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Nyheder2018december10

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7 easy ways you can tell for yourself that the moon landing really happened

Space The proof is out there. Anyone who's spent time on the internet knows that some folks doubt the veracity of the moon landing, but the evidence is all around us.

1h

NASA’s OSIRIS-REx finds signs of water on the asteroid Bennu

NASA’s OSIRIS-REx spacecraft found signs of water and lots of boulders on the asteroid Bennu.

1h

Earth's Depths Are Teeming With Otherworldly Microbes

Scientists have discovered a vast subterranean ecosystem of microbial life deep underground, stretching our sense of life's limits.

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The Atlantic Daily: Running Low on Options

What We’re Following Remaining ‘Leave’ Options: British Prime Minister Theresa May has postponed a critical parliamentary vote on a proposal on how exactly Britain will leave, and exist outside of, the European Union (her bill was reportedly likely to fail, in any case). With lawmakers at loggerheads over issues such as a permeable Irish border, and Britain’s March 2019 deadline to leave the EU f

33min

Death rates from cancer will fall in Australasian countries and Russia in 2018

Researchers predict that death rates from cancer will fall in 2018 in Australasian countries and in Russia. However, a greater proportion of the population will die in Russia from the disease than in any of the other countries, mainly because of the large numbers of men who still smoke. The study is published in Annals of Oncology.

44min

5 Questions Congress Should Ask Google's Sundar Pichai

Google's CEO will testify before the House Judiciary Committee in a hearing focused on transparency and search practices.

1h

'Surprise' Palu tsunami clue found on seafloor

Scientists are getting closer to understanding the damaging tsunami that struck Sulawesi in September.

1h

38% of European Jews have considered emigrating due to recent anti-Semitism, E.U. reports

The survey is based on responses from 16,395 Jewish people living in 12 European countries. 1 in 4 reported having experienced anti-Semitic harassment over the past 12 months. E.U. officials urged governments to do more to combat anti-Semitism, including the promotion of Holocaust education. None About 38% of European Jews have considered emigrating from Europe over the past five years due to a "

1h

Study finds four dried fruits have lower glycemic index (GI) than white bread

People with diabetes and followers of diets based on the glycemic index (GI) can enjoy dried fruits knowing they do not cause a blood sugar spike compared to starchy foods such as white bread, suggests a study published in the journal Nutrition and Diabetes.

1h

What gives a sunset its color?

Science Next time you're watching a sunset on the beach, think about the amazing physics that's bringing you the view. Gaze up at the sky one evening and you’re likely to see the crisp blue sky of the afternoon replaced with a reddish-orange hue stretching for miles. You might be…

2h

Increased risk for breast cancer after childbirth may last more than 20 years

The increased risk for breast cancer that occurs after childbirth can last more than 20 years. The risk may be enhanced when a woman is older at first birth or has a family history of breast cancer, and is not mitigated by breastfeeding.

2h

Small and isolated habitat patches crucial to species survival

Small, local patches of habitat could be playing a much bigger role in conserving biodiversity than you think, according to new research.

2h

Voyager 2 Has Entered the Space Between Solar SystemsNASA Voyager 2 Space

It is the second spacecraft to make the crossing into interstellar space, providing a new look at what lies beyond our local galactic neighborhood.

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The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Staff Infection

Written by Elaine Godfrey ( @elainejgodfrey ). Today in 5 Lines The search continues for a replacement for White House Chief of Staff John Kelly after several leading candidates reportedly have already declined the role. The U.S. Supreme Court has declined to hear a case brought by two states—Kansas and Louisiana—that were seeking to end Medicaid funding for Planned Parenthood. Maria Butina, the

2h

Lifespan extension at low temperatures is genetically controlled

A new study indicates that lifespan extension at lower temperatures is not just a matter of turning down the thermostat: it's under active genetic control.

2h

Reducing variations in feeding practices and fortifying breast milk helps micro-preemies grow

Standardizing feeding practices, including the timing for fortifying breast milk and formula with essential elements like zinc and protein, improves growth trends for the tiniest preterm infants, according to new research.

2h

Ocean fertilization by unusual microbes extends to frigid waters of Arctic Ocean

Microbes that provide natural fertilizer to the oceans by 'fixing' nitrogen from the atmosphere into a form useable by other organisms are active in the cold waters of the Bering and Chukchi Seas.

2h

New study finds bias against women and girls when intellectual ability is sought

A new study finds bias against both women and girls for jobs or activities requiring intellectual ability. The research underscores the pervasiveness of gender bias, held even among females, in both adults and young children.

2h

Shape-shifting origami could help antenna systems adapt on the fly

Researchers have devised a method for using an origami-based structure to create radio frequency filters that have adjustable dimensions, enabling the devices to change which signals they block throughout a large range of frequencies.

2h

Self-serving gift ideas for the people who let you crash on their couch

Gadgets They get a present. You get a more comfortable stay. Gifts for that person whose pad you always visit. But also a guide for how to make that gift work in your favor next time you visit. They get a present. You get a more…

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Small and isolated habitat patches crucial to species survival

Small, local patches of habitat could be playing a much bigger role in conserving biodiversity than you think, according to new research. The global study just published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (see article here) looked at the conservation values of vegetation patches in 27 countries on four continents, and considered their size and distance to other habitat.

2h

Scientific assessment of endangered languages produces mixed results

A new study of the progress made over the last 25 years in documenting and revitalizing endangered languages shows both significant advances and critical shortfalls. The article, "Language documentation twenty-five years on", will be published in the December, 2018 issue of the scholarly journal Language.

2h

Lifespan extension at low temperatures is genetically controlled, MBL study suggests

A new study from Kristin Gribble of Marine Biological Laboratory, indicates that lifespan extension at lower temperatures is not just a matter of turning down the thermostat: it's under active genetic control.

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Veterans health administration hospitals outperform non-VHA hospitals in most markets

In a new study, researchers from The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice and the White River Junction VA Medical Center in White River Junction, Vermont, used the most current publicly available data to compare health outcomes for VA and non-VA hospitals within 121 local healthcare markets that included both a VA medical center and a non-VA hospital.

2h

Trump Administration Halts Acquisition of Fetal Tissue for Research

Two NIH-run labs are affected, including one that seeks to cure HIV.

2h

Rapid genetic evolution linked to lighter skin pigmentation

The gene that causes lighter skin pigmentation, SLC24A5, was introduced from eastern African to southern African populations just 2,000 years ago. Strong positive selection caused this gene to rise in frequency among some KhoeSan populations.

2h

Addressing research gaps could help with development of disability-inclusive workplaces

Filling key gaps in the research and understanding of the treatment of people with disabilities in the workplace could help improve employee success on the job and develop more disability-inclusive workplaces.

2h

How I Made It: The Professor From the Pueblo, Rodrigo Bañuelos

Latino USA catches up with Rodrigo Bañuelos at the Latinx in the Mathematical Sciences Conference at UCLA's Institute for Pure and Applied Mathematics.

2h

Voyager 2 Bids Adieu To The Heliosphere, Entering Interstellar SpaceNASA Voyager 2 Space

The milestone makes the 41-year-old NASA probe just the second human-made object, after Voyager 1, to reach such distant regions. Now, Voyager 2 is over 11 billion miles from the sun — and counting. (Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech)

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First close-up look shows asteroid Bennu is a holey watery worldOSIRIS-REx NASA Bennu

NASA’s OSIRIS-REx mission arrived at Bennu on 3 December, and its first results show that the asteroid is chock-full of water and covered in huge boulders

3h

The global economy loses $3.6 trillion to corruption each year, says U.N.

December 9 marked International Anti-Corruption Day. The U.N. has mounted an international campaign to equip individuals, organizations, businesses and governments with tactics they can use to combat corruption in their countries. In a 2017 survey, 25% of worldwide respondents said they had had to pay a bribe to access public services in the past 12 months. None The annual costs of international

3h

Addressing research gaps could help with development of disability-inclusive workplaces

Filling key gaps in the research and understanding of the treatment of people with disabilities in the workplace could help improve employee success on the job and develop more disability-inclusive workplaces.

3h

Seeking a panacea in the gut’s microbiome

Editor in Chief Nancy Shute discusses the potential role of the gut microbiome in Parkinson's disease and one reporter's connection to the story.

3h

Readers inquire about a Neptune-sized moon, nuclear pasta and more

Readers had questions about a Neptune-sized moon, nuclear pasta and the search for extraterrestrial life.

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New bug prompts earlier end to Google+ social networkGoogle+ Bug Data Shut

Google said Monday it will close the consumer version of its online social network sooner than originally planned due to the discovery of a new software bug.

3h

Rapid genetic evolution linked to lighter skin pigmentation in a southern African population

Populations of indigenous people in southern Africa carry a gene that causes lighter skin, and scientists have now identified the rapid evolution of this gene in recent human history.

3h

Research shows journalists can restore media trust

In a first-of-its-kind study from LSU's Manship School of Mass Communication, researchers discovered journalists can increase media trust by speaking out in defense of their profession, while also doing more fact checking. Contrary to long-established practices in which journalists traditionally ignore attacks against their profession's credibility, Ray Pingree, Doris Westmoreland Darden Professor

3h

Stanford lab explores experiments in universal basic income

As officials in several U.S. cities consider experimenting with universal basic income, a Stanford lab aims to educate policymakers and the public about the latest research on what happens when people receive unconditional cash on a regular basis.

3h

How will the winds of climate change affect migratory birds?

Under future climate scenarios, changing winds may make it harder for North American birds to migrate southward in the autumn, but make it easier for them to come back north in the spring. Researchers from the Cornell Lab of Ornithology came to this conclusion using data from 143 weather radar stations to estimate the altitude, density, and direction birds took during spring and autumn migrations

3h

The Scientist's 2018 Gift Guide

The weather outside is frightful, but these sciency gifts are delightful.

3h

OSIRIS-REx discovers water on asteroid, confirms Bennu as excellent mission targetOSIRIS-REx NASA Bennu

From August through early December, the OSIRIS-REx spacecraft aimed three of its science instruments toward Bennu and began making the mission's first observations of the asteroid. During this period, the spacecraft traveled the last 1.4 million miles (2.2 million km) of its outbound journey to arrive at a spot 12 miles (19 km) from Bennu on Dec. 3. The science obtained from these initial observat

3h

Sprayable gel could help the body fight off cancer after surgery

Many people who are diagnosed with cancer will undergo some type of surgery to treat their disease—almost 95 percent of people with early-diagnosed breast cancer will require surgery and it's often the first line of treatment for people with brain tumors, for example. But despite improvements in surgical techniques over the past decade, the cancer often comes back after the procedure.

3h

The use of electrospun scaffolds in musculoskeletal tissue engineering

Rotator Cuff tears affect 15 percent of 60 year olds and carry a significant social and financial burden. Current operative techniques and repair adjuncts are associated with unacceptably high failure rates, stimulating investigation into novel tissue engineering and regenerative medicine (TERM) approaches in the field of rotator cuff surgery. In this review researchers explore the most recent adv

3h

Types and preparation techniques of scaffold materials in cartilage tissue engineering

Chondral defects caused by tumor, trauma, infection, congenital malformations are very common in clinical trials. It seriously affects the patient's physical function and quality of life. Through this review, the researchers aimed to review the progress of the types and preparation techniques of scaffold materials in cartilage tissue engineering.

3h

Rapid genetic evolution linked to lighter skin pigmentation

The gene that causes lighter skin pigmentation, SLC24A5, was introduced from eastern African to southern African populations just 2,000 years ago. Strong positive selection caused this gene to rise in frequency among some KhoeSan populations.

3h

Studies reveal role of red meat in gut bacteria, heart disease development

In concurrent studies, Cleveland Clinic researchers have uncovered new mechanisms that demonstrate why and how regularly eating red meat can increase the risk of heart disease, and the role gut bacteria play in that process. The research, led by Stanley Hazen, M.D., Ph.D., builds upon previous work showing TMAO (trimethylamine N-oxide) – a gut bacteria byproduct formed during digestion – can lead

3h

Inequality in homicide rates in Chicago neighborhoods increased over 20-year period

The United States has experienced an unprecedented decline in violent crime over the last two decades (1990-2010); however, violent crime remains stubbornly concentrated in socially and economically disadvantaged communities. This certainly rings true in Chicago.

3h

Women and girls less likely to be considered for 'brainy' tasks – study

Research reveals females deemed intellectually inferior, with prejudice present present in children as well as adults Women and girls are less likely to be seen as suited to brainy tasks, researchers have found, in the latest study to shed light on gender biases. Female students do better at school and are more likely to go to university than their male peers. However, the latest study reveals th

4h

Here’s Why Scientists Are Poring Over Ancient Alpaca Poo

Ancient poop could reveal the history of alpaca domestication.

4h

The silent Chinese propaganda in Hollywood films

China will soon overtake the U.S. as the world's largest market for films, and it is using that fact to influence how it is depicted by Hollywood. While Chinese investors have been interested in buying shares of studios for a while, the real power lies in deciding which movies get into China at all. The influence is often subtle, but may have already derailed a few careers in the name of politics

4h

Inside For-Profit Japanese Crying Sessions

Hiroki Terai, a successful Japanese businessman and author, was conducting research for a book about the country’s rising divorce rate when he came to a startling conclusion. “He found that [many] Japanese women who were initiating divorces never got over the divorce,” the filmmaker Darryl Thoms told The Atlantic . As Terai explained to Thoms, “the whole legal and practical process overwhelmed pe

4h

Reducing variations in feeding practices and fortifying breast milk helps micro-preemies grow

Standardizing feeding practices, including the timing for fortifying breast milk and formula with essential elements like zinc and protein, improves growth trends for the tiniest preterm infants, according to Children's research presented during the Institute for Healthcare Improvement 2018 Scientific Symposium.

4h

The Scientist's 2018 Gift Guide

The weather outside is frightful, but these sciency gifts are delightful.

4h

Regrowing damaged nerves hinges on shutting down key genes

Neurons in the brain and spinal cord don't grow back after injury, unlike those in the rest of the body. Now, researchers have identified some of the key steps taken by nerves in the legs as they regenerate. The findings lay out a path that spinal cord neurons might be able to follow — potentially leading to improved recovery for people paralyzed by spinal cord injuries.

4h

'Dropout' rate for academic scientists has risen sharply in past 50 years, study finds

An analysis has found that half the people pursuing scientific careers at institutions of higher education will depart the field after five years — a sharp contrast compared to 50 years ago.

4h

Journalists can restore media trust

In a first-of-its-kind study, researchers discovered journalists can increase media trust by speaking out in defense of their profession, while also doing more fact checking. Contrary to long-established practices in which journalists traditionally ignore attacks, researchers found that the combination of fact checking and defending journalism had positive effects, but fact checking alone did not.

4h

Research Gaps Leave Doctors Guessing About Treatments For Pregnant Women

To protect a developing fetus from experimental drugs or treatments that might cause birth defects, pregnant women aren't included in many clinical trials. But that limits the safety evidence, too. (Image credit: Maria Fabrizio for NPR)

4h

How will the winds of climate change affect migratory birds?

Under future climate scenarios, changing winds may make it harder for North American birds to migrate southward in the autumn, but make it easier for them to come back north in the spring. Researchers came to this conclusion using data from 143 weather radar stations to estimate the altitude, density, and direction birds took during spring and autumn migrations over several years.

4h

Humans may be reversing the climate clock, by 50 million years

Our future on Earth may also be our past. Researchers show that humans are reversing a long-term cooling trend tracing back at least 50 million years. And it's taken just two centuries.

4h

Water found on asteroid, confirming Bennu as excellent mission targetOSIRIS-REx NASA Bennu

Spectral observations made by the OSIRIS-REx spacecraft identified hydrated minerals across the asteroid, confirming that Bennu, a remnant from early in the formation of the solar system, is an excellent specimen for the OSIRIS-REx mission to study the composition of primitive volatiles and organics.

4h

Millions of low-risk people with diabetes may be testing their blood sugar too often

For people with Type 2 diabetes, testing blood sugar levels becomes part of everyday life. But a new study suggests that some of them test more often than they need to. Fourteen percent of people with Type 2 diabetes who don't require insulin are buying enough test strips to test their blood sugar two or more times a day — when they don't need to test nearly that frequently according to medical g

4h

How will the winds of climate change affect migratory birds?

Under future climate scenarios, changing winds may make it harder for North American birds to migrate southward in the autumn, but make it easier for them to come back north in the spring. Researchers from the Cornell Lab of Ornithology came to this conclusion using data from 143 weather radar stations to estimate the altitude, density, and direction birds took during spring and autumn migrations

4h

Shape-shifting origami could help antenna systems adapt on the fly

Researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology have devised a method for using an origami-based structure to create radio frequency filters that have adjustable dimensions, enabling the devices to change which signals they block throughout a large range of frequencies.

4h

Ocean fertilization by unusual microbes extends to frigid waters of Arctic Ocean

Microbes that provide natural fertilizer to the oceans by 'fixing' nitrogen from the atmosphere into a form useable by other organisms are active in the cold waters of the Bering and Chukchi Seas.

4h

Bioenergy crops could be as bad for biodiversity as climate change

A large scale expansion in bioenergy crop production could be just as detrimental to biodiversity as climate change itself, according to new research.

4h

Brainwaves suppress obvious ideas to help us think more creatively

The human brain needs to suppress obvious ideas in order to reach the most creative ones, according to scientists at Queen Mary University of London and Goldsmiths, University of London.

4h

Regrowing damaged nerves hinges on shutting down key genes

Neurons in the brain and spinal cord don't grow back after injury, unlike those in the rest of the body. Now, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have identified some of the key steps taken by nerves in the legs as they regenerate. The findings lay out a path that spinal cord neurons might be able to follow — potentially leading to improved recovery for people par

4h

Humans may be reversing the climate clock, by 50 million years

Our future on Earth may also be our past. In a study published Monday (Dec. 10, 2018) in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, researchers show that humans are reversing a long-term cooling trend tracing back at least 50 million years. And it's taken just two centuries.

4h

'Dropout' rate for academic scientists has risen sharply in past 50 years, study finds

An analysis from Indiana University researchers has found that half the people pursuing scientific careers at institutions of higher education will depart the field after five years — a sharp contrast compared to 50 years ago.

4h

Smelling the forest not the trees: Why animals are better at sniffing complex smells

Animals are much better at smelling a complex 'soup' of odorants rather than a single pure ingredient, a new study has revealed.

4h

Key cellular mechanism that triggers pneumonia in humans

Researchers have demonstrated that influenza virus impairs the immune response to pneumococcus, especially monocyte activity.

4h

Your brain on imagination: It's a lot like reality, study shows

New brain imaging research shows that imagining a threat lights up similar regions as experiencing it does. It suggests imagination can be a powerful tool in overcoming phobias or post traumatic stress.

4h

Optimal blood pressure treatment for stroke patients

Aggressive treatment of hypertension in stroke patients could do more harm than good in the long term, according to a new study.

4h

Sprayable gel could help the body fight off cancer after surgery

A research team has developed a spray gel embedded with immune-boosting drugs that could help lower the risk of cancer recurrence after surgery.

4h

Some brain tumors may respond to immunotherapy

A new study suggests that a slow-growing brain tumor arising in patients affected by neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) may be vulnerable to immunotherapy, which gives the immune system a boost in fighting cancer.

4h

Topological material switched off and on for the first time

A new study represents a significant advance in topological transistors and beyond-CMOS electronics. First time that the topological state in a topological insulator has been switched on and off using an electric field. Researchers proved this is possible at room temperature, which is necessary for any viable replacement to CMOS technology in everyday applications.

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