causes cats to go crazy

Researchers at John Innes Centre have shed light on how catnip—also known as catmint—produces the chemical that sends cats into a state of wanton abandon.

9h

Solar activity research provides insight into sun's past, future

Andrés Muñoz-Jaramillo of Southwest Research Institute and José Manuel Vaquero of the University of Extremadura have developed a new technique for looking at historic solar data to distinguish trustworthy observations from those that should be used with care. This work is critical to understanding the Sun's past and future as well as whether solar activity plays a role in climate change.

9h

A glimmer of hope for the world's coral reefs

The future of the world's coral reefs is uncertain, as the impact of global heating continues to escalate. However, according to a study published today in Nature Climate Change, the response of the Great Barrier Reef to extreme temperatures in 2017 was markedly different to one year earlier, following two back-to-back bouts of coral bleaching. Remarkably, corals that bleached and survived 2016 we

9h

Frog sex in the city: Urban tungara frogs are sexier than forest frogs

By 2050, almost 70 percent of the world's population will live in urban environments, according to the United Nations. But as cities spread, wild animals will also have to adapt. In Nature Ecology and Evolution, researchers working at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI) report that male tungara frogs in Panama City put on sexier mating displays than frogs living in nearby tropical f

9h

Houses in hurricane strike zones are built back bigger

A study of hurricane-hit areas of the United States has revealed a trend of larger homes being built to replace smaller ones in the years following a storm.

9h

Compelling evidence for small drops of perfect fluid

Nuclear physicists analyzing data from the PHENIX detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC)—a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science user facility for nuclear physics research at Brookhaven National Laboratory—have published in the journal Nature Physics additional evidence that collisions of miniscule projectiles with gold nuclei create tiny specks of the perfect fluid tha

9h

Key players in the marine nitrogen cycle use cyanate and urea

The ammonia oxidizing archaea, or Thaumarchaeota, are among the most abundant marine microorganisms. Yet, scientists are still discovering which factors allow them to thrive in the ocean. A research team from the Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology in Bremen and the University of Vienna was now able to show that marine Thaumarchaeota have a broader metabolism than previously thought. The

9h

Strep bacteria compete for 'ownership' of human tissue

A well-accepted principle in the animal kingdom—from wasps to deer—is that creatures already occupying a habitat nearly always prevail over competitors from the same species that arrive later. Such infighting for the same territory may be deemed "wasteful" by nature.

9h

Himalayan and other Asian glaciers put the brakes on

The ice streams that flow down the flanks of Asia's high mountains are moving slower as they thin.

9h

Americans Are Weirdly Obsessed With Paper Towels

Every day, as Americans dry their hands, soak up their spills, and wipe their counters, they are—whether they know it or not—contributing to their country’s dominance. In an era of waning American exceptionalism, inhabitants can at least pride themselves on an underratedly important, probably shameful distinction: They reside in the paper-towel capital of the world. This status is unquestioned. A

9h

Successful bladder repair using silk fibroid scaffolds

A team of researchers developed a novel model of partial bladder outlet obstruction in female swine and used this model to show that even after inducing severe urinary outlet resistance and damage to the bladder, they could achieve significant improvements in bladder capacity through bladder reconstruction using acellular bi-layer silk fibroin grafts.

9h

NIST's antenna evaluation method could help boost 5G network capacity and cut costs

Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have developed a method for evaluating and selecting optimal antenna designs for future fifth-generation (5G) cellphones, other wireless devices and base stations.

9h

NASA provides new look at Puerto Rico post-Hurricane Maria

Two new NASA research efforts delve into Hurricane Maria's far-reaching effects on the island's forests and on its residents' energy and electricity access.

9h

How glial cells develop in the brain from neural precursor cells

A Mainz-based research team studied how glial cells develop in the brain from neural precursor cells. They discovered that differentiation involves three stages and that three proteins in the cell nucleus, so-called transcription factors, play a key role in organizing glia-specific transcription of the genes in the cell nucleus.

9h

9h

NASA's Voyager 2 probe enters interstellar spaceNASA Voyager 2 Space

For the second time in history, a human-made object has reached the space between the stars. NASA's Voyager 2 probe now has exited the heliosphere – the protective bubble of particles and magnetic fields created by the Sun.

9h

The way bacteria ‘go fishing’ could improve antibiotics

Researchers have uncovered a mechanism by which strains of bacteria target and destroy their rivals in a never-ending quest for niche domination. The development could lead to better drug delivery systems and modern antibiotics. “What we’re studying is how bacteria engage in warfare—try to kill each other to compete for resources,” says Zachary Ruhe, a postdoctoral scholar in biology professor Da

9h

Surviving Great Barrier Reef corals have higher heatwave resistance

‘Ecological memory’ shows cumulative impact of climate change, say scientists Great Barrier Reef corals that survived bleaching in 2016 were more resistant to a second marine heatwave the following year, “astonished” scientists have observed. A study, published in the journal Nature Climate Change, outlines how a process called “ecological memory” emerged in the northernmost reefs during back-to-

9h

Scientists brew lava and blow it up to better understand volcanoes

What happens when lava and water meet? Explosive experiments with manmade lava are helping to answer this important question.

9h

China court bans iPhone sales in patent dispute: QualcommQualcomm iPhone China

A Chinese court ordered a ban in the country on iPhone sales in a patent dispute between US chipmaker Qualcomm and Apple, according to a Qualcomm statement Monday.

9h

How to Survive the 'Game of Thrones,' According to Science

If you want to survive the "Game of Thrones," it pays to be noble, female and flexible about the concept of loyalty.

9h

Addressing sleep disorders after traumatic brain injury

Amsterdam, NL, December 10, 2018 – Disorders of sleep are some of the most common problems experienced by patients after traumatic brain injury (TBI). It is important to recognize and treat these problems early to allow for optimal cognitive recovery, but because they are so common, the importance of treating them is often underestimated. In this special issue of NeuroRehabilitation scientists add

9h

Breast cancer recruits bone marrow cells to increase cancer cell proliferation

Tel Aviv University researchers have discovered that breast cancer tumors boost their growth by recruiting stromal cells that originate in bone marrow. The study suggests that targeting these cells with new therapies could be an effective way of treating the disease.

9h

New light on blocking Shiga and ricin toxins — And on an iconic biological process

Min Dong, PhD, and his lab are world experts in toxins. Now, setting their sights on Shiga toxin (player in the current E. coli outbreak from romaine lettuce) and ricin (a bioterrorism agent), they identify potential protective strategies. Their study also sheds new light on glycosylation, the attachment of sugars to large molecules, key to cells' ability to create more diverse molecules beyond wh

9h

Scientists brew lava and blow it up to better understand volcanoes

What happens when lava and water meet? Explosive experiments with manmade lava are helping to answer this important question. This long-term, ongoing study — which published its first results on Dec. 10, 2018 — aims to shed light on the basic physics of lava-water interactions, which are common in nature but poorly understood. Many visuals available.

9h

Genetic study of epilepsy points to potential new therapies

The largest study of its kind, led by international researchers including scientists at RCSI (Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland), has discovered 11 new genes associated with epilepsy. The research is published in today's issue of Nature Communications. It greatly advances knowledge of the underlying biological causes of epilepsy and may inform the development of new treatments for the condition

9h

To ease out policy of population salt reduction to prevent cardiovascular disease is dangerous

The journal Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Disease (NMCD), has published an important and authoritative statement of the ESAN (European Salt Action Network).

9h

New light on blocking Shiga and ricin toxins—And on an iconic biological process

Min Dong, Ph.D., and his lab are world experts in toxins and how to combat them. They've figured out how Clostridium difficile's most potent toxin gets into cells and zeroed in on the first new botulinum toxin identified since 1969. Now, setting their sights on Shiga and ricin toxins, they've not only identified new potential lines of defense, but also shed new light on a fundamental part of cell

9h

Cushioned shoes aren't good for your feet

A new study from Helsinki found that the more you cushion your feet, the more likely you'll get injured. This follows previous studies showing that cushioned shoes leave you more susceptible to pain and injury. A few million years of evolutionary design has been usurped by shoe marketing campaigns. None A lot happened to our feet in the transition from being quadrupeds to exclusively bipedal. Whi

9h

Kirurger på Aarhus Universitetshospital skifter skalpel ud med computermus for en tid

Flere aflyste operationer på Aarhus Universitetshospital betyder, at kirurgerne får mere tid til det administrative. Fortsætter aflysningerne vil det dog blive problematisk, mener tillidsrepræsentant for overlægerne.

9h

Ozone depletion increases Antarctic snowfall, partially mitigates ice sheet loss

Ozone layer depletion has increased snowfall over Antarctica in recent decades, partially mitigating the ongoing loss of the continent's ice sheet mass, new University of Colorado Boulder research finds.

9h

How membranes let microbes live in extreme places

Within harsh environments like hot springs, volcanic craters, and deep-sea hydrothermal vents—uninhabitable by most life forms—microscopic organisms thrive. How? Scientists have discovered a protein that modifies a microbe’s membrane and helps it survive in hot, acidic environments. The finding proves a long-standing hypothesis that these structures have a protective effect. Scientists had known

9h

New insights into childhood cancer

Peripheral nervous system tumors, known as neuroblastoma, are one of the most common types of childhood tumors. As part of an international research endeavor, researchers from Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin have studied the genetic factors behind different tumor subtypes and their prognoses. Their findings enable clinicians to predict the precise clinical course of the disease, and to adapt

9h

Proteins for making tough rubber

Inspired by nature, Chinese scientists have produced a synthetic analogue to vulcanized natural rubber. Their material is just as tough and durable as the original. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, they reveal the secret to their success: short protein chains attached to the side-chains of the polymer backbone ensure stable physical cross-linkage and give the material a "self-reinforcing" effect

9h

The fauna in the Antarctica is threatened by pathogens humans spread in polar latitudes

The fauna in the Antarctica could be in danger due the pathogens humans spread in places and research stations in the southern ocean, according to a study led by the experts Jacob González-Solís, from the Faculty of Biology and the Biodiversity Research Institute (IRBio) of the University of Barcelona, and Marta Cerdà-Cuéllas, from the Institute of Agrifood Research and Technology (IRTA-CReSA).

9h

Ozone depletion increases Antarctic snowfall, partially mitigates ice sheet loss

Ozone layer depletion has increased snowfall over Antarctica in recent decades, partially mitigating the ongoing loss of the continent's ice sheet mass, new University of Colorado Boulder research finds.

9h

Plants as antifungal factories

Researchers from three research institutes in Spain have developed a biotechnological tool to produce, in a very efficient manner, antifungal proteins in the leaves of the plant Nicotiana benthamiana. These proteins are promising biomolecules that could be used to develop new antifungals whose properties and mechanisms of action represent improvements on the existing ones, and which can be applied

9h

Underground life has a carbon mass hundreds of times larger than humans'

Microorganisms living underneath the surface of the earth have a total carbon mass of 15 to 23 billion tons, hundreds of times more than that of humans, according to findings announced by the Deep Carbon Observatory and coauthored by UT Professor of Microbiology Karen Lloyd.

9h

Fewer than half of the countries provide tuition-free pre-primary education

Researchers from the Higher School of Economics and UCLA Fielding School of Public Health’s WORLD Policy Analysis Center have found that 45 percent of countries, with only 15 percent of low-income countries, provide tuition-free pre-primary education. The results of the study will be published in the December 2018 issue of International Organisations Research Journal.

9h

A minority of countries offer free early childhood education, UCLA researchers report

Few governments make pre-primary education available on a tuition-free basis for two or more years, according to a new study from UCLA's WORLD Policy Analysis Center (WORLD).

9h

Life in Deep Earth totals 15 to 23 billion tons of carbon — hundreds of times more than humans

Barely living 'zombie' bacteria and other forms of life constitute an immense amount of carbon deep within Earth's subsurface — 245 to 385 times greater than the carbon mass of all humans on the surface, according to Deep Carbon Observatory scientists nearing the end of a 10-year international collaboration to reveal Earth's innermost secrets.

9h

Fraser River chinook critical to orcas are in steep decline, new research shows

Fraser River chinook, one of the most important food sources for southern resident killer whales, are in steep decline and should be listed for protection as an endangered species, a Canadian independent science committee said.

9h

'Carp cowboys' round up invasive Asian carp as Illinois, federal officials debate measures to protect Lake Michigan

On a bleak and biting December morning, a team of state-contracted commercial fishermen at Starved Rock Marina slipped into their waders, salted down their johnboats to protect against ice and launched onto the Illinois River.

9h

Underground life has a carbon mass hundreds of times larger than humans'

Microorganisms living underneath the surface of the earth have a total carbon mass of 15 to 23 billion tons, hundreds of times more than that of humans, according to findings announced by the Deep Carbon Observatory and coauthored by UT Professor of Microbiology Karen Lloyd.

9h

Grey nomad lifestyle provides a model for living remotely

Every other year, retired couple Jorg and Jan journey some 5,000 kilometres in their campervan from Port Fairy in southeastern Australia to Broome in the far northwest for a change of lifestyle and scenery. There they catch up with other couples from across the nation, who often converge on the beach for communal dinners. Jorg and Jan's break lasts several weeks.

9h

How the absence of blow flies overturned a wrongful conviction

On Jan. 2, 2018, Kirstin Blaise Lobato, who was charged and convicted of murder, walked free from a Nevada prison due entirely to forensic entomology.

9h

Tiny device stimulates brain without major surgery

A new stimulation device implanted in blood vessels next to the brain’s motor cortex could replace open brain surgery, scientists report. Surgeons make a small keyhole incision in the neck to place the device, called a Strentrode, which is just 4mm in diameter and is made from a strong but flexible alloy called nitinol. In 2016 the team, including researchers from the University of Melbourne, Flo

9h

Livet findes også i Jordens indre – i stort omfang

Under havbunden findes bakterier og andre livsformer med flere hundrede gange mere kulstof end den samlede menneskehed. Men forskerne finder foreløbig flere spørgsmål end svar om dette liv.

9h

Amount of deep life on Earth quantified

Having dug and drilled into the Earth, scientists can now estimate how much life exists at depth.

10h

Scientists identify vast underground ecosystem containing billions of micro-organisms

Global team of scientists find ecosystem below earth that is twice the size of world’s oceans The Earth is far more alive than previously thought, according to “deep life” studies that reveal a rich ecosystem beneath our feet that is almost twice the size of that found in all the world’s oceans. Despite extreme heat, no light, minuscule nutrition and intense pressure, scientists estimate this sub

10h

A minority of countries offer free early childhood education, researchers report

Numerous studies from countries around the globe have shown that education before primary school is associated with success in school. Despite this, few governments make pre-primary education available on a tuition-free basis for two or more years, according to a new study from the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health's WORLD Policy Analysis Center (WORLD).

10h

Life in deep Earth totals 15 to 23 billion tons of carbon—hundreds of times more than humans

Barely living "zombie" bacteria and other forms of life constitute an immense amount of carbon deep within Earth's subsurface—245 to 385 times greater than the carbon mass of all humans on the surface, according to scientists nearing the end of a 10-year international collaboration to reveal Earth's innermost secrets.

10h

Cancer cells distinguished by artificial intelligence-based system

A research team at Osaka University created a system that uses a convolutional neural network to learn the features distinguishing different cancer cells, based on images from a phase-contrast microscope. This system accurately differentiated human and mouse cancer cells, as well as their radioresistant clones. This novel approach can improve the speed and accuracy of cancer diagnosis by avoiding

10h

Hair colour gene study sheds new light on roots of redheads' locks

Scientists at the University of Edinburgh have discovered eight additional genes linked to red hair, helping to solve a mystery of how redheads inherit their flaming locks.

10h

Electronic evidence of non-Fermi liquid behaviors in an iron-based superconductor

Recently, a research team led by Prof. Xingjiang Zhou from Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, has conducted high-resolution laser-based ARPES experiments on the superconducting gap and electronic structure in the optimally-doped (Ba0.6K0.4)Fe2As2 superconductor.

10h

Scientists discover how birds and dinosaurs evolved to dazzle with colourful displays

Iridescence is responsible for some of the most striking visual displays in the animal kingdom. Now, thanks to a new study of feathers from almost 100 modern bird species, scientists have gained new insights into how this colour diversity evolved.

10h

Researchers pioneer use of new method to treat life-threatening heart arrhythmias in dogs

Morris Animal Foundation-funded researchers have developed a new treatment for dogs with a rare, but life-threatening, arrhythmia caused by atrioventricular accessory pathways (APs). The minimally invasive technique, which uses radiofrequencies, is modified from a human cardiology procedure and has a more than 95 percent success rate in treating dogs with this type of arrhythmia.

10h

Tiny Australian wallaby the last living link to extinct giant kangaroos

Scientists reveal that Australia's pint-sized banded hare-wallaby is the closest living relative of the giant short-faced kangaroos which roamed the continent for millions of years, but died out about 40,000 years ago.

10h

Undiplomatic immunity: Mutation causing arterial autoimmune disease revealed

Takayasu arteritis is an autoimmune disease resulting in chronic aortic inflammation leading to aneurysm or aortic regurgitation. Researchers showed that it is caused by MLX gene mutation. This mutation increased oxidative stress and inflammasome formation and activity, specifically in the aortic valves, explaining the inflammatory state and associated symptoms. This insight suggests the potential

10h

Using machine learning to design peptides

Scientists have developed a way of finding optimal peptide sequences: using a machine-learning algorithm as a collaborator. The algorithm analyzes experimental data and offers suggestions on the next best sequence to try, creating a back-and-forth selection process that reduces time needed to find the optimal peptide. The results could provide a new framework for experiments across materials scien

10h

Online platform for carbon dioxide-free deliveries

City centres are becoming increasingly congested by traffic, many of which are delivery vehicles. An EU-funded project has developed a solution for delivering packages that reduces traffic and eliminates carbon dioxide (CO2) and other harmful emissions.

10h

How to eat vegetables this winter without increasing your carbon footprint

DIY Make your diet green in every way. A healthy diet requires lots of vegetables—but shipping them from afar is hardly eco-friendly. Here’s how to eat a winter diet that’s green in every way.

10h

Image: Dione and Rhea appear as one

Sometimes it's all about perspective. This very convincing image of a conjoined moon masquerading as a snowman is actually two separate Saturnian moons – Dione and Rhea – taken from such an angle by the international Cassini spacecraft that they appear as one.

10h

Memory tests predict brain atrophy and Alzheimer's disease

Use of two episodic memory tests help in predicting brain atrophy and Alzheimer's disease, as indicated by a study carried out at the University of Helsinki and the University of California. Researchers suggest that comprehensive use of memory tests could improve the diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment due to Alzheimer's disease.

10h

DNA find

A Queensland University of Technology-led collaboration with University of Adelaide reveals that Australia's pint-sized banded hare-wallaby is the closest living relative of the giant short-faced kangaroos which roamed the continent for millions of years, but died out about 40,000 years ago.

10h

Norsk rådgiver om flydende solcelleanlæg: Det her vil knuse alt andet på pris

Solcelleanlæg, der flyder på for eksempel havoverfladen eller på søer, er i voldsom vækst. Særligt kombinationen af vandreservoirer og flydende solcelleanlæg spåes en stor fremtid.

10h

Nobel Peace winners urge global action vs. sexual violence

The Congolese doctor who shares this year's Nobel Peace Prize for his efforts to end the use of rape and sexual violence as weapons of war on Monday called for strong international action against the abuse, including reparations for victims.

10h

Invasive species and habitat loss our biggest biodiversity threats

Invasive species and habitat loss are the biggest threats to Australian biodiversity, according to new research by the Threatened Species Recovery Hub in partnership with The University of Queensland.

10h

Using machine learning to design peptides

Scientists and engineers have long been interested in synthesizing peptides—chains of amino acids responsible for conducting many functions within cells—to both mimic nature and to perform new activities. A designed peptide, for example, could be a functional drug acting in certain areas in the body without degrading, a difficult task for many peptides.

10h

Prison sentences do not just penalise those behind walls

In reality many of the relatives of prisoners are also subjected to harsh penalties by the State. Innocent people, who do not deserve to be punished, but who nevertheless live in the shadow of a prison. Why have we chosen a penal system which impacts so harshly on families?

10h

Global warming today mirrors conditions leading to Earth's largest extinction event, study says

More than two-thirds of life on Earth died off some 252 million years ago, in the largest mass extinction event in Earth's history.

10h

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BioNyt Videnskabens Verden (www.bionyt.dk) er Danmarks ældste populærvidenskabelige tidsskrift for naturvidenskab. Det er det eneste blad af sin art i Danmark, som er helliget international forskning inden for livsvidenskaberne.

Bladet bringer aktuelle, spændende forskningsnyheder inden for biologi, medicin og andre naturvidenskabelige områder som f.eks. klimaændringer, nanoteknologi, partikelfysik, astronomi, seksualitet, biologiske våben, ecstasy, evolutionsbiologi, kloning, fedme, søvnforskning, muligheden for liv på mars, influenzaepidemier, livets opståen osv.

Artiklerne roses for at gøre vanskeligt stof forståeligt, uden at den videnskabelige holdbarhed tabes.

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