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Nyheder2018december13

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Trump Moves to Deport Vietnam War Refugees

The Trump administration is resuming its efforts to deport certain protected Vietnamese immigrants who have lived in the United States for decades—many of them having fled the country during the Vietnam War. This is the latest move in the president’s long record of prioritizing harsh immigration and asylum restrictions, and one that’s sure to raise eyebrows—the White House had hesitantly backed o

2h

Even these Terrible Maps can teach us something

Since 2016, Terrible Maps has been collecting, well… terrible maps. They're awful, pointless and stupid, but also funny (and sometimes even instructive). Here are 10 examples. Dive into the Twitter account for hundreds more. What a strange map. How can I store it and collect more? That's how the Strange Maps blog got started back in 2006. Replace 'strange' with 'terrible', and you've got the idea

4h

The epoch of planet formation, times twenty

Astronomers have cataloged nearly 4,000 exoplanets in orbit around distant stars. Though the discovery of these newfound worlds has taught us much, there is still a great deal we do not know about the birth of planets and the precise cosmic recipes that spawn the wide array of planetary bodies we have already uncovered, including so-called hot Jupiters, massive rocky worlds, icy dwarf planets, and

1h

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Parker Solar Probe: Sun-skimming mission starts calling home

Having become the closest-ever human-made object to our star, the Parker spacecraft returns returns its first data

1h

Chinese robots are on a mission to beat NASA to the far side of the moon

Space It could be the first of many firsts. Chang’e 4 is part of an extensive and ambitious effort by China to explore the moon like only NASA has before.

1h

Fentanyl Surpasses Heroin As Drug Most Often Involved In Deadly Overdoses

When fentanyl, a synthetic opioid 50 to 100 times more powerful than morphine, infiltrated the drug supply in the U.S. it had an immediate, dramatic effect on the overdose rate. (Image credit: Towfiqu Photography/Getty Images)

55min

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Probiotics could help millions of patients suffering from bipolar disorder

About 3 million people in the US are diagnosed every year with bipolar disorder, a psychiatric condition characterized by dramatic shifts in mood from depression to mania. Currently, the standard treatment includes a combination of psychotherapy and prescription medications such as mood stabilizers and antipsychotics.

12h

Scientists crack the CRISPR code for precise human genome editing

Scientists at the Francis Crick Institute have discovered a set of simple rules that determine the precision of CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing in human cells. These rules, published in Molecular Cell, could help to improve the efficiency and safety of genome editing in both the lab and the clinic.

2h

Smart dress groped 157 times in under 4 hours

Schweppes commissioned research into how often women are touched by strangers A sensor-equipped dress designed by Ogilvy captured the party experience of three women The experiment confirms for men what women have known all along None Women around the world have long reported that men, strangers included, touch them all the time without permission, much less an invitation. Even when asked not to.

2h

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Chemical biologists unearth cause of a rare brain disorder

Babies born with pontocerebellar hypoplasia type Ib often do not survive past one year. Born with an underdeveloped brain, infants struggle to move, feed and even breathe.

5min

Look Up! Gleaming Geminid Meteor Shower of 2018 Peaks Tonight

The celestial display is expected to be the best meteor shower of 2018 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6min

N.I.H. to Scrutinize Private Donations to Scientific Research Projects

After halting a controversial alcohol study, officials will enforce new policies to ensure that private support does not compromise scientific integrity.

11min

Hubble finds far-away planet vanishing at record speed

The speed and distance at which planets orbit their respective blazing stars can determine each planet's fate—whether the planet remains a longstanding part of its solar system or evaporates into the universe's dark graveyard more quickly.

11min

Data use draining your battery? Tiny device to speed up memory while also saving power

The more objects we make "smart," from watches to entire buildings, the greater the need for these devices to store and retrieve massive amounts of data quickly without consuming too much power.

17min

Riveting Stories About Restless Wanderers

Chris Power’s debut might almost convince you that the 10,000-hour rule applies to mastery of that exacting art form, the short story. Since 2007, he’s been writing a regular column for The Guardian about expert practitioners of the genre, from Chekhov to George Saunders. Now the London-based writer has dared to publish a collection himself. Forgive the cliché, but you won’t be able to put it dow

17min

The Bigger Failure Exposed by Jazmine Headley’s Arrest

Earlier this week, a day-care center in New York City informed a 23-year-old mother, Jazmine Headley, that there was a problem with her account. For whatever reason, the city had stopped paying the fee for her son. To sort things out, she went to a municipal office with her 1-year-old in tow, hoping to somehow get her child-care benefits restored. “After sitting for some time on the floor, she go

17min

UA chemical biologists unearth cause of a rare brain disorder

In pontocerebellar hypoplasia type 1b, two key biological structures are blocked from binding to one another — which ultimately stunts critical brain growth.

18min

Hubble finds far-away planet vanishing at record speed

In their quest to learn more about faraway planets, astronomers discovered that a medium-sized planet roughly the size of Neptune is evaporating at a rate 100 times faster than a previously discovered planet of similar size.

18min

Watching brain cells fire

Brain scientists have plenty of ways to track the activity of individual neurons in the brain, but they're all invasive. Now, Stanford researchers have found a way to literally watch neurons fire — no electrodes or chemical modifications required.

18min

No. 2 gas-producing state moves to curb air pollution

Pennsylvania is aiming to curb air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions from its vast natural gas exploration fields, with the Democratic governor's administration proposing new regulations Thursday even as the Trump administration moves to relax federal requirements.

23min

Death near the shoreline, not life on land

Our understanding of when the very first animals started living on land is helped by identifying trace fossils—the tracks and trails left by ancient animals—in sedimentary rocks that were deposited on the continents.

23min

Neuroscientists uncover sensory switches controlling infanticide and parental behavior

Many species of mammals have evolved what appear to be paradoxical behaviours towards their young. Like humans, most exhibit nurturing, protective behaviours, and in some circumstances even act as surrogate parents. However, virgin males often engage in infanticide as a strategy to propagate their own genes. How are these conflicting social behaviours controlled?

23min

Tangled magnetic fields power cosmic particle accelerators

Magnetic field lines tangled like spaghetti in a bowl might be behind the most powerful particle accelerators in the universe. That's the result of a new computational study by researchers from the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, which simulated particle emissions from distant active galaxies.

23min

Your phone could work at extreme temps with new plastic

Researchers have created a new kind of plastic material that could help electronics function in extreme heat. The new plastic material could reliably conduct electricity in up to 220 degrees Celsius (428 F), according to a paper in Science . “Commercial electronics operate between minus 40 and 85 degrees Celsius. Beyond this range, they’re going to malfunction,” says Jianguo Mei, an assistant pro

33min

Nations 'face extinction' without instant climate action

Dozens of nations threatened with catastrophe from unchecked climate change warned Thursday they "face extinction" without immediate action to rein in mankind's emissions, as UN climate talks limped towards their conclusion.

35min

Ford accused of 'treachery' in France over factory closure

French Finance Minister Bruno Le Maire accused Ford of "treachery" and "cowardice" on Thursday in a furious reaction to the US automaker's decision to shutter a factory near Bordeaux and snub a potential buyer.

35min

Do You Carry Neanderthal DNA? The Shape of Your Skull May Tell.

The shape of your brain may say a lot about the Neanderthal in you.

35min

Invasive Tick Is 'Here to Stay,' and Here's Where It Could Spread Next

An invasive tick species, new to the U.S., has already popped up in nine states, and a new study suggests that the species could spread much further.

35min

Democrats Challenge Trump Over Vietnam Deportations

Opposition is building against a Trump administration plan to allow certain groups of protected Vietnamese immigrants to be deported, a day after The Atlantic reported that the U.S. is reinterpreting an agreement with Vietnam that shielded some of them from being moved out of the country. In the latest sign of growing worry over the efforts, a group of at least 22 members of Congress have signed

37min

Neuroscientists uncover sensory switches controlling infanticide and parental behavior

Many species of mammals have evolved what appear to be paradoxical behaviors towards their young. Like humans, most exhibit nurturing, protective behaviors, and in some circumstances even act as surrogate parents. However, virgin males often engage in infanticide as a strategy to propagate their own genes. How are these conflicting social behaviors controlled?

39min

Johns Hopkins researchers find the cause of and cure for brain injury associated with gut condition

Using a mouse model of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) researchers at Johns Hopkins say they have uncovered the molecular causes of the condition and its associated brain injury.

39min

Life expectancy for blacks in US driven down by guns

Young black Americans are two times more likely to die from firearms than whites, according to a new study published in BMJ Evidence-Base Medicine. Columbia University professors contributed to the study, which is among the first to evaluate firearm injury deaths based on life expectancy and quantify the magnitude of years lost among black and white Americans.

39min

Tangled magnetic fields power cosmic particle accelerators

Magnetic field lines tangled like spaghetti in a bowl might be behind the most powerful particle accelerators in the universe. That's the result of a new computational study by researchers from the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, which simulated particle emissions from distant active galaxies.

39min

New drug seeks receptors in sarcoma cells, attacks tumors in animal trials

A new compound that targets a receptor within sarcoma cancer cells shrank tumors and hampered their ability to spread in mice and pigs, a study from researchers at the University of Illinois reports.The researchers conducted a multi-year, cross-disciplinary study that went from screening potential drug candidates to identifying and synthesizing one compound, to packaging it into nanoparticles for

39min

Death near the shoreline, not life on land

Our understanding of when the very first animals started living on land is helped by identifying trace fossils–the tracks and trails left by ancient animals–in sedimentary rocks that were deposited on the continents.

39min

The 'greying' of T cells

Research in mouse cells identifies defective metabolic pathway in aging immune T cells. The pathway is critical for switching T cells from dormancy into illness-fighting mode.In experiments, researchers restored lagging T-cell function by adding small-molecule compounds. Findings suggest possible mechanism behind weakened immunity common in the elderly.

39min

Exercise at night won’t mess up your sleep

Exercising at night doesn’t have a negative effect on sleep quality, according to a new study. Researchers combed through the literature on the subject and analyzed all 23 studies that met their quality requirements. They conclude that exercising in the four hours before going to bed does not have a negative effect on sleep. “If doing sport in the evening has any effect on sleep quality at all, i

40min

Record number of Mexican gray wolves found dead in 2018

Wildlife managers have confirmed a record number of Mexican gray wolves have been reported dead this year, fueling concerns about the decades-long effort to return the endangered predator to the southwestern U.S.

41min

Virgin Galactic tourism rocket ship reaches space in testVirgin Galactic NASA

Virgin Galactic's tourism spaceship climbed more than 50 miles high above California's Mojave Desert on Thursday, reaching for the first time what the company considers the boundary of space.

41min

Scientists scour WWI shipwreck to solve military mystery

A hundred years ago, a mysterious explosion hit the only major U.S. warship to sink during World War I. Now the Navy believes it has the answer to what doomed the USS San Diego: An underwater mine set by a German submarine cruising in waters just miles from New York City.

41min

GPM observes heavy rainfall in intensifying Tropical Cyclone Owen

As expected, tropical cyclone Owen recently intensified as it moved over the Gulf of Carpentaria and NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's GPM core satellite found very heavy rainfall occurring within the revived storm. The storm has made a U-turn in the Gulf and is now headed back to Queensland.

41min

This map shows where the invasive Asian longhorned tick could spread in the U.S.

Health Find out if it's coming to a neighborhood near you. It’s never a good sign when an entomologist says a new species of invasive tick “will be difficult to impossible to eradicate.”…

44min

Video: Should Santa wear a flame-retardant suit?

Saint Nick faces a host of hazards during the holiday season, from the calories in cookies to the dying embers in your fireplace.

47min

Why Pop Culture Can’t Quit Beauty Pageants

Midway through the 1999 movie Drop Dead Gorgeous —still one of the most caustic satires of beauty pageants and their scarily dedicated contestants—the mockumentary’s camera crew goes to visit the reigning Mount Rose American Teen Princess, Mary Johanson (Alexandra Holden). The interview takes place in the eating-disorders wing of a hospital; Mary suffers from such severe anorexia that her hair is

50min

Heart Rate Variability (HRV): What It Is and How to Improve It

Researchers at Harvard University have gone as far as to say that measuring your Heart Rate Variability is “a visual insight into the most primitive part of your brain” — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

51min

NASA's GPM observes heavy rainfall in intensifying Tropical Cyclone Owen

As expected, tropical cyclone Owen recently intensified as it moved over the Gulf of Carpentaria and NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's GPM core satellite found very heavy rainfall occurring within the revived storm. The storm has made a U-turn in the Gulf and is now headed back to Queensland.

1h

Impairment rating of injured workers depends on the when and where of assessment

A comparison of a group of injured workers assessed using the two most recent editions of the AMA guides revealed that usage of the sixth edition resulted in significantly lower impairment ratings than the fifth edition. The study shows impairment rating will depend on the version of the AMA guides used for assessment.

1h

First line immunotherapy combination fails to improve overall survival in lung cancer

First line immunotherapy with durvalumab or the combination of durvalumab and tremelimumab does not improve overall survival in unselected patients with lung cancer, according to late breaking results from the MYSTIC trial presented at the ESMO Immuno-Oncology Congress.

1h

Monitoring the environment with artificial intelligence

Microorganisms perform key functions in ecosystems and their diversity reflects the health of their environment. Researchers from UNIGE use genomic tools to sequence the DNA of microorganisms in samples, and then exploit this considerable amount of data with artificial intelligence. They build predictive models capable of establishing a diagnosis of the health of ecosystems and identify species th

1h

Indlandsisen er dødsdømt: Her er politikernes løsninger

Selv hvis vi begrænser vores CO2-udledning nu, mister vi stadig indlandsisen i Grønland, konkluderer ny rapport.

1h

Scientists maximize the effectiveness of platinum in fuel cells

In the journal Science, Argonne chemists have identified a new catalyst that maximizes the effectiveness of platinum.

1h

Research team discovers oldest known plant virus at ancient settlement

Researchers studying ancient corncobs found at a Native American archeological site have recovered a 1,000-year-old virus, the oldest plant virus ever reported.

1h

Fastest-Ever Cell Contractions Observed in Primitive Invertebrate

The microscopic marine animal Trichoplax adhaerens may use rapid changes in cell shape to avoid being ripped apart by forces in the ocean.

1h

Can a Green New Deal boost the US economy and save the planet?

Politicians like the newly-elected Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez are now taking climate change seriously, but even an ambitious plan to remake the economy may not be enough

1h

Marine mammal experts gather to identify solutions to save threatened dolphins and porpoises

Thirty-seven experts from 14 countries are gathering at the Cistercian Monastery in Heilsbronn—Nuremberg from December 14 to 18 to discuss conservation options for coastal and riverine species of dolphins that are experiencing significant population declines and could be facing extinction in the foreseeable future. The group of scientists, conservationists, veterinarians and managers will be discu

1h

1h

Monitoring the environment with artificial intelligence

Microorganisms perform key functions in ecosystems, and their diversity reflects the health of their environment. However, they are still largely under-exploited in current biomonitoring programs because they are difficult to identify. Researchers from the University of Geneva (UNIGE), Switzerland, have recently developed an approach combining two cutting edge technologies to fill this gap. They u

1h

What Happens When You’re Convinced You Have Bad Genes

The first thing you should know is that the DNA-test results everyone got in this study were fake. That was on purpose. Over the course of a year, psychologists at Stanford recruited 223 participants for a study that would help scientists create personalized nutrition and exercise programs—or so they were told. What the two researchers, Bradley Turnwald and Alia Crum , most wanted to investigate

1h

Janet Jackson’s Overdue Inclusion in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame

The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame is probably as discussed for who’s not in it as for who is. Not long ago, the absence of Rush , of Kiss , of Bon Jovi, of Nina Simone was among the biggest reasons people talked about the the institution at all, spurring conversations about what “rock” means and who decides. And every time a long-ignored touchstone finally gets let in, the conversation moves on to t

1h

IPCC to take greater account of carbon storage by agroforestry systems

Researchers from CIRAD and the FAO establish coefficients for carbon storage in the soil and aboveground and belowground biomass of different agroforestry systems. The new data will be taken into account in the improved 2006 IPCC National GHG Inventory Guidelines. This work is published in the journal Environmental Research Letters.

1h

New study: Average outpatient visit in US approaching $500

The average outpatient visit in the United States costs nearly $500, according to a new scientific study. In addition, the average inpatient stay had a price tag in 2016 of more than $22,000. Both of these dollar amounts underscore a common understanding in the health profession: The US exceeds every other nation in total health care costs.

1h

Should Santa wear a flame-retardant suit? (video)

Saint Nick faces a host of hazards during the holiday season, from the calories in cookies to the dying embers in your fireplace. A flame-retardant suit could save Santa from a seriously un-jolly circumstance. But many believe these molecules belong on the naughty list due to the potential risks they pose to human health. In this video, Reactions explains the chemistry of flame retardants and asks

1h

Study shows massage helps ease arthritis pain, improve mobility

Patients with arthritis in their knees experienced significant improvement in pain and mobility after undergoing a weekly, whole-body massage for two months, according to a study led by researchers at Duke Health.

1h

How teens deal with stress may affect their blood pressure, immune system

Most teens get stressed out by their families from time to time, but whether they bottle those emotions up or put a positive spin on things may affect certain processes in the body, including blood pressure and how immune cells respond to bacterial invaders, according to Penn State researchers.

1h

'Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse' Reveals the Hero's Future

After umpteen versions of Peter Parker, the new animated feature gives fans the multidimensional hero they deserve.

1h

Virgin Galactic claims its first successful flight to edge of space

Richard Branson's space tourism firm says it has finally made a flight to the edge of space – though the craft did not reach the currently accepted definition of 100 kilometres up

1h

Why blockchain b2b will be the megatrend of 2019

2019 will be known as the enterprise-to-enterprise boom in blockchain. B2B blockchain companies will out-perform the market because they provide the tools that other businesses need in order to survive. Blockchain is expected to become a $2-billion-dollar industry in the next three years. None The potential of blockchain might have been ruined for you by your unemployed cousin who wears Balenciag

1h

Swarming behavior discovered in fish-dwelling parasite

Researchers have observed a previously unrecognized behavior in a single-celled parasite called Spironucleus vortens, which infects ornamental fish such as angelfish: The protozoans swarm.

1h

Amyloid pathology transmission in lab mice and historic medical treatments

A study has confirmed that some vials of a hormone used in discontinued medical treatments contained seeds of a protein implicated in Alzheimer's disease, and are able to seed amyloid pathology in mice.

1h

New discovery improves use of optical tweezers

This year's Nobel Prize in Physics, awarded for discoveries in laser physics, recognizes optical tweezers. Now researchers have developed a method that greatly simplifies and improves the use of optical tweezers.

1h

Letters: ‘The Issue Goes Beyond CRISPR’

The CRISPR Baby Scandal Gets Worse by the Day The young Chinese researcher He Jiankui came under fire recently after the news broke that he had allegedly made the first CRISPR- edited babies, and that another early pregnancy is underway. Last week, Ed Yong outlined the 15 most damning details about the experiment and the circumstances surrounding it. Thank you for this article and for keeping the

1h

Magic number colloidal clusters

Complexity in nature, whether in chlorophyll or in living organisms, often results from self-assembly and is considered particularly robust. Compact clusters of elemental particles can be shown to be of practical relevance, and are found in atomic nuclei, nano particles or viruses. Researchers at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) have decoded the structure and the process beh

1h

The immune system's supercell — how it matures

NK cells, or natural killer cells, play an important role in the body's defences against cancer and various infections. Now, in a joint project, researchers at Lund University in Sweden, the University of Oxford and Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm have mapped how the different steps of the maturation process of these supercells from blood producing stem cells in the bone marrow are regulated: k

1h

Argonne scientists maximize the effectiveness of platinum in fuel cells

In new research from the U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory and published in Science, scientists have identified a new catalyst that uses only about a quarter as much platinum as current technology by maximizing the effectiveness of the available platinum.

1h

Study shows prevention, treatment of ICU acquired delirium requires personalized approach

The results of first study to evaluate use of the antipsychotic drug haloperidol to reduce post-operative delirium in elderly patients undergoing elective non-cardiac thoracic surgery indicate the need for a personalized approach to delirium in the ICU.

1h

The splendid generative potential of the Sierpinski triangle

One transistor, just a pair of inductors and capacitors. Such a simple electronic circuit can become an oscillator with a surprising richness of behavior. However, even more interesting effects become visible if the structure of connections is fractal and shows some… imperfections. Could similar rules explain the diversity and complexity of the human brain dynamics?

1h

Renault board maintains Ghosn as CEO, says pay was legal

The board of the French automaker Renault said Thursday that it was keeping Carlos Ghosn as its chief executive, after an internal review of his pay package found that it had conformed with French law.

1h

Bees wearing backpacks could replace some drones

Engineers have created a sensing system small enough to ride aboard a bumble bee. The system’s tiny rechargeable battery lasts for seven hours of flight and recharges while the bees are in their hive at night. The system could one day replace drones to soar over huge farm fields and monitor temperature, humidity, or crop health. Drones need so much power to fly they can’t get very far without nee

1h

2 år mere med sprøjtegift-rester i drikkevand på sjællandsk vandværk

Vurderingen af stoffets giftighed er baseret på ‘yderst sparsom’ evidens, erkender Miljøstyrelsen.

1h

New study investigates treatments for prurigo nodularis

A team from the GW School of Medicine and Health Sciences found emerging treatments, such as neurokinin-1 receptor antagonists, were the most promising against prurigo nodularis.

1h

New discovery improves use of optical tweezers

This year's Nobel Prize in Physics, awarded for discoveries in laser physics, recognizes optical tweezers. Now researchers from the University of Gothenburg have developed a method that greatly simplifies and improves the use of optical tweezers.

1h

Physical activity in the evening does not cause sleep problems

Contrary to popular belief, there is no reason to avoid exercising in the evening, an analysis of the scientific literature has revealed.

1h

Researchers identify widespread brain alterations in children with callousness

Children with elevated levels of callous traits–such as a lack of remorse and disregard for other people's feelings–show widespread differences in brain structure compared with children with lower levels of the traits, according to a new study published in Biological Psychiatry.

1h

Research team discovers oldest known plant virus at ancient settlement

Researchers studying ancient corncobs found at a Native American archeological site have recovered a 1,000-year-old virus, the oldest plant virus ever reported.

1h

Slicing optical beams: Cryptographic algorithms for quantum networks

The mathematical models can be used not only for quantum networks and authentication but also for full-scale quantum computing. Quantum hashing can help protect quantum algorithms against mistakes. Relevant research is currently in progress at Kazan Federal University.

1h

Amyloid pathology transmission in lab mice and historic medical treatments

A UCL-led study has confirmed that some vials of a hormone used in discontinued medical treatments contained seeds of a protein implicated in Alzheimer's disease, and are able to seed amyloid pathology in mice.

1h

Drug targets for Ebola, Dengue, and Zika viruses found in lab study

No drugs are currently available to treat Ebola, Dengue, or Zika viruses, which infect millions of people every year and result in severe illness, birth defects, and even death. Scientists from the Gladstone Institutes and UC San Francisco may finally change that. They identified key ways the three viruses hijack the body's cells, and they found at least one potential drug that can disrupt this pr

1h

New genetic clues to early-onset form of dementia

In an effort to better understand frontotemporal dementia, an international team of researchers, led by Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, has found that a lone mutation in a single gene that causes an inherited form of the disorder makes it harder for neurons in the brain to communicate with one another, leading to neurodegeneration.

1h

Ebola-fighting protein discovered in human cells

Researchers have discovered a human protein that helps fight the Ebola virus and could one day lead to an effective therapy against the deadly disease, according to a new Northwestern Medicine study. The newly discovered ability of the human protein RBBP6 to interfere with Ebola virus replication suggests new ways to fight the infection.'What we envision is a small molecule drug that mimics this h

1h

Study confirms role of brain's support cells in Huntington's, points to new therapies

New research gives scientists a clearer picture of what is happening in the brains of people with Huntington's disease and lays out a potential path for treatment. The study, which appears today in the journal Cell Stem Cell, shows that support cells in the brain are key contributors to the disease.

1h

Using EHR-linked medication reminders for glaucoma patients

Mobile device reminders have been associated with better medication adherence and linking reminders to patient electronic health records (EHRs) could potentially allow some oversight by clinicians. In this study, 100 patients (average age 65) agreed to set up electronic health record-linked reminders delivered via text or voice message for glaucoma medications for three months and were surveyed ab

1h

Scientists crack the CRISPR code for precise human genome editing

Scientists at the Francis Crick Institute have discovered a set of surprisingly simple rules that determine the precision of CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing in human cells. These rules could help to improve the efficiency and safety of genome editing in both the lab and the clinic.

1h

Researchers discover new interactions between Ebola virus and human proteins

Several new connections have been discovered between the proteins of the Ebola virus and human host cells, a finding that provides insight on ways to prevent the deadly Ebola virus from reproducing and could lead to novel ways to fight these lethal viral infections, according to a study led by Georgia State University, the University of California, San Francisco, and the Gladstone Institutes.

1h

Novel mechanisms of dengue and Zika virus infections and link to microcephaly

New insights into how dengue and Zika viruses cause disease reveal strategies the viruses use to successfully infect their host and a link to microcephaly.

1h

Tumor cells conquer territory from their neighbors using a newly discovered mechanism

How do tumoral cells replace healthy cells to promote tumor progression? Scientists from the Institut Pasteur (Paris, France) and from the Champalimaud Centre for the Unknown (Lisbon, Portugal) identified a mechanism that responds to cell deformation and can be exploited by tumoral cells to squeeze out and kill their neighbors. This mechanism may promote the early expansion of tumors.

1h

Neandertal genes shed light on unique aspects of the modern human brain

A characteristic feature of modern humans is the unusually round skull and brain, in contrast to the elongated shape seen in other human species. By studying Neandertal DNA fragments found in the genomes of living Europeans, scientists have now discovered genes that influence this globular shape. An interdisciplinary research team, led by the Max Planck Institutes for Psycholinguistics and Evoluti

1h

Neandertal genes give clues to human brain evolution

A distinctive feature of modern humans is our round (globular) skulls and brains. On Dec. 13, in the journal Current Biology, researchers report that present-day humans who carry particular Neandertal DNA fragments have heads that are slightly less rounded, revealing genetic clues to the evolution of modern brain shape and function.

1h

Exercise-related hormone irisin found to target key bone cells

Scientists have discovered that irisin, a hormone released by muscles during exercise, directly acts on key regulatory cells that control the breakdown and formation of bone. The researchers say this insight raises the prospect of new treatments for bone-thinning disorders like osteoporosis.

1h

Exercise-induced hormone irisin triggers bone remodeling in mice

Exercise has been touted to build bone mass, but exactly how it actually accomplishes this is a matter of debate. Now, researchers show that an exercise-induced hormone activates cells that are critical for bone remodeling in mice. A study appearing in Cell on identifies a receptor for irisin, an exercise hormone, and shows that irisin impacts sclerostin in mice, a major cellular regulator of bone

1h

How the brain tells you to scratch that itch

It's a maddening cycle that has affected us all: it starts with an itch that triggers scratching, but scratching only makes the itchiness worse. Now, researchers have revealed the brain mechanism driving this uncontrollable itch-scratching feedback loop. In a study publishing Dec. 13 in the journal Neuron, the researchers showed that the activity of a small subset of neurons, located in a deep bra

1h

Biologists turn eavesdropping viruses into bacterial assassins

Molecular biologist Bonnie Bassler and graduate student Justin Silpe found a bacteria-killing virus that can listen in on bacterial conversations — and then they made it attack diseases including salmonella, E. coli and cholera.

1h

A new algorithm improves flight safety and reduce delays

The Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M) has taken part in the European research project TBO-Met, which has developed an algorithm that maximises the predictability of flights and reduces the risk of running into potentially dangerous storms. Thanks to this, safety can be improved, air traffic can be increased and delays can be reduced.

1h

Neurosurgery could spread protein linked to Alzheimer's, study finds

Doctors should decontaminate tools more thoroughly as a precaution, say researchers Surgical instruments used in brain operations should be treated to ensure they are not contaminated with proteins linked to Alzheimer’s disease, according to scientists who found evidence that they may be spread by certain medical procedures. The researchers urged doctors to decontaminate neurosurgical tools more

2h

Childhood hormone treatments may have spread Alzheimer’s proteins

Last century, tens of thousands of children were given growth hormone from dead bodies. Evidence is building that this may have raised their risk of Alzheimer’s disease

2h

Improved faunal status at the soft bottom in Skagerrak

Reductions of nutrients have led to a greater species richness at the seafloor in the Skagerrak after 1990. But warmer winter temperatures and increased river runoff might be the new challenges for the animal life at the soft bottom.

2h

Matter: Narrower Skulls, Oblong Brains: How Neanderthal DNA Still Shapes Us

Two genes inherited from our evolutionary cousins may affect skull shape and brain size even today. What that means for human behavior is a mystery.

2h

Some people have slightly squashed heads thanks to Neanderthal DNA

Many people carry Neanderthal DNA that can affect brain cell growth and the insulation around neurons – and that may have a small impact on brain performance

2h

We’ve been using CRISPR for years – now we know how it really works

We can now predict what changes the CRISPR gene editing technique will make to targeted DNA – a finding that will make the tool more powerful than ever before

2h

Neandertal genes shed light on unique aspects of the modern human brain

A characteristic feature of modern humans is the unusually round skull and brain, in contrast to the elongated shape seen in other human species. By studying Neandertal DNA fragments found in the genomes of living Europeans, scientists have now discovered genes that influence this globular shape. An interdisciplinary research team, led by the Max Planck Institutes for Psycholinguistics and Evoluti

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Biologists turn eavesdropping viruses into bacterial assassins

Princeton molecular biologist Bonnie Bassler and graduate student Justin Silpe have identified a virus, VP882, that can listen in on bacterial conversations—and then, in a twist like something out of a spy novel, they found a way to use that to make it attack bacterial diseases like E. coli and cholera.

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Tumor cells conquer territory from their neighbors using a newly discovered mechanism

Despite decades of cancer research, the early phases of tumour progression that connect the appearance of few abnormal cells to the formation of a clinically detectable tumour mass remains poorly understood. It was previously proposed that certain mutations could give a competitive advantage to a subset of cells that would enable them to kill and replace their neighbours, thereby initiating a canc

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Five new species of sea slugs found in the ocean depths

When you think of sea slugs, you might envision dark, slimy relatives of the slugs you see in your garden. But one group of sea slugs, the nudibranchs (pronounced "nood-i-branks"), are gaudy, fascinating creatures. They come in a wide array of bright colors and psychedelic patterns. Many have gills that stick up from their backs like clumps of water balloons, shag carpets, or Mohawk hair-dos.

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Ebola-fighting protein discovered in human cells

Researchers have discovered a human protein that helps fight the Ebola virus and could one day lead to an effective therapy against the deadly disease, according to a new Northwestern Medicine study.

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The Viruses That Eavesdrop on Their Hosts

When bacteria talk, Bonnie Bassler listens. She just never figured that viruses were listening, too. Since the 1990s, the Princeton University biologist has been studying a phenomenon called quorum sensing , in which bacteria release molecules that indicate how many of their peers are around. Through these messages, they can coordinate their behavior, and launch certain actions—such as infectious

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Here’s a rare way that an Alzheimer’s protein can spread

Amyloid-beta found in vials of growth hormone can move from brain to brain, a mouse study shows.

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Ionosphere plasma experiments reviewed in a new Kazan University publication

There are only a few so-called 'heaters' in the world — special facilities which create artificial plasma processes in the upper atmosphere by heating them.

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Puzzle solving in school-level mathematics studied in cross-regional project

The research has proven that pupils who engage in puzzle solving consistently show higher aptitude in IQ tests. As a s result, a number of recommendations appeared considering the inclusion of puzzles into various types of teaching activities. They can potentially boost logical and abstract thinking, combinatorial and spatial skills, and mathematical memory.

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Book publications still going strong in humanities and social sciences

As it appeared, not many countries maintain statistics of such ratios in their scholarly publications. Norway, in particular, is a pioneer in creating a comprehensive database of such type. 336,681 peer-reviewed publications were covered in total. For the five statistical sets, the number of monographs varied from 2 percent in Flanders to 10.6 percent for Poland, while book chapters went from 20.5

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Mobile device by UCLA makes the detection of parasitic infections faster and more sensitive

Researchers at the UCLA Henry Samueli School of Engineering have developed an inexpensive and portable platform that can rapidly detect motile parasites in bodily fluids automatically. Using their platform, more than 3 mL of a bodily fluid sample can be imaged and analyzed within 20 min, providing a throughput that is orders of magnitude better than traditional optical microscopy-based examination

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Recent advances and challenges of the drugs acting on monoamine transporters

The human monoamine transporters (hMATs) primary including hSERT, hNET and hDAT are important targets for the treatment of depression and other behavioral disorders with more than the availability of 30 approved drugs.This paper is to review the recent progress in the binding mode and inhibitory mechanism of hMATs inhibitors with the central or allosteric binding sites, for the benefit of future h

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Moun­tain birds de­clin­ing in Europe

Population data for European mountain birds have been for the first time combined in a recent study, with worrying results: the abundances of mountain-specialist birds has declined by as much as 10% in the 2000s.

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Want to help fight climate change? Try going 'flexitarian.'

Results from recent research suggest we have roughly 12 years to keep global warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius. If we can't, then the amount of greenhouse gases released to the atmosphere will have compounding feedback loops that progressively warm the planet up further. One of the biggest culprits in warming the planet is the production of beef and sheep meat. Anybody could help prevent climate cha

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How to find the person who can help you get ahead at work | Carla Harris

The workplace is often presented as a meritocracy, where you can succeed by putting your head down and working hard. Wall Street veteran Carla Harris learned early in her career that this a myth. The key to actually getting ahead? Get a sponsor: a person who will speak on your behalf in the top-level, closed-door meetings you're not invited to (yet). Learn how to identify and develop a productive

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Researchers shine new light on disease-spreading mosquitoes

When the West Nile virus (WNV) was initially isolated in two patients at a Queens, N.Y., hospital in the summer of 1999, it would have been hard to anticipate how quickly one common species of house mosquito, Culex pipiens, would help begin to spread the virus throughout the western hemisphere.

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Ongoing spill in Mexico is flooding Tijuana River with millions of gallons of raw sewage

The equivalent of more than 6 million gallons a day of raw sewage has been spilling into the Tijuana River since Monday night, according to federal officials.

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The suburbs are the spiritual home of overconsumption. But they also hold the key to a better future

Suburban affluence is the defining image of the good life under capitalism, commonly held up as a model to which all humanity should aspire.

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Swarming behavior discovered in fish-dwelling parasite

Johns Hopkins researchers have observed a previously unrecognized behavior in a single-celled parasite called Spironucleus vortens, which infects ornamental fish such as angelfish: The protozoans swarm.

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New Studies Rescue Gravitational-Wave Signal From the Noise

After the historic announcement in February 2016 hailing the discovery of gravitational waves , it didn’t take long for skeptics to emerge. The detection of these feeble undulations in the fabric of space and time by the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) was said to have opened a new ear on the cosmos. But the following year, a group of physicists at the Niels Bohr Instit

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Regular trips out guard against depression in old age

Regular visits to the cinema, theatre or to museums could dramatically reduce the chances of becoming depressed in older age a new study has found. Researchers at University College London found a clear link between the frequency of 'cultural engagement' and the chances of someone over 50 developing depression. It is the first such study to show that cultural activities not only help people manage

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Septin proteins act as cellular police to identify, imprison and kill 'superbug' Shigella

Using state-of-the art technologies to image human cells and study infection at the level of a single bacterial cell, the research team, led by the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, has uncovered the strongest evidence yet that septins take Shigella prisoner.

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Virgin Galactic launches SpaceShipTwo to the edge of space

Spacecraft launched on Thursday in test mission became first commercial US flight beyond the atmosphere since 2011 A Virgin Galactic rocket plane blasted to the edge of space on Thursday, capping off years of difficult testing to become the first US commercial human flight to reach space since America’s shuttle program ended in 2011. The test flight foreshadows a civilian space race that could ki

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Robot makes world-first baby coral delivery to Great Barrier Reef

Ecology and technology have combined to give nature a helping hand, using a robot to deliver heat-tolerant coral larvae directly onto Australia's Great Barrier Reef in the first small-scale pilot of a new technique to help restore and recover coral reefs.

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New early warning system could protect vulnerable islands from flooding

A recently developed early warning system can forecast floods on coral-lined coasts worldwide and could help save residents of low-lying island nations from unprecedented disaster, according to researchers.

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After a 1.2 billion-mile journey, a reward: There is water on the asteroid Bennu

Nineteen years ago, scientists discovered an asteroid oscillating between the orbits of Earth and Mars. In 2013, they mapped it, creating a model of what they thought it looked like. And on Monday, that model come to life.

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New techniques better determine how ancient viral DNA influences human genes

New laboratory techniques can identify which of our genes are influenced by DNA snippets that are left behind in our genetic code by viruses, a new study finds.

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Droplets of primordial soup are cooked up by scientists

Scientists create droplets of quark gluon plasma. The droplets assume exactly the shapes researchers predicted. Far too hot to touch, but a fascinating glimpse at morsels of primordial soup. For a few microseconds after the Big Bang, the universe was too hot a place for atoms' constituent particles to hold together. Instead, it's believed that the first stuff that existed during those fleeting mo

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Nature is a rich source of medicine – if we can protect it

The Pacific yew tree is a fairly small and slow growing conifer native to the Pacific Northwest. The Gila monster is a lizard with striking orange and black markings from the drylands of the Southwestern US and Mexico. Two very different organisms, but with a fascinating connection.

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Voters shrug as energized House Democrats vow action on climate

Polls show climate change still lags health care, jobs, immigration and the federal budget deficit among voters' priorities.

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How to make STEM more inclusive of black women

There are concrete ways to promote black women in their efforts to study and work in STEM fields, a new study argues. The National Science Foundation reports that women of color constitute fewer than 1 in 10 employed scientists and engineers. And the women of color who are in STEM aren’t necessarily seeing their identities reflected and incorporated in STEM fields. “Imagine walking into a lab or

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Yes, protests really can sway elections

Protests really do have an effect on election results, according to a new study based on 30 years of data. The study finds that spikes in both liberal and conservative protest activity can increase or decrease a candidate’s vote by enough to change the final outcome. “Many people are skeptical that protests matter to electoral outcomes, but our paper finds that they have a profound effect on vote

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Where did the hot Neptunes go? A shrinking planet holds the answer

'Where did the hot Neptunes go?' This is the question astronomers have been asking for a long time, faced with the mysterious absence of planets the size of Neptune. Researchers have just discovered that one of these planets is losing its atmosphere at a frantic pace. This observation strengthens the theory that hot Neptunes have lost much of their atmosphere and turned into smaller planets called

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Scientists identify 66 alien species that pose greatest threat to European biodiversity

Scientists have identified 66 alien plant and animal species, not yet established in the European Union, that pose the greatest potential threat to biodiversity and ecosystems in the region. The research lists the invasive species that are likely to arrive and spread in the region over the next decade.

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An energy-efficient way to stay warm: Sew high-tech heating patches to your clothes

What if, instead of turning up the thermostat, you could warm up with high-tech, flexible patches sewn into your clothes — while significantly reducing your electric bill and carbon footprint? Engineers have found a cost-effective way to make thin, durable heating patches by using intense pulses of light to fuse tiny silver wires with polyester. Their heating performance is nearly 70 percent high

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Scientists create most accurate tool yet developed to predict asthma in young children

Scientists have created and tested a decision tool that appears to be the most accurate, non-invasive method yet developed to predict asthma in young children.

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NASA's Webb Telescope will provide census of fledgling stars in stellar nursery

The dazzling glow of young stars dominates images of the giant stellar nursery NGC 346, in the neighboring dwarf galaxy called the Small Magellanic Cloud. But this photogenic beauty is more than just a "pretty face."

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Preparing for discovery with NASA's Parker Solar Probe

Weeks after Parker Solar Probe made the closest-ever approach to a star, the science data from the first solar encounter is just making its way into the hands of the mission's scientists. It's a moment many in the field have been anticipating for years, thinking about what they'll do with such never-before-seen data, which has the potential to shed new light on the physics of our star, the Sun.

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The parable of universal health cover for people on the move

Research published in The Lancet on December 5 revealed that harmful and unfounded myths about migration and health have become accepted and that these are used to justify policies of exclusion.

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More than air: Researchers fine-tune wind farm simulation

A collaborative research team based in Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences is working to better understand the effect wind farms have locally and globally by examining the performance of predictive models currently being used to forecast their effect.

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When heat ceases to be a mystery, spintronics becomes more real

The development of spintronics depends on materials that guarantee control over the flow of magnetically polarized currents. However, it is hard to talk about control when the details of heat transport through the interfaces between materials are unknown. This "thermal" gap in our material knowledge has just been filled thanks to the Polish-German team of physicists, who for the first time describ

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Gold recycling

'Urban mining', the recycling of precious metals from electronic gadgets, becomes ever more important, although processes that are both efficient and environmentally benign are still scarce. An international team of scientists has now looked deeper into gold dissolution, in particular, how organic thiol-containing compounds help dissolve elemental gold. Their study published in the journal Angewan

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For a longer battery life: Pushing lithium ion batteries to the next performance level

Conventional lithium ion batteries have reached performance limits. Freddy Kleitz from the University of Vienna and international colleagues have developed a new nanostructured anode material for lithium ion batteries, which extends the capacity and cycle life of the batteries. Based on a mesoporous mixed metal oxide in combination with graphene, the material could provide a new approach how to ma

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Organic food worse for the climate

Organically farmed food has a bigger climate impact than conventionally farmed food, due to the greater areas of land required. This is the finding of a new international study involving Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, published in the journal Nature.

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Swarming behavior discovered in fish-dwelling parasite

Johns Hopkins researchers have observed a previously unrecognized behavior in a single-celled parasite called Spironucleus vortens, which infects ornamental fish such as angelfish: The protozoans swarm.

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Cancer patients face higher risk for shingles, new vaccines hold promise for prevention

People newly diagnosed with cancer, particularly blood cancers, and those treated with chemotherapy have a greater risk of developing shingles, according to a new study in The Journal of Infectious Diseases. The findings may help guide efforts to prevent the often painful skin condition in cancer patients through the use of new vaccines.

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Where did the hot Neptunes go? A shrinking planet holds the answer

'Where did the hot Neptunes go?' This is the question astronomers have been asking for a long time, faced with the mysterious absence of planets the size of Neptune. A team of researchers led by UNIGE has just discovered that one of these planets is losing its atmosphere at a frantic pace. This observation strengthens the theory that hot Neptunes have lost much of their atmosphere and turned into

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Potential range for new invasive tick covers much of eastern US

Since the arrival of the Asian longhorned tick (Haemaphysalis longicornis) in North America was first reported in New Jersey in early 2018, it has been found in eight other states in the US And, by the looks of a new study comparing North American habitat with the invasive tick's native territory, it shouldn't be a surprise if it shows up in many more.

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NJIT researchers shine new light on disease-spreading mosquitoes

Physicists are now exploring laser-based technology traditionally used for studying conditions in the atmosphere — such as Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) — to shine a light on the subtlest of features of mosquito activity and better track populations that may carry a viral threat.

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Increasing the effectivity of condensation through electrowetting

Researchers of the department of Physics of Complex Fluids of the University of Twente's MESA+ institute have succeeded in increasing the effectivity of condensation through gravity-driven electrowetting. "We have been able to increase condensation by 50 percent, with room for further increase," the researchers say. Higher efficiency can be in particular interesting for heat transfer and fog harve

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What winter solstice rituals tell us about indigenous people

On the day of winter solstice, many Native American communities will hold religious ceremonies or community events.

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How poor management of Nigerian forests led to exploitation by criminals

Nigeria's forests cover about 96,043 square km– that's about 10% of the country's landmass. But the presence of authorities in these sanctuaries is either non-existent or, at best, sporadic. This has led to forest areas being poorly managed, which in turn has led to them being exploited by criminals and posing a security threat.

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Ingestible capsule can be controlled wirelessly

Researchers have designed an ingestible capsule that can be controlled using Bluetooth wireless technology. Their capsule, which can be customized to deliver drugs, sense environmental conditions, or a combination of those functions, can reside in the stomach for at least a month, transmitting information and responding to instructions from a user's smartphone.

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New discovery improves use of optical tweezers

This year's Nobel Prize in Physics, awarded for discoveries in laser physics, recognizes optical tweezers. Now researchers from the University of Gothenburg have developed a method that greatly simplifies and improves the use of optical tweezers.

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Stretched quantum magnetism uncovered by quantum simulation

By studying ultracold atoms trapped in artificial crystals of light, Guillaume Salomon, a postdoc at the Max-Planck-Institute of Quantum Optics and a team of scientists have been able to directly observe a fundamental effect of one-dimensional quantum systems. By detecting the atoms one-by-one, the team observed a stretching of the magnetic ordering when diluting the atoms in the lattice. The stud

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Researchers lay foundation for smart contrast medium

Molecular imaging techniques are playing an increasingly important role in medical diagnostics and developing new treatment methods. An interdisciplinary team of researchers from the fields of chemistry, material sciences, biomedicine, quantum physics and toxicology has managed to develop the foundations for a novel contrast medium for MRI in the framework of the FET Open EU excellence programme.

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How to save endangered freshwater pearl mussel?

The multilateral and complex relationships of freshwater pearl mussel (FPM), salmonids and other co-infectants can influence potentially in the conservation of FPM. The human impacts – habitats degradation, loss of host fish, siltation, pollution, and overexploitation affect a considerable decline of this species.

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The secret to the best seasonal hot chocolate? It's all in the chemistry!

Hot chocolate can trace its roots to the bygone days of the Mayan civilisation and Aztec empire. The drink was originally made from the fermented nibs of the 'food of the gods' – the cocoa or cacao plant—and consumed during sacrificial rituals.

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Study calls for stricter regulation of elusive rabbit breeding industry

Rabbits are one of the most popular pets in the UK and yet little is known about where these very cute and appealing animals come from. Now a new study by researchers at the Universities of Nottingham and Winchester has shed light on this elusive industry, calling for more to be done to regulate and improve the breeding of rabbits as pets.

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The secret life of cloud droplets

Do water droplets cluster inside clouds? Researchers confirm two decades of theory with an airborne imaging instrument.

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VR more engaging than video and textbooks when it comes to the classroom

Virtual reality (VR) is the most engaging and emotionally positive learning method in comparison to textbook learning and video. VR shows great potential to supplement or replace traditional learning methods and create new experiences according to researchers at the University of Warwick.

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Astronaut Nick Hague ready for second space flight attempt

Astronaut Nick Hague is ready for his next space flight attempt, after the first mission was aborted.

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An astronaut returns to Earth

ESA astronaut Alexander Gerst will return to Earth alongside NASA astronaut Serena Auñón-Chancellor and Russian cosmonaut Sergei Prokopiev on 20 December. After more than six months living and working on the International Space Station, their Soyuz is expected to touch down in Kazakhstan at around 05:06 GMT (06:06 CET).

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The key to our humanity isn't genetic, it's microbial

What if the key to perfecting the human species were actually … yogurt?

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Emission targets: If there's a (political) will, there's a way

It seems like a day doesn't pass without the release of yet another study that shows human actions will inevitably increase the Earth's average temperature past a tipping point that will lead to runaway climate change.

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Mobile device makes the detection of parasitic infections faster and more sensitive using artificial intelligence

Parasitic infections affect hundreds of millions of people, posing a serious public health threat worldwide. For example, sleeping sickness and Chagas disease are neglected tropical diseases that are caused by the bloodborne Trypanosoma parasite. Historically given little attention, these devastating diseases affect people mainly in sub-Saharan Africa and South America, causing enormous socioecono

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Your gout, your fault?

Is gout a consequence of lifestyle choices? Or is it mainly genetics?

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Septin proteins act as cellular police to identify, imprison and kill 'superbug' Shigella

A protein family found naturally in our cells could help stop the spread of dangerous drug resistant infections by using 'detective' like powers to collect evidence of bacterial infection and imprison it, according to new research published in the journal Cell Host & Microbe.

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Tale of two trees: New web tool estimates gene trees with ease

Scientists introduce ORTHOSCOPE, a new web-based tool capable of inferring gene function, estimating gene trees and identifying sets of ancestral genes in just minutes.

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Deportation: Noncitizens fare better in counties that are 20-40 percent Hispanic

An exhaustive new analysis of deportation practices across the country reveals a 'protective effect' for noncitizens living in communities that are 20 percent to 40 percent Hispanic.

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UMN researchers give new insight to muscular dystrophy patients

New research by University of Minnesota scientists has revealed the three dimensional structure of the DUX4 protein, which is responsible for the disease, facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD). Unlike the majority of genetic diseases, FSHD is not caused by a protein that is missing or not functioning properly. Rather it is caused when a functioning, normal, protein shows up in a place wher

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Explore 200 years of climate change in Denmark, Greenland, and the Faeroes

Record breaking heat waves, severe hurricanes, forest fires, and floods. The weather made the headlines right across the world in 2018.

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Record-wet and record-dry months increased in regions worldwide

More rainfall extremes are observed in regions around the globe, setting both wet and dry records, a new study shows. Yet there are big differences between regions: The central and Eastern U.S., northern Europe and northern Asia have experienced heavy rainfall events that have led to severe floods in the recent past. In contrast, most African regions have seen an increased frequency of months with

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Scientists discover new, frightening-looking creature in Florida, of course

It's as long as a snake, is spotted like a leopard, has two small arms with gills sticking out of its body and it lives in the swamps of Florida's panhandle. What is it?

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Invention promises airport security screening without queues

A research team led by The Australian National University (ANU) has invented a device that could be developed into ultra-sensitive cameras for security screening which would not require people to queue at airports.

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Time travel is possible – but only if you have an object with infinite mass

The concept of time travel has always captured the imagination of physicists and laypersons alike. But is it really possible? Of course it is. We're doing it right now, aren't we? We are all traveling into the future one second at a time.

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Startup Founders Think Real Progress on Diversity Is Years Away

Most startup founders think it’ll take more than a decade for the tech workforce to look like America; more than one-third think it will take more than two decades.

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NASA's InSight Mars Lander Snaps Selfie, Surveys Workspace

The Red-Planet-probing spacecraft is on course to deploy its instruments in early 2019 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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How big data has created a big crisis in science

There's an increasing concern among scholars that, in many areas of science, famous published results tend to be impossible to reproduce.

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Specific genes protect cress plants from heavy metals

The Polish Olkusz region, which is home to one of the largest lead-zinc ore deposits in the world and a correspondingly large number of mines, holds a sad record: it is home to some of the most contaminated soils in Europe. The average concentrations of cadmium, zinc and lead can be five to ten times higher than the maximum permissible value in Switzerland. Plants grow poorly here because the toxi

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Efter kritik og it-problemer: 15 kommuner får EU-millioner til gratis wifi-hotspots

Fremover kan du hoppe på et gratis wifi-netværk i 15 danske kommuner, der har fået EU-støtte til at etablere gratis offentlige wifi-hotspots. Midlerne uddeles ikke uden både kritik og forsinkelse.

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New transport mechanism of a nanomaterial through a cell membrane: membrane stretching

Increasing awareness of bioeffects and toxicity of nanomaterials interacting with cells puts in focus the mechanisms by which nanomaterials can cross lipid membranes. Apart from well-discussed energy-dependent endocytosis for large objects and passive diffusion through membranes by solute molecules, there are other transport mechanisms based on physical principles. A team of theoretical physics at

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Warmer winters mean more rain on the Svalbard archipelago

It's often said that the Arctic is one of the places most vulnerable to climate change. Temperatures are climbing faster there than anywhere else on the planet. Increasing winter temperatures mean increasing amounts of rain instead of snow, and scientists are still working to understand exactly what this means on the ground.

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Microscopes offer peek at mosquito virus on the move

Researchers have developed a way to see how a virus moves within a mosquito’s body, which could lead to the prevention of mosquitoes transmitting diseases. “Previously, the common understanding was that when a mosquito has picked up a virus, it first needs some time to build up inside the midgut, or stomach, before infecting other tissues in the mosquito,” says Alexander Franz, an assistant profe

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The long dry: Why the world's water supply is shrinking

A global study has found a paradox: our water supplies are shrinking at the same time as climate change is generating more intense rain. And the culprit is the drying of soils, say researchers, pointing to a world where drought-like conditions will become the new normal, especially in regions that are already dry.

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Maria's far-reaching effects on Puerto Rico's watersheds and forests

Scientists spent the past year evaluating the impacts of Hurricane Maria, a powerful category 5 storm that struck Puerto Rico head-on in September 2017.

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Increased motor activity linked to improved mood

Increasing one's level of physical activity may be an effective way to boost one's mood, according to a new study.

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Indian ocean may be more disruptive to tropical climate than previously believed

The Indian Ocean played a far greater role in driving climate change during the last ice age than previously believed and may disrupt climate again in the future.

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The Joy of No-Gift Christmas

This year, Heather Hund and her family will gather in West Texas on December 25 and solidify a new Christmas tradition, in which each relative is randomly assigned to give a gift to another family member and to a house pet. “The rules are basically a regift for the human and then $10 for the pet,” Hund told me. “And my 18-month-old son got put in [the latter] category too, so it’s small humans an

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How chickens became the ultimate symbol of the Anthropocene

We are living on the planet of the chickens. The broiler (meat) chicken now outweighs all wild birds put together by three to one. It is the most numerous vertebrate (not just bird) species on land, with 23 billion alive at any one time. Across the world, chicken is the most commonly eaten meat. This has made it a vivid symbol of the Anthropocene – the proposed new geological epoch that marks the

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Two Workers Die at American Research Base in Antarctica

Officials said two fire technicians died in an accident at a generator building near McMurdo Station, the main United States base on the continent.

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Enhanced osteogenic activity of pre-osteoblasts on surface-modified 3-D printed scaffolds

Materials such as poly(ε-caprolactone) are used as scaffolds in bone tissue engineering, but their inherent hydrophobicity and surface smoothness can impair cell attachment, proliferation and differentiation in the lab, or after implantation in vivo. Surface modifications including chemical alterations or the immobilization of biologically active molecules on materials can overcome the intrinsic h

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Humpback whales linger in Sitka Sound

The Allen Marine tour boat pushed off the dock at the Sitka Crescent Harbor on a clear crisp October afternoon with University of Alaska Southeast researchers, alumni and supporters of the university in search of humpback whales. It didn't take long to find them.

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How to disguise your personal web-surfing at work

DIY Take a break but keep your job. When you read your favorite site at work, you don't necessarily want your boss to find out about it. Here's how to sneakily browse the web.

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Bizarre fossil that baffled us for years is early starfish ancestor

Extinct animals called stylophorans have caused confusion for decades, but fossils with preserved soft tissue reveal that they were relatives of starfish

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Trump and His Supporters Thrive on Cruelty

The binding agent between Donald Trump and his backers is the president’s consistent demonstration of cruelty, argues writer Adam Serwer in the latest Atlantic Argument . From the president’s mockery of the disabled New York Times reporter Serge Kovaleski, to his denigration of Christine Blasey Ford, to his villainizing of undocumented immigrants, it has become clear that Trump galvanizes his bas

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Lung lavage as new test method improves tuberculosis diagnosis in rhinoceros

Scientists performed repeated lung lavage as a new approach for tuberculosis diagnosis in rhinoceros. Subsequent genetic tests reliably identified mycobacteria in the animals' respiratory fluids — with minimal stress and risk for the rhinos.

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Governments, researchers underestimate impact of inefficient land-use on climate change

Policymakers and researchers have underestimated the effect that changes in land management and people's diets would have on limiting greenhouse gas emissions and countering the effects of climate change, according to a new study.

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First sensor package that can ride aboard bees

Farmers can already use drones to soar over huge fields and monitor temperature, humidity or crop health. But these machines need so much power to fly that they can't get very far without needing a charge. Now, engineers have created a sensing system that is small enough to ride aboard a bumblebee.

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Flows that help bacteria feed and organize biofilms

Figuring out how bacteria bring in nutrients could point to ways of killing them without poison. More generally, this research could also reveal how small organisms cooperate by generating networks of flow patterns.

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Climate data now available on Amazon

A new climate dataset representing historic and future conditions in Alaska, the Yukon and Northwest Territories is now available on Amazon's Public Dataset Program.

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Living on Mars: Team to lead simulation facility mission

The air may be breathable and the location is on planet Earth, but for two weeks a multidisciplinary team of Purdue students and alumni will eat, sleep, work and live like they're on Mars.

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New findings on concussion in football's youngest players

New research from Seattle Children's Research Institute and UW Medicine's Sports Health and Safety Institute found concussion rates among football players ages 5-14 were higher than previously reported, with five out of every 100 youth, or 5 percent, sustaining a football-related concussion each season.

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Fifty years of decline in Queensland's coastal sharks

Queensland's coastal shark numbers are continuing a 50-year decline, in sharp contradiction of suggestions of 'exploding' shark populations, according to an analysis of Queensland Shark Control Program data.University of Queensland and Griffith University researchers analyzed data from the program, which has used baited drumlines and nets since 1962 to minimize human-shark interactions, and now sp

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New techniques better determine how ancient viral DNA influences human genes

New laboratory techniques can identify which of our genes are influenced by DNA snippets that are left behind in our genetic code by viruses.

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Researchers identify pathway that drives sustained pain following injury

Research in mice identifies a set of neurons responsible for sustained pain and resulting pain-coping behaviorsFindings point to the existence of separate neural pathways that regulate threat avoidance versus injury mitigationStudy can inform new ways to gauge the efficacy of candidate pain therapies by assessing behaviors stemming from different pathways

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Novel X-ray imaging technique provides nanoscale insights into behavior of biological molecules

Berkeley Lab researchers, in collaboration with scientists from SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and the Max Planck Institute, have demonstrated that fluctuation X-ray scattering is capable of capturing the behavior of biological systems in unprecedented detail.

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Scientists explore the potential for a truly decentralised energy system

Writing in the journal Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Heriot-Watt University scientists have published one of the first unbiased, major comprehensive reviews of blockchain technology.

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New book describes ways for researchers to make their images more informative and appealing

Felice Frankel has spent more than 25 years helping scientists and engineers create engaging and informative photographs and images depicting their work. Her images have appeared on the covers of many of the world's leading scientific journals, and she has described some of the processes and methods involved in several books, as well as in classes and workshops at MIT and around the country, and a

4h

Researchers capture 'key' to deadly malaria infection

An international team led by Institute researchers has visualised the unique molecular 'key' used by the world's deadliest malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, to enter and infect human blood cells.

4h

Fifty years of decline in Queensland's coastal sharks

Queensland's coastal shark numbers are continuing a 50-year decline, in sharp contradiction of suggestions of 'exploding' shark populations, according to an analysis of Queensland Shark Control Program data.

4h

Four NASA-sponsored experiments set to launch on Virgin Galactic spacecraft

A winged spacecraft will soon take off with four NASA-supported technology experiments onboard. Virgin Galactic's SpaceShipTwo will separate from the WhiteKnightTwo twin-fuselage carrier aircraft and continue its rocket-powered test flight.

4h

A Designer Seed Company Is Building a Farming Panopticon

Indigo Ag, known for its microbe-coated seeds, is acquiring geospatial data startup TellusLabs to use satellites to learn every last thing about its farmers’ fields.

4h

Postmates' Quest to Build the Delivery Robot of the Future

The company has spent the past two years stealthily learning how to design and build its own delivery robots, coming soon to a city near you.

4h

Aston Martin's $3M Valkyrie Hypercar Gets a V12 Engine

The forthcoming hypercar will draw more than 1,000 horsepower from the naturally aspirated engine, made with help from Formula 1 engineers.

4h

Meet the Safecracker of Last Resort

T he house was gone, consumed by the November 2018 Woolsey Fire that left swaths of Los Angeles covered in ash and reduced whole neighborhoods to charcoaled ruins. Amidst the tangle of blackened debris that was once a house in the suburbs northwest of Los Angeles, only one identifiable feature stood intact. It was a high-security jewel safe, its metal case discolored by the recent flames, looming

4h

Operation mechanism of ferroelectric HfO2-based transistor and memory has been elucidated

Ferroelectric HfO2-based transistor and memory are expected to realize ultralow power electronics; however, their operation mechanism and scalability were not clarified yet.?Physical mechanism of low voltage operation of a transistor with ferroelectric-HfO2 gate insulator has been experimentally clarified. Scalability of ferroelectric memory with HfO2 tunnel-layer down to 20nm diameter has been th

4h

The long dry: why the world's water supply is shrinking

A global study has found a paradox: our water supplies are shrinking at the same time as climate change is generating more intense rain. And the culprit is the drying of soils, say researchers, pointing to a world where drought-like conditions will become the new normal, especially in regions that are already dry.

4h

Selective dissolution of elemental gold from multi-metal sources in organic solutions

"Urban mining", the recycling of precious metals from electronic gadgets, becomes ever more important, although processes that are both efficient and environmentally benign are still scarce. An international team of scientists has now looked deeper into gold dissolution, in particular, how organic thiol-containing compounds help dissolve elemental gold. Their study published in the journal Angewan

4h

How the Brain's Face Code Might Unlock the Mysteries of Perception

Doris Tsao mastered facial recognition in the brain. Now she’s looking to determine the neural code for everything we see — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

Ny metode gør bambus lige så stærkt som stål

Nu håber forskerne bag metoden at vække interesse også i Skandinavien.

4h

Midtjylland rydder bordet – båret af et højt bundniveau

Regionshospitalet Silkeborg er klart bedst blandt de mindste hospitaler, mens Regionshospitalet Viborg presser sig ind foran Vejle Sygehus som bedst blandt de mellemstore hospitaler i Dagens Medicins ranking af Danmarks Bedste Hospitaler.

4h

Demographics of deportation: Noncitizens fare better in communities that are 20-40 percent Hispanic

An exhaustive new analysis of deportation practices across the country reveals a "protective effect" for noncitizens living in communities that are 20 percent to 40 percent Hispanic.

4h

Comet Will Make Closest Approach to Earth This Weekend. And You Can See It Without a Telescope.

As comets blaze across the night sky, they can bring wonder and excitement to those watching from Earth – or even a sense of impending doom.

4h

Hurricane flooding affects Lumbee River Basin

As the global population has exploded over the last century, nitrogen has become one of the most common water contaminants in the world.

4h

People with gay and lesbian acquaintances tend to support same-sex marriage

Friendship bonds that may seem superficial at first glance could be just deep enough to produce attitude changes that help spark social transformations, according to a Penn State sociologist.

4h

Black teens deal with stop-and-frisk on way to school

Black Caribbean students in London and New York City say they’ve either witnessed or been subject to stop-and-frisk procedures on trips to and from school, according to a new small study. Stop-and-frisk search and school safety are both subjects of frequent public debate, but the fact that students face these searchers on their way to school hasn’t gotten much attention, researchers say. “Young p

4h

New High School Neuroscience Curriculum

Image: Shutterstock A neuroscience curriculum for high school students has found a home on The Franklin Institute’s new website dedicated to the brain. Educators looking to generate excitement about brain science with an eye towards the field’s societal implications can now access the expertly reviewed—and free—resource. The curriculum, developed jointly by the University of Pennsylvania’s Center

4h

US Navy's Secrecy Likely Stalled Ocean Science Progress for Decades

When the U.S. Navy classified vital seafloor data during World War II and after, it delayed the development of a key theory.

4h

The 'gilets jaunes' movement is not a Facebook revolution

In less than a month, France's gilets jaunes (yellow vests) have gone from being a celebrated example of Facebook's ability to power a spontaneous revolution to a cautionary tale of how social networks can be manipulated by outsiders to provoke outrage and sow dissension. But in both of these extreme scenarios, the central actors lie outside France, whether it's the platforms based in Silicon Vall

4h

Study confirms rise in megaesophagus cases in dogs was linked to pet food

A new report has found that the increase in megaesophagus cases in Australia in 2017 and 2018 can be linked to Advance Dermocare pet food.

4h

Video game players frequently exposed to graphic content may see world differently

Disturbing imagery disrupts perception, but not as much among violent video game players, UNSW Sydney psychologists have shown.

4h

Hospitalsenhed Midt har fundet ny hospitalsdirektør

Thomas Balle Kristensen stopper som hospitalsdirektør på Præhospitalet i Region Midtjylland for i stedet at blive hospitalsdirektør på Hospitalsenheden Midt.

4h

Hospitalsansat kan have smittet 440 patienter med tuberkulose

440 patienter indkaldes til tjek for tuberkulose på Aalborg Universitetshospital. Patienterne kan være smittet af en af hospitalets egne ansatte.

4h

We can't know the future cost of climate change. Let's focus on the cost of avoiding it instead

As delegates at the UN climate summit in Katowice, Poland, discuss the possibility of restraining global warming to 1.5℃, it might sound like a reasonable question to ask how much money it will cost if they fail.

4h

Stop-and-frisk on the way to school

Stop-and-frisk search and school safety are both subjects of frequent public debate, but there's a place these two issues meet that hasn't gotten much attention: On the journeys of city students to and from school.

4h

Blow flies helped exonerate a woman of murder 17 years after the fact

Science Or rather, a lack thereof. In December 2009, Hans Sherrer, editor and publisher of Justice Denied, a magazine dedicated to the wrongfully convicted, contacted me regarding Lobato’s case. He said…

5h

We have a Christmas comet: How to spot interplanetary comet 46P/Wirtanen

We're in for a pre-Christmas treat this weekend, as the cosmos entertains us with two equally exciting gifts: the Geminid meteor shower and the interplanetary comet 46P/Wirtanen.

5h

Whale experts call for rethink of global shipping routes to stop marine giants becoming 'roadkill'

In a new report, researchers from Macquarie University are calling for a rethink of global shipping routes, to protect whales and sharks from becoming marine 'roadkill'.

5h

Apple deepens Austin ties, expands operations east and westApple Austin US Texas

Apple will build a $1 billion campus in Austin, Texas, break ground on smaller locations in Seattle, San Diego and Culver City, California, and over the next three years will expand in Pittsburgh, New York and Colorado.

5h

How to best predict chemical reactions of contaminants in water

Turning on the faucet and not getting clean water, or any water at all, is a global issue. Cleaning wastewater could help make more water available. In delving into the nuances of wastewater purification, scientists often use computational chemistry approaches. Which is best? Researchers examined five options using 110 reactions associated with a highly reactive sulfate radical breaking apart a co

5h

The next great leap forward? Combining robots with the Internet of Things

The Internet of Things is a popular vision of objects with internet connections sending information back and forth to make our lives easier and more comfortable. It's emerging in our homes, through everything from voice-controlled speakers to smart temperature sensors. To improve our fitness, smart watches and Fitbits are telling online apps how much we're moving around. And across entire cities,

5h

Networking goes quantum

A scientist involved in expanding quantum communication to a network of users, is continuing his work at the University of Bristol.

5h

Two-micron fill tubes fill two needs

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's National Ignition Facility (NIF) and General Atomics engineers have created an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) fuel capsule with a two-micron-diameter fill tube—and along the way, found a solution to a "Bay Bridge"-like dilemma that could have dramatically slowed the process of fabricating NIF capsules.

5h

Gift Ideas for the Neat Freak: Coasters, Desk Organizers, Slippers

From coasters and slippers to elegant lifestyle accoutrements, this collection of beautiful objects will keep their home looking perfect.

5h

How Zoos Protect Animals When Natural Disasters Strike

With hurricanes and wildfires becoming more frequent and intense, zoos are facing the staggering task of protecting animals while the world runs amok.

5h

What Donald Trump and Dick Cheney Got Wrong About America

I. A Dangerous Idea C an America still lead the world? Should it? If so, how? These fundamental questions have lurked in the background for years. Donald Trump brought them front and center. The knee-jerk response of national-security professionals to such questions is to offer a history lesson on the benefits of the “liberal international order” that America built after 1945. I once used that ph

5h

A Math Function Describes How Whole Societies Remember–and Forget

A Neruda masterpiece—and a bi-exponential curve—define the dynamics of the fast then slow fade of our greatest collective sorrows and joys — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

Image of the Day: Blood and Guts

Researchers find that stem cells in the human intestine may provide up to 10 percent of circulating blood cells.

5h

The long dry: global water supplies are shrinking

A global study has found a paradox: our water supplies are shrinking at the same time as climate change is generating more intense rain. And the culprit is the drying of soils, say researchers, pointing to a world where drought-like conditions will become the new normal, especially in regions that are already dry.

5h

It's in the genes – there may be hope for pikas hit by climate change, researchers find

As the climate changes, animals that can only survive in certain temperature ranges are being forced to relocate or perish. Pikas – small, arguably adorable mountain mammals that look like a cross between a rabbit and a gerbil – are the poster child of climate indicator species due to their severe sensitivity to heat.

5h

Beyond social networks: How cultural beliefs really spread

When Amir Goldberg had his first child a decade ago, he was bewildered to learn that some of his colleagues at Princeton University, where he was a doctoral student, weren't planning to vaccinate their offspring.

5h

Image: Space chips etched in silicon

Multiple integrated circuits destined to serve as the brains of Europe's future space missions are etched together onto single pieces of silicon.

5h

Study reveals striking decline of Vermont's bumble bees

A new study examining 100 years of bumble bee records reveals that almost half of Vermont's species, which are vital pollinators, have either vanished or are in serious decline.

5h

Pushing lithium ion batteries to the next performance level

Conventional lithium ion batteries, such as those widely used in smartphones and notebooks, have reached performance limits. Materials chemist Freddy Kleitz from the Faculty of Chemistry of the University of Vienna and international scientists have developed a new nanostructured anode material for lithium ion batteries, which extends the capacity and cycle life of the batteries. Based on a mesopor

5h

Lemvig-læger og Region Midtjylland indgår ferie-aftale

Region Midtjylland har givet lægerne i Lemvig-området lovning på, at de kan holde den ferie, de ønsker næste år. Den langsigtede lægedækningsudfordring i området består dog fortsat.

5h

Biologists shed new light on the diversity of natural selection

For nearly 100 years, biologists have argued about how exactly natural selection can possibly work. If nature selects the individuals with the best genes, then why aren't all organisms the same? What maintains the genetic variation that natural selection acts upon, the genetic variation that has ultimately led to the spectacular diversity of life on Earth today? Recent findings made at Uppsala Uni

5h

Scientists develop a cellulose biosensor material for advanced tissue engineering

I.M. Sechenov of First Moscow State Medical University teamed up with Irish colleagues to develop a new imaging approach for tissue engineering. The team produced hybrid biosensor scaffold materials based on cellulose matrices labeled with pH- and calcium-sensitive fluorescent proteins. These materials enable visualization of the metabolism and other important biomarkers in engineered artificial t

5h

Scientists study genes misidentified as 'non-protein coding'

The human genome contains regions that "code" for proteins, which means they have instructions to make protein molecules with specific functions in the body. But Yale researchers have discovered several protein-coding genes that were misidentified as non-protein-coding, and one in particular that plays a key role in the immune system.

5h

The world's first culturally sensitive robots for elderly care

Researchers have developed revolutionary new robots that adapt to the culture and customs of the elderly people they assist.

5h

New climate model to be built from the ground up

Facing the certainty of a changing climate coupled with the uncertainty that remains in predictions of how it will change, scientists and engineers from across the country are teaming up to build a new type of climate model that is designed to provide more precise and actionable predictions.

5h

Microscopic devices that control vibrations could allow smaller mobile devices

To make modern communications possible, today's mobile devices make use of components that use acoustic waves (vibrations) to filter or delay signals. However, current solutions have limited functionalities that prevent further miniaturization of the mobile devices and constrain the available communication bandwidth.

5h

Scientists automate electrolyte composition analysis for aluminium production

A team from Siberian Federal University (SFU) has suggested a new method for automatic composition analysis of electrolyte samples from electrolysis baths. It will provide for more accurate technological control and increase the efficiency of aluminium production. The article has been published in Crystals.

5h

Mini-detectors for the gigantic? Bose-Einstein condensates are currently not able to detect gravitational waves

The gravitational waves created by black holes or neutron stars in the depths of space have been found to reach Earth. Their effects, however, are so small that they can only be observed using kilometer-long measurement facilities. Physicists are therefore discussing whether ultracold and miniscule Bose-Einstein condensates with their ordered quantum properties could also detect these waves. Prof.

5h

Development of world's first vertical gallium oxide transistor through ion implantation doping

Researchers at the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT) and Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology (TUAT) demonstrate a vertical Ga2O3 metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) that adopts an all-ion-implanted process for both n-type and p-type doping, paving the way for new generations of low-cost and highly manufacturable Ga2O3 power ele

5h

Pollen dispersal in traditional processing of buckwheat

Interpreting the source and significance of crop pollen in archaeological sites has always been a key issue in environmental and agricultural archaeology. The research team of Dr. Shang Xue from the Department of Archaeology and Anthropology of the University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, recently conducted a simulation study on the dispersal pattern of pollen in the traditional processing of bu

5h

Light-induced modification of a carboxylic acid with an aminocyclopropenone

Researchers at Kanazawa University report in the Journal of Organic Chemistry that carboxylic acids, functional groups contained in biomolecules, drugs and materials, can be readily modified by light-induced organic reactions using an aminocyclopropenone. This discovery opens up new pathways for carboxylic acid modification with potential applications including determination of drug target protein

5h

Efterforskning afsluttet: Ingen spor efter kinesiske spion-chips

Kinesiske spionchips skulle angiveligt være installereret i hardware hos Apple og Amazon. Nu viser en undersøgelse det modsatte.

5h

Nasa's Jupiter mission Juno reveals giant polar storms

Stunning images from Nasa's Jupiter "JunoCam" show huge, "endless storms" at the planet's poles.

5h

High-efficiency discovery drives low-power computing

Challenge any modern human to go a day without a phone or computer, and you'd be hard pressed to get any takers. Our collective obsession with all things electronic is driving a dramatic daily drain on the world's power. In fact, according to studies from the Semiconductor Research Corporation, if we continue on pace with our current ever-increasing energy consumption, by the year 2035, we will us

6h

Scientists create most accurate tool yet developed to predict asthma in young children

Scientists at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center have created and tested a decision tool that appears to be the most accurate, non-invasive method yet developed to predict asthma in young children.

6h

Climate change is happening, but how fast? This is what we really know

From past temperature change to future sea level rise, climate science is full of conflicting numbers. Here’s our guide to the ones you can and can’t trust

6h

50 years ago, armadillos hinted that DNA wasn’t destiny

Nine-banded armadillos have identical quadruplets. But the youngsters aren’t identical enough, and scientists 50 years ago could not figure out why.

6h

The Liberal Arts May Not Survive the 21st Century

F or many years, Wisconsin had one of the finest public-university systems in the country. It was built on an idea: that the university’s influence should not end at the campus’s borders, that professors—and the students they taught—should “ search for truth ” to help state legislators write laws, aid the community with technical skills, and generally improve the quality of life across the state.

6h

How Facebook Made a Universal Open Source Language for the Web

GraphQL is a widely used tool allowing applications written in different programming languages to talk to one another.

6h

Social Media Is Terrible For Mental Health. But It Could Also Help

The internet holds potential solutions to pernicious mental health issues. Harnessing that potential is proving complicated.

6h

The Rise of Knowledge Economics

What is knowledge? How does it disseminate? And what’s its value? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

High-efficiency discovery drives low-power computing

Challenge any modern human to go a day without a phone or computer, and you'd be hard pressed to get any takers. Our collective obsession with all things electronic is driving a dramatic daily drain on the world's power. In fact, according to studies from the Semiconductor Research Corporation, if we continue on pace with our current ever-increasing energy consumption, by the year 2035, we will us

6h

Geus ønsker sig millioner til at screene grundvandet – Aarhus-forskere er allerede i gang

Hvis grundvandet skal tjekkes for alle relevante pesticider og nedbrydningsprodukter, er der to bejlere til opgaven: Aarhus Universitet, der allerede er i gang – og Geus, der ønsker millioner til instrument, udvikling og drift.

6h

Photos from Japan space rovers show rocky asteroid surface

Japan's space agency says more than 200 photos taken by two small rovers on an asteroid show no signs of a smooth area for the planned touchdown of a spacecraft early next year.

6h

EU court rejects 'excessively high' diesel emissions limits

An EU court on Thursday rejected the "excessively high" diesel emissions limits Brussels set just after the scandal in which German carmaker Volkswagen cheated on emissions tests.

6h

Experts Aren't Taking a Shine to California's Rooftop Solar Rule

Energy economists say the new home requirement is inefficient and benefits wealthier people; supporters say it’s just one piece of the puzzle — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

Apple announces plan to build $1 billion campus in TexasApple Austin US Texas

Apple will build a $1 billion campus in Austin, Texas, and establish smaller new locations in Seattle, San Diego and Culver City, California, the company said Thursday.

6h

Local conditions shape plant communities

The local environment plays a key role in determining what kinds of plants grow there, according to a new study that could change how threatened species are managed.

6h

6h

Færre laserkilder i fiberkabler skal gøre Internettet grønnere

DTU-forskere skal sammen med flere danske virksomheder udvikle nye grønne alternativer til infrastrukturen bag internettet

6h

Why the U.S. is an anomaly among democracies

From the time of the ancient Greeks, political philosophers believed the only way to have diversity in a society was for it to be an empire or a dictatorship. They thought homogeneity was the core of democracy: one ethnic group, one racial group, and especially one religion. Then America broke that mold in 1787. Eboo Patel cites historical examples of how Benjamin Franklin donated funds to differ

7h

Fireball That Exploded Over Greenland Shook Earth, Triggering Seismic Sensors

These are the first-ever seismic recordings of a meteor impact on ice in Greenland.

7h

5G: The Complete WIRED Guide

Here's everything you'll ever want to know about the spectrum, millimeter wave technology, and on why 5G could give China an edge in the AI race.

7h

Marvel Comics Genius Stan Lee Turned Outcasts Into Heroes

Stan Lee, who died in November at the age of 95, turned comic books into art through his ability to empower others.

7h

Dr. Elon & Mr. Musk: Life Inside Tesla's Production Hell

Unfettered genius. Unpredictable rages. Here's what it was like to work at Tesla as Model 3 manufacturing ramped up and the company's leader melted down.

7h

Trump Is Running Out of Alibis

The president is running out of alibis. On Wednesday, Donald Trump’s former attorney and fixer, Michael Cohen, was sentenced to three years in prison for tax evasion, financial fraud, and violating campaign-finance laws in accordance with facilitating almost $300,000 in hush-money payments he made to women who said they had affairs with the president. Cohen, prosecutors said , “made or caused bot

7h

What Will 2020 Democrats Do When Crowds Chant ‘Lock Him Up’?

One of the early choices every 2020 Democratic presidential contender will face is how to react the first time the audience at a campaign event breaks into the chant “Lock him up.” That day likely isn’t far away now that prosecutors from the Southern District of New York, in Donald Trump’s own Justice Department, have formally implicated the president in two violations of campaign-finance law by

7h

America Needs to Restore Dignity of Work

T here was once a path to a stable and prosperous life in America that has since closed off. It was a well-traveled path for many Americans: Graduate from high school and get a job, typically with a local manufacturer or one of the service industries associated with it, and earn enough to support a family. The idea was not only that it was possible to achieve this kind of success, but that anyone

7h

If Beale Street Could Talk Is a Seismic Cinematic Achievement

“It’s a miracle to realize that somebody loves you.” So writes James Baldwin in his 1974 novel, If Beale Street Could Talk , which has been carefully and handsomely translated to the screen by the director Barry Jenkins. Baldwin tells his story of brute injustice with piercing, sometimes angry prose: A man from Harlem named Fonny (played in the film by Stephan James) is imprisoned for a crime he

7h

The Divide Between Silicon Valley and Washington Is a National-Security Threat

A silent divide is weakening America’s national security, and it has nothing to do with President Donald Trump or party polarization. It’s the growing gulf between the tech community in Silicon Valley and the policy-making community in Washington. Beyond all the acrimonious headlines, Democrats and Republicans share a growing alarm over the return of great-power conflict. China and Russia are cha

7h

Ethereum thinks it can change the world. It’s running out of time to prove it.

The blockchain system has daunting technical problems to fix. But first, its disciples need to figure out how to govern themselves.

7h

EU-Domstolen underkender dansk statsstøtte til Femern

Danmarks statsgaranti for lånene, der skal finansiere tunnellen mellem Danmark og Tyskland, er blevet underkendt af EU-Domstolen. Kommissionen må nu genbehandle Danmarks anmodning om at give statsgarantier.

7h

Aarhus er stadig bedst blandt de store

Et højt bundniveau sikrer Aarhus Universitetshospital en førsteplads blandt de store hospitaler i Dagens Medicins ranking af Danmarks bedste hospitaler.

7h

An energy-efficient way to stay warm: Sew high-tech heating patches to your clothes

What if, instead of turning up the thermostat, you could warm up with high-tech, flexible patches sewn into your clothes — while significantly reducing your electric bill and carbon footprint? Engineers at Rutgers and Oregon State University have found a cost-effective way to make thin, durable heating patches by using intense pulses of light to fuse tiny silver wires with polyester. Their heatin

8h

CETSA HT in early drug discovery through screening against B-Raf and PARP1

A new study published ahead-of-print by SLAS Discovery describes an evaluation of microplate-based high-throughput cellular thermal shift assay (CETSA HT) performed at AstraZeneca to assess its suitability and reliability for application to early drug discovery campaigns.

8h

The Oil Industry’s Covert Campaign to Rewrite American Car Emissions Rules

Energy giants and conservative groups have been aggressively pushing Trump’s rollback of fuel efficiency rules for automobiles, a Times investigation found.

8h

Natural Disasters And The Pause Button

Scientists say too often after deadly natural disasters, like the recent wildfires in California, there is a rush to rebuild, but not always smartly.

8h

A Doctor Allegedly Whispered to His Patient That She Looked Like a ‘Sexy Librarian’

The doctor instructed his patient to stand in front of him. He cupped her crotch and inserted his fingers into her vagina through her clothes, moving his hand repeatedly to her rectal area. Then he squeezed her breasts, according to the formal accusation filed by the Medical Board of California. The patient, accompanied to the appointment by her 4-year-old granddaughter, asked why that was necess

8h

New York’s new wage law for Uber drivers is a lesson for cities around the world

Alex Rosenblat rode along with Uber drivers for 5,000 miles. We talked with her about the huge impact the law could have.

8h

Enkel metode skaber overophedet damp med almindeligt sollys

Med billige materialer, sollys og vand kan en ny teknik udviklet på Massachusetts Institute of Technology skabe 130 grader varm vanddamp. Så kan medicinsk udstyr steriliseres langt ude i ødemarken.

8h

Vi skaber exe-programmer fra Java – og det kører forrygende hurtigt

I hvert fald under Virtualbox, hvor exe-filer giver ydelsesforbedringer på 45 procent med Version2's test-kode.

8h

Ingestible capsule can be controlled wirelessly

MIT researchers have designed an ingestible capsule that can be controlled using Bluetooth wireless technology. Their capsule, which can be customized to deliver drugs, sense environmental conditions, or a combination of those functions, can reside in the stomach for at least a month, transmitting information and responding to instructions from a user's smartphone.

8h

Climate change: Failure to tackle warming 'suicidal'

UN secretary general tells climate negotiators in Poland that failure to make progress would be a desperate blow for the planet.

9h

10h

Japan plans tighter regulation of tech giants

Japan is planning to tighten regulation of tech giants like Google and Facebook after an expert panel called for better oversight on competition and privacy, an official said Thursday.

10h

At least $9bn in insurance claims from California fires

Insurance claims from the recent devastating California wildfires that killed at least 89 people and destroyed 19,000 homes and businesses have reached at least $9 billion, the state's insurance commissioner said Wednesday.

10h

Siemens wins Canada train contract over Bombardier

German manufacturer Siemens saw off Canadian rival Bombardier to clinch a Can$989 million contract to produce 32 trains, Canada's state-subsidized passenger rail company announced Wednesday.

10h

States cite climate worries in push to stop US coal sales

Four states that say burning coal will hurt their residents as it makes climate change worse are trying to stop the Trump administration from selling vast reserves of the fuel that are beneath public lands.

10h

Scientists identify 66 alien species that pose greatest threat to European biodiversity

Scientists have identified 66 alien plant and animal species, not yet established in the European Union, that pose the greatest potential threat to biodiversity and ecosystems in the region.

11h

Researchers design technology that sees nerve cells fire

Researchers at Stanford University, Palo Alto, California, have created a noninvasive technology that detects when nerve cells fire based on changes in shape. The method could be used to observe nerve activity in light-accessible parts of the body, such as the eye, which would allow physicians to quantitatively monitor visual function at the cellular level. The study was published in the journal L

11h

Barely scratching the surface: A new way to make robust membranes

Argonne researchers have demonstrated a new technique's viability for membranes.

11h

U.S. Diplomats With Mysterious Illness in Cuba Had Inner-Ear Damage, Doctors Say

A report by the first doctors to examine Americans who suffered mystifying symptoms after hearing a high-pitched sound at the embassy in Cuba confirms that their condition is real.

12h

Ny teknologi kan give din smartphone otte gange længere batteritid

Det nye batteri bliver både billigere og skal kun lades en gang om ugen, men der går nok en del år, før det kommer på markedet, forklarer forsker.

12h

Scientists identify 66 alien species that pose greatest threat to European biodiversity

Scientists have identified 66 alien plant and animal species, not yet established in the European Union, that pose the greatest potential threat to biodiversity and ecosystems in the region. The research, led by the UK's Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, lists the invasive species that are likely to arrive and spread in the region over the next decade.

12h

Inability to perform basic activities delays mental health patients' discharge

Mental health patients who have difficulty performing daily living tasks are four times more likely to experience discharge delays than someone who can perform those tasks independently.

12h

Santa Claus take note: Winter is coming, but get yourself a raincoat

Climate change in the Arctic means more winter rain, and consequently more rain falling on snow. The result can be a buildup of ice under the snow, which can wreak havoc with arctic ecosystems.

12h

New device could help answer fundamental questions about quantum physics

Researchers have developed a new device that can measure and control a nanoparticle trapped in a laser beam with unprecedented sensitivity.

12h

New research suggests how parents protect children from the long-term effects of stress

When young children experience violence or poverty, the effect can last well into adulthood. But new research from the Emory School of Medicine suggests that a strong parental relationship could override some of these effects, by changing how children perceive the environmental cues that help them distinguish between what's safe or dangerous.

12h

Vaccine could help address the opioid epidemic

Synthetic psychoactive drugs have become a serious public health threat in recent years. This is particularly true of the fentanyls, a large family of synthetic opioids, which can be up to 10,000 times more potent than morphine. Synthetic opioids are highly addictive and, because of their potency, often prove fatal: among the roughly 72,000 drug overdose deaths in the US in 2017, some 30,000 were

12h

New device could help answer fundamental questions about quantum physics

Researchers have developed a new device that can measure and control a nanoparticle trapped in a laser beam with unprecedented sensitivity. The new technology could help scientists study a macroscopic particle's motion with subatomic resolution, a scale governed by the rules of quantum mechanics rather than classical physics.

13h

Ekspert: Her er de tre største konsekvenser ved at indlandsisen smelter

Indlandsisen kommer til at smelte uanset hvad, og det har allerede store konsekvenser.

13h

Large population of potential young planets found in distant planetary systems

Astronomers used the powerful ALMA telescope to discover that in other parts of the Milky Way Galaxy (seen here) there is potentially a large population of young planets — similar in mass to Neptune or Jupiter — at wide-orbit that are not detectable by other current planet searching techniques.

13h

Scientists identify new minerals for carbon capture

Research confirms new minerals are capturing and storing carbon. The minerals, members of the hydrotalcite group, are the first outside of the carbonate family to naturally capture atmospheric CO2 in mine waste, important as society continues to forge ways to lower our carbon emissions and combat climate change.

13h

Clearest view ever of cell membrane yields unexpected structure, research possibilities

Scientists have gained the clearest view yet of a patch of cell membrane and its components, revealing unexpected structures and opening up new possibilities for pharmaceutical research.

13h

Vind med Ingeniørens julekalender: 13. december

Vær med i Ingeniørens julekalender 2018. Hver dag med nye præmier!

13h

Excess body weight responsible for nearly 4 percent of cancers worldwide

Excess body weight accounted for approximately 3.9 percent of all cancers worldwide in 2012, a figure that is expected to rise in the coming decades given current trends.

14h

3D-printed reconstructions provide clues to ancient site

Part of the ancient archaeological site of Tiwanaku, Bolivia, believed by Incans to be where the world was created has been reconstructed using 3D printed models of fragments of an ancient building.

14h

How deep learning is bringing automatic cloud detection to new heights

Can deep learning — a distinct subset of machine learning — do a better job at identifying clouds in lidar data than the current physics-based algorithms? The answer: A clear 'yes.' A new model is much closer to the answers scientists arrive at but in just a fraction of the time.

14h

Fishery length, angler effort: How they relate

A new study suggests reducing the number of fishing days in a season doesn't reduce catch as much as some would predict.

14h

Helping the anti-parasitic medicine go down

An international team has developed a novel pharmaceutical formulation to administer triclabendazole — an anti-parasitic drug used to treat a type of flatworm infection — in billions of tiny capsules.

14h

Blood test could lead to cystic fibrosis treatment tailored to each patient

Researchers have used a blood test and microarray technology to identify distinct molecular signatures in children with cystic fibrosis. These patterns of gene expression ultimately could help predict disease severity and treatment response, and lead to therapies tailored to each patient's precise biology.

14h

Ritalin drives greater connection between brain areas key to memory, attention

Scientists have described increased connections between key parts of the brains of monkeys who have taken methylphenidate (Ritalin).

14h

Barely scratching the surface: A new way to make robust membranes

Researchers have demonstrated a new technique's viability for membranes.

14h

Tiny tech tracks hummingbirds at urban feeders

Urban hummingbird feeders are highly prevalent. Researchers want to understand the health implications for birds congregating and sharing food resources at these bird buffets. Data from a new study using RFID technology is one piece of that puzzle.

14h

Stem cell researchers develop promising technique to generate new muscle cells in lab

To help patients with muscle disorders, scientists have engineered a new stem cell line to study the conversion of stem cells into muscle.

14h

Researchers design technology that sees nerve cells fire

Researchers have created a noninvasive technology that detects when nerve cells fire based on changes in shape. The method could be used to observe nerve activity in light-accessible parts of the body, such as the eye, which would allow physicians to quantitatively monitor visual function at the cellular level.

14h

Universal health care is great — except in Russia. Here's why.

America's lack of universal healthcare leaves it with higher costs and worse outcomes than our more enlightened fellow developed countries. Russia's healthcare system shows us that even a great idea can be poorly implemented. The attempts to cut costs and the catastrophic results show us what pitfalls the United States will have to avoid when we do finally get universal health care. The benefits

15h

The Atlantic Daily: When Vietnam War Refugees Are Vulnerable to Deportation

What We’re Following War Refugees: The Trump administration’s new position on a protected group of Vietnamese immigrants—many of whom fled to the U.S. during the Vietnam War—now leaves them vulnerable to deportation. Returning to a policy it retreated from back in August, the White House is reinterpreting a 2008 agreement that had prevented the deportation of Vietnamese people who arrived in the

16h

Trump Administration Asks to Roll Back Rules Against Water Pollution

Environmental groups are concerned and plan litigation.

16h

3-D-printed reconstructions provide clues to ancient site

Part of the ancient archaeological site of Tiwanaku, Bolivia, believed by Incans to be where the world was created has been reconstructed using 3-D printed models of fragments of an ancient building. The results are presented in a study published in the open access journal Heritage Science.

10min

America’s Most Hazardous Volcano Erupted This Year. Then It Erupted and Erupted.

A landmark study unspools a timeline of the most destructive eruption in recorded history of Hawaii’s Kilauea volcano.

1h

Calories in popular restaurant chain meals 'excessive' warn experts

The calorie content of popular main meals served in UK and international restaurant chains is excessive and only a minority meet public health recommendations, finds a University of Liverpool study published in the Christmas issue of The BMJ.

1h

A ‘Self-Aware’ Fish Raises Doubts About a Cognitive Test

submitted by /u/burtzev [link] [comments]

2h

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Incohencerated

Written by Elaine Godfrey ( @elainejgodfrey ) and Madeleine Carlisle ( @maddiecarlisle2 ) Today in 5 Lines Michael Cohen, President Donald Trump’s longtime former lawyer, was sentenced to three years in prison after being convicted of tax evasion, campaign-finance violations, and lying to Congress. In a prepared statement, Cohen said that his “blind loyalty” to Trump led him “to take a path of da

2h

The Parker Solar Probe takes its first up-close look at the sun

NASA’s Parker Solar Probe survived its first encounter with the sun and is sending data back to Earth.

2h

7 of the most interesting fictional drugs

Fictional drugs are a major part of the lore and foundation for many science fiction stories. The unique effects they have on their characters is an interesting new way to explore important issues. Many of these fictional drugs are synonymous with the stories that have been told. Fiction writers have always been good at whisking us away to strange and new alien worlds, places we've never dreamed

2h

Ritalin drives greater connection between brain areas key to memory, attention

Louis Populin and collaborators at the University of Wisconsin-Madison collaborators published a study this week in the Journal of Neuroscience describing increased connections between key parts of the brains of monkeys who have taken methylphenidate (Ritalin).

2h

Surgery unnecessary for many prostate cancer patients

Otherwise healthy men with advanced prostate cancer may benefit greatly from surgery, but many with this diagnosis have no need for it. These conclusions were reached by researchers after following a large group of Scandinavian men with prostate cancer for 29 years. The results are now published in The New England Journal of Medicine.

2h

Theresa May Isn't Going Down Without a Fight

LONDON—For more than two years, British Prime Minister Theresa May has had to balance European Union negotiators, an opposition Labour Party intent on toppling her government, and dozens of rebellious parliamentary colleagues. So when she vowed on Wednesday to fight a no-confidence vote against her “with everything I’ve got,” it was par for the course. May has earned a reputation for soldiering o

2h

3h

The Rubber Ducky Comet Blasted a Magnetic Path Through Space

Rosetta's comet sent a magnetic shock wave screaming out in front of it, blazing a trail through the stellar wind. And scientists just found it.

3h

Record levels of mercury released by thawing permafrost in Canadian Arctic

Permafrost thaw slumps in the western Canadian Arctic are releasing record amounts of mercury into waterways, according to new research by University of Alberta ecologists.

3h

Rice plants that grow as clones from seed

Plant biologists have discovered a way to make crop plants replicate through seeds as clones. The discovery, long sought by plant breeders and geneticists, could make it easier to propagate high-yielding, disease-resistant or climate-tolerant crops and make them available to the world's farmers.

3h

Blood test could lead to cystic fibrosis treatment tailored to each patient

Researchers at Stanley Manne Children's Research Institute at Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago, and colleagues, used a blood test and microarray technology to identify distinct molecular signatures in children with cystic fibrosis. These patterns of gene expression ultimately could help predict disease severity and treatment response, and lead to therapies tailored to each pati

3h

Barely scratching the surface: A new way to make robust membranes

Argonne researchers have demonstrated a new technique's viability for membranes.

3h

Huge Marsupial Lion Terrorized Ancient Australia, Sat Adorably on Its Tail

The marsupial lion has long mystified scientists. But the recent discovery of more of its fossils, including a nearly complete skeleton of the extinct beast, has revealed some of its secrets.

3h

Crashes increase when speed limits dip far below engineering recommendation

Speed limits set only five miles per hour below engineering recommendations produce a statistically significant decrease in total, fatal and injury crashes, and property-damage-only crashes, according to a group of researchers.

3h

Resting easy: Oxygen promotes deep, restorative sleep

Exposure to high levels of oxygen encourages the brain to remain in deep, restorative sleep, according to a new study.

3h

Earth's cobalt deposits formed much later than previously believed

Cobalt deposits in the Democratic Republic of Congo, one of Earth's largest cobalt-mining regions, are 150 million years younger than previously thought, according to a new study. The study provides critical insight into exploration for cobalt, an important component in rechargeable batteries.

3h

Professor models system using baking soda filled capsules to capture CO2 emissions

Coal and natural gas represent the majority of the US energy supply. Even with pollution controls, burning these fossil fuels for energy releases a tremendous amount of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. Research uses microcapsule technology that may make post-combustion carbon capture cheaper, safer, and more efficient.

3h

Clue to epidemics in 'bursty' social behavior

Researchers have developed a mathematical model that could cure the potential to underestimate how quickly diseases spread. The team discovered that current predictive models may miss the influence of a critical aspect of the social behavior of individuals called 'burstiness.'

3h

Biologists shed new light on an old question

For nearly 100 years biologists have argued about how exactly natural selection can possibly work. If nature selects the individuals with the best genes then why aren't all organisms the same? What maintains the genetic variation that natural selection acts upon, the genetic variation that has ultimately led to the spectacular diversity of life on Earth today? Recent findings suggest that the answ

3h

Independent expert panel on medical assistance in dying releases three reports

The Council of Canadian Academies (CCA) has released three reports on requests for medical assistance in dying (MAID), the result of an independent Expert Panel review conducted at the request of the federal government. The reports were released following their tabling in Parliament today.

3h

Researchers design technology that sees nerve cells fire

Researchers at Stanford University, Palo Alto, Calif., have created a noninvasive technology that detects when nerve cells fire based on changes in shape. The method could be used to observe nerve activity in light-accessible parts of the body, such as the eye, which would allow physicians to quantitatively monitor visual function at the cellular level.

3h

‘A rare sight’: Astronaut snaps incredible photo of 5 spaceships

The spacecraft belong to Russia and two private American aerospace companies. Six astronauts are currently aboard the International Space Station to conduct a variety of experiments. On Monday, Russian cosmonauts conducted a spacewalk to investigate the nature and cause of a mysterious 2-millimeter-wide hole in a Russian spacecraft. None Alexander Gerst, an astronaut for the German European Space

3h

Suit Filed to Stop Seismic Airgun Blasting in Atlantic Ocean

Eight environmental groups took the legal measure in an effort to protect North Atlantic right whales and other marine organisms.

3h

How unconventional metals behave, with an eye on high-temperature superconductors

By trapping atoms in a lattice of light, researchers explore how unconventional metals conduct electricity, with an eye toward understanding high-temperature superconductors.

3h

Cardinals living in adjacent deserts are sharply distinct in genetics and song

New research suggests that populations of the Northern Cardinal — one of the most ubiquitous backyard birds in the United States — are undergoing speciation in two adjacent deserts. This study, which analyzed genetics and vocal behavior, gives clues about the early steps in bird speciation.

3h

Climate change imperils Midwest ag production

A new study shows that Midwest agriculture is increasingly vulnerable to climate change because of the region's reliance on growing rain-fed crops.

3h

Umbilical cord blood metal levels in newborns

New findings reveal urban and rural differences in prenatal exposure to essential and toxic elements.

3h

Length of eye blinks might act as conversational cue

Blinking may feel like an unconscious activity, but new research suggests that humans unknowingly perceive eye blinks as nonverbal cues when engaging in conversation.

3h

Subway train travel linked to spread of flu-like illnesses

Despite the commuter cold being a widely accepted concept, it has never been proven that public transport contributes to the spread of airborne infections. Now new research on the London underground commute has proven a link does exist.

3h

Arctic Report Card Documents 'Cascading Effects' Of Warming Ocean Temperatures

The U.S. government says warming ocean temperatures and melting ice have resulted in the "most unprecedented transition in history" in the Arctic, leading to extreme weather events across the globe. (Image credit: Mario Tama/Getty Images)

3h

Climate Scientist Says Argument 'The Climate Is Always Changing' Is Wrong

NPR's Ari Shapiro talks with climate scientist Stephanie Herring about why the argument "the climate is always changing" is problematic in explaining the temperature changes around the world today.

2min

9 Trumpworld Figures That Should Fear Mueller the Most

After Michael Cohen's sentencing, plenty more people and entities in Trump's orbit potentially sit in the special counsel's crosshairs.

6min

Loss of tight junction protein promotes development of precancerous cells

BIDMC researchers demonstrated that the lack of claudin 18 prompted the development of precancerous, abnormal cells and polyps in the engineered mouse model.

8min

Ancient Marine Reptiles Had Familiar Gear

Ichthyosaurs had traits in common with turtles and modern marine mammals, like blubber and countershading camouflage. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

10min

Woman asks big tech to stop showing maternity ads after stillbirthGoogle Sundar Pichai

Advertisers are increasingly using hyper-specific information on users, collected by big tech companies, to sell products. An open letter published Tuesday outlines how this kind of ad targeting can be not only creepy, but also inadvertently cruel and distressing. Also on Tuesday, the House questioned Google's CEO, partly on issues related to data privacy. None If you search for any product onlin

21min

Tencent Music shares rise on first trading day

Shares in Chinese streaming music giant Tencent Music Entertainment are up 7 percent to $13.90 in afternoon trading Thursday, their first day of trade

24min

Virgin Galactic aims to reach space soon with tourism rocket

Richard Branson's Virgin Galactic is gearing up to finally send its tourism rocket ship to the edge of space.

24min

Some Kotex Tampons Recalled After Reports of 'Pieces Left in the Body'

Certain Kotex tampons are being recalled after some users reported that the product unraveled or came apart, and in some cases, resulted in "pieces left in the body."

24min

Perhaps the Most Effective Way to Fight Racism

In White Right: Meeting With the Enemy , the filmmaker Deeyah Khan, a Muslim woman of color, recounts a television interview that she gave during the summer of 2016. “The fact of the matter is that the U.K. is never going to be white again,” she told the BBC. “Similarly, our parents who have left Pakistan, Afghanistan, Iraq, Somalia, and other Muslim countries, for them to think that they can ree

26min

Stem cell researchers develop promising technique to generate new muscle cells in lab

To help patients with muscle disorders, scientists at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) have engineered a new stem cell line to study the conversion of stem cells into muscle. Findings appeared in Cell Reports.

29min

Hybrid rice engineered with CRISPR can clone its seeds

New research has created self-cloning hybrid rice, raising hopes of higher food production.

30min

32min

Gaming firm settles VR lawsuit with Facebook-owned OculusFacebook ZeniMax Oculus

ZeniMax Media on Wednesday said it struck a deal with Facebook-owned Oculus to settle a lawsuit over the video game giant's virtual reality technology.

36min

Fishery length, angler effort: How they relate

A new study suggests reducing the number of fishing days in a season doesn't reduce catch as much as some would predict. The publication, Compression and relaxation of fishing effort in response to changes in length of fishing season for red snapper (Lutjanus campechanus) in the northern Gulf of Mexico, was released by NOAA in the November 2018 National Fishery Bulletin.

36min

How deep learning is bringing automatic cloud detection to new heights

Kids lying on their backs in a grassy field might scan the clouds for images—perhaps a fluffy bunny here and a fiery dragon over there. Often, atmospheric scientists do the opposite—they search data images for the clouds as part of their research to understand Earth systems.

42min

Researchers develop mathematical solver for analog computers

University of Notre Dame's Zoltán Toroczkai and collaborators have been working toward developing a novel mathematical approach that will help advance computation beyond the digital framework.

44min

Studying how unconventional metals behave, with an eye on high-temperature superconductors

By trapping atoms in a lattice of light, researchers explore how unconventional metals conduct electricity, with an eye toward understanding high-temperature superconductors

44min

More 'heatwave' summers will affect animals

Heatwaves similar to those experienced in Europe in 2018 can have a very negative impact on animals. A new study shows that overheated birds have smaller offspring, and that those that are born may have lower chances of survival.

48min

How bullying affects the structure of the teen brain

The effects of constantly being bullied are more than just psychological. Research now shows that there may be physical structural differences in the brains of adolescents who are regularly victimized, and this could increase the chance that they suffer from mental illness.

48min

Bose-Einstein condensates cannot currently detect gravitational waves

The gravitational waves created in the depths of space indeed reach Earth. Their effects, however, are so small that they could only be observed so far using kilometer-long measurement facilities. Physicists therefore discuss whether Bose-Einstein condensates with their ordered quantum properties could also detect these waves. Astronomers have now looked at these suggestions and have soberly deter

48min

Cardinals living in adjacent deserts are sharply distinct in genetics and song

New research suggests that populations of the Northern Cardinal —one of the most ubiquitous backyard birds in the United States— are undergoing speciation in two adjacent deserts. This study, which analyzed genetics and vocal behavior, gives clues about the early steps in bird speciation. The study is published in the journal Ecology and Evolution.

48min

Five Years of Record Warmth Intensify Arctic's Transformation

Sea ice is the thinnest it's been at any time in the last 30 years, and wild reindeer and caribou populations continue to decline — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

58min

Babies born in opioid withdrawal have unusually small heads

Infants born dependent on opioids had heads that were smaller than babies whose moms didn’t use the drugs during pregnancy.

59min

Big picture look at climate change impact on US agriculture: Midwest at risk

A new Cornell University-led study shows that Midwest agriculture is increasingly vulnerable to climate change because of the region's reliance on growing rain-fed crops.

1h

Fishery length, angler effort: How they relate

A new study suggests reducing the number of fishing days in a season doesn't reduce catch as much as some would predict. The publication, Compression and relaxation of fishing effort in response to changes in length of fishing season for red snapper (Lutjanus campechanus) in the northern Gulf of Mexico, was released by NOAA in the November 2018 National Fishery Bulletin.

1h

Maria's far-reaching effects on Puerto Rico's watersheds and forests

Scientists at the National Science Foundation (NSF) co-located Luquillo Critical Zone Observatory (CZO) and Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) sites in Puerto Rico spent the past year evaluating the impacts of Hurricane Maria, a powerful category 5 storm that struck Puerto Rico head-on in September 2017.

1h

Cloud or no cloud, that is the question

Researchers at PNNL teamed up to find out if deep learning–a distinct subset of machine learning–can do a better job at identifying clouds in lidar data than the current physics-based algorithms. The answer: A clear 'yes.' The new model is much closer to the answers scientists arrive at but in just a fraction of the time.

1h

Preparation, characterization of major degradation products of Pralatrexate injection

The major degradation products of pralatrexate drug product formed under hydrolytic and light stress conditions were identified, synthesized and characterized using advanced spectroscopic techniques such as NMR, HR-MS and IR.

1h

GVSU researcher compares running economy in Nike shoe, track spikes

Kyle Barnes, assistant professor of movement science at Grand Valley State University, has researched strategies to improve running economy and performance for years. He incorporated the Nike Vaporfly 4 percent shoes in his studies and in October published results in the journal Sports Medicine that validated Nike's original study results giving the shoe the 4 percent name, while at the same time,

1h

Crashes increase when speed limits dip far below engineering recommendation

Speed limits set only five miles per hour below engineering recommendations produce a statistically significant decrease in total, fatal and injury crashes, and property-damage-only crashes, according to a group of Penn State researchers.

1h

Helping the anti-parasitic medicine go down

Scientists have developed a new way to deliver anti-parasitic medicines more efficiently.

1h

Clear expectations cut school suspensions

When students receive clear, consistent expectations of behavior, school suspensions drop by as much as 10 percent, a new study shows. To put that in context, more than 2.75 million K-12 students were suspended during the 2013 to 2014 school year. A 10 percent reduction means 275,000 more students were in class learning. A 2012 study by the Everyone Graduates Center at John Hopkins University fou

1h

NASA's Juno mission halfway to Jupiter science

On Dec. 21, NASA's Juno spacecraft will be 3,140 miles (5,053 kilometers) above Jupiter's cloud tops and hurtling by at a healthy clip of 128,802 mph (207,287 kilometers per hour). This will mark the solar-powered spacecraft's halfway point in data collection during its prime mission.

1h

First-ever look at complete skeleton of Thylacoleo, Australia's extinct 'marsupial lion'

Thyalacoleo carnifex, the 'marsupial lion' of Pleistocene Australia, was an adept hunter that got around with the help of a strong tail, according to a new study. These insights come after newly discovered remains, including one nearly complete fossil specimen, allowed these researchers to reconstruct this animal's entire skeleton for the first time.

1h

Teens get more sleep with later school start time, researchers find

In 2016, Seattle Public Schools pushed back start times for its 18 high schools by 55 minutes. Researchers have now announced that, as a result, teens at two Seattle high schools got more sleep on school nights — a median increase of 34 minutes of sleep each night — and showed improved attendance and grades.

1h

DNA study shows stethoscopes loaded with bacteria, including staphylococcus

Stethoscopes carried by health care practitioners are loaded with diverse bacteria, including some that can cause healthcare-associated infections, according to a study. The research also reviewed the effectiveness of cleaning methods, finding a standardized approach to be superior for removing bacteria compared with various approaches employed by health care practitioners.

1h

Obtaining polyester from plant oil

Chemists have developed a new catalysis concept for obtaining polyester from castor oil.

1h

‘Today Is the Day I Am Getting My Freedom Back’

NEW YORK — With his teary-eyed and grim-faced family arrayed behind him, Michael Cohen laid claim to his freedom in a federal courtroom here on Wednesday morning. Not from incarceration, of course—Donald Trump’s former longtime lawyer, fixer, and foot soldier knew he was soon headed to prison after he pleaded guilty to what a federal judge called “a veritable smorgasbord of fraudulent conduct.” N

1h

Cardinals living in adjacent deserts are sharply distinct in genetics and song

New research suggests that populations of the Northern Cardinal — one of the most ubiquitous backyard birds in the United States — are undergoing speciation in two adjacent deserts. This study, which analyzed genetics and vocal behavior, gives clues about the early steps in bird speciation.

1h

NSF-supported scientists present new research results on Earth's critical zone

To develop a deeper understanding of the critical zone, the National Science Foundation (NSF) supports nine Critical Zone Observatories (CZOs) across the US NSF CZO scientists study how the critical zone responds to changes in climate and land use.

1h

Deep biosphere beneath the seafloor explored at American Geophysical Union fall meeting

The scientists are working to understand the nature of subseafloor microbial communities and whether these communities are unique. They're also researching where microbes in ocean crust come from and whether these microbes can provide clues about where to look for life on other planets.

1h

A Woman Fell Asleep During Cupping Therapy. She Woke Up with Bizarre Blisters.

She had applied the cups herself, and then fell asleep, according to a new report of the case.

1h

Exploding Stars Helped Kill Earth's Ancient Sea Monsters, New Study Suggests

Did an exploding star kill the Earth's biggest sharks?

1h

CO2-driven acidity hits oceans hard

Streams of gas-filled volcanic bubbles rising up to the surface off the rocky cliffs of Ischia, Italy are making the seawater acidic and radically changing life around them in the process. Researchers studying species living near these gassy vents are learning what it takes to survive in acidic waters—and getting a glimpse of what future oceans will look like if the acidification continues. Their

1h

Insects are disappearing from science textbooks—and that should bug you

Animals They make up the biggest bunch of the animal kingdom by far. Insect-related content fell 75 percent in textbooks published after 2000 as compared to those published before 1965.

1h

Climate change is 'shrinking winter'

Snowy mountain winters are being squeezed into shorter periods, threatening water supplies and increasing wildfire risk.

1h

NASA's InSight takes its first selfie

NASA's InSight lander used a camera on its robotic arm to take its first selfie — a mosaic made up of 11 images. This is the same imaging process used by NASA's Curiosity rover mission, in which many overlapping pictures are taken and later stitched together.

1h

Unlocking the secrets of how cells communicate offers insights into treating diseases

Researchers have made a significant breakthrough by developing the 3D structure of proteins from inside the eye lens that control how cells communicate with each other, which could open the door to treating diseases such as cataracts, stroke and cancer.

1h

Why deep oceans gave life to the first big, complex organisms

Why did the first big, complex organisms spring to life in deep, dark oceans where food was scarce? A new study finds great depths provided a stable, life-sustaining refuge from wild temperature swings in the shallows.

1h

The epoch of planet formation, times twenty

A team of astronomers has conducted ALMA's first large-scale, high-resolution survey of protoplanetary disks, the belts of dust and gas around young stars.

1h

Fetal Tissue Research Is Curtailed by Trump Administration

Studies that rely on tissue from aborted fetuses have pitted abortion critics against scientists who say the research helps millions of people.

1h

Marshall University study finds differences in umbilical cord blood metal levels in newborns

New findings from a team of Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine researchers reveal urban and rural differences in prenatal exposure to essential and toxic elements.

1h

Saving species with better monitoring

The BioScience Talks podcast features discussions of topical issues related to the biological sciences.

1h

Climate change imperils Midwest ag production

A new Cornell University-led study shows that Midwest agriculture is increasingly vulnerable to climate change because of the region's reliance on growing rain-fed crops.

1h

News release: Increased motor activity linked to improved mood

Increasing one's level of physical activity may be an effective way to boost one's mood, according to a new study from a team including scientists at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in collaboration with the National Institute of Mental Health Intramural Research Program.

1h

How peace with FARC threatens Colombia’s forests

Fires that contribute to deforestation spiked six-fold in Colombia in the year after a historic 2016 peace agreement ended decades of conflict between Fuerzas Armadas Revolucionarias de Colombia (FARC) guerrillas and government forces, according to new research. “This dramatic increase from trends in the last decade will boost the likelihood of deforestation in protected areas in the upcoming yea

1h

In the Sierras and Rockies, the Snowpack Is Shrinking Fast

An analysis of 36 years of snowpack shows that the US's peaks are shrinking, and that means more wildfires, less drinking water … and less skiing.

1h

How Ted Lieu Became Google’s Accidental Champion

Yesterday, Google CEO Sundar Pichai testified before the House Judiciary Committee. The topic was Google’s control of information, thanks to its eponymous search engine, its power over online advertising and commerce, and its Android operating system, which runs most of the world’s smartphones. Pichai had declined an invitation to testify about on Russian meddling in U.S. elections before Septemb

2h

UNLV study unlocks clues to how planets form

UNLV researchers Shangjia Zhang and Zhaohuan Zhu led a team of international astronomers in a study that used the powerful ALMA telescope to discover that in other parts of the Milky Way Galaxy (seen here) there is potentially a large population of young planets — similar in mass to Neptune or Jupiter — at wide-orbit that are not detectable by other current planet searching techniques.

2h

Live from the ocean research vessel Atlantis

Scientists and engineers on a deep-sea expedition aboard the research vessel Atlantis in the East Pacific Ocean will be broadcasting live to the American Geophysical Union fall meeting exhibit booth from 2:30 to 3:30 p.m. EST on Tuesday, Dec. 11, Wednesday, Dec. 12, and Thursday, Dec. 13.

2h

Helping the anti-parasitic medicine go down

An international team has developed a novel pharmaceutical formulation to administer triclabendazole — an anti-parasitic drug used to treat a type of flatworm infection — in billions of tiny capsules.

2h

Tiny tech tracks hummingbirds at urban feeders

Urban hummingbird feeders are highly prevalent. UC Davis veterinary researchers want to understand the health implications for birds congregating and sharing food resources at these bird buffets. Data from a new study using RFID technology is one piece of that puzzle.

2h

Combining three treatment strategies may significantly improve melanoma treatment

A study by a team led by a Massachusetts General Hospital investigator finds evidence that combining three advanced treatment strategies for malignant melanoma — molecular targeted therapy, immune checkpoint blockade and the use of tumor-targeting viruses — may markedly improve outcomes.

2h

Delayed high school start times in seattle increase sleep, grades and attendance

In Seattle, Washington, delaying the start time of two high schools by nearly an hour lengthened students' daily sleep by more than half an hour, and was associated with reduced sleepiness and increased academic performance. Notably, in the students at the school that was more economically disadvantaged, the delayed start time was also associated with an increase in punctuality and attendance.

2h

Simple and rapid test for Ebola diagnosis could improve outbreak control

David Sebba and colleagues have created a point-of-care diagnostic test that, in fewer than 30 minutes, distinguishes Ebola infections from other endemic diseases that share similar initial symptoms, such as Lassa fever and malaria.

2h

Indian ocean may be more disruptive to tropical climate than previously believed

The Indian Ocean played a far greater role in driving climate change during the last ice age than previously believed and may disrupt climate again in the future.

2h

A new strategy for brain regeneration after stroke

Dr. Kazunobu Sawamoto (Professor, Nagoya City University and NIPS) and Dr. Naoko Kaneko (Associate professor, Nagoya City University) in collaboration with Dr. Atsushi Nambu (Professor, NIPS) and Dr. Yasuo Kawaguchi (Professor, NIPS) have revealed a novel mechanism for neuronal regeneration, using the mouse model for ischemic stroke.

2h

Teens get more sleep with later school start time, researchers find

In 2016, Seattle Public Schools pushed back start times for its 18 high schools by 55 minutes. In a paper published Dec. 12 in Science Advances, researchers at the University of Washington and the Salk Institute for Biological Studies announced that, as a result, teens at two Seattle high schools got more sleep on school nights — a median increase of 34 minutes of sleep each night — and showed i

2h

Your eyes are a window to your stress

Your eyes may offer a way to measure your stress while multitasking, according to a new study. Previous studies on workload and productivity include physical aspects, such as how much a person walks or carries, but they do not take into account a person’s state of mind. “If your vitals are bad, then something is wrong with your body and doctors will work to figure out what’s wrong with you,” says

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Opinion: The Central Dogma of Mitochondrial Genetics Needs Rewriting

The recent discovery of 17 people who have inherited maternal and paternal lines of mitochondrial DNA has major ramifications for medical and ancestry research.

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First direct evidence that later school day really does help teenagers

Since Seattle high schools decided to start an hour later, students have been getting more sleep – and school attendance and grades have improved

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Australia’s ‘marsupial lion’ was a meat-ripping, tree-climbing terror

First full reconstruction of Thylacoleo carnifex shows it tore apart its prey like a Tasmanian devil, had the bite strength of a lion, and climbed like a koala

2h

Researchers report acute findings from Havana embassy phenomenon

Researchers from the University of Pittsburgh and University of Miami describe the acute symptoms and associated clinical findings following their assessment of 25 US diplomats living in Cuba.

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Crashes increase when speed limits dip far below engineering recommendation

Speed limits set only five miles per hour below engineering recommendations produce a statistically significant decrease in total, fatal and injury crashes, and property-damage-only crashes, according to a group of Penn State researchers.

2h

First-ever look at complete skeleton of Thylacoleo, Australia's extinct 'marsupial lion'

Thyalacoleo carnifex, the "marsupial lion" of Pleistocene Australia, was an adept hunter that got around with the help of a strong tail, according to a study released December 12, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Roderick T. Wells of Flinders University and Aaron B. Camens of the South Australia Museum, Adelaide. These insights come after newly-discovered remains, including one nearly c

2h

Tiny tech tracks hummingbirds at urban feeders

Beep" is not a sound you expect to hear coming from a hummingbird feeder. Yet "beeps" abounded during a study led by the University of California, Davis to monitor hummingbirds around urban feeders and help answer questions about their behavior and health.

2h

Indian ocean may be more disruptive to tropical climate than previously believed

The Indian Ocean played a far greater role in driving climate change during the last ice age than previously believed and may disrupt climate again in the future. That's according to a new study from The University of Texas at Austin, the findings of which could rewrite established Pacific-centric theories on tropical climate change.

2h

Chickens to be marker of Anthropocene

New research shows the age of man — the Anthropocene — will be defined by the chicken.

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New research questions the 'Glass Cliff' and corroborates the persistent 'Glass Ceiling'

Are women more likely to be appointed to leadership positions in crisis situations when companies are struggling with declining profits?

2h

Low-cost catalyst boosts hydrogen production from water

A future powered by carbon-free fuel depends on our ability to harness and store energy from renewable but intermittent sources, such as solar and wind. Now, a new catalyst gives a boost to a number of clean energy technologies that depend on producing hydrogen from water.

2h

Butterflies: Fallen through the net?

Using long-term data from the "Butterfly Monitoring Germany" citizens' research project, scientists have now investigated the matter using butterflies as an example. According to the research, there are more butterfly species in Natura 2000 areas than elsewhere. However, the same decline in the numbers of species regardless whether the communities are located within or outside the protected area

2h

Students around the globe collect quality, eye-opening research data on mammals

Researchers are running a large-scale camera-trap study called eMammal, recently enlisted the help of K-12 students from 28 schools and four countries — the United States, India, Mexico and Kenya. What the researchers, and the kids, discovered was surprising.

2h

3D printing offers helping hand to patients with arthritis

3D printing can cut the cost of adaptive aids that help people with hand arthritis. Current products are quite expensive, and more so to create customized versions, but 3D printing drops the cost by an average of 94 percent for 20 different handheld devices.

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All About Apples: Health Benefits, Nutrition Facts and History

An apple a day may really keep the doctor away, as these fruits are low in calories and high in fiber, have only a trace of sodium and no fat.

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Data that illuminates the AI boom

Artificial intelligence is being industrialized at remarkable speed in Europe, China, and the US, but diversity remains a problem.

2h

The epoch of planet formation, times twenty

A team of astronomers has conducted ALMA's first large-scale, high-resolution survey of protoplanetary disks, the belts of dust and gas around young stars.

2h

North Carolina Veers Toward a Congressional-Election Do-Over

DURHAM, N.C.—It’s rare that there’s bipartisan agreement on anything in North Carolina politics today . It’s even stranger that a closely contested election rocked by claims of fraud would be the instigator. But there’s an emerging consensus among Republicans and Democrats that the contested election in the Ninth Congressional District, tainted by sordid revelations , ought to have a do-over, the

2h

Scientists pave the way for saliva test for Alzheimer's disease

Scientists have identified three biomarkers for detecting mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease in saliva samples. The research has promising results for application in a clinical setting.

2h

Rethinking school suspensions: School climate offers a clue

Researchers have found that when educators and administrators focus on creating a positive school climate, the likelihood of a student being suspended decreases by approximately 10 percent.

2h

Record-wet and record-dry months increased in regions worldwide

More and more rainfall extremes are observed in regions around the globe — triggering both wet and dry records, a new study shows. Yet there are big differences between regions: The central and Eastern US, northern Europe and northern Asia have experienced heavy rainfall events that have led to severe floods in recent past. In contrast, most African regions have seen an increased frequency of mon

2h

Coral larvae use sound to find a home on the reef

A new study is starting to unravel that mystery. Researchers found that the soundscape of a reef — the combined sounds of all animals living nearby — might play a major role in steering corals towards healthy reef systems and away from damaged ones.

2h

Pope Francis demotes 2 cardinals named in sexual abuse cases

The cardinals have been removed from the pope's C-9 cabinet, an informal group designed to help restructure the bureaucracy of the Vatican. The cardinals have not been removed from the church. In February, the Vatican will host a conference to inform church leaders about the impacts of sexual abuse. None Pope Francis has removed two cardinals from his informal cabinet after they were implicated i

2h

2 proteins decide whether cells become placenta or baby

Researchers have pinpointed two proteins that are the keys to deciding which cells turn into placenta and which turn into a baby. Mammalian embryos are unlike those of any other organism in that they must grow within the mother’s body. While other animal embryos grow outside the mother, their embryonic cells can get right to work accepting assignments, such as head, tail, or vital organ. By contr

3h

Researchers create first sensor package that can ride aboard bees

Farmers can already use drones to soar over huge fields and monitor temperature, humidity or crop health. But these machines need so much power to fly that they can't get very far without needing a charge. Now, engineers at the University of Washington have created a sensing system that is small enough to ride aboard a bumblebee.

3h

Why deep oceans gave life to the first big, complex organisms

Why did the first big, complex organisms spring to life in deep, dark oceans where food was scarce? A new study finds great depthsprovided a stable, life-sustainingrefuge from wild temperature swings in the shallows.

3h

Governments, researchers underestimate impact of inefficient land-use on climate change

Policymakers and researchers have underestimated the effect that changes in land management and people's diets would have on limiting greenhouse gas emissions and countering the effects of climate change, according to a study led by Princeton University.

3h

Rice plants that grow as clones from seed

Plant biologists at the UC Davis have discovered a way to make crop plants replicate through seeds as clones. The discovery, long sought by plant breeders and geneticists, could make it easier to propagate high-yielding, disease-resistant or climate-tolerant crops and make them available to the world's farmers.

3h

Unlocking the secrets of how cells communicate offers insights into treating diseases

Portland State University researchers have made a significant breakthrough by developing the 3D structure of proteins from inside the eye lens that control how cells communicate with each other, which could open the door to treating diseases such as cataracts, stroke and cancer

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Bitcoin’s price is plummeting – will the cryptocurrency survive?

Bitcoin investors have had a rough ride this year as the price of the cryptocurrency has tumbled, making it less economical to produce the coins

3h

Quantum network joins four people together for encrypted messaging

A multi-user quantum network shows that secure quantum links between several people at once could be possible using standard telecommunications equipment

3h

If China Hacked Marriott, 2014 Marked a Full-on Assault

It increasingly appears that China was behind the Marriott hack, making 2014 a landmark year in cyberattacks against the US.

3h

Unlocking the secrets of how cells communicate offers insights into treating diseases

Portland State University researchers have made a significant breakthrough by developing the 3-D structure of proteins from inside the eye lens that control how cells communicate with each other, which could open the door to treating diseases such as cataracts, stroke and cancer.

3h

Rice plants that grow as clones from seed

Plant biologists at the University of California, Davis have discovered a way to make crop plants replicate through seeds as clones. The discovery, long sought by plant breeders and geneticists, could make it easier to propagate high-yielding, disease-resistant or climate-tolerant crops and make them available to the world's farmers.

3h

Governments, researchers underestimate impact of inefficient land-use on climate change

Policymakers and researchers have underestimated the effect that changes in land management and people's diets would have on limiting greenhouse gas emissions and countering the effects of climate change, according to a study led by Princeton University.

3h

New 'Doom' levels to come in Feb. 2019 from game designer John Romero

For a 25-year-old game, "Doom" is showing plenty of life.

3h

Gut hormone increases response to food

The holiday season is a hard one for anyone watching their weight. The sights and smells of food are hard to resist. One factor in this hunger response is a hormone found in the stomach that makes us more vulnerable to tasty food smells, encouraging overeating and obesity.

3h

Michael Cohen Sentenced to Three Years for Lies, ‘Blind Loyalty’ to Trump

President Donald Trump’s former personal lawyer Michael Cohen was sentenced to three years in prison on Wednesday, just days after directly implicating Trump in a felony stemming from hush-money payments to two women made just weeks before the 2016 election. The sentencing marked the culmination of a months-long saga that began in April with a dramatic FBI raid on Cohen’s home and office and ende

3h

Biologists shed new light on an old question

For nearly 100 years biologists have argued about how exactly natural selection can possibly work. If nature selects the individuals with the best genes then why aren't all organisms the same? What maintains the genetic variation that natural selection acts upon, the genetic variation that has ultimately led to the spectacular diversity of life on Earth today? Recent findings made at Uppsala Unive

3h

Does work stress increase cancer risk?

In an International Journal of Cancer study of data on more than 280,000 people from North America and Europe, work stress was associated with a significantly increased risk of colorectal, esophagus, and lung cancers.

3h

Researchers find clue to epidemics in 'bursty' social behavior

Researchers from NYU Tandon School of Engineering and Politecnico di Torino, Italy, have developed a mathematical model that could cure the potential to underestimate how quickly diseases spread. The team discovered that current predictive models may miss the influence of a critical aspect of the social behavior of individuals called 'burstiness.'

3h

Study suggests improved compliance with the NIH sex as a biological variable policy

In 2016, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) implemented a policy which requires grant applicants to 'consider sex as a biological variable (SABV)' in vertebrate animal and human studies.

3h

NASA examines reborn Tropical Cyclone Owen's temperatures

An infrared look by NASA's Aqua satellite found intense storms around the center of the recently revived Tropical Cyclone Owen.

3h

Clearest view ever of cell membrane yields unexpected structure, research possibilities

Working with a Nobel Prize-winning biophysicist, a team of researchers at Virginia Commonwealth University has gained the clearest view yet of a patch of cell membrane and its components, revealing unexpected structures and opening up new possibilities for pharmaceutical research.

3h

Scientists identify new minerals for carbon capture

Research confirms new minerals are capturing and storing carbon in a new paper by University of Alberta geologists and their collaborators. The minerals, members of the hydrotalcite group, are the first outside of the carbonate family to naturally capture atmospheric CO2 in mine waste, important as society continues to forge ways to lower our carbon emissions and combat climate change.

3h

NASA examines reborn Tropical Cyclone Owen's temperatures

An infrared look by NASA's Aqua satellite found intense storms around the center of the recently revived Tropical Cyclone Owen.

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Hearing loss is a risk factor for premature death

A new study links hearing loss with an increased risk for mortality before the age of 75 due to cardiovascular disease. Researchers found that mortality among those with hearing loss is elevated, particularly among men and women younger than age 75 and those who are divorced or separated. However, mortality risk was diminished in adults with a well-hearing partner. This is the first study to inves

3h

Dracula ants possess fastest known animal appendage: The snap-jaw

Move over, trap-jaw ants and mantis shrimp: There's a faster appendage in town. According to a new study, the Dracula ant, Mystrium camillae, can snap its mandibles at speeds of up to 90 meters per second (more than 200 mph), making it the fastest animal movement on record.

3h

Stanford researcher deciphers flows that help bacteria feed and organize biofilms

Figuring out how bacteria bring in nutrients could point to ways of killing them without poison. More generally, this research could also reveal how small organisms cooperate by generating networks of flow patterns.

3h

An integrated approach to finding new treatments for breast cancer

An integrated, multipronged approach aiming at identifying therapeutic targets in cancer has uncovered gene DPYSL3 as a potential contributor to a specific subset of triple-negative breast cancer.

3h

Resting easy: Oxygen promotes deep, restorative sleep, study shows

Exposure to high levels of oxygen encourages the brain to remain in deep, restorative sleep, according to a new study by University of Alberta neuroscientists.

3h

Scientists identify new minerals for carbon capture

Research confirms new minerals are capturing and storing carbon in a new paper by University of Alberta geologists and their collaborators. The minerals, members of the hydrotalcite group, are the first outside of the carbonate family to naturally capture atmospheric CO2 in mine waste, important as society continues to forge ways to lower our carbon emissions and combat climate change.

3h

No female mice? Scientists may still approve NIH grant

An increasing number of scientists are including female animals in their experimental designs and analyses for preclinical studies, as required by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in January 2016, reports a new study. But NIH reviewers are not necessarily considering that inclusion when they score an application for funding, which was a goal of the requirement.

3h

Clearest view ever of cell membrane yields unexpected structure, research possibilities

Working with a Nobel Prize-winning biophysicist, a team of researchers at Virginia Commonwealth University has gained the clearest view yet of a patch of cell membrane and its components, revealing unexpected structures and opening up new possibilities for pharmaceutical research.

3h

Earth's cobalt deposits formed much later than previously believed

Cobalt deposits in the Democratic Republic of Congo, one of Earth's largest cobalt-mining regions, are 150 million years younger than previously thought, according to a new study by University of Alberta geologists. The study provides critical insight into exploration for cobalt, an important component in rechargeable batteries.

3h

Record levels of mercury released by thawing permafrost in Canadian Arctic

Permafrost thaw slumps in the western Canadian Arctic are releasing record amounts of mercury into waterways, according to new research by University of Alberta ecologists.

3h

Pew study: Artificial intelligence will mostly make us better off by 2030 but fears remain

The year is 2030, and artificial intelligence has changed practically everything. Is it a change for the better or has AI threatened what it means to be human, to be productive and to exercise free will?

3h

NASA Space Lasers Creating Most Detailed Map Ever of Antarctica's Ice

It's measuring the highs and lows of our planet.

3h

UTI test often fails to detect infection, say researchers

Study suggests standard test, widely used since 1950s, does not work for chronic sufferers The “gold standard” test for urinary tract infections (UTIs) is not fit for purpose, according to research which suggests that it fails to diagnose most chronic sufferers. UTIs afflict an estimated 150-200 million people around the world every year. While many, particularly young women, suffer acute attacks

3h

Juno mission halfway to Jupiter science

On Dec. 21, at 8:49:48 a.m. PST (11:49:48 a.m. EST) NASA's Juno spacecraft will be 3,140 miles (5,053 kilometers) above Jupiter's cloud tops and hurtling by at a healthy clip of 128,802 mph (207,287 kilometers per hour). This will be the 16th science pass of the gas giant and will mark the solar-powered spacecraft's halfway point in data collection during its prime mission.

3h

Scientists to present new long-term ecological research findings

New results presented by National Science Foundation (NSF) Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) scientists at the 2018 American Geophysical Union fall meeting reveal hidden realms in ice-covered lakes and deep soils. The conference will take place from Dec. 10 to Dec. 14 in Washington, D.C.

4h

Pitt professor models system using baking soda filled capsules to capture CO2 emissions

Coal and natural gas represent the majority of the US energy supply. Even with pollution controls, burning these fossil fuels for energy releases a tremendous amount of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. Research led by the University of Pittsburgh and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) uses microcapsule technology that may make post-combustion carbon capture cheaper, safer, and more e

4h

Scientists pave the way for saliva test for Alzheimer's disease

University of Alberta scientists have identified three biomarkers for detecting mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease in saliva samples. The research has promising results for application in a clinical setting.

4h

Gut hormone increases response to food

The holiday season is a hard one for anyone watching their weight. The sights and smells of food are hard to resist. One factor in this hunger response is a hormone found in the stomach that makes us more vulnerable to tasty food smells, encouraging overeating and obesity.

4h

Hearing loss is a risk factor for premature death

A new study links hearing loss with an increased risk for mortality before the age of 75 due to cardiovascular disease. Researchers found that mortality among those with hearing loss is elevated, particularly among men and women younger than age 75 and those who are divorced or separated. However, mortality risk was diminished in adults with a well-hearing partner. This is the first study to inves

4h

Exercise following weight loss may reduce colorectal cancer risk, study finds

New research suggests that exercise is a key factor in reducing colorectal cancer risk after weight loss. According to the study, physical activity causes beneficial changes in the bone marrow. The study is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology — Endocrinology and Metabolism.

4h

New mouse model may speed identification of promising muscular dystrophy therapies

A Massachusetts General Hospital research team has created a new mouse model of a common form of muscular dystrophy with the potential of rapidly distinguishing promising therapeutic drugs from those unlikely to be successful.

4h

Study evaluates efficacy and safety of pancreatic cancer treatment

In a new study published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology, Manuel Hidalgo, MD, PhD, and colleagues conducted a phase I/II trial designed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of nab-paclitaxel given in combination with gemcitabine in patients with pancreatic cancer and reduced health status.

4h

Johns Hopkins researchers examine testosterone use to increase BMD in HIV-infected men

A new study has shown that HIV-infected men had lower median bone mineral density (BMD) scores at the hip compared to HIV-uninfected men, and all men who received testosterone had significantly greater BMD scores at the lumbar spine.

4h

UC researchers find chronic rhinitis influences hospital readmissions for asthma and COPD patients

Patients hospitalized for either asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have a higher risk of being readmitted for a hospital stay within 30 days of release if they also suffer from chronic rhinitis, according to a trio of researchers at the University of Cincinnati.

4h

Pesticide exposure raises risk for cardiovascular disease among Latino workers

Latinos who are exposed to pesticides in their workplaces are twice as likely to have cardiovascular disease compared with Latinos who are not exposed to pesticides at work, according to a new study published in the journal Heart.

4h

High-dose antipsychotics place children at increased risk of unexpected death

Children and young adults without psychosis who are prescribed high-dose antipsychotic medications are at increased risk of unexpected death, despite the availability of other medications to treat their conditions, according to a Vanderbilt University Medical Center study published today in JAMA Psychiatry.

4h

The Dracula ant snaps its jaw shut 5,000 times faster than you can blink

Animals It’s a snap, quite literally. Like human fingers, Mystrium camillae mandibles can slide past each other at blazing speeds, though the ants’ snaps are one thousand times faster.

4h

Google’s AI Guru Wants Computers to Think More Like Brains

Google's top AI researcher, Geoff Hinton, discusses a controversial Pentagon contract, a shortage of radical ideas, and fears of an "AI winter."

4h

Climate talks must be rescued from failure, warns UN chief

"Key political issues" deadlocking UN climate talks "remain unresolved", UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres warned Wednesday after an unscheduled stop at the troubled negotiations in Poland.

4h

#BlackGirlMagic: Black women in STEM are driving forward—educators need to catch up

The need for more scientists and engineers is a persistent issue plaguing industries throughout the United States. Several initiatives created to prioritize science, technology, engineering and mathematics in schools are helping educators prepare more diverse students and workers for STEM fields. However, these efforts might be falling short when it comes to representation of people of color, acco

4h

Rethinking school suspensions: School climate offers a clue

A 2012 study by the Everyone Graduates Center at John Hopkins University found that when a high school freshman receives a single suspension, their chances of dropping out of school can increase by a third. Furthermore, only 49 percent of students with three or more suspensions graduate high school. That's nearly a flip of a coin on whether a student receives a diploma or not.

4h

Students around the globe collect quality, eye-opening research data on mammals

Children all over the world are learning science by collecting data and running experiments in their classroom. But what if the data they collected during their school day could be used to help scientists? Turns out, it can. Researchers at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences and NC State University, running a large-scale camera-trap study called eMammal, recently enlisted the help of K-1

4h

New research questions the 'Glass Cliff' and corroborates the persistent 'Glass Ceiling'

Are women more likely to be appointed to leadership positions in crisis situations when companies are struggling with declining profits? The term "glass cliff" was coined by researchers Ryan and Haslam in the early 2000s to describe a phenomenon in which women are more likely than men to be promoted to precarious management positions with a higher risk of failure. Exemplar cases often used to supp

4h

A ‘Self-Aware’ Fish Raises Doubts About a Cognitive Test

A little blue-and-black fish swims up to a mirror. It maneuvers its body vertically to reflect its belly, along with a brown mark that researchers have placed on its throat. The fish then pivots and dives to strike its throat against the sandy bottom of its tank with a glancing blow. Then it returns to the mirror. Depending on which scientists you ask, this moment represents either a revolution o

4h

Baby Gene Edits Could Affect a Range of Traits

The gene targeted for its role in HIV is linked to increased severity of other infectious diseases—and has implications for learning in mice — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

Buzz! Slap! Ow! Taking the virus out of a mosquito's bite

They approach with the telltale sign — a high-pitched whine. It's a warning that you are a mosquito's next meal. But that mosquito might carry a virus, and now the virus is in you. Now, with the help of state-of-the-art technology, researchers can see how a virus moves within a mosquito's body, which could lead to the prevention of mosquitoes transmitting diseases.

4h

Developing brains of premature babies benefit from caffeine therapy

New research shows early caffeine treatment of premature babies born less than 29 weeks' gestation has no long-term negative effects on brain development.

4h

How plants can generate electricity to power LED light bulbs

Researchers have discovered that living plants are literally 'green' power source: they can generate, by a single leaf, more than 150 Volts, enough to simultaneously power 100 LED light bulbs. Researchers also showed that an 'hybrid tree' made of natural and artificial leaves can act as an innovative 'green' electrical generator converting wind into electricity.

4h

Maintaining the unlimited potential of stem cells

Scientists have discovered a new protein complex that keeps the brakes on stem cells, allowing them to maintain their indefinite potential. The new complex, called GBAF, could provide a future target for regenerative medicine.

4h

Attention, please! Anticipation of touch takes focus, executive skills

A study examines what happens in children's brains when they anticipate a touch to the hand, and relates this brain activity to the executive functions the child demonstrates on other mental tasks.

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