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Nyheder2018december11

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Lifespan extension at low temperatures is genetically controlled, study suggests

Why do we age? Despite more than a century of research (and a vast industry of youth-promising products), what causes our cells and organs to deteriorate with age is still unknown.

35min

Datacentre vil sluge strømmen fra to ud af tre nye havmølleparker

Datacentrenes elforbrug i 2030 vil svare til 62,5 pct. af elproduktionen fra tre kommende havmølleparker på hver 800 MW, fremgår det af et ministersvar. Voldsomt meget, siger Enhedslisten, der har spurgt.

3h

Nasa har fundet tegn på vand på mulig farlig asteroide

Fundet på asteroiden Bennu kan måske forklare livets opståen på Jorden.

1h

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SF vil sikre penge til totalscreening af grundvandet

Geus har foreslået en metode, der potentielt kan finde op imod 1.100 aktivstoffer og nedbrydningsstoffer i grundvandet.

6h

Gene study unravels redheads mystery

Researchers at Edinburgh University carry out out the largest genetic study of hair colour to date.

1h

Stop sterilizing your dust—Antimicrobial chemical tied to antibiotic resistance genes in dust

Most people have heard about antibiotic-resistant germs. But how about antibiotic-resistant dust?

13min

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New discoveries predict ability to forecast dementia from single molecule

Scientists who recently identified the molecular start of Alzheimer's disease have used that finding to determine that it should be possible to forecast which type of dementia will develop over time — a form of personalized medicine for neurodegenerative diseases.

10min

Lethal combination: Drug cocktail turns off the juice to cancer cells

A widely used diabetes medication combined with an antihypertensive drug specifically inhibits tumor growth – this was discovered by researchers two years ago. In a follow-up study, scientists report that this drug cocktail induces cancer cell death by switching off their energy supply.

10min

Perovskite solar cells: cheaper production and high efficiency

A team of chemists and physicists is offering a novel approach for the selective layer formation in perovskite solar cells. The molecule assembles itself into a monolayer, which can cover a variety of surfaces and can function as a hole transporting material in a perovskite solar cell.

10min

Extreme Events "Virtually Impossible" Without Warming

Marine heatwaves, drought and heavy rains in 2017 all bore the fingerprints of climate change — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

15min

Winners of the 2018 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year Contest

National Geographic magazine has announced the winning entries in its annual photo competition . The grand-prize winner this year is Jassen Todorov, who will take home a $5,000 prize for his aerial image of thousands of recalled Volkswagen and Audi cars in the Mojave desert. The contest runners have shared with us the top winners and honorable mentions below, selected from a pool of nearly 10,000

18min

Study: Innovative model helps kids on autism spectrum avoid behavioral drugs in ER

An innovative care model developed by Nemours Children's Hospital for children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) in the emergency department (ED) reduces the use of medication administered to kids who are prone to stress and sensory overload in this care setting. Information about this care model was presented today at the Institute for Healthcare Improvement's National Forum.

19min

Historic earthquakes test Indonesia's seismic hazard assessment

Using data gleaned from historical reports, researchers have now identified the sources of some of the most destructive Indonesian earthquakes in Java, Bali and Nusa Tenggara, using these data to independently test how well Indonesia's 2010 and 2017 seismic hazard assessments perform in predicting damaging ground motion.

19min

Researchers propose guidelines for the therapeutic use of melatonin

In an article published in Endocrine Reviews, Brazilian professors discuss the general criteria to be considered when prescribing the pineal hormone as a health supplement. The guidelines will help health professionals to analyze, understand and interpret the effects of melatonin.

19min

Stronger pesticide regulations likely needed to protect all bee species, say studies

Regulators worldwide currently use honeybees as the sole model species failing to account for potential threats posed by agrochemicals to the full diversity of bee species from bumblebees to solitary bees, which are probably more important for pollination of food crops than managed honeybees. They are potentially more vulnerable to pesticides given they nest in the ground and bumblebee queens have

24min

A future for red wolves may be found on Galveston Island, Texas

Red wolves, once nearly extinct, again teeter on the abyss. New research finds red wolf ancestry in Texas — providing opportunities for additional conservation action and difficult policy challenges. Researchers have identified red wolf "ghost alleles" in canid population on Galveston Island.

24min

Internet therapy apps reduce depression symptoms

In a sweeping new study, psychologists have found that a series of self-guided, internet-based therapy platforms effectively reduce depression.

24min

New research to examine why more men are not employed in early years education

Currently only around 2% of the UK's Early Years Education (EYE) workforce are male—a figure that has remained stubbornly resistant to change for several decades.

31min

New study finds employee incentives can lead to unethical behavior in the workplace

Findings suggest that setting compensation goals can increase dishonesty when managers are also paid a bonus for hitting certain targets.

33min

A Guarantee of Tuition-Free College Can Have Life-Changing Effects

Highly selective colleges have long struggled with racial and economic diversity. At 38 such institutions in the United States , more students come from households in the top 1 percent than from those in the bottom 60 percent. That is in part due to who applies to the universities: Many high-achieving students from a low-income or minority background don’t think they can get in to a prestigious i

35min

Stronger pesticide regulations likely needed to protect all bee species, say studies

Pesticide regulations designed to protect honeybees fail to account for potential health threats posed by agrochemicals to the full diversity of bee species that are even more important pollinators of food crops and other plants, say three new international papers co-authored by University of Guelph biologists.

37min

Researchers make shape shifting cell breakthrough

A new computational model developed by researchers from The City College of New York and Yale gives a clearer picture of the structure and mechanics of soft, shape-changing cells that could provide a better understanding of cancerous tumor growth, wound healing, and embryonic development.

37min

Ant-Man and the Wasp: Small wonders lead to superhero science

Max Mikel-Stites and Anne Staples were searching for a sequel.

37min

The holiday season can be deadly for hospital patients

Health A study says you're more likely to die if you're discharged during festive times. For most of us, holiday laziness just means slacking off at work—but being less regimented around Christmas and New Year’s is literally deadly for some people.

42min

Alaska earthquakes offer new insight into improving hazard assessment

The 2016 Iniskin earthquake (magnitude 7.1) that shook Anchorage, Alaska, was captured by the seismometers of the EarthScope Transportable Array. This data is helping Geoff Abers, a professor at Cornell University's Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, and Michael Mann, a graduate student in his group, explore answers to fill crucial gaps in understanding intra-slab earthquakes. Their wor

43min

Researchers develop smartphone-based ovulation test

Investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital are developing an automated, low-cost tool to predict a woman's ovulation and aid in family planning. Capitalizing on advancements in several areas, including microfluidics, artificial intelligence (AI) and the ubiquity of smartphones, the team has built an ovulation testing tool that can automatically detect fern patterns—a marker of ovulation—in a

43min

Don't Ask Jude Law About 'Captain Marvel'—He Fears Snipers

The actor doesn't want to be the first one taken out for spoiling a secret too soon.

43min

Tough artificial mother-of-pearl material breaks world record

Researchers have developed an imitation material comparable to mother-of-pearl with adjustable physical properties. Natural mother-of-pearl, such as mussels, is one of the hardest, most stable, and stiff natural materials. The structure of mother-of-pearl is exquisite under an electron microscope; it looks like a miniature brick wall, the joints of which are filled with mortar. The bricks are com

45min

Warming, sea-ice loss: Arctic Report Card tracks region's environmental changes

NOAA's annual report card on the Arctic, released today, shows that the Arctic region experienced the second-warmest air temperatures ever recorded; the second-lowest overall sea-ice coverage; lowest recorded winter ice in the Bering Sea; and earlier plankton blooms due to early melting of sea ice in the Bering Sea.

45min

52 million tree stories more accessible to science

The world's primary archive of tree ring data, which holds more than 52 million cost-free records spanning 8,000 years of history, has gotten a makeover by scientists from four countries committed to making science more accessible. The International Tree Ring Data Bank, developed in 1974 and populated by hundreds of contributing scientists and agencies, had only been used for a handful of studies

45min

How skin cells protect themselves against stress

Cell biologists have developed a new method for measuring how mechanical forces in cells are processed.

45min

Chemical engineers develop new theory to build improved nanomaterials

Researchers have developed a new theory to better predict how nanoclusters will behave when a given metal is introduced to their structure.

45min

Unique immune cell likely drives chronic inflammation

For the first time, researchers have identified that an immune cell subset called gamma delta T cells that may be causing and/or perpetuating the systemic inflammation found in normal aging in the general geriatric population and in HIV-infected people who are responding well to drugs (anti-retrovirals).

45min

Terahertz laser for sensing and imaging outperforms its predecessors

A new terahertz laser is the first to reach three key performance goals at once — high constant power, tight beam pattern, and broad electric frequency tuning — and could thus be valuable for a wide range of applications in chemical sensing and imaging.

45min

NIH Plans to Spend Up to $20 Million on Search for Alternatives to Fetal Tissue for Research

The preliminary announcement comes in the wake of a Trump administration order that agency scientists to stop buying such tissue from humans — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

48min

NASA measures rainfall from Tropical Cyclone Owen's remnants at Queensland coast

The low pressure area formerly known as Tropical Cyclone Owen continued to organize and cross the southern Gulf of Carpentaria, Australia on Dec. 11. The Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite provided a look at the rainfall rates within the system.

49min

Better biomedical devices, wearable displays may result from tiny light-guiding structures

For the first time, researchers have fabricated light-guiding structures known as waveguides just over one micron wide in a clear silicone commonly used for biomedical applications. The tiny, flexible waveguides can be used to make light-based devices such as biomedical sensors and endoscopes that are smaller and more complex than currently possible.

49min

New discoveries predict ability to forecast dementia from single molecule

Scientists who recently identified the molecular start of Alzheimer's disease have used that finding to determine that it should be possible to forecast which type of dementia will develop over time — a form of personalized medicine for neurodegenerative diseases.

54min

Internet therapy apps reduce depression symptoms, IU study finds

In a sweeping new study, Indiana University psychologists have found that a series of self-guided, internet-based therapy platforms effectively reduce depression. The work, which reviewed 21 pre-existing studies with a total of 4,781 participants, was published in the November issue of the Journal of Medical Internet Research. The study was led by Lorenzo Lorenzo-Luaces, a clinical professor in th

54min

CCNY-Yale researchers make shape shifting cell breakthrough

A new computational model developed by researchers from The City College of New York and Yale gives a clearer picture of the structure and mechanics of soft, shape-changing cells that could provide a better understanding of cancerous tumor growth, wound healing, and embryonic development.

54min

Alaska earthquakes offer new insight into improving hazard assessment

Earthquake hazard assessment often overlooks intra-slab earthquakes. EarthScope Transportable Array data for the 2016 Iniskin and Nov. 30, 2018 Anchorage earthquakes in Alaska offer new insight into potential causes of heavy shaking from these intra-slab events.

54min

Drug repositioning strategy identifies potential anti-epilepsy drugs

Starting with human brain tissue from patients with epilepsy, University of Iowa researchers used gene expression profiling and bioinformatics to identify 91 FDA-approved drugs, that may also have potential as anti-epilepsy treatments. Testing showed three of drugs — a diabetes drug, a hypertension medication, and an antiparasitic therapy — significantly reduced seizure-like movement in zebrafis

54min

Stronger pesticide regulations likely needed to protect all bee species, say studies

Regulators worldwide currently use honeybees as the sole model species failing to account for potential threats posed by agrochemicals to the full diversity of bee species from bumblebees to solitary bees, which are probably more important for pollination of food crops than managed honeybees. They are potentially more vulnerable to pesticides given they nest in the ground and bumblebee queens have

54min

The 23 Best Albums of 2018

Editor’s Note : Find all of The Atlantic ’s “Best of 2018” coverage here . Though Drake kept watch over the Hot 100 from the No. 1 spot for much of 2018, this year in music was not one of consensus. Rather it saw squabbles and insurgencies, with the streaming-driven atomization of tastes—and deepening of the overall sea of songs—reaching a crescendo. Accordingly, our best-albums list is a thing o

56min

Major companies are using AI to decide who you speak to on the phone

When you ring a call centre, an AI could be deciding which person will speak to you, based on their ability to influence your decisions

1h

2018 er det næstvarmeste år i Arktis nogensinde

Konsekvenserne af global opvarmning bliver ved med at hobe sig op, advarer ny amerikansk undersøgelse.

1h

What a Newfound Kingdom Means for the Tree of Life

The tree of life just got another major branch. Researchers recently found a certain rare and mysterious microbe called a hemimastigote in a clump of Nova Scotian soil. Their subsequent analysis of its DNA revealed that it was neither animal, plant, fungus nor any recognized type of protozoan — that it in fact fell far outside any of the known large categories for classifying complex forms of lif

1h

Degrading permafrost puts Arctic infrastructure at risk by mid-century

Seventy percent of the current infrastructure in the Arctic has a high potential to be affected by thawing permafrost in the next 30 years. Even meeting the climate change targets of the Paris Agreement will not substantially reduce those projected impacts, according to a new study.

1h

Did supernovae kill off large ocean animals at dawn of Pleistocene?

The effects of a supernova — and possibly more than one — on large ocean life like school-bus-sized Megalodon 2.6 million years ago are detailed in a new article.

1h

Taking uncertainty out of cancer prognosis

An analysis of nearly 20,000 cancer patient histories and genetic data has revealed that knowing the genetic cause of a cancer does not help predict how deadly the disease will be. Instead, researchers have discovered that copy number variations in specific gene sites are far more informative, providing new opportunities to improve prognosis.

1h

Possible connection between cardiovascular disease and living near oil and gas wells

Researchers have found a possible connection between the intensity of oil and gas exploration in an area and early indicators of cardiovascular disease among nearby residents.

1h

Better biomedical devices, wearable displays may result from tiny light-guiding structures

For the first time, researchers have fabricated light-guiding structures known as waveguides just over one micron wide in a clear silicone commonly used for biomedical applications. The tiny, flexible waveguides can be used to make light-based devices such as biomedical sensors and endoscopes that are smaller and more complex than currently possible.

1h

Relationship impairments hinder men seeking mental health treatment

Relationship impairment (difficulty managing expectations and requirements within an intimate relationship) plays a role in explaining the association between symptom severity and those seeking treatment among post-9/11 military veterans. However, the role it plays is different for men and women.

1h

Brigham researchers develop smartphone-based ovulation test

Artificial intelligence used to detect signs of ovulation in a woman's saliva automatically and at low cost.

1h

Breakthrough Starshot's incredible plan to laser-propel spacecraft to Alpha Centauri

The Breakthrough Starshot initiative was co-founded by Stephen Hawking. The project raised $100 million and is moving ahead with extensive research. The goal of Starshot is to send tiny "StarChip" spacecraft to explore neighboring star systems. None Imagine paper-thin nano-spacecraft being propelled through space at 134 million mph by super-powerful lasers, brighter than the sun. They would also

1h

How Should You Talk to Policymakers about Climate Change?

Nobody knows for sure what the most effective strategy is, but I have a few ideas — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

Earth’s cold storage is melting. Here’s what’s oozing out.

Environment Viruses, bacteria, methane, and more. Permafrost isn’t just cold dirt, it’s Earth’s natural cold storage. But what happens when it melts?

1h

ISS: Spacewalk cosmonauts investigate mystery holeRussian ISS Hole Soyuz

The mystery hole in a Soyuz capsule docked to the International Space Station caused a pressure leak.

1h

A future for red wolves may be found on Galveston Island

Red wolves, once nearly extinct, again teeter on the abyss. New research finds red wolf ancestry in Texas — providing opportunities for additional conservation action and difficult policy challenges. Michigan Tech researcher Kristin Brzeski and others have identified red wolf "ghost alleles" in canid population on Galveston Island.

1h

Gut microbiome may affect some anti-diabetes drugs

Why do orally-administered drugs for diabetes work for some people but not others?According to researchers at Wake Forest School of Medicine, bacteria that make up the gut microbiome may be the culprit.

1h

Women and men with heart attack symptoms get different treatment from EMS

Researchers from the George Washington University (GW) have examined the care that women and men with heart attack symptoms receive from emergency medical services (EMS) after a 911 call and found that women were less likely to receive aspirin, be resuscitated, or be transported to the hospital in ambulances using lights and sirens.

1h

Superhero science: Ant-Man and the Wasp

For most of Mikel-Stites' life, he had been nit-picking at the 'science' in science-fiction movies.

1h

National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) issues new guidelines for COPD

NICE makes a 'strong' recommendation that patients with severe COPD be referred for evaluation for bronchoscopic lung volume reduction, including the Zephyr® Endobronchial Valve System.NICE has broadened the criteria for evaluation and a new group of people for whom lung volume reduction surgery was unsuitable may now be evaluated for treatment with Zephyr Valves, a less invasive treatment option.

1h

Macrophage cells key to helping heart repair — and potentially regenerate: New study

Macrophage cells have the ability to act in a neo-natal-like state, a time in life where they aid in the growth and development of organs, meaning they could be channeled to help repair the heart following a heart attack.

1h

FEFU young scientists developed unique method to calculate transparent materials porosity

Applying the new method, technologists and materials scientists will be able to quickly, accurately and without destroying the studied objects to obtain information about the microstructure and functionality of transparent materials – single crystals, glasses, and ceramics. The article on that is available online on the site of the Journal of Alloys and Compounds.

1h

Forgotten statue kept in a margarine tub is 2,000-year-old treasure

Silver-eyed Minerva found by a farmer 10 years ago dates back to first or second century A 2,000-year-old Roman statuette of a silver-eyed goddess Minerva that for more than a decade was kept in a plastic margarine tub is among a record number of treasure discoveries made by the nation’s army of metal detectorists. The British Museum on Tuesday revealed the details of 1,267 finds across England,

1h

Black walnuts contain health-boosting compounds too

Black walnuts contain molecular compounds called phytosterols, which may have health benefits. Phytosterols have been shown to help prevent obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease while promoting lower cholesterol, lower inflammation, and anticancer activity in the body. “The health benefits of phytosterols are well known, and now we have critical information for both consumers and producer

1h

Green production of chemicals for industry

Industry consumes large quantities of crude oil to produce basic substances for drugs, cosmetics, plastics, or food. However, these processes consume a lot of energy and produce waste. Biological processes with enzymes are far more sustainable. The protein molecules can catalyze various chemical reactions without auxiliary materials or solvents being required. But they are expensive and, hence, ha

1h

Algorithms to locate centrioles in the cell

Investigators from the UEx have developed a methodology with new algorithms to analyze the location of the centriole in a model cell. Thanks to this technology, they have been able to discover how the actin cytoskeleton, is involved in the polarised placement of centrioles in Drosophila, just as happens in vertebrates.

1h

Meditation adapts the brain to respond better to feedback

Researchers have discovered a link between meditation and how individuals respond to feedback.

1h

Degrading permafrost puts Arctic infrastructure at risk by mid-century

Seventy percent of the current infrastructure in the Arctic has a high potential to be affected by thawing permafrost in the next 30 years. Even meeting the climate change targets of the Paris Agreement will not substantially reduce those projected impacts, according to a new study published in Nature Communications.

1h

Chemists find a new tool for understanding enzymes—Google

Yale scientists have taken a novel approach to unraveling the complex structure and regulation of enzymes: They Googled it.

1h

Chemical engineers develop new theory to build improved nanomaterials

Thanks in part to their distinct electronic, optical and chemical properties, nanomaterials are utilized in an array of diverse applications from chemical production to medicine and light-emitting devices. But when introducing another metal in their structure, also known as "doping," researchers are unsure which position the metal will occupy and how it will affect the overall stability of the nan

1h

Relationship impairments hinder men seeking mental health treatment

Relationship impairment (difficulty managing expectations and requirements within an intimate relationship) plays a role in explaining the association between symptom severity and those seeking treatment among post-9/11 military veterans. However, the role it plays is different for men and women.

1h

Better biomedical devices, wearable displays may result from tiny light-guiding structures

For the first time, researchers have fabricated light-guiding structures known as waveguides just over one micron wide in a clear silicone commonly used for biomedical applications. The tiny, flexible waveguides can be used to make light-based devices such as biomedical sensors and endoscopes that are smaller and more complex than currently possible.

1h

Possible connection between cardiovascular disease and living near oil and gas wells

Researchers at the Colorado School of Public Health have found a possible connection between the intensity of oil and gas exploration in an area and early indicators of cardiovascular disease among nearby residents.

1h

Terahertz laser for sensing and imaging outperforms its predecessors

A terahertz laser designed by MIT researchers is the first to reach three key performance goals at once — high constant power, tight beam pattern, and broad electric frequency tuning — and could thus be valuable for a wide range of applications in chemical sensing and imaging.

1h

BMI is a good measure of health after all, new study finds

A new study from the University of Bristol supports body mass index as a useful tool for assessing obesity and health.

1h

NASA measures rainfall from Tropical Cyclone Owen's remnants at Queensland coast

The low pressure area formerly known as Tropical Cyclone Owen continued to organize and cross the southern Gulf of Carpentaria, Australia on Dec. 11. The Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite provided a look at the rainfall rates within the system.

1h

Relationship between low income and obesity is relatively new, says study

It's a fact: poverty and obesity are intimately connected. But this relationship is only about 30 years old, according to a new study coauthored by UT researchers and published in Palgrave Communications, an open-access, online journal.

1h

Taking uncertainty out of cancer prognosis

An analysis of nearly 20,000 cancer patient histories and genetic data has revealed that knowing the genetic cause of a cancer does not help predict how deadly the disease will be. Instead, researchers from CSHL have discovered that copy number variations in specific gene sites are far more informative, providing new opportunities to improve prognosis.

1h

Pitt chemical engineers develop new theory to build improved nanomaterials

Researchers from the University of Pittsburgh's Swanson School of Engineering have developed a new theory to better predict how nanoclusters will behave when a given metal is introduced to their structure. Their findings were featured on the cover of ACS Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters.

1h

Researchers discover unique immune cell likely drives chronic inflammation

For the first time, researchers have identified that an immune cell subset called gamma delta T cells that may be causing and/or perpetuating the systemic inflammation found in normal aging in the general geriatric population and in HIV-infected people who are responding well to drugs (anti-retrovirals).

1h

Yale chemists find a new tool for understanding enzymes — Google

In a new study published online this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, chemistry professor Victor Batista and his colleagues used the Google algorithm PageRank to identify key amino acids in the regulation of a bacterial enzyme essential for most microorganisms.

1h

How returning to a prior context briefly heightens memory recall

Returning to the context where a memory was formed temporarily brings back vivid details of the episode by increasing the electrical excitability of the engrams that store the memory in the brain, a new study in Neuron shows.

1h

Did supernovae kill off large ocean animals at dawn of Pleistocene?

The effects of a supernova — and possibly more than one — on large ocean life like school-bus-sized Megalodon 2.6 million years ago are detailed in a paper just published in Astrobiology.

1h

The importins of anxiety

According to some estimates, up to one in three people around the world may experience severe anxiety in their lifetime. In a study described today in Cell Reports, researchers at the Weizmann Institute of Science have revealed a previously unknown mechanism underlying anxiety. Targeting this biochemical pathway may help develop new therapies for alleviating the symptoms of anxiety disorders.

1h

Paternal grandfather's high access to food may indicate higher mortality risk in grandsons

A paternal grandfather's access to food during his childhood is associated with mortality risk, especially cancer mortality, in his grandson, shows a large three-generational study from Stockholm University. The reason might be epigenetic — that environmental exposures in one generation may influence health outcomes in following generations.

1h

Lethal combination: Drug cocktail turns off the juice to cancer cells

A widely used diabetes medication combined with an antihypertensive drug specifically inhibits tumor growth – this was discovered by researchers from the University of Basel's Biozentrum two years ago. In a follow-up study, recently published in Cell Reports, the scientists report that this drug cocktail induces cancer cell death by switching off their energy supply.

1h

Study: Degrading permafrost puts Arctic infrastructure at risk by mid-century

Seventy percent of the current infrastructure in the Arctic has a high potential to be affected by thawing permafrost in the next 30 years. Even meeting the climate change targets of the Paris Agreement will not substantially reduce those projected impacts, according to a new study published in Nature Communications.

1h

New link between atrial fibrillation and mutations in heart disease gene

A nationwide research team has found a strong relationship between early-onset Afib and mutations that break TTN, a gene that helps maintain the structure of heart muscle. According to these new findings, roughly two percent of the nearly 2,800 early-onset Afib patients examined had a loss-of-function mutation in TTN, a percentage that increased the younger a patient was. TTN is also associated wi

1h

Study: Neurons in the brain work as a team to guide movement of arms, hands

The apparent simplicity of picking up a cup of coffee or turning a doorknob belies the complex sequence of calculations and processes that the brain must undergo to identify the location of an item in space, move the arm and hand toward it, and shape the fingers to hold or manipulate the object. New research, published today in the journal Cell Reports, reveals how the nerve cells responsible for

1h

Effect of oral alfacalcidol on clinical outcomes in patients without secondary hyperparathyroidism R

"Treatment with active vitamin D did not decrease cardiovascular events in kidney patients undergoing hemodialysis"– A research group in Japan reported their research results in the December 11 issue of JAMA. "Death risk did not decrease either", according to the principal investigator Dr. Tetsuo Shoji, Research Professor at Department of Vascular Medicine, Osaka City University Graduate School o

1h

Medical training or a family? Residents, training programs seek balance

A new analysis finds striking inconsistency in parental leave policies at the nation's top residency programs, illustrating the enormous challenge these programs face balancing training the next generation of doctors and supporting trainees' personal and family needs.

1h

Sun-soaking device turns water into superheated steam

MIT engineers have built a device that soaks up enough heat from the sun to boil water and produce 'superheated' steam hotter than 100 degrees Celsius, without any expensive optics.

1h

Successful anti-PD-1 therapy requires interaction between CD8+ T cells and dendritic cells

A team led by a Massachusetts General Hospital investigator has found that successful cancer immunotherapy targeting the PD-1 molecule requires interaction between cytotoxic CD8+ T cells, which have been considered the primary therapeutic target, and dendritic cells, critical activators of T cell response.

1h

Roadmap reveals shortcut to recreate key HIV antibody for vaccines

A team led by Duke Human Vaccine Institute researchers, publishing online Dec. 11 in the journal Immunity, reported that they have filled in a portion of the roadmap toward effective neutralization of HIV, identifying the steps that a critical HIV antibody takes to develop and maintain its ability to neutralize the virus.

1h

Loss of two genes drives a deadly form of colorectal cancer, reveals a potential treatment

Scientists from Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute (SBP), in collaboration with clinicians from Scripps Clinic, have identified that the loss of two genes drives the formation of serrated colorectal cancer–yielding potential biomarkers. The research has also identified a combination treatment that has treated the cancer in mice. The study published today in Immunity.

1h

Arctic's record warming driving 'broad change' in environment: study

Global warming is heating the Arctic at a record pace, driving broad environmental changes across the planet, including extreme storms in the mid-latitudes, a major US scientific report said Tuesday.

1h

Cosmonauts to examine mystery hole on ISS spacewalkRussian ISS Hole Soyuz

Russian cosmonauts were to carry out a spacewalk Tuesday to examine a mystery hole in a Soyuz spacecraft docked on the International Space Station that a Moscow official suggested could have been deliberate sabotage.

1h

ICESat-2 reveals profile of ice sheets, sea ice, forests

Less than three months into its mission, NASA's Ice, Cloud and land Elevation Satellite-2, or ICESat-2, is already exceeding scientists' expectations. The satellite is measuring the height of sea ice to within an inch, tracing the terrain of previously unmapped Antarctic valleys, surveying remote ice sheets, and peering through forest canopies and shallow coastal waters.

1h

Researchers identify additional mechanisms at play in insecticide resistance

Researchers have used a bioinformatics approach to integrate information from multiple studies on insecticide resistance in mosquitoes and uncovered a number of important resistance mechanisms that had not previously been recognized.

1h

How catnip makes the chemical that causes cats to go crazy

Researchers have shed light on how catnip — also known as catmint — produces the chemical that sends cats into a state of wanton abandon.

1h

Improved treatment of anxiety disorders

Traumatic experiences can become deeply entrenched in a person's memory. How can fears following a traumatic event be reduced in the long term and prevented from becoming a permanent stress-related disorder? Researchers have recently shed new light on these questions.

1h

New understanding of mysterious 'hereditary swelling'

For the first time ever, biomedical researchers have unveiled cellular defects that lead to the rare disease hereditary angioedema (HAE), where patients experience recurrent episodes of swelling that requires immediate treatment. This new understanding is an important step towards gene therapy for patients.

1h

Neighborhood affects the healthiness of dietary choices

A new study shows that living or moving to a neighborhood with a higher socioeconomic status is clearly associated with better adherence to dietary recommendations. Researchers studied the connection between neighborhoods' socioeconomic status and dietary choices from data covering over 16,000 Finnish adults.

1h

New light-based technology reveals how cells communicate in human disease

Scientists have developed a new technique that uses light to understand how cells communicate in human disease.

1h

Attention training improves intelligence and functioning of children's brain

Being able to voluntarily regulate our attention is crucial for mental processes such as intelligence and learning in children. With this in mind, researchers have carried out a study in which they evaluated the influence of a computer-based attention-training intervention on intelligence scores and brain functioning on a group of pre-school age children.

1h

New method gives microscope a boost in resolution

Scientists have been able to boost current super-resolution microscopy by a novel tweak. They coated the glass cover slip as part of the sample carrier with tailor-made biocompatible nanosheets that create a 'mirror effect'. This method shows that localizing single emitters in front of a metal-dielectric coating leads to higher precision, brightness and contrast in Single Molecule Localization Mic

1h

Giganthandel vil skubbe Sweco af tronen som Nordens største rådgiver

Svenske ÅF vil købe finske Pöyry for 4,5 mia. kr. Målt på omsætning vil den fusionerede rådgivningsvirksomhed blive Nordens største med en årsomsætning omkring 14 mia. kr.

2h

Warming Arctic Enters ‘Uncharted Territory,’ With Effects Felt in U.S., Scientists Say

The Arctic has been warmer in the last five years than at any time since records began in 1900, a report from a United States scientific agency found.

2h

New study makes 52 million tree stories more accessible to science

The world's primary archive of tree ring data, which holds more than 52 million cost-free records spanning 8,000 years of history, has gotten a makeover by scientists from four countries committed to making science more accessible.

2h

Researchers consider whether supernovae killed off large ocean animals at dawn of Pleistocene

About 2.6 million years ago, an oddly bright light arrived in the prehistoric sky and lingered there for weeks or months. It was a supernova some 150 light years away from Earth. Within a few hundred years, long after the strange light in the sky had dwindled, a tsunami of cosmic energy from that same shattering star explosion could have reached our planet and pummeled the atmosphere, touching off

2h

Transformed: the plant whose sex life fascinated Charles Darwin

Researchers have genetically transformed the Common Primrose (Primula vulgaris) for the first time in a development that could shed light on one of the plant world's most renowned reproductive systems.

2h

Calibrating cosmic mile markers

New work from the Carnegie Supernova Project provides the best-yet calibrations for using type Ia supernovae to measure cosmic distances, which has implications for our understanding of how fast the universe is expanding and the role dark energy may play in driving this process. Led by Carnegie astronomer Chris Burns, the team's findings are published in The Astrophysical Journal.

2h

Can social interactions affect spread of disease?

Most real-world systems, such as biological, social, and economic schemes evolve constantly. The dynamics of such systems are characterized by significantly enhanced activity levels over short periods of time (or "bursts") followed by long periods of inactivity.

2h

A new way to turn saltwater fresh can kill germs and avoid gunk buildup

A new device that harnesses sunlight to produce pure vapor from seawater could last longer and produce cleaner water than other technology.

2h

Number of dementia sufferers worldwide grew by 117 percent in 26 years

An international group of collaborating scientists that includes HSE Professor Vasily Vlasov has analyzed data from 195 countries on the spread of Alzheimer's disease and other dementia between 1990 and 2016. The results have been published in the journal The Lancet Neurology.

2h

Parents, kids spend more time discussing how to use mobile technology

Most parents would agree that one of the of the biggest modern parenting challenges is monitoring a child's online activity.

2h

Hong Kong's waters benefit health and wellbeing

A ground-breaking study has revealed how spending time in and around Hong Kong's 'blue spaces' (harbours, coastlines and beaches) is linked to better health and wellbeing, especially for older adults.

2h

Vibrating crystal made of 10 billion atoms smashes quantum record

Testing increasingly large objects proves that quantum mechanics works at larger scales – a finding that could help build quantum computers

2h

Your gut microbiome is ‘more than the sum of its parts’

Researchers have developed a mathematical approach to analyze and model interactions between gut bacteria in fruit flies. This method could lead to a more sophisticated understanding of the complex interactions between human gut microbes. The gut microbiome—the world of microbes that inhabit the human intestinal tract—has captured the interest of scientists and clinicians for its critical role in

2h

East Antarctica glacial stronghold melting as seas warm

Nasa detects ice retreat probably linked to ocean changes in region once thought stable A group of glaciers spanning an eighth of the East Antarctica coastline are being melted by the warming seas, scientists have discovered. This Antarctic region stores a vast amount of ice, which, if lost, would in the long-term raise global sea level by tens of metres and drown coastal settlements around the w

2h

The contribution of international academics to UK must be recognised, says business school

Immigrant academics play a critical role in the UK's international and national collaborations that bring social and economic benefits beyond academia, shows a new study of the public engagement activities of the UK's native-born and international academics.

2h

'Pest-controlling' bats could help save rainforests

A new study shows that several species of bats are giving Madagascar's rice farmers a vital pest control service by feasting on plagues of insects. And this, a zoologist at the University of Cambridge believes, can ease the financial pressure on farmers to turn forest into fields.

2h

Protein Sample Quality Identification and Evaluation

Checking the quality of your protein before and during your process gives you the highest chance of getting the consistent results. Learn how to evaluate the quality of your protein samples with this application note from NanoTemper!

2h

Sierra snowpack could drop significantly by end of century

A future warmer world will almost certainly feature a decline in fresh water from the Sierra Nevada mountain snowpack. Now a new study by the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) that analyzed the headwater regions of California's 10 major reservoirs, representing nearly half of the state's surface storage, found they could see on average a 79 percent drop in

2h

A correlation between obesity and income has only developed in the past 30 years

It is well known that poorer Americans are more likely to be obese or suffer from diabetes; there is a strong negative correlation between household income and both obesity and diabetes. This negative correlation, however, has only developed in the past 30 years, according to researchers. Since 1990, the rise of obesity and diabetes was fastest among the poorest US regions.

2h

Can social interactions affect spread of disease?

Researchers draw connections between people's social activity and the spread of epidemics through a mathematical model.

2h

Den amerikanske a-kraft-industri kæmper for sin overlevelse

I sammenligning med Rusland og Kina er USA er blevet irrelevant for den nukleare industri, mener bekymret amerikansk ekspert, som kæmper for at vende udviklingen.

2h

Citations show academic and non-academic researchers 'win' when they collaborate

A new analysis of research citations by University of Maryland professor of computer science Ben Shneiderman indicates that the average number of citations a university research paper receives is progressively boosted by having: (1) more than one author; (2) coauthors from multiple U.S. institutions; (3) international coauthors; and, most powerfully, (4) coauthors from business and/or government a

2h

The source of stem cells points to two proteins

Mammalian embryos are unlike those of any other organism as they must grow within the mother's body. While other animal embryos grow outside the mother, their embryonic cells can get right to work accepting assignments, such as head, tail or vital organ. By contrast, mammalian embryos must first choose between forming the placenta or creating the baby.

2h

The list of extreme weather caused by human-driven climate change grows

The tally of extreme weather events linked to climate change continues to grow, with new studies outlining links to more than a dozen events in 2017.

2h

ICESat-2 reveals profile of ice sheets, sea ice, forests

With each pass of the ICESat-2 satellite, the mission is adding to datasets tracking Earth's rapidly changing ice.

2h

Custom-made artificial mother-of-pearl

ETH researchers developed an imitation comparable to mother-of-pearl, the physical properties of which can be specifically adjusted.

2h

Transformed: the plant whose sex life fascinated Charles Darwin

Researchers have genetically transformed the Common Primrose (Primula vulgaris) for the first time in a development that could shed light on one of the plant world's most renowned reproductive systems.

2h

New study makes 52 million tree stories more accessible to science

The world's primary archive of tree ring data, which holds more than 52 million cost-free records spanning 8,000 years of history, has gotten a makeover by scientists from four countries committed to making science more accessible. The International Tree Ring Data Bank, developed in 1974 and populated by hundreds of contributing scientists and agencies, had only been used for a handful of studies

2h

Future doctors learn how to prescribe physical activity for their patients

An initiative adopted by Lancaster University to embed physical activity into the training for medical students has been showcased at a national and international level.Movement for Movement is recognised as a UK best practice exemplar by the 2018 WHO Europe Physical Activity Fact Sheets and the 2018 WHO Europe Physical Activity in the Health Sector report.Physical inactivity is the 4th leading ri

2h

Lithuanian scientists' approach to perovskite solar cells — cheaper production and high efficiency

A team of chemists from Kaunas University of Technology (KTU), Lithuania together with physicists from Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin (HZB) science institute, Germany are offering novel approach for the selective layer formation in perovskite solar cells. The molecule, synthesised by the KTU chemists, assembles itself into a monolayer, which can cover a variety of surfaces and can function as a hole tra

2h

Copper compound as promising quantum computing unit

Chemists at Friedrich Schiller University in Jena (Germany) have now synthesised a molecule that can perform the function of a computing unit in a quantum computer. They report on their work in the current issue of the research journal Chemical Communications.

2h

How skin cells protect themselves against stress

Cell biologists at the University of Münster have developed a new method for measuring how mechanical forces in cells are processed. The results have been published in the journal "Nature Communications".

2h

Smelling the forest – – not the trees

New study by the University of Konstanz: Animals are much better at smelling a complex 'soup' of odorants rather than a single pure ingredient.

2h

Calibrating cosmic mile markers

New work from the Carnegie Supernova Project provides the best-yet calibrations for using type Ia supernovae to measure cosmic distances, which has implications for our understanding of how fast the universe is expanding and the role dark energy may play in driving this process. The research was led by Carnegie astronomer Chris Burns.

2h

Calculated risk: Crickets draw mates, lethal parasites with upbeat call

Males of many animal species have evolved extravagant signals to attract mates, but those signals also risk exposing males to predators and parasites. Researchers have generally hypothesized that natural selection favors subtler mating cues in especially high-risk environments, offsetting females' preferences for showier displays.

2h

3 kinds of bias that shape your worldview | J. Marshall Shepherd

What shapes our perceptions (and misperceptions) about science? In an eye-opening talk, meteorologist J. Marshall Shepherd explains how confirmation bias, the Dunning-Kruger effect and cognitive dissonance impact what we think we know — and shares ideas for how we can replace them with something much more powerful: knowledge.

2h

Australia is still listening to Voyager 2 as NASA confirms the probe is now in interstellar spaceNASA Voyager 2 Space

NASA has confirmed that Voyager 2 has joined its twin to become only the second spacecraft to enter interstellar space – where the sun's flow of material and magnetic field no longer affect its surroundings. The slightly faster Voyager 1 entered interstellar space in August 2012.

2h

Plants as efficient antifungal factories

Researchers report that they can efficiently produce antifungal proteins in plants based on a modified tobacco mosaic virus. The results of this research, which could have a major impact in the agri-food industry, have been published in the Plant Biotechnology Journal.

2h

New understanding of mysterious 'hereditary swelling'

For the first time ever, biomedical researchers from Aarhus University, Denmark, have unveiled cellular defects that lead to the rare disease hereditary angioedema (HAE), where patients experience recurrent episodes of swelling that requires immediate treatment. This new understanding is an important step towards gene therapy for patients.

2h

New approach towards an improved treatment of anxiety disorders

Traumatic experiences can become deeply entrenched in a person's memory. How can fears following a traumatic event be reduced in the long term and prevented from becoming a permanent stress-related disorder? Researchers at the Mainz University Medical Center have recently shed new light on these questions.

2h

Researchers at LSTM identify additional mechanisms at play in insecticide resistance

Researchers at LSTM have used a bioinformatics approach to integrate information from multiple studies on insecticide resistance in mosquitoes and uncovered a number of important resistance mechanisms that had not previously been recognised.

2h

The contribution of international academics to UK must be recognised, says business school

Immigrant academics play a critical role in the UK's international and national collaborations that bring social and economic benefits beyond academia, shows a new study of the public engagement activities of the UK's native-born and international academics.

2h

Small and isolated habitat patches crucial to species survival

Small local patches of bushland could be playing a much bigger role in conserving biodiversity than previously thought, according to new research.

2h

New guidance outlines recommendations for infection control in anesthesiology

The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America has issued a new expert guidance on how hospitals and healthcare providers may reduce infections associated with anesthesiology procedures and equipment in the operating room. The guidance, published in SHEA's journal, Infection Control & Healthcare Epidemiology, recommends steps to improve infection prevention through increased hand hygiene, envi

2h

Can social interactions affect spread of disease?

In a paper publishing next week in the SIAM Journal on Applied Dynamical Systems, a team of researchers from New York University and Politecnico di Torino, Italy, draws connections between people's social activity and the spread of epidemics through a mathematical model.

2h

Novel technique may significantly reduce breast biopsies

A novel technique that uses mammography to determine the biological tissue composition of a tumor could help reduce unnecessary breast biopsies, according to a new study.

2h

Digital mammography increases breast cancer detection

The shift from film to digital mammography increased the detection of breast cancer by 14 percent overall in the United Kingdom without increasing the recall rate, according to a major new study.

2h

Lægeforeningen efter rettelse i tolkegebyret: Hele gebyret er en fejl

Tolkegebyret bliver ændret, så patienter, der får en lægeerklæring for at blive fritaget for gebyret, ikke selv skal betale for den. Lægeforeningen mener, at rettelsen understreger behovet for at afskaffe hele gebyret.

3h

A future for red wolves may be found on Galveston Island

Red wolves, once nearly extinct, again teeter on the abyss. New research finds red wolf ancestry on Galveston Island—providing opportunities for additional conservation action and difficult policy challenges.

3h

The complex history of Earth's magnetic reversals

Throughout Earth's long geologic history, the magnetic pole has not remained stable.

3h

Insights into magnetic bacteria may guide research into medical nanorobots

Researchers have long studied magnetotactic bacteria (MTB), aquatic microbes that have the ability to orientate themselves to magnetic fields. This unusual behaviour makes them a subject of interest for improving our understanding of biomagnetism, and potentially harnessing their abilities for future technologies, such as medical nanorobots. Neutrons have been used to explore the characteristics o

3h

Sea sponge study offers clues to how life adapts to harsh environments

A new study of modern sea sponges is beginning to tell us how early life forms such as sea sponges found ways to survive in extreme environments prior to the evolution of modern life and the oxygenation of Earth's oceans between a billion and 541 million years ago.

3h

A correlation between obesity and income has only developed in the past 30 years

It is well known that poorer Americans are more likely to be obese or suffer from diabetes; there is a strong negative correlation between household income and both obesity and diabetes. This negative correlation, however, has only developed in the past 30 years, according to researchers in Tennessee and London. Since 1990, the rise of obesity and diabetes was fastest among the poorest US regions,

3h

Neighborhood affects the healthiness of dietary choices

A new study shows that living or moving to a neighborhood with a higher socioeconomic status is clearly associated with better adherence to dietary recommendations. Researchers studied the connection between neighborhoods' socioeconomic status and dietary choices from data covering over 16,000 Finnish adults.

3h

ESMO Immuno-Oncology Congress showcases new technologies set to improve cancer treatment

Innovation in immuno-oncology is exploding and new technologies that are set to benefit many patients with cancer are being showcased in the highly diverse array of topics to be discussed at the ESMO Immuno-Oncology Congress, to be held 13-16 December in Geneva, Switzerland.

3h

New light-based technology reveals how cells communicate in human disease

Scientists at the University of York have developed a new technique that uses light to understand how cells communicate in human disease.

3h

Silica paradox

An international team of physicists and materials scientists from NUST MISIS, Bayerisches Geoinstitut (Germany), Linköping University (Sweden), and California Institute of Technology (USA) has discovered 'impossible' modifications of silica coesite-IV and coesite-V – i.e., materials that had not been supposed to exist. Their structure reveals the exception from the general rules of formation of ch

3h

Meditation adapts the brain to respond better to feedback

In a new study in the Journal of Cognitive, Affective & Behavioral Neuroscience researchers from the University of Surrey have discovered a link between meditation and how individuals respond to feedback.

3h

Algorithms to locate centrioles in the cell

Investigators from the UEx have developed a methodology with new algorithms to analyse the location of the centriole in a model cell. Thanks to this technology, they have been able to discover how the actin cytoskeleton, is involved in the polarised placement of centrioles in Drosophila, just as happens in vertebrates. However, the planar cell polarity-dependent factors which affect the location o

3h

Attention training improves intelligence and functioning of children's brain

the study shows that the beneficial effects of training in the brain and intelligence are greater when an educator implement a coaching strategy design in order to help the child to understand their training process

3h

Prehistoric Viruses and the Function of the Brain

The exceedingly strange story of learning, memory and the “Arc” gene — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

Physicists edge closer to controlling chemical reactions

A team of researchers from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, and Aarhus University in Denmark has developed an algorithm for predicting the effect of an external electromagnetic field on the state of complex molecules. The algorithm, which is based on a theory developed earlier by the same team, predicts tunneling ionization rates of molecules. This refers to the probability that an

3h

Geminids meteor shower: An astrophysicist on what to look out for

The Geminids meteor shower peaks on the mornings of December 13 and 14, 2018 – but if you look up any time there's a clear night sky up until December 17, you might just catch a glimpse of a Geminid meteor.

3h

A glimpse into future oceans

Something peculiar is happening in the azure waters off the rocky cliffs of Ischia, Italy. There, streams of gas-filled volcanic bubbles rising up to the surface are radically changing life around them by making seawater acidic. Stanford researchers studying species living near these gassy vents have learned what it takes to survive in acidic waters, providing a glimpse of what future oceans might

3h

Study suggests shamans acted as the first professional class in human society

The names may vary—medicine man, witch doctor, holy man, prophet—but the notion of the shaman, someone who uses trance to commune with the supernatural and effect real-world change, is one that crosses virtually all cultural boundaries.

3h

Citations show academic and non-academic researchers 'win' when they collaborate

Findings in new article indicate that when academics work with business, government, and/or NGO partners they produce more cited, higher impact research.

3h

Going viral: New cells for norovirus production in the lab

Human norovirus is a major cause of infections that can be particularly dangerous to children and elderly people. Here, a research team found that human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived intestinal epithelial cells allowed for efficient growth of human norovirus in the laboratory, without requiring human tissue or bile. This method raises fewer practical and ethical issues than conventional sy

3h

'Pest-controlling' bats could help save rainforests

A new study shows that several species of bats are giving Madagascar's rice farmers a vital pest control service by feasting on plagues of insects. And this, a zoologist believes, can ease the financial pressure on farmers to turn forest into fields.

3h

Q&A: Will New York's Lyft, Uber driver salary changes spread?

Lyft, Uber and companies like them have rewritten what transportation looks like in the 21st century. They've been living in a four-wheeled wild west, though, without many restrictions on what they do and how they do it.

3h

Practical measures to help bridge gender gap in young adults

Assigning chores to children equally, giving them unsupervised freedom outdoors, and providing good career role models would help address workplace gender inequality, according to University of Queensland research.

3h

Technology and policy pathways to Paris emissions goals

Now convening in Katowice, Poland, amid dire warnings from the IPCC Special Report on Global Warming of 1.5 degrees Celsius and the National Climate Assessment about the pace of climate change and severity of its impacts, the 24th Conference of the Parties (COP24) to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) aims to get the world on track to keep global warming well below

3h

Researchers use computer model to predict prostate cancer progression

An international team of cancer researchers from Denmark and Germany have used cancer patient data to develop a computer model that can predict the course of disease for prostate cancer. The model is currently being implemented at a prostate cancer clinic in Germany. The researchers have also found the enzyme that appears to trigger some of the first mutations in prostate cancer.

3h

Green production of chemicals for industry

Industry consumes large quantities of crude oil to produce basic substances for drugs, cosmetics, plastics, or food. However, these processes consume a lot of energy and produce waste. Biological processes with enzymes are far more sustainable. The protein molecules can catalyze various chemical reactions without auxiliary materials or solvents being required. But they are expensive and, hence, ha

3h

Boron nitride and silver nanoparticles to help get rid of carbon monoxide emissions

Chemists from NUST MISIS have developed a new hybrid catalyst for carbon monoxide oxidation consisting of hexagonal boron nitride and silver nanoparticles. This material makes it possible to get a full conversion of carbon monoxide at only 194 degrees Celsius. This temperature is nowhere near the process's record temperatures, but in the future, chemists can reduce the temperature of catalysis mor

3h

New method gives microscope a boost in resolution

Scientists at the University of Würzburg have been able to boost current super-resolution microscopy by a novel tweak. They coated the glass cover slip as part of the sample carrier with tailor-made biocompatible nanosheets that create a 'mirror effect'. This method shows that localizing single emitters in front of a metal-dielectric coating leads to higher precision, brightness and contrast in Si

3h

MSMU scientists discovered the role of iron in programmed cell death

Health care professionals from I.M. Sechenov Moscow State Medical University published a review of scientific articles to illustrate how the atoms of iron initiate ferroptosis – programmed cell death. The article was published in the Free Radical Biology and Medicine journal.

3h

Ni/MWCNT-based electrochemical sensor for fast detection of phenol in wastewater

In a paper published in NANO, researchers from the Harbin Institute of Technology have discovered a low cost and non-enzymatic phenol sensor that exhibits high sensitivity, good selectivity, reproducibility, and stability which has potential application in phenol detection in discharged wastewater.

3h

Nyt lægemiddel mod hæmofili A med inhibitor tegner godt i klinikken

Børnelæger opelever, at en undergruppe af børn med hæmofili A med inhibitor har stor gavn af lægemidlet Hemlibra. Dog mangler de svar på en række spørgsmål forbundet med brugen af lægemidlet.

3h

Nordsjællands Hospital gør klar til vintertravlhed

Arbejdstilrettelæggelsen bliver ændret hos lægerne på akutafdelingen og de medicinske afdelinger på Nordsjællands Hospital for at dæmme op for vinterens forventede travlhed.

3h

Electricity needs to be better regulated to benefit consumers, says new report

Electricity market regulation must be redesigned to offer the best value for consumers, according to a new report published today.

3h

Why artificial intelligence is likely to take more lives

Artificial neurons for deeply intelligent machines – this is the new artificial intelligence (AI) revolution, led by Geoffrey Hinton and his team since 2012. That year, Hinton, an expert in cognitive science at the University of Toronto and a researcher at Google Brain, demonstrated the striking effectiveness of a deep neural network (DNN) in an image-categorisation task.

3h

Cities can grow without wrecking reefs and oceans. Here's how

"What happens if the water temperature rises by a few degrees?" is the 2018 International Year of the Reef leading question. While the ocean is the focus, urbanisation is the main reason for the rising temperatures and water pollution. Yet it receives little attention in this discussion.

3h

Santa Is Nothing but Stress for Families Who Don’t Believe in Him

In 2018, the measures parents can take to protect a child’s belief in Santa are impressively sophisticated. In addition to the old “Leave a note signed ‘S.C.’ alongside some half-eaten cookies” trick, and the slightly more advanced Oh-look-a-tuft-of-red-and-white-fabric-caught-on-the-fireplace! maneuver, parents can now also set their kids up to follow @Santa or @OfficialSanta on Twitter, quickly

3h

The food poisoning find that could save lives

Researchers at The Australian National University (ANU) have made a discovery that has the potential to save lives when treating bacterial infections, especially serious food poisoning.

3h

How self-driving cars will make our cities more charming

Everyone's trying to get ready for roads that will be filled with more and more self-driving cars. But just as the first cars were imagined to be like horse-drawn carriages without the horses, it's easy to fall into the trap of thinking that a future with self-driving cars won't be that different —except that we won't have to drive.

3h

Successful observations of single molecule dynamics with low X-ray doses

In recent years, the observation of single protein molecules has made a phenomenal development, and it has become possible to observe molecular dynamics in vivo at high-speed and with high accuracy. In conventional DXT (Diffracted X-ray Tracking), by labeling with a gold nanocrystal a specific site of a target protein molecule and by observing the positional change of the diffracted X-ray spots fr

3h

A step closer toward revolution in electronics?

A successful development of a microfluidic platform capable of sorting individual carbon nanotubes in new dissertation in physics could possible lead to a revolution in the technology of electronic devices.

3h

These 'useless' quirks of evolution are actually evidence for the theory

Evolution is a fascinating field but can be rife with misunderstanding. One misconception is that evolution has some innate sense of direction or purpose. In reality, evolution is a mindless, plan-free phenomenon, driven into endless possibilities by random mutations, the most successful of which win out.

3h

Field-responsive mechanical metamaterials (FRMMs)

In a recent study published in Science Advances, materials scientists Julie A. Jackson and colleagues presented a new class of materials architecture called field-responsive mechanical metamaterials (FRMM). The FRMMs exhibit dynamic control and on-the-fly tunability for designing and selecting the construct's composition and structure. Typically, properties of mechanical metamaterials are programm

3h

Music evokes powerful positive emotions through personal memories

Music is known to evoke emotions through a range of mechanisms. A new study gives insights into the way positive emotional reactions can be triggered by music and pictures.

3h

Depression: New tool delivers swifter picture of cognitive deficit

A new tool will assist clinicians to assess people suffering from major depressive disorder (MDD).

3h

Pushing closer to a new cancer-fighting strategy

A molecular pathway that's frequently mutated in many different forms of cancer becomes active when cells push parts of their membranes outward into bulging protrusions, researchers report.

3h

Sierra snowpack could drop significantly by end of century

A future warmer world will almost certainly feature a decline in fresh water from the Sierra Nevada mountain snowpack. Now a new study that analyzed the headwater regions of California's 10 major reservoirs, representing nearly half of the state's surface storage, found they could see on average a 79 percent drop in peak snowpack water volume by 2100.

3h

The social networks of flowers

For centuries, people have conveyed feelings of happiness and love with flowers. Now an EU research team has found that plants flower more when surrounded by relatives compared to when growing with strangers or alone.

3h

Sudden stratospheric warming linked to open water in polar ice pack

In the depths of the long night that cloaks the Arctic in frigid darkness for three months each winter, a surprising patch of open water appeared, just to the north of Greenland.

3h

Your smartphone apps are tracking your every move: four essential reads

If you have a smartphone, it probably is a significant part of your life, storing appointments and destinations as well as being central to your communications with friends, loved ones and co-workers. Research and investigative reporting continue to reveal the degree to which your smartphone is aware of what you're up to and where you are – and how much of that information is shared with companies

3h

CRISPR method for conditional gene regulation

A team of engineers at the University of Delaware has developed a method to use CRISPR/Cas9 technology to set off a cascade of activities in cells, a phenomenon known as conditional gene regulation. Their method, described in the journal Nature Chemical Biology, introduces a new functionality to CRISPR, one of today's most-talked-about technologies.

3h

Making it easier to capture carbon dioxide in the cement industry

Cement manufacture accounts for as much as seven percent of global greenhouse gas emissions. A new hybrid technology makes it easier and less expensive to capture and purify CO2 produced by the industry. And the technology can be retrofitted to existing plant.

3h

'Pest-controlling' bats could help save rainforests

A new study shows that several species of bats are giving Madagascar's rice farmers a vital pest control service by feasting on plagues of insects. And this, a zoologist at the University of Cambridge believes, can ease the financial pressure on farmers to turn forest into fields.

3h

Citations show academic and non-academic researchers 'win' when they collaborate

Findings in new PNAS paper indicate that when academics work with business, government, and/or NGO partners they produce more cited, higher impact research.

3h

Sierra snowpack could drop significantly by end of century

A future warmer world will almost certainly feature a decline in fresh water from the Sierra Nevada mountain snowpack. Now a new study by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory that analyzed the headwater regions of California's 10 major reservoirs, representing nearly half of the state's surface storage, found they could see on average a 79 percent drop in peak snowpack water volume by 2100.

3h

Pushing closer to a new cancer-fighting strategy

A molecular pathway that's frequently mutated in many different forms of cancer becomes active when cells push parts of their membranes outward into bulging protrusions, Johns Hopkins researchers report in a new study. The finding, published Nov. 7 in Nature Communications, could eventually lead to new targets for cancer-fighting therapeutics.

3h

Going viral: New cells for norovirus production in the lab

Human norovirus is a major cause of infections that can be particularly dangerous to children and elderly people. Here, an Osaka University-led research team found that human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived intestinal epithelial cells allowed for efficient growth of human norovirus in the laboratory, without requiring human tissue or bile. This method raises fewer practical and ethical issue

3h

No room for pollies' personal views in euthanasia debate

Whatever the opinion of the public, academics or medical professionals, QUT researchers say it will be politicians who decide on whether laws on euthanasia, or voluntary assisted dying, are changed. Researchers from QUT's Australian Centre for Health Law Research have published an article in the University of New South Wales Law Journal on how politicians approach euthanasia and assisted suicide w

3h

How climate impacts solar and wind power supply

One of the challenges with solar and wind power is that, on any given day, the sun isn't always shining, and the wind isn't always blowing when we want it to. Now, zooming out, researchers at Columbia's Earth Institute have found that the same could be true on the scale of years to decades.

3h

Cutting and pasting with graphene

To date it has proved very difficult to convert the promises of the miracle material graphene into practical applications. Amedeo Bellunato, Ph.D. candidate at the Leiden Institute of Chemistry, has developed a method of cutting graphene into smaller fragments using a diamond knife. He can then construct nanostructures from the fragments. Ph.D. defence 11 December.

3h

Researchers identify additional mechanisms at play in insecticide resistance

Researchers at LSTM have used a bioinformatics approach to integrate information from multiple studies on insecticide resistance in mosquitoes and uncovered a number of important resistance mechanisms that had not previously been recognised.

3h

Climate change, models, mimics and predators: A complicated relationship

Climate change as a disruptive force has been studied in terms of its effects on direct interactions in ecological relationships, such as those between predator and prey, for example. Until now however, little has been known about how the effect of a changing climate on the annual emergence cycles of species—phenological synchrony—may be affecting more complicated evolutionary relationships such a

3h

Study links frequent red meat consumption to high levels of chemical associated with heart disease

Researchers have identified another reason to limit red meat consumption: high levels of a gut-generated chemical called trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO), that also is linked to heart disease. Scientists found that people who eat a diet rich in red meat have triple the TMAO levels of those who eat a diet rich in either white meat or mostly plant-based proteins, but discontinuation of red meat eventua

3h

When less is more: A promising approach for low-cell-number epigenomic profiling

Scientists have developed a technique that enables analysis of DNA-protein interactions using very small numbers of cells, ranging from 100 to 1,000. Their method could capture previously unexamined epigenomic information, facilitate biomarker discovery and open new avenues for precision medicine.

3h

New sepsis treatment a step closer

A large clinical study assesses how clinicians are treating sepsis.

3h

People still favor guys for ‘high I.Q.’ jobs

New research finds bias against both women and girls for “brainy” jobs or activities. “Despite their achievements in the classroom and the workplace, our experiments suggest that women and girls may still encounter bias in circumstances where brilliance is viewed as the key to success,” observes Andrei Cimpian, an associate professor in New York University’s psychology department and the senior a

3h

Cake's Electric Kalk Motorcycle Is a Silent Dirt Biking Joy

Want to get a rookie into off-roading? Let them ride Cake's $13,000, all-electric motorcycle.

4h

To Clean Up Space Junk, Some People Grabbed a Net and Harpoon

The latest efforts to corral space debris employ a wide-ranging bag of tricks including orbital fishing gear, tiny thrusters and 'space feathers.'

4h

Retsmedicinsk kunst giver de døde et ansigt

Hvert år samles fagpersoner i Texas for at lære at genskabe ansigter til hjælp i drabssager.

4h

Geology and grapes a winning pair

About 150 years after grapes were first cultivated on a small strip of Pelee Island, vineyards now cover two-thirds of the island and have become its major agricultural enterprise.

4h

Climate change will have region-specific impacts on human health, economy

The Earth has already warmed approximately 1.7 degrees since 1901, the Fourth National Climate Assessment (NCA) reports, and projected warming between 2.7 degrees and 3.6 degrees by 2100 will bring even more record-breaking storms, rising sea levels and spread of disease-carrying insects.

4h

More glaciers in East Antarctica are waking up

East Antarctica has the potential to reshape coastlines around the world through sea level rise, but scientists have long considered it more stable than its neighbor, West Antarctica. Now, new detailed NASA maps of ice velocity and elevation show that a group of glaciers spanning one-eighth of East Antarctica's coast have begun to lose ice over the past decade, hinting at widespread changes in the

4h

New tool delivers swifter picture of cognitive deficit

A new tool, developed by researchers from the University of Adelaide, will assist clinicians to assess people suffering from major depressive disorder (MDD).

4h

Music evokes powerful positive emotions through personal memories

Music is known to evoke emotions through a range of mechanisms. A new study gives insights into the way positive emotional reactions can be triggered by music and pictures.

4h

Study links frequent red meat consumption to high levels of chemical associated with heart disease

Researchers have identified another reason to limit red meat consumption: high levels of a gut-generated chemical called trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO), that also is linked to heart disease. Scientists found that people who eat a diet rich in red meat have triple the TMAO levels of those who eat a diet rich in either white meat or mostly plant-based proteins, but discontinuation of red meat eventua

4h

Favoring female flowers in hemp horticulture

A UConn plant science professor working with hemp plants has developed a way to maximize the production of female flowers, which produce significantly higher quantities of cannabinoids than male flowers.

4h

Solcellebilen bliver langt dyrere end antaget

Motoren bliver billigere – men prisen på batteriet mere end fordoblet.

4h

Sensitive robots feel the strain

Flexible skin for soft robots, embedded with electrical nanowires, combines conductivity with sensitivity within the same material.

4h

Researchers reveal new ways to strip unconscious bias from the job market

Changing language in job advertisements and de-identifying CVs during recruitment can significantly boost a person's prospects of landing a job by overcoming unconscious bias, new University of Melbourne research shows.

4h

Tooth enamel analysis shows two early hominin species ate a generalized diet

A team of researchers with members affiliated with several institutions in Germany has found evidence that suggests two species of hominins from the Early Pleistocene ate a generalized diet. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes their study of fossilized tooth enamel from the two species and what they found.

4h

Nuclear events make a flower bloom

Flowers are the reproductive organs of a plant. Their formation depends on strict nuclear events that, if compromised, can leave the plant sterile. A new study by researchers at the Nara Institute of Science and Technology (NAIST) shows how two transcription factors, AGAMOUS and CRABS CLAW, bind sequentially to the gene YUC4, which is responsible for synthesizing the plant hormone auxin. The findi

4h

Nyt center for kønsidentitet åbner på Rigshospitalet

Fra februar kan Rigshospitalet tilbyde skræddersyet, individuel hjælp ved kønsidentitetsforhold.

4h

What more could we do to prevent veteran suicides? Survey reveals clues

Every day, 20 veterans die by suicide — and most choose a firearm to do it. A new survey of veterans who receive VA mental health care could guide suicide prevention efforts. Ninety-three percent said they would approve of the VA offering options to address firearm access – such as having health providers ask about veterans' access to firearms, providing gun locks, or teaching veterans' family an

4h

New sepsis treatment a step closer

Australian emergency medicine clinician-researchers are leading a large new study to understand how patients with sepsis are treated in emergency departments. The study is the next step for the research team, following a successful pilot trial in which the team compared two treatments at the opposing end of a spectrum of accepted practice for sepsis,

4h

When less is more: A promising approach for low-cell-number epigenomic profiling

Scientists at Kyushu University and Tokyo Institute of Technology in Japan have developed a technique that enables analysis of DNA-protein interactions using very small numbers of cells, ranging from 100 to 1,000. Their method could capture previously unexamined epigenomic information, facilitate biomarker discovery and open new avenues for precision medicine.

4h

The richer the reward, the faster you'll likely move to reach it

If you are wondering how long you personally are willing to stand in line to buy that hot new holiday gift, scientists say the answer may be found in the biological rules governing how animals typically forage for food and other rewards.

4h

The source of stem cells points to two proteins

While other animal embryos grow outside the mother, their embryonic cells can get right to work accepting assignments, such as head, tail or vital organ. By contrast, mammalian embryos must first choose between forming the placenta or creating the baby. New research has pinpointed two proteins that are the keys to this decision making. The process of assigning cells to placenta or baby is importan

4h

Buridan's donkey: Neuroscience resolves medieveal decision-making conundrum

The brain updates its preferences in real-time in order to choose between two equally attractive options, reveals a human neuroimaging and eye-tracking study. The research shows how we avoid becoming paralyzed by indecision like the starving donkey in a famous thought experiment.

4h

This Is Your Brain on Puppies

I have an 11-pound Chihuahua, and I love to smoosh her against my face. I’m not exactly sure what I get out of this ritual, because she doesn’t smell great. Still, I take her up in my hands, bring her toward my head, and make a noise in her side that is like a small scream, but without opening my mouth. Afterward, we look at each other for a moment—she’s suspicious, and I’m slightly embarrassed—b

4h

Did Free Pens Cause the Opioid Crisis?

Chiara Zarmati Early in Dopesick , a book examining how Purdue Pharma helped addict an alarming number of Americans to opioids , Beth Macy writes about the army of drug reps who pushed the painkiller OxyContin. In its approach to sales, Macy shows, Purdue was scientific. Using information purchased from a data-mining firm, the company determined which physicians were prescribing the most of its c

4h

The source of stem cells points to two proteins

While other animal embryos grow outside the mother, their embryonic cells can get right to work accepting assignments, such as head, tail or vital organ. By contrast, mammalian embryos must first choose between forming the placenta or creating the baby. New research at MSU has pinpointed two proteins that are the keys to this decision making. The process of assigning cells to placenta or baby is i

4h

The richer the reward, the faster you'll likely move to reach it, study shows

If you are wondering how long you personally are willing to stand in line to buy that hot new holiday gift, scientists at Johns Hopkins Medicine say the answer may be found in the biological rules governing how animals typically forage for food and other rewards.

4h

Switching to a home battery won't help save the world from climate change

Home energy storage systems might save you money, but under current policies, they would also often increase carbon emissions. That is the conclusion reached by a team of researchers at the University of California San Diego in a study published recently in the journal Environmental Science & Technology.

4h

Gribble me this: What eats wood and poops clean energy?

Nexus Media News This crustacean could help produce biofuels at lower cost and with less energy. The gribble—a small, wood-eating critter—offers clues to developing sustainable biofuels.

4h

Women having a heart attack wait longer than men to get help

Women are being urged to call an ambulance immediately if they have heart attack symptoms, following research showing they wait longer than men to get help.

5h

Online game trains players how to sort waste correctly

A simple online game can teach people to more accurately sort waste — with lasting results, a new study has found. Study participants who played the game received immediate feedback on their sorting choices. The second time they played — when feedback was no longer provided — players still improved their average accuracy from 69 per cent to 84 per cent. Even when a week passed between games, pl

5h

Using water molecules to unlock neurons' secrets

Researchers have developed a method to observe the electrical activity of neurons by analyzing the behavior of surrounding water molecules. This simple and non-invasive method, which could eliminate the need for electrodes and fluorophores, can be used to monitor the activity within a single neuron or potentially on an entire region of the brain.

5h

Human antibody discovery could save lives from fungal killer

A new way to diagnose, treat and protect against stealth fungal infections that claim more than 1.5 million lives per year worldwide has been moved a step closer.

5h

New evidence that females might benefit most from a low-salt diet

A low-salt diet may be more beneficial in lowering blood pressure in females than males, report scientists who found that while actual salt retention isn't higher in females, there is still an effect that drives pressure up.

5h

Bioenergy crops could be as bad for biodiversity as climate change

A large scale expansion in bioenergy crop production could be just as detrimental to biodiversity as climate change itself, according to new research.

5h

How Shared, Open Data Can Help Us Better Overcome Disasters

Citizen collection of radiation information after Fukushima and of air quality information after California's wildfires should serve as a model.

5h

15 Smart-Home Gift Ideas (2018): Ecobee, Dyson, Wemo, and More

Robot vacuums, smart thermostats, and more awesome gift ideas for that person in your life who can activate everything in their home with a sneeze.

5h

Image of the Day: Cellular Destiny

Progenitor cells in the pancreas of humans get developmental cues from proteins in their environment.

5h

Switching to a home battery won't help save the world from climate change

Home energy storage systems might save you money, but under current policies, they would also often increase carbon emissions. That is the conclusion reached by a team of researchers at the University of California San Diego in a study published recently in the journal Environmental Science & Technology.

5h

5h

Climate change: Protecting the poor from green taxes

Has President Macron's controversial fuel tax set back carbon taxes globally?

5h

Drone owners in India must get government approval before every flight

A law designed to open up civilian access to the skies in India overturns a ban on drones, but only by giving the government automated control over when they can take off

5h

Tenacious and flexible goal pursuit gets older people on the move

Tenacious goal pursuit and flexible goal adjustment have been shown to help maintain psychological well-being despite age related challenges and losses. A recent study demonstrates that tenacity and flexibility are beneficial for out-of-home mobility as well.

5h

Blue crabs face dire threat thanks to climate change

New research provides evidence that larval blue crabs experience increased mortality under low oxygen and/or low pH conditions. Inhabiting a vast network of estuaries along the Atlantic coast, blue crabs are ecologically important and represent one of the valuable and prized catches in the United States. The crabs spawn in estuaries at a time of year when water-quality issues such as low dissolve

5h

Doctors Once Prescribed Showers to Treat Mental Illness

The 19th century was a time of great innovation in plumbing. Cities got the first modern sewers, whose tunnels snaked for miles underground. Houses got bathrooms, with ceramic toilets, tubs, and sinks that you would easily recognize as such today. And, not to be left behind in this time of infrastructure overhaul, psychiatric hospitals got hydrotherapy: the method of using water to treat madness.

5h

Answering the mystery of what atoms do when liquids and gases meet

How atoms arrange themselves at the smallest scale was thought to follow a 'drum-skin' rule, but mathematicians have now found a simpler solution.

5h

Terahertz laser for sensing and imaging outperforms its predecessors

A terahertz laser designed by MIT researchers is the first to reach three key performance goals at once—high constant power, tight beam pattern, and broad electric frequency tuning—and could thus be valuable for a wide range of applications in chemical sensing and imaging.

5h

Slow flow for glaciers thinning in Asia

Providing water for drinking, irrigation and power, glaciers in the world's highest mountains are a lifeline for more than a billion people. As climate change takes a grip and glaciers lose mass, one might think that, lubricated by more meltwater, they flow more quickly. However, satellite images from over the last 30 years show that it isn't as simple as that.

5h

Increased snowfall in Antarctica buffers sea-level rise

A team of scientists from NASA and British Antarctic Survey (BAS), describes how analysis of 53 ice cores collected from across Antarctica reveals snowfall increased during the 20th century and mitigated sea-level rise by 10 mm. However, Antarctica's additional ice mass gained from snowfall only makes up for about a third of its overall ice loss. The study is published in the journal Nature Climat

5h

Antarctic fauna threatened by human-spread pathogens in polar latitudes

Antarctic fauna could be in danger due to pathogens humans spread in the southern ocean, according to a study led by Jacob González-Solís from the Faculty of Biology and the Biodiversity Research Institute (IRBio) of the University of Barcelona, and Marta Cerdà-Cuéllas from the Institute of Agrifood Research and Technology (IRTA-CReSA).

5h

Using water molecules to unlock neurons' secrets

Neurons are brain cells that communicate with each other by sending electrochemical signals along axons. When a neuron is about to release a signal in the form of an electric charge, it allows ions to pass through its membrane via ion channels. This ion transfer creates an electrical potential difference between the inside and outside of the cell, and that difference is referred to as the membrane

5h

Novel laser technology for microchip-size chemical sensors

Most lasers emit photons of exactly the same wavelength, producing a single color. However, there are also lasers that consist of many frequencies, with equal intervals in between, as in the teeth of a comb; thus, they are referred to as "frequency combs." Frequency combs are perfect for detecting a variety of chemical substances.

5h

New evidence that females might benefit most from a low-salt diet

A low-salt diet may be more beneficial in lowering blood pressure in females than males, report scientists who found that while actual salt retention isn't higher in females, there is still an effect that drives pressure up.

5h

Apple phones still sold in China despite ban

Apple stores in China continued with business as usual Tuesday despite a court-ordered ban on iPhone sales, but the US tech giant faces a growing nationalist backlash over the US-sought arrest of a Huawei executive.

5h

Google 'must scrap censored Chinese search plans': NGOs

Google must abandon its development of a censored search engine for China, dozens of NGOs demanded Tuesday, warning personal data would not be safe from Beijing authorities.

5h

Great snakes! Indonesians wrestle with giant python

A viral video showing a gigantic python wrapping itself around an Indonesian villager has secured more than a million views, after locals wrestled with the serpent before successfully caging it.

5h

Should Johannesburg Zoo's last elephant stay or go?

When the last African elephant at the Johannesburg Zoo lost her male companion to illness in September, some people said 39-year-old Lammie should be sent to a bigger sanctuary so she wouldn't spend her final years alone.

5h

Carbon conscious: how one man is shrinking his footprint

Some people count their calories. Dirk Gratzel counts his carbon emissions.

5h

UN science panel chief calls for more action to curb warming

The head of the U.N.'s top science panel on climate change said Tuesday the world needs to "do more and faster" to prevent global warming on a scale that would cause irreversible environmental damage and hit poor societies hard.

5h

Oil thieves cause spill in Rio de Janeiro's Guanabara Bay

Thieves caused at least 60,000 litres of oil to spill into Rio de Janeiro’s Guanabara Bay.

5h

The Speech That Facebook Plans to Punish

Last month, Mark Zuckerberg, Facebook’s CEO and majority shareholder, published a memo on censorship. “What should be the limits to what people can express?” he asked. “What content should be distributed and what should be blocked? Who should decide these policies and make enforcement decisions?” The company had previously posted its community standards and the internal guidelines that it uses wh

5h

How the Moon’s ice craters will power a human colony

NASA's Michelle Thaller walks us through what it will take to sustain human life on the surface of the Moon. One way would be to run a very strong electrical current through water, separating it into hydrogen and oxygen. It's how astronauts on the International Space Station currently harvest oxygen to breathe. There's already evidence of ice at the Moon's poles, likely thanks to billions of year

6h

Goodwill is for life, not just for Christmas. I want it to be my legacy | Stewart Dakers

The human race needs all the love and hope it can get. So I will not face the dying of my light with rage, but with grace My crumbly crew are having coffee at the community centre after its annual carol concert and Charlie hits his usual glass-half-empty note. Trouble is, he’s right. Goodwill seems pretty thin on the ground nowadays, wherever you look. Wars and rumours of wars, famine , drought, f

6h

How to Use Siri Shortcuts to Get Through Your Daily Grind

Siri Shortcuts might be the virtual assistant's most useful feature yet.

6h

Crispr Scandal: How Do You Publish a Scientific Villain's Data?

The scientific community is at a loss over how, and whether, to publish the controversial gene-editing work of He Jiankui.

6h

Years before CRISPR babies, this man was the first to edit human embryos

In 2015, an unknown Chinese scientist edited the DNA of human embryos. It was a step on an inexorable path to designer babies.

6h

We Need More Minorities in Clinical Trials

The trusted physician-patient relationship is a good way to recruit them — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

Asteroid Bennu Had Water! NASA Probe Makes Tantalizing Find

NASA's OSIRIS-REx probe, which just arrived at the asteroid Bennu last week, has already found lots of hydrated minerals on the space rock, mission team members announced today (Dec. 10).

6h

'Miracle' Excavation of 'Little Foot' Skeleton Reveals Mysterious Human Relative

Following an epic 20-year-long excavation in South Africa, researchers have finally recovered and cleaned the nearly-complete skeleton of an ancient human relative.

6h

Super-Steamy Megalodon May Have Been Too Hot to Avoid Extinction

Why did megalodon go extinct? New research has answers, and the shark's high body temperature likely played a part.

6h

These Simple Tips May Prevent Holiday Weight Gain, Study Suggests

Some simple tips, including weighing yourself regularly, can help prevent holiday weight gain, a new study finds.

6h

Ansat gemte filer lokalt på pc: Nu rammer datalæk 20.000 borgere i Gladsaxe Kommune

En medarbejder i Gladsaxe kommune overtrådte kommunens datasikkerhedsregler, da en fil ved endt arbejdstid blev gemt lokalt på bærbar computer. Det endte galt med et pc-tyveri.

6h

As Winters Warm, Blood-Sucking Ticks Drain Moose Dry

Researchers across New England and Canada scramble to protect the iconic species from growing parasite populations — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

Udskældte sæler er ingen trussel for fisk i Østersøen

Truslen kommer fra miljøforandringer, fiskeri og stigende havtemperaturer, siger forskere, der har regnet på fremtidige scenarier.

6h

A Nonbinding Migration Pact Is Roiling Politics in Europe

An international migration pact adopted by the vast majority of the world’s nations aims to better handle rising flows of migrants worldwide, explicitly upholds national sovereignty, and is not legally binding. Why, then, is much of Europe freaking out over it? The United Nations Global Migration Compact, signed this week by 164 countries, has been years in the making, and includes relatively unc

6h

Trump Can’t Stop Confessing

Donald Trump can’t stop telling on himself. Just two years into his presidency, the New York real-estate mogul turned politician faces at least two separate criminal investigations, while half a dozen former advisers, including his former campaign chair, deputy campaign chair, national-security adviser, foreign-policy adviser, and personal attorney have all pleaded guilty to or been convicted of

6h

Does It Matter Where You Go to College?

This year, more than 2 million Americans will apply to college. Most will aim for nearby schools without global brands or billion-dollar endowments. But for the tens of thousands of families applying to America’s most elite institutions, the admissions process is a high-cost, high-stress gantlet. American parents now spend almost half a billion dollars each year on “independent education consulta

6h

The Language the Poet Knows

It is one of writing’s oldest cliches: Find your voice . Developing this ineffable quality—unique to a given writer, derived largely from reflection and experience—can seem like an elusive goal. Particularly for poets, with their highly personal interaction with language and the challenge of adapting it to form, the quest can seem highly subjective. We Begin in Gladness , a collection of new and

6h

Lessons From a Failing Company

When Leigh Radford was young, her father worked in logistics at Procter & Gamble, formulating new products and technologies for Pringles. Radford’s mother worked as an educator at the University of Cincinnati, specializing in early-childhood education. Later, Radford worked for Eastern Air Lines, which would become Continental Airlines, before going on to get her master’s in business administrati

6h

Rambøll godkendt til at certificere brandrådgivere

Ny ordning kritiseres for at kunne udløse inhabilitet, fordi virksomheder kan certificere egne medarbejdere. Rambøll vil dog ikke certificere egne brandrådgivere.

7h

Getting goose bumps could boost hair growth

The same nerves and muscles that create goose bumps may make hair grow.

7h

Russian crew to inspect mysterious hole in Soyuz spacecraft

Cosmonauts to collect samples for analysis after suspicions foreign sabotage caused leak Two Russian cosmonauts are preparing to venture outside the International Space Station to investigate a mysterious leak. It was spotted on 30 August in the Russian Soyuz spacecraft attached to the station. The crew quickly located and sealed the tiny hole that created a slight loss of pressure. Space officia

7h

Minister dropper udskudt frekvensauktion i år

De udskudte frekvensauktioner bliver tidligst gennemført i det nye år, skriver ministeren i en mail til Folketingets teleordførere.

7h

Nuclear events make a flower bloom

Researchers at the Nara Institute of Science and Technology (NAIST) report AGAMOUS and CRABS CLAW partner in a feed-forward system to terminate the floral meristem and form the gynoecium in Arabidopsis plants. The findings give new understanding on the epigenetics that determine fruit number and size.

7h

Using water molecules to unlock neurons' secrets

EPFL researchers have developed a method to observe the electrical activity of neurons by analyzing the behavior of surrounding water molecules. This simple and non-invasive method, which could eliminate the need for electrodes and fluorophores, can be used to monitor the activity within a single neuron or potentially on an entire region of the brain.

7h

Human antibody discovery could save lives from fungal killer

A new way to diagnose, treat and protect against stealth fungal infections that claim more than 1.5 million lives per year worldwide has been moved a step closer, according to research published in Nature Communications.

7h

The Golden Age of Rich People Not Paying Their Taxes

In the summer of 2008, William Pfeil made a startling discovery: Hundreds of foreign companies that operated in the U.S. weren’t paying U.S. taxes, and his employer, the Internal Revenue Service, had no idea. Under U.S. law, companies that do business in the Gulf of Mexico owe the American government a piece of what they make drilling for oil there or helping those that do. But the vast majority

7h

The Grim Future of Urban Warfare

War is won by breaking an enemy’s morale until their ability to resist collapses. In Iraq, the U.S. military employed “ shock and awe ,” demonstrating overwhelming force while using superior technology and intelligence. It was a new term for an ancient approach: “Let your plans be dark and impenetrable as night, and when you move, fall like a thunderbolt,” Sun Tzu wrote in The Art of War , centur

7h

Her går supercomputeren aldrig i sort

DTU Risø har etableret et redundant system til både køling, fibernet og strømforsyning, så fremtidens supercomputere ikke går i sort.

8h

U.N. Climate Change Summit Enters Crucial Final Week

World leaders are gathered in Poland this week to discuss climate change. The U.S. hosted a meeting on coal, a highly polluting fuel, that many developing nations depend on.

8h

Pacific nations resist US push to lift tuna quota

Pacific island nations have vowed to oppose US efforts to increase its catch limit in the world's largest tuna fishery, saying the proposal does nothing to improve sustainable fishing.

9h

Fighting climate change in the shadow of Mount Everest

Formed in the shadow of Mount Everest, the turquoise depths of Nepal's Imja glacial lake would be a breathtaking miracle of nature to behold—were they not a portent of catastrophic floods.

9h

Chile's pine forests: a botanical dinosaur bound for extinction?

In Quinquen, an indigenous community in southern Chile, Ricardo Melinir shows off a forest of Chilean pine trees—the araucaria araucana, a "living fossil" seen as sacred by several local tribes.

9h

Google CEO faces House grilling on breach, China censorshipGoogle Sundar Pichai

Google's CEO faces a grilling from U.S. lawmakers on how the web search giant handled an alarming data breach and whether it may bend to Chinese government censorship demands.

9h

Twitter warns global users their tweets violate Pakistani law

When Canadian columnist Anthony Furey received an email said to be from Twitter's legal team telling him he may have broken a slew of Pakistani laws, his first instinct was to dismiss it as spam.

9h

Amazon suffering 'epidemic' of illegal gold mines

Illegal gold mining in the Amazon has reached "epidemic" proportions in recent years, causing damage to pristine forest and waterways, a conservation group said Monday as it released an unprecedented new map of the activities.

10h

Hold the phone: Huawei mistrust imperils China tech ambitions

China's ambitious drive to dominate next-generation 5G technology faces a sudden reality check as fears spread that telecom companies like Huawei could be proxies for Beijing's intrusive security apparatus.

10h

BladderMax: Fake News and Outrageous Headlines

A newspaper ad for BladderMax is disguised as a news story reporting "the end of bladder leakages." The information is inaccurate and the headlines are preposterous.

10h

NASA's first look: Tiny asteroid is studded with boulders

NASA's first look at a tiny asteroid shows the space rock is more moist and studded with boulders than originally thought.

10h

END OF FEED

It’s a Briefcase! It’s a Pizza Box! No, It’s a Mini Satellite

Orbiting instruments are now so small they can be launched by the dozens, and even high school students can build them.

11min

ScienceTake: Geckos Can Run on Water

A small lizard joins the elite group of animals that race across the surface of water.

11min

How Geckos Move Across Water

The Asian house gecko can move across water at great speed by using a half-running, half-swimming motion.

11min

Hertz, Clear partner to speed rentals with biometric scans

Biometric screening is expanding to the rental car industry.

29min

Scientific assessment of endangered languages produces mixed results

A new study of the progress made over the last 25 years in documenting and revitalizing endangered languages shows both significant advances and critical shortfalls. The article, "Language documentation twenty-five years on", by Frank Seifart (CNRS & Université de Lyon, University of Amsterdam, and University of Cologne), Nicholas Evans (ARC Centre of Excellence for the Dynamics of Language, The A

29min

Small and isolated habitat patches crucial to species survival

Small, local patches of habitat could be playing a much bigger role in conserving biodiversity than you think, according to new research.

29min

Trees can help mitigate ammonia emissions from farming

A new online calculator and guidance has been developed to help farmers and others to design woodlands to capture airborne ammonia and so reduce air pollution.

35min

Forskere bruger computermodel til at forudsige prostatakræft-forløb

Et internationalt hold af forskere fra Danmark og Tyskland har ud fra patientdata udviklet en computermodel,…

1h

Google lukker socialt netværk i april efter datalæk

Google har opdaget nyt sikkerhedshul på Google Plus, der derfor lukker tidligere end planlagt.

1h

Women having a heart attack wait longer than men to get help

Women are being urged to call an ambulance immediately if they have heart attack symptoms, following research showing they wait longer than men to get help. The study is published today in European Heart Journal: Acute Cardiovascular Care, a publication of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC).

1h

Forskere advarer mod AI-baserede videoer: Kan misbruges til påvirkning af valg

Teknikker baseret på kunstig intelligens til at forfalske videoer med er på fremmarch, og det kan blandt andet eksempelvis misbruges til cyber-propaganda, advarer forskere.

1h

Online game trains players how to sort waste correctly

A simple online game can teach people to more accurately sort waste–with lasting results, a new UBC study has found. Study participants who played the game developed by UBC researchers received immediate feedback on their sorting choices. The second time they played–when feedback was no longer provided–players still improved their average accuracy from 69 per cent to 84 per cent. Even when a we

2h

Tenacious and flexible goal pursuit gets older people on the move

Tenacious goal pursuit and flexible goal adjustment have been shown to help maintain psychological well-being despite age related challenges and losses. A recent study demonstrates that tenacity and flexibility are beneficial for out-of-home mobility as well.

2h

Immune cells sacrifice themselves to protect us from invading bacteria

Our immune systems are working overtime this time of year. Knowing that a bunch of dedicated immune cells are willing to explode themselves to inform other cells about the danger may offer a bit of consolation.

2h

East Antarctica's glaciers are stirring

Nasa detects the first signs of significant melting in a swathe of previously quiet ice streams.

3h

Vind med Ingeniørens julekalender: 11. december

Vær med i Ingeniørens julekalender 2018. Hver dag med nye præmier!

3h

4h

Russians Prepare for Spacewalk, Aiming to Solve a Space Station Mystery

The two men will spend six hours examining and repairing a tiny hole that roiled space relations between the United States and Russia.

4h

Leaked Audio Reveals Google’s Efforts to Woo Conservatives

“We've recognized that the company is generally seen as liberal by policymakers,” a government-relations executive told Google employees in February.

5h

Trump Prepares to Unveil a Vast Reworking of Clean Water Protections

The proposed new rule would chip away at wetlands safeguards put in place during the administration of President George H.W. Bush.

6h

Elon Musk Abuses Tesla Autopilot on *60 Minutes*Elon Musk Tesla SEC

By ignoring his company's instructions, Musk risked making the public even more confused about how to safely use the semi-autonomous system.

6h

END OF FEED

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BioNyt Videnskabens Verden (www.bionyt.dk) er Danmarks ældste populærvidenskabelige tidsskrift for naturvidenskab. Det er det eneste blad af sin art i Danmark, som er helliget international forskning inden for livsvidenskaberne.

Bladet bringer aktuelle, spændende forskningsnyheder inden for biologi, medicin og andre naturvidenskabelige områder som f.eks. klimaændringer, nanoteknologi, partikelfysik, astronomi, seksualitet, biologiske våben, ecstasy, evolutionsbiologi, kloning, fedme, søvnforskning, muligheden for liv på mars, influenzaepidemier, livets opståen osv.

Artiklerne roses for at gøre vanskeligt stof forståeligt, uden at den videnskabelige holdbarhed tabes.

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