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Nyheder2018december14

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Origins of Pain

Research in mice identifies a set of neurons responsible for sustained pain and resulting pain-coping behaviors Findings point to the existence of separate neural pathways that regulate threat avoidance versus injury mitigation Study can inform new ways to gauge the efficacy of candidate pain therapies by assessing behaviors stemming from different pathways.

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Lovforslag: Kommuner vil overvåge borgeres el-forbrug til kontrol af bopælspligt

Et nyt lovforslag fra Transport-, Bygnings- og Boligministeriet vil give kommunerne lov til at overvåge danskernes forbrug af el, gas, vand og varme. Det skal styrke kontrol med bopælspligten – men datalovgivningen skal først omgås.

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Mangel på D-vitamin hos nyfødte øger risikoen for skizofreni

Forskning viser, at nyfødte børn med mangel på D-vitamin har 44 procent større risiko for at få skizofreni senere i livet.

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Scientists create bee vaccine to fight off 'insect apocalypse'

Scientists in Finland have developed what they believe is the world's first vaccine to protect bees against disease, raising hopes for tackling the drastic decline in insect numbers which could cause a global food crisis.

1h

Once you lack folate, the damage can’t be fixed

Folate deficiency creates more problems in connection with cell division and DNA replication than previously thought, a study shows. Once a person lacks folate, the resulting damage is irreversible. The researchers therefore encourage people to be more aware of the level of folate in the blood. Folate is a type of vitamin B found in, for example, broccoli, spinach, peas, mushrooms, shellfish, and

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Vattenfall får grønt lys til Danmarks største vindmøllepark på land

Aalborg og Himmerland kommuner har nu – efter en lang planlægningsproces – givet energiselskabet Vattenfall lov til at etablere fase 2 af det, der bliver Danmarks største vindmøllepark på land.

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HIV vaccine protects non-human primates from infection

New research shows that an experimental HIV vaccine strategy works in non-human primates. In the study, rhesus macaque monkeys produced neutralizing antibodies against one strain of HIV that resembles the resilient viral form that most commonly infects people, called a Tier 2 virus.

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See a passing comet this Sunday

On Sunday, Dec. 16, the comet known as 46P/Wirtanen will make one of the 10 closest comet flybys of Earth in 70 years, and you may even be able to see it without a telescope.

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Technology will kill the 9-to-5 work week, says Richard Branson

Branson made the argument in a recent blog post published on the Virgin website. The 40-hour work week stems from labor laws created in the early 20th century, and many have said this model is becoming increasingly obsolete. The average American currently works 47 hours per week, on average . None Have you ever had a 'case of the Mondays,' or remarked that you can't believe it's 'hump day' alread

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Virgin Galactic finally made it to space. Here's what that means.Branson Virgin Galactic

Space It's not just a big deal for future space tourists, either. The work these companies are doing could be tremendously helpful in opening up more research opportunities to labs around the world.

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Leo DiCaprio's Rumored Plan to Buy a Dinosaur Duo Has Paleontologists Upset

Leonardo DiCaprio is rumored to be in the market for a $2.5 million dinosaur duo: a meat-eating Allosaurus mother and babe, according to Page Six in the New York Post.

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The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Kyl Switch

Written by Elaine Godfrey ( @elainejgodfrey ) Today in 5 Lines Arizona Senator Jon Kyl, who was appointed to replace the late Senator John McCain in September, announced that he will resign from the Senate on December 31. Arizona Governor Doug Ducey is now required to name a Republican replacement for Kyl. Republican Governor Scott Walker of Wisconsin signed legislation stripping powers from the

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A Crushing Injury for Team Parker | Gold Rush

Parker's crew member Chad suffers a terrible hand injury while at work. Stream Full Episodes of Gold Rush: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/gold-rush/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/GoldRush/ https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Gold_Rush https://twitter.com/Discovery We're on Instagr

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Countries Struggle To Agree On Rules For Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions

As a major climate conference nears its end in Poland, negotiators are still haggling over the rules nations must follow in order to meet their commitments to reduce greenhouse gases.

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Climate talks extended as island nations demand action

Weary officials from almost 200 countries faced another day of negotiations at the U.N. climate talks to bridge their last remaining differences as small island nations on Friday demanded an ambitious stance against global warming.

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California mandates 100-percent zero-emission bus fleet

California moved Friday to eliminate fossil fuels from its fleet of 12,000 transit buses, enacting a first-in-the-nation mandate that will vastly increase the number of electric buses on the road.

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Tiny ‘Zombies’ Rising from the Tundra

“There are several things about Longyearbyen that may seem ‘strange’ to visitors,” warns the Norwegian city’s tourist board . One of the northernmost settlements in the world, Longyearbyen, which is on the island of Svalbard, is home to 2,100 residents from almost 50 countries—most of whom weren’t born there. “This is not a place people spend their entire lives or where families are continued thr

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Q&A: Albinism Strips Pigment From the Body, Including the Eyes

The pigment shortage may cause eyes to appear pink or red. In fact, the coloring results from exposed blood vessels.

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Being a father to a school-age girl makes men less sexist, study suggests

The study tracked the responses of more than 5,000 men over the course of a decade. The results showed that men who lived with daughters were less likely to hold traditional views on gender relations and roles. This effect seemed to be strongest as the daughters entered secondary-school age. None A new study suggests that being a father to a school-age girl causes men to hold less traditional vie

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I Grønland mærker de klimaforandringerne på egen krop

Otte ud af ti indbyggere i Grønland har oplevet klimaforandringerne i deres eget liv, viser ny…

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We now know how much starlight there’s ever been

Scientists track gamma rays across the universe's extragalactic background to calculate all of the starlight ever produced. For 10.8 billion years, star production has been decelerating. The research team measured nine years worth of data from the universe's 739 known blazars. The good news is that scientists believe they've figured out how much starlight the universe has ever produced since the

1h

Lin-Manuel Miranda's Hogwarts House? Slytherin, Naturally

Makes sense. Slytherin are known for their resourcefulness and ambition.

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Wiring diagram of the brain provides a clearer picture of brain scan data

In a study published today in the journal BRAIN, neuroscientists led by Michael D. Fox, M.D., Ph.D., of Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) used data from the human brain connectome — a publicly available 'wiring diagram' of the human brain based on data from thousands of healthy human volunteers — to reassess the findings from neuroimaging studies of patients with Alzheimer's disease.

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Alzheimer's-Related Protein Can Spread by Tainted Growth Hormone

A hormone treatment contaminated with amyloid-β given to mice caused the protein’s accumulation in their brains, suggesting the same could have occurred in humans given the therapy.

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Trump Is Helping the Saudis Starve Yemen

In The Imperial Presidency , the historian Arthur M. Schlesinger Jr. warned that the habit of “indiscriminate global intervention , far from strengthening American security, seemed rather to weaken it by involving the United States in remote, costly and mysterious wars, fought in ways that shamed the nation before the world and, even when thus fought, demonstrating only the inability of the most

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Trump’s Ability to Manipulate the News Cycle

As the number of scandals surrounding the White House grows, so does, it seems, the president’s free time—and his ability to change the narrative. It would take an exceptionally bad string of events to crown any one week the most tumultuous of Donald Trump’s presidency, but the past few days have been a strong contender. The Department of Justice implicated Trump in a scheme to pay two of his all

2h

UNC Punts on Silent Sam

There was shock, then backlash. Last week, officials at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill announced their plans for the infamous Confederate statue known as Silent Sam, and it hardly satisfied anyone. On Friday, protestors converged outside of the Center for Leadership Development at Chapel Hill as, inside, the UNC system’s Board of Governors met to deliberate on the university’s pl

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New data shows that Fentanyl kills more people than heroin

Health These four charts show how the opioid epidemic is evolving. Since 2011, overdose deaths have risen by 54 percent, up from 41,340 to 63,632 in 2016. But within those deaths, there are a number of trends emerging.

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These incredibly realistic fake faces show how algorithms can now mess with us

A new approach to AI fakery can generate incredibly realistic faces, with whatever characteristics you’d like.

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Journals Retract 13 Papers from Heart Stem Cell Lab

It's the latest fallout from an investigation by Harvard and Brigham and Women's into work overseen by Piero Anversa.

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NASA moves liquid hydrogen tank to Huntsville for testing

NASA is moving a massive liquid hydrogen tank to Huntsville, Alabama, for testing as part of its plans to eventually return to the moon.

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Tornadoes Don't Form Like Meteorologists Thought They Did

Tornado rotation seems to start right at ground level.

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This weekend’s comet will be the brightest of the year

Space 46P/Wirtanen will be fuzzy, green, and visible with the naked eye. On Sunday, December 16, the comet named 46P/Wirtanen will pass a mere 7 million miles from Earth and will look green and fuzzy as it passes in the night sky.

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1 gene error linked to early-onset dementia

Scientists have discovered a lone mutation in a single gene that causes an inherited form of frontotemporal dementia makes it harder for neurons in the brain to communicate with one another, leading to neurodegeneration. Unlike the more common Alzheimer’s disease, frontotemporal dementia tends to afflict young people. People with the illness typically begin to suffer memory loss by their early 60

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A damming trend

Hundreds of dams are being proposed for Mekong River basin in Southeast Asia. The negative social and environmental consequences—affecting everything from food security to the environment—greatly outweigh the positive changes of this grand-scale flood control, according to new research by Michigan State University.

3h

NASA-NOAA's satellite tracks a stronger Tropical Cyclone Owen nearing landfall

Tropical Cyclone Owen continued to strengthen as it moved east through the Gulf of Carpentaria and toward a landfall in western Queensland, Australia. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided a visible image of the storm.

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Mention of 'fossil fuels' cut from videos at UN climate talks

Videos produced by environmental groups to be shown to thousands of participants in a major UN climate summit were banned by organisers for mentioning fossil fuels, in a move campaigners say amounts to censorship.

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'No evidence' of Huawei spying, says German IT watchdog

Germany's IT watchdog has expressed scepticism about calls for a boycott of Chinese telecoms giant Huawei, saying it has seen no evidence the firm could use its equipment to spy for Beijing, news weekly Spiegel reported Friday.

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Counting the breaths of wild porpoises reveals their revved-up metabolism

A new method tracks harbor porpoises’ breathing to collect rare information on the energy needs of the marine mammals.

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International academic 'Santa survey' shows children stop believing in Father Christmas aged eight

It's that time of year when children look forward to a stocking full of presents—but the first international academic "Santa survey" shows many adults also wish they still believed in Father Christmas and some had felt betrayed when they discovered the truth.

3h

For these critically endangered marine turtles, climate change could be a knockout blow

Hawksbill turtles aren't the only marine turtles threatened by the destabilizing effects of climate change, but a new study from researchers at Florida State University shows that this critically endangered species could be at particular risk.

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Self-driving, burrito-carrying rovers are going to talk to us with their eyes

Technology This cute new robot is a bundle of sensors and smarts. Here’s how it works. Here's what you need to know about the new delivery rover from Postmates.

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Photos of the Week: Sweet Spill, Bovine Rescue, Miss Universe

Big waves in Portugal, holiday lights in Europe, New Year’s preparations in Japan, President Donald Trump’s former attorney sentenced to prison, images from the asteroid Bennu, a flight with Virgin Galactic, a Christmas event in a Brazilian prison, a giant middle finger in Vermont, and much more

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Is James Bond an alcoholic?

A new study analyzes the possibility that Bond has a problem. The lethal super spy generally rocks a killer blood-alcohol level. What's actually so cool about this guy? Sure, Ian Fleming's James Bond is always suave and sort of in control. However, through various actors and reimaginings, alcohol remains one of the few constants. A dry martini, usually, depending on the Bond actor, "shaken, not s

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Scientists maximize the effectiveness of platinum in fuel cells

Scientists have identified a new catalyst that uses only about a quarter as much platinum as current technology by maximizing the effectiveness of the available platinum.

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Age-related immunity loss

Research in mouse cells identifies defective metabolic pathway in aging immune T cells. The pathway is critical for switching T cells from dormancy into illness-fighting mode. In experiments, researchers restored lagging T-cell function by adding small-molecule compounds. Findings suggest possible mechanism behind weakened immunity common in the elderly.

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Scientists overhaul corn domestication story with multidisciplinary analysis

Scientists are revising the history of one of the world's most important crops. Drawing on genetic and archaeological evidence, researchers have found that a predecessor of today's corn plants still bearing many features of its wild ancestor was likely brought to South America from Mexico more than 6,500 years ago. Farmers in Mexico and the southwestern Amazon continued to improve the crop over th

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The Innocent Man Tells Half a Story

The opening scene of The Innocent Man , a new Netflix true-crime series hitting streaming shelves just in time for the holidays, features a television, a prominently displayed copy of The Innocent Man by John Grisham, and a quote from Anaïs Nin: “We see things as we are, not as they are.” That Anaïs Nin? The novelist, diarist, and pioneer of female erotica? It’s hard not to feel as if she’s cited

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Radio Atlantic: Does the NRA Connect Trump to Russia?

Subscribe to Radio Atlantic: Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Google Play This week saw lots of developments in Mueller’s investigation: Paul Manafort, Michael Cohen, David Pecker, and Maria Butina—who on Thursday became the first Russian national convicted of seeking to influence the 2016 election. As part of Russia’s years-long effort to cozy up to the American right , Butina gained access

4h

New research may upend what we know about how tornadoes form

New data on the birth of tornadoes suggest that the twisters don’t form from the top down.

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Ebola-fighting protein discovered in human cells

Researchers have discovered a human protein that helps fight the Ebola virus and could one day lead to an effective therapy against the deadly disease, according to a new study. The newly discovered ability of the human protein RBBP6 to interfere with Ebola virus replication suggests new ways to fight the infection.

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Atmospheric aerosol formation from biogenic vapors is strongly affected by air pollutants

According to a recent study, air pollution not only affects air quality, but it also changes the pathways along which new particles are formed in the atmosphere.

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Scientific basis for EPA's Endangerment Finding is stronger than ever

The evidence used to support the EPA's 2009 Endangerment Finding on greenhouse gases is even stronger and more conclusive now. This finding comes three months after a senior Republican senator said that the Trump Administration might still try to repeal the landmark decision.

4h

Shrinking objects to the nanoscale

Researchers have invented a new way to fabricate nanoscale 3D objects of nearly any shape. They can also pattern the objects with a variety of useful materials, including metals, semiconducting quantum dots, and DNA.

4h

Noncoding mutations contribute to autism risk

A whole-genome sequencing study of nearly 2,000 families has implicated mutations in 'promoter regions' of the genome — regions that precede the start of a gene — in autism. The study is the first genome-wide analysis to uncover a role for mutations in the noncoding portion of the genome in any human condition.

4h

The Rap War in Calabasas

The feud between Kanye West and Drake, reignited by an Epic of Gilgamesh– length stream of tweets from West on Thursday night that Drake has not yet publicly responded to, involves violence and illness, race and family, music and capitalism. It started, though, with swimming. “Since the pool line he’s been trying to poke at me and fuck with me,” West tweeted , likely referring to these Drake lyri

4h

Atlantic Readers Share Their Favorite Books of 2018

We Asked Readers: What was the best book you read in 2018, and why? Here’s how they responded. My favorite book of 2018 was Melmoth by Sarah Perry. On its surface, this book is about the narrator’s encounter with a supernatural specter—an immortal witch known as Melmoth, or the witness, who observes people’s worst deeds and then stalks them with the intention of convincing them to follow her on h

4h

Colorado River Delta report provides restoration road map

Four growing seasons after the engineered spring flood of the Colorado River Delta in March 2014, the delta's birds, plants and groundwater continue to benefit. The diversity and abundance of birds of special conservation concern remains high in the restoration sites, groundwater was recharged and some of the trees are now more than 14 feet (4.2 meters) tall, according to a new article.

4h

Quantum chemical calculations on quantum computers

A new quantum algorithm has been implemented for quantum chemical calculations such as Full-CI on quantum computers without exponential/combinatorial explosion, giving exact solutions of Schroedinger Equations for atoms and molecules, for the first time.

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How complexity science can quickly detect climate record anomalies

When making sense of the massive amount of information packed into an ice core, scientists face a forensic challenge: how best to separate the useful information from the corrupt. Tools from information theory, a branch of complexity science, can quickly flag which segments, in over a million data points, require further investigation.

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Scientists warn of slow progress towards United Nations biodiversity targets

Researchers praises widespread commitment but call for broader participation to better protect global marine ecosystems.

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Cutting emissions proves a sticking point at Poland climate talks

Slow progress on 2015 Paris agreement comes as scientists warn of need to get on track Negotiators at the climate conference in Poland have inched closer to an outcome, as the official deadline for finishing a deal ran out. The conference was meant to approve a rulebook which would govern how nations put into action the goals set in the landmark Paris agreement of 2015, when the world resolved to

4h

At least 340,000 Americans died from radioactive fallout between 1951 and 1973

Hiroshima and Nagasaki resulted in the deaths of hundreds of thousands. But new research shows that domestic U.S. nuclear tests likely killed more. The new research tracked an unlikely vector for radioactive transmission: dairy cows. The study serves as a reminder of the insidious and deadly nature of nuclear weapons. None When we think of nuclear disasters, a few names probably come to mind. The

5h

Gadget Lab Podcast: Climate Change and Cognitive Dissonance

Climate change is real, and it’s impacting us right now. How much of it can be fixed by personal responsibility versus policy?

5h

Researchers use jiggly Jell-O to make powerful new hydrogen fuel catalyst

A cheap and effective new catalyst developed by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, can generate hydrogen fuel from water just as efficiently as platinum, currently the best — but also most expensive — water-splitting catalyst out there.The catalyst, which is composed of nanometer-thin sheets of metal carbide, is manufactured using a self-assembly process that relies on a surp

5h

Endangered northern bettongs aren’t picky truffle eaters

Without the northern bettong, the variety of Australia’s truffle-producing fungi could take a hit, a new study finds.

5h

Adhesives for biomedical applications can be detached with light

Pulling off a little plastic bandage may soon get a lot less painful. Researchers have developed a new type of adhesive that can strongly adhere wet materials — such as hydrogel and living tissue — and be easily detached with a specific frequency of light. The adhesives could be used to attach and painlessly detach wound dressings, transdermal drug delivery devices, and wearable robotics.

5h

A Salamander of Legend Emerges From Southern Swamps

The reticulated siren is the largest vertebrate discovered in the United States in decades.

5h

Trilobites: Watch This Wolf Go Fishing

Yes, researchers in Minnesota have recorded wolves diving into a stream to grab a meal.

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Does dark matter really cause skin cancer? Have a guess.

A far-out theory proposed earlier this year falls apart under closer examination, says a new study.

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When kids anticipate touch, it takes focus

The ability to anticipate also indicates an ability to focus, according to a new study of young children. The study examines what happens in children’s brains when they anticipate a touch to the hand, and relates this brain activity to the executive functions the child demonstrates on other mental tasks. Anticipation is often viewed as an emotional experience, an eager wait for something to happe

5h

Nasa's Juno probe films Jupiter's storms – video

Nasa's Juno craft has captured the chaotic weather systems on Jupiter as well as taken new measurements that will help to build a map of the planet's interior. The $1.1bn probe entered into an orbit pattern in July 2016 on a mission to peer through the clouds that shroud Jupiter and learn how the planet, and ultimately all the planets in our solar system were formed around the nascent sun 4.5bn y

5h

What Chewed-Up Gum Reveals About Life in the Stone Age

No one today quite understands how they did it, but people in the Stone Age could turn ribbons of birch bark into sticky, black tar. They used this tar to make tools, fixing arrowheads onto arrows and blades onto axes. And they chewed it, as evidenced by teeth marks in some lumps. These unassuming lumps of chewed birch-bark tar turn out to be an extraordinary source of ancient DNA. This month, tw

5h

Breastfeeding for more than 6 months associated with smaller maternal waist circumference

Breastfeeding for more than 6 months was found to be independently associated with smaller waist circumference in the decade after delivery among women in the POUCHmoms Study.

5h

A damming trend

Hundreds of dams are being proposed for Mekong River basin in Southeast Asia. The negative social and environmental consequences — affecting everything from food security to the environment — greatly outweigh the positive changes of this grand-scale flood control, according to new research by Michigan State University.

5h

NASA-NOAA's satellite tracks a stronger Tropical Cyclone Owen nearing landfall

Tropical Cyclone Owen continued to strengthen as it moved east through the Gulf of Carpentaria and toward a landfall in western Queensland, Australia. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided a visible image of the storm.

5h

Levels of gene-expression-regulating enzyme altered in brains of people with schizophrenia

A study using a PET scan tracer developed at the Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging at Massachusetts General Hospital has identified, for the first time, epigenetic differences between the brains of living individuals with schizophrenia and those of unaffected study participants.

5h

For these critically endangered marine turtles, climate change could be a knockout blow

Researchers suggest that projected increases in air temperatures, rainfall inundation and blistering solar radiation could significantly reduce hawksbill hatching success at a selection of major nesting beaches.

5h

Can stem cells help a diseased heart heal itself? Researcher achieves important milestone

Scientists have taken an important step toward the goal of making diseased hearts heal themselves — a new model that would reduce the need for bypass surgery, heart transplants or artificial pumping devices.

5h

Self-perception and reality seem to line-up when it comes to judging our own personality

When it comes to personality, it turns out your peers probably think the same way about you as you do about yourself.

5h

Early physical therapy can reduce risk, amount of long-term opioid use, study finds

Patients who underwent physical therapy soon after being diagnosed with pain in the shoulder, neck, low back or knee were approximately 7 to 16 percent less likely to use opioids in the subsequent months, according to a new study.

5h

Experts Urge U.S. to Continue Support for Nuclear Fusion Research

An international fusion project could help the nation eventually develop its own, smaller reactor — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Join Blue Planet II Live-Tweet

Starting December 16, ocean scientists will live-tweet the BBC documentary series Blue Planet II, available via Netflix. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Er du bange for nåle? Vaccine-piller kan blive fremtiden

Danske forskere arbejder på at lave en pille, der kan erstatte stikket med vaccination. Det kan gøre det nemmere og billigere at vaccinere i ulande.

5h

Self-perception and reality seem to line-up when it comes to judging our own personality

When it comes to personality, it turns out your peers probably think the same way about you as you do about yourself

5h

Can stem cells help a diseased heart heal itself? Researcher achieves important milestone

A team of Rutgers scientists have taken an important step toward the goal of making diseased hearts heal themselves — a new model that would reduce the need for bypass surgery, heart transplants or artificial pumping devices.

5h

For these critically endangered marine turtles, climate change could be a knockout blow

Researchers from FSU's Department of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Science suggest that projected increases in air temperatures, rainfall inundation and blistering solar radiation could significantly reduce hawksbill hatching success at a selection of major nesting beaches.

5h

UMN medical school researchers study abnormal blood glucose levels of discharged patients

University of Minnesota Medical School researchers decided to delve into an area where little data currently exists. They wanted to know what happens after these patients with abnormal blood glucose measurements are discharged? Are uncontrolled blood glucose levels associated with worse outcomes after patients are discharged from the hospital? Surprisingly, despite a large body of literature aroun

5h

International academic 'Santa survey' shows children stop believing in Father Christmas aged 8

It's that time of year when children look forward to a stocking full of presents — but the first international academic 'Santa survey' shows many adults also wish they still believed in Father Christmas and some had felt betrayed when they discovered the truth.

5h

Study 'Proves' Parachutes Don't Save People Who Fall Out of Airplanes

You might think that it's safer to jump out of an airplane with a parachute than without one. But, according to science, you'd be wrong.

5h

How long can an event hold humanity's attention? There's an equation for that.

Science Societies forget, and this physicist wants to know why. A team of social scientists tried to create a qualitative method for analyzing the process by which societies forget. The results were published this week.

6h

Facebook Exposed 6.8 Million Users' Photos to Cap Off a Terrible 2018

In the latest in its long string of 2018 incidents, Facebook let developers access the private photos of millions of users.

6h

Colorado River Delta report provides restoration road map

Four growing seasons after the engineered spring flood of the Colorado River Delta in March 2014, the delta's birds, plants and groundwater continue to benefit, according to a report prepared for the International Boundary and Water Commission by a binational University of Arizona-led team.

6h

Viktor Orbán Is Exploiting Anti-Semitism

Last week’s cover of the Hungarian business magazine Figyelő featured András Heisler, head of the Federation of Hungarian Jewish Communities. The problem? Paper money—20,000 forint bills—floated around and over the picture of Heisler, with one appearing to protrude from his forehead. The federation, Hungary’s largest Jewish group, condemned the cover, which it described as “incitement,” saying it

6h

Process Crimes and Misdemeanors

On this much, hizzoner’s critics and defenders have tended to agree: The greatest accomplishment of Rudy Giuliani’s career was how he cleaned up crime in New York City during his time as mayor. When he entered office, the city was riddled with crimes both serious (there had been more than 2,000 murders in 1990, the peak year ) and petty (people urinating in public or the infamous squeegee men ext

6h

Prostate cancer: New computer model enables researchers to predict course of disease

How does a normal cell turn into a deadly cancer? Seeking an answer to this Question researchers examined the tumor genomes of nearly 300 prostate cancer patients. Their findings describe the ways in which changes in the prostate cells' genetic information pave the way for cancer development. Using a newly developed computer model, it is now possible to predict the course of the disease in individ

6h

A young star caught forming like a planet

Astronomers have captured one of the most detailed views of a young star taken to date, and revealed an unexpected companion in orbit around it.

6h

A co-worker's rudeness can affect your sleep — and your partner's

A new study found workplace incivilities has the potential to not only negatively affect an employee's sleep but their partner's as well.

6h

Mammalian keratin genes and adaptation to living on land or sea

Scientists have performed one of the largest comparative genomic studies to help determine the key molecular and evolutionary origins of mammalian adaptations seen in skin proteins.

6h

A painless adhesive: Adhesives for biomedical applications can be detached with light

Pulling off a Band-Aid may soon get a lot less painful.

6h

Colorado River Delta report provides restoration road map

Four growing seasons after the engineered spring flood of the Colorado River Delta in March 2014, the delta's birds, plants and groundwater continue to benefit. The diversity and abundance of birds of special conservation concern remains high in the restoration sites, groundwater was recharged and some of the trees are now more than 14 feet (4.2 meters) tall, according to an International Boundary

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You Can't Save a Species If It Doesn't Have a Name

A newly discovered plant genus could be wiped out by dams and mining. Could giving it a name save it from extinction? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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A role for microRNAs in social behavior

Researchers have uncovered a microRNA cluster that regulates synaptic strength and is involved in the control of social behavior in mammals. The researchers presume that their discovery may point to new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of social deficits in neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism spectrum disorder or schizophrenia.

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The Atlantic Hires Michael Owen as Deputy Editor of TheAtlantic.com

As The Atlantic continues rapid expansion in the newsroom and across the organization, editor in chief Jeffrey Goldberg and editor of TheAtlantic.com Adrienne LaFrance announced that Michael Owen has been hired as a deputy editor on the digital team. Owen most recently ran The New York Times ’s news team responsible for digital presentation, programming, and audience strategies. When Owen begins

19min

Parents' brain activity 'echoes' their infant's brain activity when they play together

Research shows for the first time that when adults are engaged in joint play together with their infant, the parents' brains show bursts of high-frequency activity, which are linked to their baby's attention patterns and not their own.

22min

IPCC to take greater account of carbon storage by agroforestry systems

Researchers have established coefficients for carbon storage in the soil and aboveground and belowground biomass of different agroforestry systems.

22min

Half-Size, Ruffle-Headed Relative of Triceratops Discovered

If head frills were a fashion statement, a newly identified 73-million-year-old triceratops relative was certainly at the top of its game.

38min

Home improvement gifts for people who love getting their hands dirty

Gift Guides You know, those people that are always outside making you look lazy. Put that smart light bulb back in the re-gifting pile. Here's a gift guide for the friend or family member who is always outdoors, cutting up brush, and posting photos…

41min

HIV vaccine protects non-human primates from infection

New research shows that an experimental HIV vaccine strategy works in non-human primates. In the study, rhesus macaque monkeys produced neutralizing antibodies against one strain of HIV that resembles the resilient viral form that most commonly infects people, called a Tier 2 virus.

42min

Early physical therapy can reduce risk, amount of long-term opioid use, study finds

Patients who underwent physical therapy soon after being diagnosed with pain in the shoulder, neck, low back or knee were approximately 7 to 16 percent less likely to use opioids in the subsequent months, according to a new study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine and the Duke University School of Medicine.

42min

Characteristics of physicians excluded from public insurance programs

This study examined the characteristics of physicians excluded from Medicare and state public insurance programs for fraud, health care crimes or unlawful prescribing of controlled substances. There were 2,222 physicians (0.3 percent) excluded temporarily or permanently between 2007 and 2017 based on federal data. Exclusion rates were highest in the West and Southeast, with West Virginia having th

42min

Is early physical therapy associated with less opioid use in patients with musculoskeletal pain?

The use of early physical therapy in a study of nearly 89,000 US adults with musculoskeletal pain of the shoulder, neck, knee and low back was associated with a lower likelihood of subsequent opioid use in an analysis of health insurance claims from 2007 to 2015. For patients who did use opioids, early physical therapy was associated with reduced opioid use for shoulder, knee and low back pain but

42min

We train Colombian woolly monkeys to be wild again – and maybe save them from extinction

Colombia's Andes Mountains used to be loaded with wildlife, including South America's sole bear species, the spectacle bear, and the mountain tapir, which lives only in the world's highest altitudes.

56min

Researchers verify that agricultural biodiversity is an effective tool to fight plagues

Researchers of the Ecophysiology and Biotechnology group of the Universitat Jaume I (UJI) in Castellón, Spain, have taken part in a study that reveals how agricultural biodiversity is an effective tool for combatting plagues and the effects that climate change has on crops. The results of the work, now published in Frontiers in Plant Science, show that preservation of traditional varieties improve

56min

Improv training may curb anxiety for teens

Improvisational theater training can reduce fearfulness and anxiety among teens struggling with social interactions, according to a new study. School-based improv theater—performing without a script or preparation—may be effective for social phobias and anxiety disorders because it offers a low stigma, low cost, and more accessible context for help in reducing these symptoms, researchers say. Par

56min

The Books Briefing: All the Lonely People

If you’re lonely, you’re not alone. A sense of isolation is strikingly common among Americans of all ages, as Kristen Radtke found out while working on a forthcoming book. Her graphic essays, like the other stories collected below, capture the unique, inarticulable, yet always recognizable feelings that come with a failure to connect . Nafkote Tamirat weaves a haunting mystery from the alienating

59min

How do cellular machines unfold misfolded proteins?

Protein chains typically fold to function. Folding is a complex process and if done correctly leads to a unique functional fold topology for a given protein chain. Other topologies are also possible but are often non-functional or toxic. These misfolded proteins are then unfolded and subsequently refolded to the correct fold topology; otherwise, they undergo degradation.

1h

The Grimch: Evil Cubes

The Grimch was pondering, thinking hard with his noggin, What mean thing could he make for players who log in? He hatched a plan to foil both old players and n00bs It was quite shocking, it was called “Evil Cubes!” Badges for your efforts: 90% accuracy or higher – Evil Cubes Grandmaster 80% accuracy or higher – Evil Cubes Master Everyone else who completes all 12 cubes – Evil Cubes Challenger … a

1h

A painless adhesive

Pulling off a Band-Aid may soon get a lot less painful. Researchers from Harvard and Xi'an Jiaotong University in China have developed a new type of adhesive that can strongly adhere wet materials — such as hydrogel and living tissue — and be easily detached with a specific frequency of light. The adhesives could be used to attach and painlessly detach wound dressings, transdermal drug delivery

1h

The most important thing you can do to fight climate change: talk about it | Katharine Hayhoe

How do you talk to someone who doesn't believe in climate change? Not by rehashing the same data and facts we've been discussing for years, says climate scientist Katharine Hayhoe. In this inspiring, pragmatic talk, Hayhoe shows how the key to having a real discussion is to connect over shared values like family, community and religion — and to prompt people to realize that they already care abou

1h

Clothing patch is like a personal heating system

Instead of turning up the thermostat, high-tech, flexible patches sewn into your clothes may one day keep you warm and significantly reduce your electric bill and carbon footprint at the same time. Engineers have discovered a way to use intense pulses of light to fuse tiny silver wires with polyester to make thin, durable heating patches. Their heating performance is nearly 70 percent higher than

1h

How an app can help fight loneliness in old people at Christmas

Loneliness, as a leading cause of depression and obesity, is believed to cost £6,000 per person in health and social care services. Loneliness is especially prevalent during the winter holidays, perhaps intensified by the short days, bad weather and the impression that everyone else is enjoying the festive season with family and friends.

1h

Plan for food waste to be separated

People will have to separate their food waste to combat methane emissions

1h

Protein involved in nematode stress response identified

When humans experience stress, their inner turmoil may not be apparent to an outside observer. But many animals deal with stressful circumstances — overcrowded conditions, not enough food — by completely remodeling their bodies. These stress-induced forms, whether they offer a protective covering or more camouflaged coloration, can better withstand the challenge and help the animal survive until

1h

Missing ocean monitoring instrument found after five years at sea

After going missing on Christmas Day five years ago, deep ocean measuring equipment belonging to the UK's National Oceanography Centre (NOC) has just been found on a beach in Tasmania by a local resident after making an incredible 14,000 km journey across the ocean.

1h

A space playground for the fourth state of matter

A recipe to understand atomic structures:

1h

There is hope amidst environmental anxiety, says a scholar of ecotheology

Climate change affects everyone. Awareness of the vast scope and rapid pace of the required adjustments may cause feelings of impotence. According to Panu Pihkala, an ecotheologian, the power of constructive actions and political influence is also inherent in the correct processing of eco-anxiety.

1h

The Torturous Psychology of 10-Minute Tasks

I’m trying to construct an alternative theory of myself in which I’m a tidy person. It’s not going well. Walking my recycling from my apartment to the trash room down the hall takes me anywhere from two minutes to a month. I hate looking at broken-down boxes and empty LaCroix cans in my apartment, but studies say humans are bad at prioritizing long-term goals over instant gratification, and I app

1h

Nations still worlds apart at crunch UN climate summit

Nations at UN climate talks were haggling Friday over the world's plan to avert disaster as host Poland dumped a draft decision text on delegates just hours before the summit was due to end.

1h

Image: Mount Triglav, Slovenia

The Copernicus Sentinel-2A satellite takes us over Mount Triglav in Slovenia. At 2800 m above sea level, the mountain is the highest in the country and a significant source of national pride, even featuring on the Slovenian coat of arms. Milan Kucan, the former president, famously once said that it was the duty of every countryman and woman to scale the mountain at least once in their lives.

1h

First-ever footage of wolves hunting freshwater fish captured near Voyageurs National Park

The Voyageurs Wolf Project, a collaboration between the University of Minnesota and Voyageurs National Park, has followed GPS-collared wolves from over seven different packs since 2015, but the "Bowman Bay" pack was recently caught displaying a unique behavior: hunting freshwater fish.

1h

A holiday gift to primary care doctors: Proof of their time crunch

The average primary care doctor needs to work six more hours a day than they already do, in order to make sure their patients get all the preventive and early-detection care they deserve, a new study finds. Fortunately, the new study was written as a parody — no one is asking doctors to work past midnight every night. At least, not yet.

1h

Study peels back details on mammalian keratin genes and adaptation to living on land or sea

Whether by land or by sea, mammals live in a diverse variety of protective skins adapted against the elements, from swimming in the deepest azure oceans to climbing precipitous mountain peaks.

1h

How complexity science can quickly detect climate record anomalies

The history of our climate is written in ice. Reading it is a matter of deciphering the complex signals pulled from tens of thousands of years of accumulated isotopes frozen miles below the surface of Antarctica.

1h

Scientists warn of slow progress towards United Nations biodiversity targets

Scientists from the United States and Brazil warn that the current global progress toward United Nations (UN) sustainability goals is not fast enough to avert the biodiversity crisis. A scientific team led by the California Academy of Sciences evaluated progress toward current biodiversity targets put forth by the UN Convention for Biological Diversity specifically aimed at protecting the world's

1h

Trilobites: One of Nature’s Smallest Flowering Plants Can Survive Inside of a Duck

If one duckweed lands where a bird relieves itself, it’s capable of eventually creating a dense mat of duckweeds where there were none before.

1h

How US Corn Farmers Adapted to Climate Change

How US Corn Farmers Adapted to Climate Change Changing weather and planting practices in recent decades have led to increased corn yields, but whether the findings will apply to other crops and regions remains unknown. Corn-Solar-Sensor.jpg Solar-powered soil water station in corn field Image credits: Nancy Davis/United States Department of Agriculture Earth Friday, December 14, 2018 – 10:00 Gabr

1h

How Amazon delivers holiday gifts from the buy button to your door: Go inside a fulfillment center

A couple of weeks before Christmas, the inside of an Amazon Robotics fulfillment center near Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport looks more industrial than anything having to do with holiday shopping.

1h

Archaeologist debunks the myth of "the nearly naked Bushmen"

It is said that "clothes maketh the man."

1h

Predicting the accuracy of a neural network prior to training

Constructing a neural network model for each new dataset is the ultimate nightmare for every data scientist. What if you could forecast the accuracy of the neural network earlier thanks to accumulated experience and approximation? This was the goal of a recent project at IBM Research and the result is TAPAS or Train-less Accuracy Predictor for Architecture Search (click for demo). Its trick is tha

1h

1h

Don’t be shy: a dose of narcissism is good for you | Oliver Burkeman

The unhealthy narcissist’s secret fear is that if he’s not God, he’s nothing. The healthy narcissist knows the middle way In what undoubtedly qualifies as one of the sickest burns in modern politics, Denmark’s finance minister, Kristian Jensen, observed last year , “There are two kinds of European nations: there are small nations and there are countries that have not yet realised they are small n

2h

Africa: An air pollution wildcard

For the past four years, atmospheric scientists have been flying around the world with NASA on a mission to analyze pollution chemistry in the air and oceans. The NASA Atmospheric Tomography Mission or ATom, which flew its last campaign this spring, discovered unexpected levels of pollutants over the Pacific, Atlantic and Arctic oceans.

2h

On the horizon: Looking ahead for global conservation

Every year for the last decade, an expert team of horizon scanners, science communicators and researchers have identified the top emerging issues in global conservation. This year's team included Fauna & Flora International's (FFI) Head of Marine Conservation, Nicola Frost, with the results published in the scientific journal Trends in Ecology and Evolution.

2h

Orangutans can communicate about the past just like humans, new research finds

The evolution of language converted a defenceless naked ape into a world-dominating force. It fundamentally transformed how humans transmit information and knowledge. A large and potent component of language is our ability to communicate about things that are not here, that happened in the past, or that will happen in the future. This feature of language is known as "displaced reference".

2h

Huge Brain Study Uncovers "Buried" Genetic Networks Linked to Mental Illness

Enormous genomic analysis yields tantalizing insights into mechanisms behind conditions such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

Scientists warn of slow progress towards United Nations biodiversity targets

Team praises widespread commitment but calls for broader participation to better protect global marine ecosystems.

2h

NIH scientists find that breast cancer protection from pregnancy starts decades later

In general, women who have had children have a lower risk of breast cancer compared to women who have never given birth. However, new research has found that moms don't experience this breast cancer protection until many years later and may face elevated risk for more than 20 years after their last pregnancy.

2h

Building an AI to predict if you carry a killer on your skin

Machine learning to successfully predict the risk of developing possibly life-threatening infection from the genomic features of a bacterial isolate.

2h

The feature size and functional range of molecular electronic devices

The tunneling leakage is a major quantum obstacle which hinders further miniaturization of electronic devices. To explore the miniaturization limits of molecular electronics, the oligo(aryleneethynylene) (OAE) molecules were employed to investigate the transition between through-space tunneling and molecular tunneling. For the shortest OAE molecule, the intrinsic single-molecule charge transport c

2h

How complexity science can quickly detect climate record anomalies

When making sense of the massive amount of information packed into an ice core, scientists face a forensic challenge: how best to separate the useful information from the corrupt.Tools from information theory, a branch of complexity science, can quickly flag which segments, in over a million data points, require further investigation.

2h

Alzheimer peripheral blood: mRNA expression of amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme

Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia in elderly populations. Changes in the expression of the amyloid precursor protein (APP)-cleaving enzymes directly affect the formation of amyloid beta (Aβ) plaques, a neuropathological hallmark of AD.BACE1 mRNA level in AD subjects was significantly higher than those of healthy controls, whereas ADAM10 level was significantly lower in

2h

Hundreds of Photos Form a Single Portrait of Britain’s Decline

In her latest work of digital collage, artist Emily Allchurch takes on economic inequality and the real estate bubble.

2h

Women don't speak up over workplace harassment because no one hears them if they do

There are good reasons why those experiencing sexual harassment – particularly in the workplace – don't report it at the time it occurs. To do so is likely to result in ostracism, exclusion, career suicide or a direct threat to a complainant's ongoing employment.

2h

Weather monitoring from the ground up

Many startups tailor their first product or service to a specific market segment in order to validate their ideas and get some early traction. Far fewer develop a solution to such a fundamental problem that they explore several markets simultaneously, but ClimaCell has done just that.

2h

When teens sleep in, grades go up

When school begins later, teens get more snooze time—and grades and attendance improve, a new study shows. After public schools in Seattle reorganized school start times, teens got more sleep on school nights—a median increase of 34 minutes of sleep each night. This boosted the total amount of sleep on school nights from a median of six hours and 50 minutes, under the earlier start time, to seven

2h

Quantum chemical calculations on quantum computers

A new quantum algorithm has been implemented for quantum chemical calculations such as Full-CI on quantum computers without exponential/combinatorial explosion, giving exact solutions of Schroedinger Equations for atoms and molecules, for the first time.

2h

How does diet during pregnancy impact allergies in offspring?

A small percentage of women said they consumed fewer allergens during pregnancy to stave off food allergies in their newborns, according to preliminary research Karen Robbins, M.D., presented during the American College of Asthma Allergy and Immunology 2018 Annual Scientific Meeting.

2h

A role for microRNAs in social behavior

Researchers have uncovered a microRNA cluster that regulates synaptic strength and is involved in the control of social behavior in mammals. The researchers presume that their discovery may point to new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of social deficits in neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism spectrum disorder or schizophrenia. The research is published today in EMBO Reports.

2h

Correlation of stroke and dementia with death: A study from the Swedish dementia registry

Patients who died of IS the most common type of dementia was vascular dementia while those died from other causes were most often diagnosed with Alzheimer's dementia (AD). Patients who died from IS and were registered in Riksstroke had higher MMSE score compared to other groups. Patients who died from IS took more cardiovascular medications. There were no differences in the use of antipsychotics,

2h

Atmospheric aerosol formation from biogenic vapors is strongly affected by air pollutants

According to a recent study published in the journal Science Advances, air pollution not only affects air quality, but it also changes the pathways along which new particles are formed in the atmosphere.

2h

Prostate cancer: New computer model enables researchers to predict course of disease

How does a normal cell turn into a deadly cancer? Seeking an answer to this Question researchers from Charité — Universitätsmedizin Berlin examined the tumor genomes of nearly 300 prostate cancer patients. Their findings describe the ways in which changes in the prostate cells' genetic information pave the way for cancer development. Using a newly developed computer model, it is now possible to p

2h

Hospitalizations for homeless individuals are on the rise

Data from a new retrospective cohort study suggest a rise in acute hospital use among homeless individuals for mental illness and substance use disorder.

2h

Native cherries are a bit mysterious, and possibly inside-out

People don't like parasites. But there's a local Aussie tree that's only a little bit parasitic: the native cherry, or cherry ballart.

2h

Scientists dismiss the idea of travel through wormholes

A RUDN employee and Brazilian colleagues have called into question the concept of using stable wormholes as portals to different points of space-time. The results of the studies were published in Physical Review D.

2h

How to wrap wine bottles, tennis racquets, and other weird shapes

DIY With paper, scissors, and tape—no gift bags required. Not every gift fits that traditional rectangular shape. Here are a few ways to wrap weirdly-shaped items with nothing but wrapping paper, tape, and scissors.

2h

Soybean oil driving technology to improve roadways

Holiday drivers who find that roadwork is driving them crazy may find in future years that a Purdue University-affiliated startup can seal the deal for a merrier journey.

2h

Are reef corals stressed or just pessimistic?

Climate change threatens coral reefs around the globe. The high temperatures associated with this phenomenon can lead to "bleaching," the breakdown of the symbiosis between corals and the algae that live within their cells. Since corals are nourished by these photosynthetically active algal "symbionts," bleaching – so called because the coral tissues become clear/white, exposing the white skeleton

2h

Satellite Spies Methane Bubbling up from Arctic Permafrost

Radar instrument aboard a Japanese probe can spot signs of gas seeping from lakes that form as the ground thaws — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

The role of lipid nanoparticles and its surface modification in reaching the brain

Nanomedicine is a field of science that employs materials in the nanometer scale.Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD) are the most common disorders worldwide, becoming a serious economic burden and public health problem.In this review, we have highlighted the potential of lipid nanoparticles in reaching the brain, a challenging task in modern medicine.

2h

A summary of electrospun nanofibers as drug delivery system

Recently, electrospun polymeric nanofibers have proven to be an interesting strategy for drug delivery systems application.This review presents an overview of the reported drugs loaded into polymeric nanofibers, to be used as drug delivery systems.

2h

Vitamin E TPGS emulsified vinorelbine bitartrate loaded solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN)

Vinorelbine bitartrate (VRL), a semi synthetic vinca alkaloid approved for breast cancer, has been proven to be beneficial as first line and subsequent therapies. However, its hydrophilic and thermo labile nature provides hindrance to oral clinical translation. The current work focused on the application of DOE a modern statistical optimization tool for the development and optimization of a solid

2h

Birth of a hybrid

Scientists from NUST MISIS and the Merzhanov Institute of Structural Macrokinetics & Materials Science have developed a new method for producing bulk MAX-phases — layered materials which simultaneously possess the properties of metals and ceramics. By combining the methods of self-propagating high-temperature synthesis and high-temperature shear deformation, it was possible to obtain sufficiently

2h

Folate deficiency creates hitherto unknown problems in connection with cell division

Folate deficiency creates more problems in connection with DNA replication than researchers had hitherto assumed, researchers from the University of Copenhagen show in a new study. Once a person lacks folate, the damage caused by this cannot be reversed. The researchers therefore encourage people to be more aware of the level of folate in the blood.

2h

Foxes in the city: Citizen science helps researchers to study urban wildlife

A team of researchers led by wildlife ecologist Theresa Walter analyzed over 1,100 fox sightings made by the public as part of the citizen science project StadtWildTiere (www.stadtwildtiere.at). The joint team of researchers from the Vetmeduni Vienna and the University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna (BOKU) now showed that foxes prefer specific city areas and environments. The study

2h

RNAIII (RIP) & Deriv. as potential tools for the treatment of S. aureus biofilm infections

S. aureus under the biofilm mode of growth is often related to several nosocomial infections, more frequently associated with indwelling medical devices (catheters, prostheses, portacaths or heart valves).The present paper will provide an overview on the activity and potential applications of RIP as biofilm inhibiting compound, useful in the management of S. aureus biofilm infections.

2h

Study shows magnesium optimizes vitamin D status

A randomized trial by Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center researchers indicates that magnesium optimizes vitamin D status, raising it in people with deficient levels and lowering it in people with high levels.

2h

Retsmedicinere finder kroppens hemmeligheder

Politiet bruger forskellige grene af retsmedicin, når forbrydelser eller dødsfald skal opklares.

2h

Moun­tain birds de­clin­ing in Europe

Population data for European mountain birds had been combined in a recent study, with worrying results: The abundance of mountain-specialist birds has declined by as much as 10 percent since 2000.

2h

Two stalagmites found in Chinese cave offer a way to improve accuracy of carbon-14 dating

A team of researchers with members affiliated with several institutions in the U.S. and China has found two stalagmites that offer a way to improve the accuracy of the carbon-14 dating technique. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes the stalagmites and their study of them.

2h

The contest for the worst air pollutant

In its report published on June 28, 2018, the French Agency for Health Safety (ANSES) presented a list of 13 new priority air pollutants to monitor.

2h

Head Start slashes likelihood of adult poverty

One of the United States' most successful anti-poverty measures starts very early in life: Head Start, a preschool program for disadvantaged kids, increased children's education and significantly reduced the likelihood of adult poverty, according to a University of Michigan study.

2h

Allegations of civil and human rights violations in detention facilities are numerous

Immigration detention facilities that are privately operated or located in remote areas of the country garnered more grievances and held detainees significantly longer than in publicly run facilities, according to a study by USC Gould School of Law Professor Emily Ryo.

2h

Are computer-aided decisions actually fair?

Algorithmic fairness is increasingly important because as more decisions of greater importance are made by computer programs, the potential for harm grows. Today, algorithms are already widely used to determine credit scores, which can mean the difference between owning a home and renting one. And they are used in predictive policing, which suggests a likelihood that a crime will be committed, and

2h

"Top Knot Turn Up" / "Bad Habits" | Madame Gandhi and Amber Galloway-Gallego

"Music is so much more than sound simply traveling through the ear," says sign language interpreter Amber Galloway-Gallego. In a spirited performance, musician and activist Madame Gandhi plays two songs — "Top Knot Turn Up" and "Bad Habits" — while Galloway-Gallego provides an animated sign language interpretation.

3h

When heat ceases to be a mystery, spintronics becomes more real

The development of spintronics depends on materials that guarantee control over the flow of magnetically polarized currents. However, it is hard to talk about control when the details of heat transport through the interfaces between materials are unknown. This thermal gap in our material knowledge has just been filled thanks to a Polish-German team of physicists, who now describe in detail the dyn

3h

Tale of two trees: New web tool estimates gene trees with ease

Gene trees, much like family trees, trace the lineage of a particular gene from its deep ancestral roots to its still-growing branches. By comparing gene trees to species trees, which map the evolutionary history of species, scientists can learn which species have which genes, what new functions those genes gained over time, and which functions they may have lost. Now, scientists at the Okinawa In

3h

Studying marine biodiversity from pole to pole

Many scientists around the world are studying marine biodiversity—the variety of life forms in the ocean. But there is no common standard for how to conduct this research or to compile the data from different studies in different areas. MBARI's Francisco Chavez, a biological oceanographer, and his collaborators have been developing an international collaboration to fill these gaps and collect biol

3h

Megacity traffic soot contributes to global warming

Soot from road traffic in emerging countries can reach high altitudes, where it can be transported over long distances and thus contributes to global warming. This is the conclusion of a study performed by an international team of researchers in the Bolivian cities of La Paz (the seat of government), El Alto and the neighboring Chacaltaya mountain observatory. The reduction of pollutants from road

3h

Climate change has made western megadrought 38 percent more severe, say new estimates

Over the last few decades, the American West has seen major increases in wildfire activity and big decreases in groundwater supply. Warmer temperatures are paving the way for the invasion of destructive bark beetles, while lower precipitation is drying out lakes and rivers.

3h

First Dutch bananas could help tackle worldwide fungal threat

University grows 60 plants on coco peat and rock wool, avoiding soil-borne disease A Dutch university has grown the Netherlands’ first crop of bananas as part of a research programme that could help protect the fruit from a deadly fungus that threatens production worldwide. Wageningen University grew 60 banana plants in its greenhouses on coco peat and rock wool, avoiding the threat of a soil-bor

3h

No GPS? A DIY Radio Transmitter Can Help You Navigate

The old-school way to navigate is with a clock and a sextant, but you can also hack together this alternative.

3h

How to Cancel Subscriptions in Your Phone's Settings Menu

So you forgot to cancel your Hulu subscription after the free trial ended. Here's how to get out of it.

3h

Sonic the Hedgehog Is Ready For His Closeup—and It's Weird

Plus Epic's Steam-killing online store goes live, and the rest of the week in gaming news.

3h

A co-worker's rudeness can affect your sleep — and your partner's, new PSU study finds

A new study from Portland State University and University of Illinois researchers found workplace incivilities has the potential to not only negatively affect an employee's sleep but their partner's as well

3h

Skin game

Medical University of Vienna professor Leopold Eckhart and colleagues have performed one of the largest comparative genomic studies to help determine the key molecular and evolutionary origins of mammalian adaptations seen in skin proteins. "The results of the present study provide important new data on the evolution of keratins that control the mechanical stability of the epidermis, the outermost

3h

Praksislæge savner konkrete svar fra Sundheds- og Ældreministeriet om tolkegebyr

Efter et halvt års ventetid får praktiserende læge nu svar på sit bekymringsbrev fra Sundheds- og Ældreministeriet. Men han føler ikke, at hans spørgsmål bliver besvaret.

3h

Modification of existing nitrile latex with magnetite nano particle

The present invention provides a method to produce black iron oxide nanoparticle slurry having a magnetite structure and homogenously disperse. It can be used as formed or mixed with another medium.

3h

Exactly how we would send our first laser-powered probe to Alpha Centauri

The dream of traveling to another star system, and maybe even finding populated worlds there, is one that has preoccupied humanity for many generations. But it was not until the era of space exploration that scientists have been able to investigate various methods for making an interstellar journey. While many theoretical designs have been proposed over the years, a lot of attention lately has bee

3h

Direct electrolysis has mixed results for extracting fuel sources from microalgae

Researchers are investigating ways to improve biodiesel production by using electrical fields to break open microalgae cells with varied results, according to a new study in the Pertanika Journal of Science & Technology.

3h

Black widow spiders dial up posture for survival and sex

A new study led by Western University's Natasha Mhatre shows that body dynamics and posture are crucial to how black widow spiders decode the important vibrations that travel through their webs and up their legs. Black widows rely on these vibrations for sexual signals, capturing prey and evading predators.

3h

Data from Kilauea suggests the eruption was unprecedented

A very large team of researchers from multiple institutions in the U.S. has concluded that the Kilauea volcanic eruption that occurred over this past summer represented an unprecedented volcanic event. In their paper published in the journal Science, the researchers describe the sequence of events that transpired and what set them apart from other volcanic eruptions.

3h

Computing the origin of life

As a principal investigator in the NASA Ames Exobiology Branch, Andrew Pohorille is searching for the origin of life on Earth, yet you won't find him out in the field collecting samples or in a laboratory conducting experiments in test tubes. Instead, Pohorille studies the fundamental processes of life facing a computer.

3h

It's not so easy to gain the true measure of things

I teach measurement – the quantification of things. Some people think this is the most objective of the sciences; just numbers and observations, or what many people call objective facts.

3h

Using Wi-Fi signals to perform analog, wave-based computations

A pair of researchers, one with the Langevin Institute, the other a company called Greenerwave, both in France, has developed a way to use ordinary Wi-Fi signals to perform analog, wave-based computations. In their paper published in the journal Physical Review X, Philipp del Hougne and Geoffroy Lerosey describe their experiments and what they represent.

3h

Video: Enjoying the Geminids from above and below

On the night of December 13, into the morning of December 14, 2018, tune into the night sky for a dazzling display of fireballs. Thanks to the International Space Station, this sky show – the Geminids meteor shower—will be viewed from both above and below.

3h

Applying emerging technology to solve environmental challenges

Technology and environmental sustainability leaders must work together on collaborative solutions to unlock the power of emerging technology to address the challenges of environmental sustainability, including those related to climate change and responsible water management.

3h

Researchers solve seismic mystery that shook central Alberta communities

Icequakes created by a unique combination of weather and buckling lake ice—not earthquakes—caused the tremors that damaged homes and properties in several central Alberta communities last New Year's Day, according to new research.

3h

Horned dinosaur Crittendenceratops discovered in Arizona

Palentologists are announcing a new dinosaur discovery in the southwest United States. Crittendenceratops krzyzanowskii is a new ceratopsid (horned) dinosaur from 73-million-year-old (Late Cretaceous) rocks in southern Arizona. It is one of the few dinosaurs named from Arizona.

3h

Magic number colloidal clusters

Complexity in nature often results from self-assembly, and is considered particularly robust. Compact clusters of elemental particles can be shown to be of practical relevance, and are found in atomic nuclei, nanoparticles or viruses. An interdisciplinary team of researchers led by professors Nicolas Vogel and Michael Engel at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) has decoded the

3h

The splendid generative potential of the Sierpinski triangle

One transistor can become an oscillator with a surprising richness of behavior. However, even more interesting effects emerge if the structure of connections is fractal and shows some imperfections. Could similar rules explain the diversity and complexity of human brain dynamics?

3h

Researchers fine-tune wind farm simulation

Wind power is on track to supply almost a fifth of the world's demand for electricity by 2050, according to the Global Wind Energy Council. While wind turbines are generally thought of as a sustainable alternative to traditional energy sources, relatively little is known about the impact they have on their immediate surroundings. A collaborative research team based in Beijing, China, is working to

3h

Actual image of a white dwarf feeding on material from a larger red giant 650 light years from Earth

The SPHERE planet-hunting instrument on the European Southern Observatory's Very Large Telescope captured this image of a white dwarf feeding on its companion star, a type of Red Giant called a Mira variable. Most stars exist in binary systems, and they spend an eternity serenely orbiting their common center of gravity. But something almost sinister is going on between these two.

3h

Innovation increases observable volume of the universe by a factor of seven

The detection of Einstein's gravitational waves relies on highly precise laser measurements of small length changes. The kilometer-size detectors of the international network (GEO600, LIGO, Virgo) are so sensitive that they are fundamentally limited by tiny quantum mechanical effects. These cause a background noise which overlaps with gravitational-wave signals. This noise is always present and ca

3h

Hospitals may dole out hip, knee replacements unfairly

Members of minority and lower-income populations are less likely to be eligible for hip or knee replacement surgery because they don’t meet rigid, unfairly applied hospital criteria for the operations, researchers say. The requirements—in areas such as weight, blood sugar, and tobacco use—are designed to reduce complications and lower costs. But, they may also unintentionally deny members of mino

3h

Engageret lektor bliver prodekan for uddannelse på Det Juridiske Fakultet

Lektor Kristian Cedervall Lauta ansættes som prodekan for uddannelse ved Det Juridiske Fakultet…

3h

Spørg Fagfolket: Sker der noget ved at fryse mad ned flere gange?

Flere læsere vil gerne vide, om de kan tø mad ned flere gange, eller om de risikerer at blive syge. Det svarer professor på KU på.

3h

Final Brain in the News of 2018

Photo from the December issue of Brain in the News . Image: Shutterstock If you’re a subscribed reader of Brain in the News, you should have the final issue of the year in your mailbox by now (if you’re a loyal reader from outside of North America, please allow a couple extra days for delivery). This year Brain in the News underwent a few changes, while maintaining the foundation of the publicati

3h

Medicinstuderende: Landets bedste kliniksted er i Hjørring

Gynækologisk obstetrisk afdeling på Regionshospital Nordjylland i Hjørring sikrer, at de studerende får et lærerigt og trygt ophold. Derfor kårer medicinstuderende afdelingen som landets bedste kliniksted.

3h

Machine learning to speed chemical discoveries, reduce waste

Researchers have combined artificial neural networks with infrared thermal imaging to control and interpret chemical reactions with new precision and speed. Novel microreactors allow chemical discoveries to take place quickly and with far less environmental waste than standard large-scale reactions. The system can reduce the decision-making process about certain chemical manufacturing processes fr

3h

A young star caught forming like a planet

Astronomers have captured one of the most detailed views of a young star taken to date, and revealed an unexpected companion in orbit around it.

3h

Analysis of 2,000 Brains Provides Clues to Schizophrenia, Autism

The PsychENCODE project delves into the DNA, RNA, and protein changes related to brain development and neuropsychiatric disorders, but researchers caution it's just a first step toward treatment.

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Scientists Are Fighting For The Stricken Pickle Against This Tricky Disease

Downy mildew, once just a nuisance, has evolved into a devastating adversary to the pickle, as it now quickly adapts to fungicides and pickle hybrids, and can lay waste to crops in a matter of days. (Image credit: Bernd Settnik/Picture Alliance via Getty Images)

3h

Why do people need to sleep?

Health To keep your mind and body healthy, get some shut eye. There’s nothing better than a good night’s rest. But have you ever wondered why that’s true? It’s hard to understand how important sleep is to staying healthy and…

4h

People Didn’t Used to Ask for ‘Space’ in Their Relationships

The Amazon show The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel has been praised for the “ intricate ,” “ meticulously created ” fictional 1958 world that the titular comedian Midge Maisel and her loved ones inhabit. But while the visuals of the series may be transporting, the dialogue, for the sociologist Jay Livingston, is occasionally jarring. He’s written a couple of blog posts about the anachronistic words and ph

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Economics: The Discipline That Refuses to Change

In the late 1800s, one of the most enduring fictional characters of all time first appeared on the scene. No, I am not talking about Sherlock Holmes or Oliver Twist, but a less well-known though arguably more influential individual: Homo economicus . Literally meaning “economic man,” the origins of the term Homo economicus are somewhat obscure — early references can be traced to the Oxford econom

4h

Clint Eastwood Plays a Different Sort of Cowboy in The Mule

In recent years, Clint Eastwood has largely concerned himself with the business of heroism. His past three directorial efforts, American Sniper , Sully , and The 15:17 to Paris , were quiet, plaintive portraits of real-life icons, ordinary folks elevated to celebrity by acts of derring-do. But when Eastwood himself is both behind and in front of the camera, things change. The Mule is Eastwood’s f

4h

An Augmented Reality

Denise was already late, even before her augmented-reality glasses decided to perform another endless system update. Updating… Updating… She drummed her fingers on the steering wheel of her car. She could not afford to be late for her first appointment of the day. Being late meant being rushed, and a rushed pitch would almost always turn into a failed pitch. She’d been emphatically reminded of th

4h

It’s Time to Drop the ‘LGBT’ From ‘LGBTQ’

Frank Kameny, the last century’s greatest gay-rights activist , filed the first-ever Supreme Court petition challenging discrimination against homosexuals. He led some of the first gay-rights demonstrations. He was the first openly gay congressional candidate. He spearheaded the challenge to the psychiatric establishment’s categorization of homosexuality as a mental illness. He fought tirelessly

4h

Retningslinjer må ikke skabe usikkerhed om akademisk frihed

Studerende og medarbejdere er inviteret til internt debatmøde om personalepolitiske retningslinjer…

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14 Gifts for People Who Are Perpetually Cold

From smart coffee mugs to a weighted blanket, these smart gifts will make your loved ones feel warm and fuzzy—inside and out.

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Google's Algorithm Isn't Biased, It's Just Not Human

Expanding the search algorithm beyond absolute areas like store hours, locations, and historical facts shifted a system designed to create order into chaos.

4h

A young star caught forming like a planet

Astronomers have captured one of the most detailed views of a young star taken to date, and revealed an unexpected companion in orbit around it.

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Image of the Day: Shoots Up

During plants’ cell division, mother cells give daughter cells a signal to show them which way is up.

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Trump’s Distractions Don’t Deter His Sharp Campaign Focus

Even as scandal engulfs the White House, President Donald Trump and his inner circle remain laser-focused on the campaign. Now they’re zeroing in on a state that was crucial to his victory in 2016—and likely will be in 2020 as well. According to two sources familiar with the matter, Bob Paduchik is leaving his post as co-chair of the Republican National Committee to oversee the campaign’s Ohio op

4h

Autistic people listen to their hearts to test anti-anxiety therapy

Trial seeks further proof that tuning into our internal organs’ activity can reduce anxiety A pioneering therapy aimed at lowering anxiety by tuning into your own heartbeat is being put to the test in the first clinical trial of its kind. The treatment, known as interoception-directed therapy, is being tested on 120 autistic people, for whom anxiety is a common problem. Continue reading…

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What Lies Beneath the Transylvanian Castle That Imprisoned 'Dracula'?

A castle where the bloodthirsty Vlad the Impaler may have once been imprisoned is slowly revealing its secrets, thanks to new radar scans of the ground below the structure.

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Coal power emissions in the US are even higher than we thought

The carbon emissions from lugging coal around can be much higher than thought – up to a third as much as is emitted when the stuff is burned

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World’s first lab-grown steak revealed – but the taste needs work

Nascent industry aims to reduce environmental impact of beef production The first steak grown from cells in the lab and not requiring the slaughter of a cow has been produced in Israel. The meat is not the finished article: the prototype costs $50 for a small strip, and the taste needs perfecting, according to its makers. But it is the first meat grown outside an animal that has a muscle-like tex

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The best laptops of 2018

In almost every dorm room, library, coffee shop, office and airport around the world, you will find someone with their head buried in a laptop.

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What chance has Nasa of finding life on Mars?

When the US space agency's next rover gets to Mars in 2021, it will seek evidence of ancient life.

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50,000-Year-Old Tiara Made from Woolly Mammoth Ivory Found in Denisova Cave

The tiara was probably worn by an adult man with a relatively large head.

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The disorientated ape: Why clever people can be terrible navigators

The human sense of direction is extraordinarily variable. Now we know why some people are so good at getting lost

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Mountain of Evidence Confirms: Climate Change Is Really, Really Bad for Human Health and Well-Being

It's now beyond official: Greenhouse gases, such as carbon dioxide, pose a danger to public health and welfare, according to an exhaustive review that looked at 275 scientific studies published over the past nine years.

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Spacesuits for Spiders

Recently, a user of an online forum for science-fiction writing posed an intriguing question to the rest of the community. In the user’s imaginary world, spiders rule the planet. The arachnids have grown intelligent enough to build a spacefaring empire, and they need spacesuits to travel into space. So, then: “How to design a spacesuit for an arachnid?” The inquiry made me giggle. It reminded me

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Update: More Evidence Supports Delaying School Start Times for Sleep Deprived Teens

Sleep deprivation is a serious health and academic concern for teenagers. A new study adds more support for calls to push back school start times as an effective strategy.

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A Year Without Net Neutrality: No Big Changes (Yet)

Internet providers have refrained from blocking content or creating "fast lanes" while battles continue in the courts and among lawmakers.

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Sci-Fi Promised Us Home Robots. So Where Are They?

It seemed like 2018 was going to be the year when robots made a big leap toward the fabled Rosie from the Jetsons. Consumers, though, had other ideas.

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'Super Smash Bros. Ultimate' Is a Massive Monument to Itself

The game is Nintendo doing what Nintendo does best—but at times its deference to history threatens to overwhelm it.

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It’s time for a Bill of Data Rights

As the US Senate debates a new bill, a data-governance expert presents a plan to protect liberty and freedom in the digital age

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At least 15 central banks are serious about getting into digital currency

Digital cash may soon start replacing the physical kind.

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China has never had a real chip industry. Making AI chips could change that.

The country has struggled for decades to build a competitive semiconductor industry. In making specialized AI chips, though, it’s got a head start.

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In the Nature–Nurture War, Nature Wins

Environmental influences are important, too, but they are largely unsystematic, unstable and idiosyncratic — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Formand for Medicinrådet: Urimelig anklage fra Scleroseforeningen

Scleroseforeningens kampagne mod Medicinrådet er urimelig, mener rådets formand Jørgen Schøler Kristensen, der afviser, at beslutning om sclerosemidlet Ocrevus bliver forhalet.

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Scleroseforeningen raser over Medicinrådets vurdering af Ocrevus

Sclerose-midlet Ocrevus var igen til diskussion i Medicinrådet, hvor den kliniske merværdi blev vurderet til at være lille. Ubegribeligt, lyder det fra Scleroseforeningen.

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Beskidt vind fra syd forpester luftkvaliteten i Danmark

Mens vi venter på en klimaaftale ved COP24, kører kulkraft-kedlerne på fuldt blus i bl.a. Polen og Tyskland. Til stor skade for både klima og luftkvalitet.

5h

"Spy" Virus Eavesdrops on Bacteria, Then Obliterates Them

Viruses use bacteria’s chemical language to time their destruction; this might lead to new ways to fight infections — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

Almindelige brugere beta-tester Windows 10 uden at vide det

Private brugere, der manuelt søger efter nye opdateringer til Windows 10, bliver i praksis beta-testere af ustabile opdateringer.

5h

Fly til turister strejfer kanten af rummet

Virgin Galactics rumfly USS Unity nåede under en bemandet vellykket testflyvning over 82 kilometer væk fra landjorden.

5h

Praktiserende læge køber regionsklinik på Langeland

1660 borgere på Langeland kan se frem til et mere permanent lægetilbud, når praktiserende læge Osman Aden Mohamed overtager regionsklinikken i Rudkøbing til februar.

5h

Scientists design custom nanoparticles with new 'stencil' method

Nano-sized particles already make bicycles and tennis rackets lighter and stronger, protect eyeglasses from scratches, and help direct chemotherapy drugs to cancer cells. But their usefulness depends on being able to precisely sculpt them into the right configurations—no easy task when they're so tiny that thousands of them could fit into the thickness of a sheet of paper.

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Mars InSight lander seen in first images from space

On Nov. 26, NASA's InSight mission knew the spacecraft touched down within an 81-mile-long (130-kilometer-long) landing ellipse on Mars. Now, the team has pinpointed InSight's exact location using images from HiRISE, a powerful camera onboard another NASA spacecraft, Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO).

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Better superconductors from ceramic copper oxides

Medical magnetic resonance imaging, high-power microwave generators, superconducting magnetic energy storage units, and the solenoids in nuclear fusion reactors are very different technologies which all critically rely on the ability of superconducting materials to carry and store large electric currents in a compact space without overheating or dissipating large amounts of energy.

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Study highlights challenges facing black computing faculty

A recent study used text-mining analysis to highlight the impact that microaggressions have on black faculty in computing disciplines, finding that it contributes to a sense of alienation from the larger higher education community.

5h

Branson's Virgin Galactic reaches edge of space

The latest test flight by Sir Richard Branson's Virgin Galactic makes it to the edge of space and back.

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Researchers use jiggly Jell-O to make powerful new hydrogen fuel catalyst

A cheap and effective new catalyst developed by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, can generate hydrogen fuel from water just as efficiently as platinum, currently the best—but also most expensive—water-splitting catalyst out there.

5h

California texting tax: What we know about the proposal

A proposal this week by a California commission to impose a "texting tax" has raised more questions than answers. Here's what we know so far:

5h

The Paris Accord Promised a Climate Solution. Here’s Where We Are Now.

The world is not on track to meet its goals under the Paris climate agreement, even as warnings grow more dire. How did we get to this point?

5h

Montreal Turns to Coyote Hazing After 19 People Are Bitten

As coyotes have flourished in urban environments, cities are faced with the task of learning how to coexist peacefully.

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United Airlines could power jets with biofuel made from trash

A new plant in Gary, Ind., plans to turn hundreds of thousands of tons of trash into fuel, some of which could end up powering United Airlines' planes.

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The truth about panda sex

We humans love to hear about how utterly useless pandas are at sex. 'They won't breed to save their species!' Except that's not true at all, says zoologist Lucy Cooke. Wild pandas are extremely virile — their sperm is 10 to 100 times more dense than human sperm — and pandas in the wild have been observed having sex 40 times in a single afternoon. In this comprehensive and fascinating talk, Cooke

5h

I Used Gmail Auto-Complete, And Now I Know I’m Worthless

A specter is haunting Gmail—the specter of a completed sentence. My fingers tap out the beginning of a message, and a gray phantom appears, with eerie anticipation. “Thanks for taking [ a look! ]” “Tuesday’s no [ good, sorry. ]” “Can’t tom[ orrow but what about next week? ]” The spectral presence is a technology called Smart Compose . If you’ve used Gmail even once in the past few months, you’ve

6h

The Other Way the National Enquirer Helped Elect Trump

On Wednesday, the tabloid publisher AMI signed a non-prosecution agreement with prosecutors in New York, admitting that the company had paid the former Playboy model Karen McDougal $150,000 as part of a “catch and kill” deal—AMI never intended to publish her account of an affair with Donald Trump—with the Trump campaign. In broad strokes, the public has known most of that story for some time now.

6h

The 25 Best Television Episodes of 2018

Editor’s Note : Find all of The Atlantic ’s “Best of 2018” coverage here . On television, it was a year of assassins finding their hearts in acting class, of conflicted spies realizing their fates, of unsettling outings to suburban mansions haunted by Donald Glover in prosthetics. BoJack Horseman went to a funeral; Kim-Joy went all the way to pâtisserie week. The Roy family, meanwhile, seemed ben

6h

Smaller Amazon Go store tested in Seattle as retailer eyes new venues

Amazon continues its experiments with new physical retail formats and technologies, this time with a shrunken version of its no-checkout convenience stores.

6h

Counting the breaths of wild porpoises reveal their revved-up metabolism

A new method tracks harbor porpoises’ breathing to collect rare information on the energy needs of the marine mammals.

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LATEST

Elektrolyse er kernen i at udnytte brint

Der er tre veje, man kan gå, når man skal spalte vand til brint og ilt: alkalisk elektrolyse, PEM-elektrolyse og fastoxid-celler.

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Brintfolket vejrer morgenluft

Brint har hidtil spillet en birolle i energidebatten, men nu er der ved at komme langt større fokus på den centrale rolls, som brinten spiller i den grønne omstilling.

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Podcast-special: Brint er på vej ud af elbilens skygge

Brint har hidtil spillet en noget tilbagetrukket rolle i energidebatten – i hvert fald i Danmark, hvor der i dag blot kører 82 brintbiler. Men i Østen sker der en stor udvikling inden for brintkøretøjer og de tilhørende tankstationer.

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Low skilled, low paid workers of the world don't unite, research shows

Workers in low-skilled, low paid employment aren't prone to band together and form a common bond, new research has shown.

16min

Melbourne geneticists make new discovery about how a baby's sex is determined

Medical researchers at Melbourne's Murdoch Children's Research Institute have made a new discovery about how a baby's sex is determined — it's not just about the X-Y chromosomes, but involves a 'regulator' that increases or decreases the activity of genes which decide if we become male or female.

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Breathing in moon dust could release toxins in astronauts’ lungs

We already knew that lunar dust is highly abrasive, but now it seems minerals in the dust can easily react with human cells and release large amount of toxins

28min

The Corruption of the Republican Party

Why has the Republican Party become so thoroughly corrupt? The reason is historical—it goes back many decades—and, in a way, philosophical. The party is best understood as an insurgency that carried the seeds of its own corruption from the start. I don’t mean the kind of corruption that regularly sends lowlifes like Rod Blagojevich, the Democratic former governor of Illinois, to prison. Those abu

33min

Low skilled, low paid workers of the world don't unite, research shows

Workers in low-skilled, low paid employment aren't prone to band together and form a common bond, new research has shown.

34min

Stress in new mothers causes lasting health risks, depending on race, ethnicity, poverty

African-American women undergo more physical 'wear-and-tear' during the first year after giving birth than Latina and white women, a consequence that may have long-lasting health effects, according to a study of a diverse group of more than 2,400 low-income women. The study today (Friday, Dec. 14) in the week's American Journal of Perinatology involved women of diverse racial and ethnic background

51min

Virgin Galactic's SpaceShipTwo: The view from the edge of space

Virgin Galactic's SpaceShipTwo rocket ship has made a successful test flight, 82.7km above the Earth's surface.

52min

Dataudtræk forhindrer medicinfejl på Regionshospitalet Horsens

Systematisk brug af data hjælper Regionshospitalet Horsens med at skabe overblik og forebygge fejlmedicinering. Hospitalet har en særlig aftale vedrørende methotrexat.

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Marriage just a click away for China's desperate single men

Marriage to a Vietnamese bride is just a click—and a few thousand dollars—away on a blizzard of Chinese websites promising to solve the "single problems" of China's men.

1h

Mangel på folat skaber hidtil ukendte problemer i celledeling

Det skaber flere problemer for kopieringen af DNA, hvis man mangler folat, end man hidtil har vidst….

1h

Landmænds nye overvågning: Humlebier med sensorrygsække

Med en vægt på kun 102 milligram har forskere nu bygget en elektronisk rygsæk, som kan gøre humlebier til små sensorsværme på fremtidens marker.

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Her er de dygtigste inden for 70 behandlinger

Hvem er bedst til at behandle blødende mavesår, testikelkræft og hoftebrud? Se de 93 vindere inden for 70 behandlings- og diagnoseområder.

3h

Østdanmarks dataproblemer hober sig op

Stor frustration blandt fagfolk over Sundhedsplatformen, som spænder ben for komplette datasæt på en lang række behandlingsområder. Uhensigtsmæssige procedurer eller ringe behandlingskvalitet risikerer at passere under radaren, når de kliniske afdelinger ikke længere har overblikket over konsekvenserne af deres undersøgelser og behandlinger. Region Hovedstaden håber, at problemerne er fjernet ind

3h

Massiv utilfredshed i selskaberne

Hvad skriver årsrapporterne fra en række kliniske kvalitetsdatabaser om de problemer, Sundhedsplatformen har givet?

3h

Fem sorte år for Danmarks enestående data

Klinikere melder om desperat mangel på data fra Region Hovedstaden og Region Sjælland. er er omsider et regionsproblem, hvor sundhedsministeren bør skride ind.

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Vinder: »Data har gjort os bedre til at holde folk varme«

Lynge Kirkegaard, ledende overlæge, Bedøvelse og intensiv, Sønderborg Sygehus. Afdelingen er Danmarks bedste til anæstesi.

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Vinder: »Altid fedt, når man ligger lidt bedre end naboen«

Mona Skarbye, ledende overlæge, mave-tarm-kirurgisk afdeling på Slagelse Sygehus. Afdelingen er Danmarks bedste til at screene for tarmkræft.

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Vinder: »Vi holder hele tiden øje med kongeindikatoren på vores tavle«

Kim Lauritsen, ledende overlæge, afdeling for medicinske mavetarmsygdomme, Odense Universitetshospital. Afdelingen er Danmarks bedste til behandling af blødende mavesår.

4h

Fremgang på en række parametre

Danmarks bedste til behandling af rygsøjlegigt

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Vinder: »Vi har lært af andre og ændret kirurgiske teknikker«

Kim Houlind, ledende overlæge, karkirurgisk afdeling, Kolding Sygehus. Afdelingen er Danmarks bedste til at foretage perifer bypass.

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Vinder: »Humor og data er især vigtigt på ­onkologisk afdeling«

Mette Yilmaz, overlæge, onkologisk afdeling, teamansvarlig for gastrointestinal cancer, Aalborg Universitetshospital. Afdelingen er Danmarks bedste til onkologisk behandling af ventrikelcancer.

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Flere tager stilling til behandlingsintensivering

Danmarks bedste til behandling af leddegigt

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Skuffende tilbagegang

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Being a father to school-aged daughter 'makes men less sexist'

Author of LSE research says findings show scope for ‘changing attitude later in life’ Being the father of a school-aged daughter makes men less sexist, according to a new study. The team behind the work say the findings support the idea that men become more aware of the challenges facing women when they see the female experience of life up close through their offspring – something dubbed the “mig

4h

Oh my: a psychological approach to awe – Science Weekly podcast

Nicola Davis asks what’s behind one of humanity’s most powerful and possibly evolutionarily important emotions When it comes to emotions, words such as joy, anger and disgust immediately spring to mind. But in recent years, psychologists have been turning their attention to a lesser-studied emotion: awe. Whether it’s a breathtaking landscape or a glorious sunset, this research is painting awe, an

4h

Phantom project: Student 3-D prints first full 'human' for radiation therapy research

At just 1 year old, she is 5 feet 1 inch tall and weighs 15 pounds. She can hold 36 gallons of water for up to 4 1/2 hours. She has a detachable head but remains faceless. Her name is Marie, and no, this is not her online profile.

4h

Good vibrations: Neutrons lend insight into acoustic fracking

Hydraulic fracturing contributes significantly to US energy production. It works by tapping hard-to-reach pockets of oil and natural gas where more traditional drilling methods fall short. However, the process requires large amounts of water and chemicals, which can negatively impact public health and the environment.

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Fishing pressure and climate change challenge Tokelau's food security

Tokelau's fish-dependent population may be at risk of seeing its main source of locally available animal protein dramatically reduced if the amounts and species of fish caught by local fishers in their waters stay the same or increase.

4h

Timken turns to neutrons to get its bearings on internal stresses

Bearings are used in many common applications such as wheels, drills, and even toys like the popular fidget spinner. Those applications and others like them rely on bearings to allow for smooth, efficient motion for millions of rotations.

4h

Scuba-diving Santa brings holiday cheer to fish, museumgoers

It's a busy time for Santa Claus, but he's making time to feed some fish in San Francisco.

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UN climate summit set for tense finale as nations sound alarm

UN talks aimed at averting catastrophic climate change are set to wrap up in Poland Friday after two weeks of heated disputes between rich and poor nations that saw countries most at risk plead for action.

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Oh my: a psychological approach to awe – Science Weekly podcast

Nicola Davis asks what’s behind one of humanity’s most powerful and possibly evolutionarily important emotions

4h

Apple upstages Amazon in selecting new tech hub locationsApple Austin US Texas

One tech giant strung dozens of North American cities through a circus-like contest that led mayors and governors to desperately pitch their regions—and offer huge sums of public money—in hopes of landing a gleaming new corporate campus. The other swept in quietly before making its big move.

4h

Study reveals how Chinese travellers use technology abroad

Traditional cultural values and government policy influence how Chinese backpackers use technology while travelling, according to new research by the University of East Anglia (UEA).

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Minister: Vi lander ikke en klimaaftale i dag

COP24-aftalen skulle have været indgået i dag, men det kommer ikke til at lykkes, mener Lars Christian Lilleholt.

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New properties of sulfur atom discovered

2019 will be, as proclaimed by the UN, the 'International Year of the Periodic Table of Chemical Elements', in commemoration of the 150th anniversary of its creation. Researchers from the Faculty of Science of the University of Malaga (UMA) have recently revealed new properties of one of its key elements: sulfur.

5h

Exploring ways to reduce child deaths in low-income countries

In Mozambique, the probability of dying in the first month after hospital discharge is high, particularly for babies under three months of age, shows a study led by ISGlobal. The study also shows that an algorithm based on simple clinical parameters can identify those children at higher risk of dying and that would therefore benefit from follow-up after discharge. Implementation of these models co

5h

»Jeg tænkte, at det var godt nok dyrt«

Sydjysk påholdenhed og store armbevægelser på Sjælland – de fem regionsformænd har indrettet deres kontorer vidt forskelligt og til meget forskellige beløb. Kom på besøg hos formændene og opdag, hvad de har brugt pengene på.

5h

Ældre udskrives endnu dårligere, end de indlægges

Danmarks bedste til geriatrisk behandling 2018

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Sundhedsreform – mit juleønske

Der udvikles og afprøves lokalt mange gode metoder og organiseringer, men vi er alt for fodslæbende med at kopiere det, andre har afprøvet.

5h

Import af affald er kun en god idé de næste ti år

Fjernvarme fra importeret affald er ikke længere en klimamæssig fordel, når konkurrencen fra renere energikilder øges, viser ny analyse fra DTU.

6h

Vind med Ingeniørens julekalender: 14. december

Vær med i Ingeniørens julekalender 2018. Hver dag med nye præmier!

6h

How Big Data Can Help in Disaster Response

Technology is enabling better management of risks and crises — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

Collagen nanofibrils in mammalian tissues get stronger with exercise

A recent experimental study on nanoscale collagen fibrils sheds light on reasons why collagen is such a resilient material.

7h

Peeling off slimy biofilms like old stickers

Slimy, hard-to-clean bacterial mats called biofilms cause problems ranging from medical infections to clogged drains and fouled industrial equipment. Now, researchers have found a way to cleanly and completely peel off these notorious sludges.

7h

Mars InSight lander seen in first images from space

On Nov. 26, NASA's InSight mission knew the spacecraft touched down within an 81-mile-long (130-kilometer-long) landing ellipse on Mars. Now, the team has pinpointed InSight's exact location using images from HiRISE, a powerful camera onboard another NASA spacecraft, Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO).

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Asian glaciers slowed by ice loss, NASA finds

Asia's high mountain glaciers are flowing more slowly in response to widespread ice loss, affecting freshwater availability downstream in India, Pakistan and China, a new study finds.

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Computer chip vulnerabilities discovered

A research team has uncovered significant and previously unknown vulnerabilities in high-performance computer chips that could lead to failures in modern electronics.

8h

Unpredictable food sources drive some bats to cooperatively search for food

With the help of novel miniature sensors, biologists have found that bat species foraged socially if their food sources were in unpredictable locations, such as insect swarms or fish schools. In contrast, bats with food sources at fixed locations foraged on their own and did not communicate with one another while foraging or eating.

8h

Plants' defense against insects is a bouquet

Researchers have revealed how the mixture of chemical weapons deployed by plants keeps marauding insects off base better than a one-note defense. This insight goes beyond the ecological convention of studying a single chemical compound a plant is packing and offers new ways to approach agricultural pest management.

8h

Genetically modified pigs resist infection with the classical swine fever virus

Researchers have developed genetically modified pigs that are protected from classical swine fever virus (CSFV), according to a new study.

8h

Whether a urinary tract infection recurs may depend on the bacterial strain

Genetically diverse bacterial strains that cause urinary tract infections differ in their ability to trigger protective immune responses in mice, potentially explaining why these infections frequently recur in many patients, according to a new study.

8h

Tangled magnetic fields power cosmic particle accelerators

Magnetic field lines tangled like spaghetti in a bowl might be behind the most powerful particle accelerators in the universe. That's the result of a new computational study that simulated particle emissions from distant active galaxies.

8h

Molecular causes of brain injury associated with gut condition uncovered

Using a mouse model of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), researchers have uncovered the molecular causes of the condition and its associated brain injury.

8h

Biologists turn eavesdropping viruses into bacterial assassins

Researchers have found a bacteria-killing virus that can listen in on bacterial conversations — and then they made it attack diseases including salmonella, E. coli and cholera.

9h

New interactions between Ebola virus and human proteins discovered

Several new connections have been discovered between the proteins of the Ebola virus and human host cells, a finding that provides insight on ways to prevent the deadly Ebola virus from reproducing and could lead to novel ways to fight these lethal viral infections, according to a new study.

9h

In older people, type 2 diabetes is associated with a decline in brain function over 5 years, study shows

New research shows that in older people living in the community, type 2 diabetes is associated with a decline in verbal memory and fluency over five years.

9h

Cannabis-based drug in combination with other anti-spasticity

Oral spray containing two compounds derived from the cannabis plant reduced spasticity compared with placebo in patients already taking anti-spasticity drugs.

9h

Sewage bacteria lurking in Hudson river sediments, study finds

A new study shows that fecal bacteria from sewage are living in far greater quantities in near-shore sediments of the Hudson River than in the water itself. The river's pollution levels are generally monitored based on samples of clear water, not sediments, so the findings suggest that people stirring up the bottom while wading, swimming or kayaking may face previously unrecognized health risks.

9h

Drug targets for Ebola, Dengue, and Zika viruses found in lab study

No drugs are currently available to treat Ebola, Dengue, or Zika viruses, which infect millions of people every year and result in severe illness, birth defects, and even death. Scientists may finally change that. They identified key ways the three viruses hijack the body's cells, and they found at least one potential drug that can disrupt this process in human cells.

9h

At a New York Privacy Pop-Up, Facebook Sells Itself

The one-day pop-up kiosk is meant to show that Facebook takes users’ privacy concerns seriously. It also was an opportunity to gather more data.

9h

Breast Cancer Risk May Rise After Childbirth, but Is Still Low

Women who recently gave birth may have an increased risk of breast cancer that lasts about 20 years. But for most, the overall risk is still small.

9h

Climate change: 'Hell to pay' if COP24 talks fail

Weary delegates enter the last official day of UN climate talks with many critical issues undecided.

9h

Fitness instructors' comments shape women's body satisfaction

A new study found that while exercise — in this case, a 16-minute conditioning class — generally improved women's mood and body satisfaction, women felt even better if the instructor made motivational comments that focused on strength and health instead of on losing weight or changing the appearance of one's body.

9h

Mass spectrometry sheds new light on thallium poisoning cold case

In 1994, Chinese university student Zhu Ling began experiencing stomach pain, hair loss and partial paralysis. By the time doctors diagnosed Ling with thallium poisoning about four months later, she was in a coma. Two decades after the poisoning, mass spectrometry has been used to analyze several of Ling's hairs collected in 1994 and 1995 and established a timeline of her poisoning.

9h

Genetic marker, predictor of early relapse in pediatric ALL uncovered

Researchers recently discovered that by testing the level of NER (nucleotide excision repair) gene expression, pediatric oncologists can determine the likelihood of early relapse (less than three years) in their acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients.

9h

Protein involved in nematode stress response identified

When humans experience stress, their inner turmoil may not be apparent to an outside observer. But many animals deal with stressful circumstances — overcrowded conditions, not enough food — by completely remodeling their bodies. These stress-induced forms, whether they offer a protective covering or more camouflaged coloration, can better withstand the challenge and help the animal survive until

9h

To repair DNA damage, plants need good contractors

Researchers report which genes are turned on or off, and in which order, to orchestrate the cellular processes required to protect and repair the genome in response to DNA damage. The research reveals the genetic framework controlling a complex biological process that has broad implications for understanding how plants in particular, and organisms in general, cope with DNA damage to ensure long-te

9h

Postkort skal forhindre fatale medicinfejl

Fremover vil plejepersonale modtage et postkort, der advarer om faren ved methrotrexat, når de modtager lægemidlet fra apoteket.

10h

Study reveals how Chinese travellers use technology abroad

Traditional cultural values and government policy influence how Chinese backpackers use technology while travelling, according to new research by the University of East Anglia (UEA).The study looked at how independent Chinese tourists use the internet during their trips abroad and found strong social influences on their digital behaviour. These result from their embedded culture, social circles, a

10h

Nationwide Bomb Threats Look Like New Spin on an Old Bitcoin Scam

Apparent bitcoin scammers caused chaos across the US Thursday, radically escalating longstanding tactics.

10h

The Atlantic Daily: There Was a Path

What We’re Following 2016 Meddling: Maria Butina is the first Russian to be convicted of trying to influence American politics in the run-up to the 2016 election. She has agreed to cooperate with prosecutors, writes Natasha Bertrand , and could help shed light on “whether there was any coordination between President Donald Trump’s campaign, Russia, and the NRA during the election.” Pushback: Some

10h

Maria Butina’s Defiant Plea and Yet Another Russian Ploy

The first Russian to be convicted of trying to infiltrate and influence American policy makers in the run-up to the 2016 election walked into a courtroom on Thursday with her head held high, gazing defiantly at the audience that had gathered to watch her plead guilty. Wearing a green prison uniform over a billowy long-sleeved shirt with two large holes in each elbow, Maria Butina affirmed to a ju

10h

The Lancet Neurology: Cannabis-based drug in combination with other anti-spasticity

Oral spray containing two compounds derived from the cannabis plant reduced spasticity compared with placebo in patients already taking anti-spasticity drugs.

10h

Virgin Galactic Takes Off, and Space Tourism Draws NearerBranson Virgin Galactic

Richard Branson's extra-planetary effort takes a giant leap toward realizing its dream of making space tourism a reality.

11h

Big-Boned Chickens May Be Humans' Geologic Legacy

Millions of years from now, the geologic record of the 'Anthropocene' will be littered with plastics, yes, but also chicken bones. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

‘Toxic Masculinity Has Deformed and Destroyed Our Men’

“Even if I beat her, she was mine. There was nothing she could do about it.” That’s a man in Kitchanga, the Democratic Republic of Congo, reflecting on the way he used to treat his wife. He’s speaking to a classroom filled with other men, all of whom are enrolled in the Fatherhood Program , an organization run by a Congolese man who hopes to change the country’s conception of masculinity. Its mot

11h

Study shows in older people, type 2 diabetes is associated with a decline in brain function over 5 years

New research published in Diabetologia (the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes [EASD]) shows that in older people living in the community, type 2 diabetes (T2D) is associated with a decline in verbal memory and fluency over five years.

11h

These beautiful images preserve plant species that might otherwise disappear forever

Environment Plant scans are beautiful images—and important scientific documents. A national network of botanical research centers has banded together to scan and share disappearing plants.

11h

Why victims of childhood adversity have a harder time achieving their goals

New findings suggest that childhood adversity may be directly linked to depression. Adverse childhood experiences include a wide range of stressful or traumatic events brought upon by abuse and neglect. Important landmark studies from the '90s suggest that these experiences are common and lead to a number of health, social and behavioral problems throughout life. New research published in the jou

11h

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: I, Spy

Written by Olivia Paschal ( @oliviacpaschal ), Elaine Godfrey ( @elainejgodfrey ), and Madeleine Carlisle ( @maddiecarlisle2 ) Today in 5 Lines The Senate voted 56–41 to withdraw U.S. military support for Saudi Arabia’s war in Yemen, amid bipartisan outrage over President Donald Trump’s defense of the Kingdom’s actions. In a letter to the White House, the Department of Homeland Security, and the

11h

Behold, the closest-ever photo of a coronal streamer

NASA's Parker Solar Probe is currently traveling closer to the sun than any other spacecraft before it. The probe is recording data on the star to help scientists learn more about the star and its volatile nature. Also this week, NASA released the first images of its Mars InSight lander taken from space. None NASA's Parker Solar Probe has come closer to the sun than any human spacecraft before it

11h

The best presents for new parents

Gift Guides They're overworked and emotionally drained, but your gift could help. It’s cliche because it’s true: new parents never sleep. Unfortunately, shuteye isn’t something you can wrap up and hand to an adult. But there are plenty of ways to make…

11h

NY sues Walmart, Target for selling toys with high lead levels

New York state authorities on Thursday announced a lawsuit against retail giants Walmart and Target for selling Chinese-made toys that had up to 10 times the legal limit of lead.

11h

To repair DNA damage, plants need good contractors

When a building is damaged, a general contractor often oversees various subcontractors—framers, electricians, plumbers and drywall hangers—to ensure repairs are done in the correct order and on time.

11h

Protein involved in nematode stress response identified

When humans experience stress, their inner turmoil may not be apparent to an outside observer. But many animals deal with stressful circumstances—overcrowded conditions, not enough food—by completely remodeling their bodies. These stress-induced forms, whether they offer a protective covering or more camouflaged coloration, can better withstand the challenge and help the animal survive until condi

11h

Megacity traffic soot contributes to global warming

Soot from road traffic in emerging countries can reach high altitudes, where it can be transported over long distances and thus contributes to global warming. The reduction of pollutants from road traffic such as soot particles from diesel cars should therefore have high priority in order to both protect the health of the population in the growing conurbations of emerging countries and reduce glob

12h

Where DOES Space Begin? Virgin Galactic's SpaceShipTwo Flies Right into the Debate

"SpaceShipTwo, welcome to space," reads a triumphant tweet from Virgin Galactic posted during today's successful test flight after the company's vehicle reached 51.4 miles (82.7 kilometers) in altitude.

12h

To repair DNA damage, plants need good contractors

Researchers at the Salk Institute report which genes are turned on or off, and in which order, to orchestrate the cellular processes required to protect and repair the genome in response to DNA damage. The research, appearing in PNAS, reveals the genetic framework controlling a complex biological process that has broad implications for understanding how plants in particular, and organisms in gener

12h

Study compares dialysis reimbursement around the globe

Dialysis reimbursement policies in most countries are focused on conventional in-center hemodialysis, although home hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis might contribute to quality of life and cost savings.The reimbursement for dialysis in low- and middle-income countries is insufficient to treat all patients with kidney failure and has a disproportionately high impact on public health expenditure

12h

Genetically modified pigs resist infection with the classical swine fever virus

Researchers have developed genetically modified pigs that are protected from classical swine fever virus (CSFV), according to a study published December 13 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Hongsheng Ouyang of Jilin University, and colleagues. As noted by the authors, these pigs offer potential benefits over commercial vaccination and could reduce economic losses related to classical sw

12h

Unpredictable food sources drive some bats to cooperatively search for food

Humans aren't the only species that have dinner parties. Scientists have observed many animals, including bats, eating in groups. However, little was known about whether bats actively help each other find food, a process known as social foraging.

12h

Collagen nanofibrils in mammalian tissues get stronger with exercise

Collagen is the fundamental building block of muscles, tissues, tendons, and ligaments in mammals. It is also widely used in reconstructive and cosmetic surgery. Although scientists have a good understanding about how it behaves at the tissue-level, some key mechanical properties of collagen at the nanoscale still remain elusive. A recent experimental study conducted by researchers at the Universi

12h

Yum and Yuck: The Psychology Of What We Eat…And What We Spit Out

This week on the Hidden Brain radio show, we dig into the culture and psychology that determines the foods that make us salivate and the scents that make us squirm. (Image credit: Parth Shah)

12h

Protein involved in nematode stress response identified

When humans experience stress, their inner turmoil may not be apparent to an outside observer. But many animals deal with stressful circumstances — overcrowded conditions, not enough food — by completely remodeling their bodies. These stress-induced forms, whether they offer a protective covering or more camouflaged coloration, can better withstand the challenge and help the animal survive until

12h

Plants' defense against insects is a bouquet

Michigan State University scholar Andrea Glassmire and her colleagues have revealed how the mixture of chemical weapons deployed by plants keeps marauding insects off base better than a one-note defense. This insight goes beyond the ecological convention of studying a single chemical compound a plant is packing and offers new ways to approach agricultural pest management. The research was publishe

12h

Study finds sewage bacteria lurking in Hudson river sediments

A new study shows that fecal bacteria from sewage are living in far greater quantities in near-shore sediments of the Hudson River than in the water itself. The river's pollution levels are generally monitored based on samples of clear water, not sediments, so the findings suggest that people stirring up the bottom while wading, swimming or kayaking may face previously unrecognized health risks. G

12h

Mass spectrometry sheds new light on thallium poisoning cold case

In 1994, Chinese university student Zhu Ling began experiencing stomach pain, hair loss and partial paralysis. By the time doctors diagnosed Ling with thallium poisoning about four months later, she was in a coma. Ling survived, but she suffered permanent neurological damage. A police investigation determined that Ling was intentionally poisoned, but the case remains unsolved.

12h

Africa Is the New Front in the U.S.-China Influence War

Facing increased competition for influence from China, the Trump administration unveiled a new strategy for Africa focused on commercial ties, counterterrorism, and better-targeted U.S. foreign aid. But it may be too little, too late. In a wide-ranging speech Thursday at the Heritage Foundation, a conservative think tank in Washington, D.C., John Bolton, President Trump’s national-security advise

12h

Why women make businesses more profitable

While the workplace is slowly diversifying, some industries have been slow to change. A growing body of research is uncovering that workplaces with greater diversity actual perform better. One of the clearest examples of this effect is in venture capitalism, where nearly all venture capitalists are white, male, Harvard graduates. When VC firms hire more women, their effectiveness and profitabilit

12h

Astrocytes, the Underrated Stars

You usually hear the term “brain cell” referring to neurons, like they’re the only cell type present in the brain. But that’s far from the case. Neurons can be considered the main cellular unit in our nervous system, as they are the cells that transfer the information by means of electrical and chemical signals. I won’t […]

12h

Researchers pioneer machine learning to speed chemical discoveries, reduce waste

Machine learning algorithms can predict stock market fluctuations, control complex manufacturing processes, enable navigation for robots and driverless vehicles, and much more.

12h

Study scrutinizes hidden marketing relationships on social media

Federal regulators require social media personalities to alert their viewers to promotional payments for products and gadgets shown on their channels, but an analysis by Princeton University researchers shows that such disclosures are rare.

12h

New undersea maps lead to hydrothermal vent and species discoveries

A spectacular new hydrothermal vent field, named JaichMatt, has been discovered during an expedition aboard Schmidt Ocean Institute's R/V Falkor. The vents were identified using Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institution's (MBARI) Dorado autonomous underwater vehicle to conduct exploratory seafloor surveys with one meter lateral resolution. Simultaneously, MBARI's new Low Altitude Survey System wa

12h

University of California and Elsevier Locked in Negotiations

The UC system is pushing to change the subscription model and accelerate open access, but if there’s no contract agreement by December 31, faculty and students lose access altogether.

12h

The Geminid meteor peaks Thursday night. Here’s how to view it best.

Look up at the skies from 2 to 7:30 a.m. on December 14 to see the most meteors. To get the best view, travel away from city lights, avoid looking at your phone and let your eyes adjust to the dark. Stargazers might also be able to catch a glimpse of a comet making a rare appearance, NASA astronomers say. None Look up to the sky during the early hours of December 14 to see what's likely to be the

12h

Spacewatch: China's moon lander enters lunar orbit

Chang’e-4 is second spacecraft in Chinese mission to land on far side of the moon China’s lunar lander Chang’e-4 has successfully entered orbit around the moon. After a voyage of 240,000 miles (385,000km) that lasted 110 hours, the spacecraft fired its retrorockets on 12 December while just 80 miles above the lunar surface. This placed it in a stable elliptical orbit, where it will stay until the

12h

12h

NSU researchers uncover genetic marker, predictor of early relapse in pediatric ALL

Researchers recently discovered that by testing the level of NER (nucleotide excision repair) gene expression, pediatric oncologists can determine the likelihood of early relapse (less than three years) in their acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients. This

12h

Mass spectrometry sheds new light on thallium poisoning cold case

In 1994, Chinese university student Zhu Ling began experiencing stomach pain, hair loss and partial paralysis. By the time doctors diagnosed Ling with thallium poisoning about four months later, she was in a coma. Two decades after the poisoning, Richard Ash–an associate research scientist in the University of Maryland's Department of Geology–used mass spectrometry to analyze several of Ling's h

12h

Face masks may protect hog farm workers and their household members from staph bacteria

Face masks appear to provide important protection against drug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacteria for hog farm workers and for household members to whom they might otherwise transmit the bacteria, according to a study led by scientists at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

12h

13h

Virgin Galactic Rocket Ship Reaches Space, a Milestone in Space TourismBranson Virgin Galactic

Richard Branson’s company, which sent the crewed craft, SpaceShipTwo, more than 50 miles above Earth, is one of several racing to make space tourism a reality.

13h

Mapping the Brain’s Genetic Landscape

Scientists have taken a step toward building a computer model of the brain’s genome, one that may help clarify the genetic roots of schizophrenia, autism and other disorders.

13h

Trump’s NOAA Nominee Won’t Get Senate Vote This Year

The White House will have to decide whether to renominate Barry Lee Myers, the chief executive of AccuWeather, next year.

13h

Data use draining your battery? Tiny device to speed up memory while also saving power

Millions of new memory cells could be part of a computer chip and save power for smart devices, thanks to the discovery of a previously unobserved functionality in a super thin material.

13h

Facebook Bug Bounty Program Makes Biggest Reward Payout Yet

Despite Cambridge Analytica and a damaging hack, Facebook's bug bounty program offers a bright spot.

13h

The Senate Thinks It Can Change the U.S.-Saudi Relationship

The Senate faced down Donald Trump on Thursday, demanding the withdrawal of U.S. support for the Saudi-led war in Yemen by a resounding bipartisan margin, then unanimously declaring the Saudi crown prince responsible for the murder of the journalist Jamal Khashoggi. It was a historic challenge not only to the president, but also to the nature of the U.S.-Saudi relationship, which has spanned some

13h

Fitness instructors' comments shape women's body satisfaction

A new Northwestern University study found that while exercise, in this case, a 16-minute conditioning class, generally improved women's mood and body satisfaction, women felt even better if the instructor made motivational comments that focused on strength and health instead of on losing weight or changing the appearance of one's body.

13h

How to be "Team Human" in the digital future | Douglas Rushkoff

Humans are no longer valued for our creativity, says media theorist Douglas Rushkoff — in a world dominated by digital technology, we're now just valued for our data. In a passionate talk, Rushkoff urges us to stop using technology to optimize people for the market and start using it to build a future centered on our pre-digital values of connection, creativity and respect. "Join 'Team Human.' Fi

13h

CRISPR joins battle of the bulge, fights obesity without edits to genome

A weighty new study shows that CRISPR therapies can cut fat without cutting DNA. Researchers describe how a modified version of CRISPR was used to ramp up the activity of certain genes and prevent severe obesity in mice with genetic mutations that predispose them to extreme weight gain. Importantly, the researchers achieved long-lasting weight control without making a single edit to the genome.

13h

Virgin Galactic passenger rocket reaches space in test flightBranson Virgin Galactic

The rocket, dubbed SpaceShipTwo, reached an altitude of 51 miles on Thursday. Virgin Galactic hopes to soon transport space tourists into the atmosphere on the rocket. The successful test is a landmark for Virgin Galactic, which has seen its fair share of setbacks since it was founded in 2004. None In a successful test of what Virgin Galactic founder Richard Branson hopes will be "the world's fir

13h

Tony Can't Lift the Last Pieces of His Dredge | Gold Rush

Tony Beets is dismantling the last sections of his 1940s dredge at remote Thistle Creek, ready to transport it 100 miles to Dawson City. The problem? Trying to move the biggest and heaviest pontoon on the dredge. Stream Full Episodes of Gold Rush: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/gold-rush/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Go

13h

Study scrutinizes hidden marketing relationships on social media

Federal regulators require social media personalities to alert their viewers to promotional payments for products and gadgets shown on their channels, but an analysis by Princeton University researchers shows that such disclosures are rare.

13h

In search of missing worlds, Hubble finds a fast evaporating exoplanet

Now, astronomers have used Hubble to nab a second 'very warm' Neptune (GJ 3470b) that is losing its atmosphere at a rate 100 times faster than that of GJ 436b. Both planets reside about 3.7 million miles from their star. That's one-tenth the distance between our solar system's innermost planet, Mercury, and the Sun.

13h

Collagen nanofibrils in mammalian tissues get stronger with exercise

A recent experimental study conducted by researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Washington University in St. Louis, and Columbia University on nanoscale collagen fibrils reported on, previously unforeseen, reasons why collagen is such a resilient material.

13h

Exoplanet is vanishing—and really fast

An exoplanet almost 100 light years away from Earth is disappearing, and—by cosmic standards—disappearing fast, astronomers report. Scientists using the Hubble Space Telescope discovered GJ 3470b—a medium-sized exoplanet roughly the size of Neptune is evaporating at a rate 100 times faster than a previously discovered planet of similar size. “This is the smoking gun that planets can lose a signif

13h

Moving around now may improve your mood later

Increases in physical activity tend to be followed by increases in mood and perceived energy level, research finds. This beneficial effect was even more pronounced for study subjects who had bipolar disorder. Participants, 242 adults, ages 15 to 84, with an average age of 48 years, used activity trackers and electronic diaries for two weeks. The sample included 54 people with bipolar disorder. Th

13h

Genetically modified pigs resist infection with the classical swine fever virus

Researchers have developed genetically modified pigs that are protected from classical swine fever virus (CSFV), according to a study published December 13 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Hongsheng Ouyang of Jilin University, and colleagues. As noted by the authors, these pigs offer potential benefits over commercial vaccination and could reduce economic losses related to classical sw

14h

Plants' defense against insects is a bouquet

Michigan State University scholar Andrea Glassmire and her colleagues have revealed how the mixture of chemical weapons deployed by plants keeps marauding insects off base better than a one-note defense. This insight goes beyond the ecological convention of studying a single chemical compound a plant is packing and offers new ways to approach agricultural pest management. The research was publishe

14h

Study finds sewage bacteria lurking in Hudson river sediments

A new study shows that fecal bacteria from sewage are living in far greater quantities in near-shore sediments of the Hudson River than in the water itself. The river's pollution levels are generally monitored based on samples of clear water, not sediments, so the findings suggest that people stirring up the bottom while wading, swimming or kayaking may face previously unrecognized health risks.

14h

Unpredictable food sources drive some bats to cooperatively search for food

With the help of novel miniature sensors, an international group of biologists that included University of Maryland Biology Professor Gerald Wilkinson found that bat species foraged socially if their food sources were in unpredictable locations, such as insect swarms or fish schools. In contrast, bats with food sources at fixed locations foraged on their own and did not communicate with one anothe

14h

Novel mechanisms of dengue and Zika virus infections and link to microcephaly

New insights into how dengue and Zika viruses cause disease reveal strategies the viruses use to successfully infect their host and a link to microcephaly.

14h

Computer chip vulnerabilities discovered by WSU researchers

A Washington State University research team has uncovered significant and previously unknown vulnerabilities in high-performance computer chips that could lead to failures in modern electronics.

14h

Big data reveals hints of how, when and where mental disorders start

The first wave of data from the PsychENCODE project holds new clues to how and when psychiatric diseases such as schizophrenia emerge.

14h

Radiohead Will Enter the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2019

Plus: Miley Cyrus will appear on the next season of *Black Mirror*.

14h

Is wasp venom the next healthcare revolution?

Researchers are looking at the venom of wasps, bees, and arachnids to develop life-saving medical therapies. Researchers at MIT created synthetic variants of a peptide found in wasp venom that proved an effective antibiotic. With the "post-antibiotic era" looming, synthetic peptides could provide a way to maintain global health initiatives. Two of the most common phobias are the fear of insects a

14h

Virgin-rigmands rumfly kysser kanten af rummet under bemandet test

Richard Branson testede med succes bemandet rumfly, der skal fragte turister ud i rummet

14h

How the brain tells you to scratch that itch

It's a maddening cycle that has affected us all: it starts with an itch that triggers scratching, but scratching only makes the itchiness worse. Now, researchers have revealed the brain mechanism driving this uncontrollable itch-scratching feedback loop. Researchers showed that the activity of a small subset of neurons, located in a deep brain region called the periaqueductal gray, tracks itch-evo

14h

Exercise-induced hormone irisin triggers bone remodeling in mice

Exercise has been touted to build bone mass, but exactly how it actually accomplishes this is a matter of debate. Now, researchers show that an exercise-induced hormone activates cells that are critical for bone remodeling in mice. A study identifies a receptor for irisin, an exercise hormone, and shows that irisin impacts sclerostin in mice, a major cellular regulator of bone structure in humans.

14h

Neanderthal genes give clues to human brain evolution

A distinctive feature of modern humans is our round (globular) skulls and brains. Researchers report that present-day humans who carry particular Neanderthal DNA fragments have heads that are slightly less rounded, revealing genetic clues to the evolution of modern brain shape and function.

14h

People Living on Mountains Face Avalanche of Climate Risks

As higher elevations warm, melting glaciers and disappearing snow will create major challenges — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

14h

China demands developed countries 'pay their debts' on climate change

Key sticking point at UN negotiations is how countries should account for their greenhouse gas emissions China called on rich countries to “pay their debts” on climate change at global talks on Thursday, criticising developed countries for not doing enough to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and provide finance to help poor countries do the same. The trenchant intervention by Xie Zhenhua, the mini

14h

Opening in Venice: New Space Highlighting Ocean Preservation

The center, funded by the Thyssen-Bornemisza Art Contemporary foundation, uses a variety of disciplines to focus on environmental issues.

14h

Why is the night sky dark?

Space Looking at the stars takes you back through time. All the way to the beginning. If the universe is full of stars, why don't they light up the night sky?

15h

Mission finds watery ‘hydroxyls’ on asteroid Bennu

The OSIRIS-REx mission to the asteroid Bennu has discovered evidence of water molecules there, researchers report. From August through early December, the OSIRIS-REx spacecraft aimed three of its instruments toward Bennu and began making the mission’s first observations of the asteroid. During this period, the spacecraft traveled the last 1.4 million miles (2.2 million km) of its outbound journey

15h

Knowing just one gay person shifts attitudes

People who met and became acquainted with at least one gay person were more likely to later change their minds about marriage equality and become more accepting of gay and lesbian people in general, research shows. Sociologists have long proposed that when people establish certain relationships, they may change their attitudes about issues, often referred to as the contact effect, explains Daniel

15h

MON 810 and NK603 GM Maize: No effects detected on rat health or metabolism

A diet based on MON 810 or NK603 transgenic maize does not affect the health or metabolism of rats, under the conditions of the GMO 90+1 project1. This unprecedented study performed by a research consortium led by Inra brought together a number of partners2, including Inserm. The research was performed as part of the Risk'OGM program funded by the French Ministry of Ecological and Inclusive Transi

15h

Researchers peel off slimy biofilms like old stickers

Slimy, hard-to-clean bacterial mats called biofilms cause problems ranging from medical infections to clogged drains and fouled industrial equipment. Now, researchers at Princeton have found a way to cleanly and completely peel off these notorious sludges.

15h

NYU researchers pioneer machine learning to speed chemical discoveries, reduce waste

Researchers have combined artificial neural networks with infrared thermal imaging to control and interpret chemical reactions with new precision and speed. Novel microreactors allow chemical discoveries to take place quickly and with far less environmental waste than standard large-scale reactions. The system can reduce the decision-making process about certain chemical manufacturing processes fr

15h

Parents' brain activity 'echoes' their infant's brain activity when they play together

Research shows for the first time that when adults are engaged in joint play together with their infant, the parents' brains show bursts of high-frequency activity, which are linked to their baby's attention patterns and not their own. The study publishes December 13 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology and was conducted by Dr Sam Wass of the University of East London in collaboration with Dr V

15h

Researchers uncover molecular mechanisms linked to autism and schizophrenia

Two UCLA-led studies published in Science have linked DNA changes to their molecular effects in the brain, uncovering new mechanisms for psychiatric diseases. The findings provide a roadmap for developing a new generation of therapies for conditions like autism, schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

15h

Scientists create genomic resource to explore biological underpinnings of brain disorders

A team of researchers, including scientists from UNC School of Medicine, has developed a model of unprecedented sophistication that relates variations in DNA and gene activity to the risk of brain disorders.

15h

Noncoding mutations contribute to autism risk

A whole-genome sequencing study of nearly 2,000 families has implicated mutations in 'promoter regions' of the genome — regions that precede the start of a gene — in autism. The study is the first genome-wide analysis to uncover a role for mutations in the noncoding portion of the genome in any human condition.

15h

USC researchers discover abundant source for neuronal cells

USC researchers seeking a way to study genetic activity associated with psychiatric disorders have discovered an abundant source of human cells — the nose.

15h

CRISPR joins battle of the bulge, fights obesity without edits to genome

A weighty new study shows that CRISPR therapies can cut fat without cutting DNA. In a paper published Dec. 13, 2018, in the journal Science, UC San Francisco researchers describe how a modified version of CRISPR was used to ramp up the activity of certain genes and prevent severe obesity in mice with genetic mutations that predispose them to extreme weight gain. Importantly, the researchers achiev

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In the developing brain, scientists find roots of neuropsychiatric diseases

The most comprehensive genomic analysis of the human brain ever undertaken has revealed new insights into the changes it undergoes through development, how it varies among individuals, and the roots of neuropsychiatric illnesses such as autism spectrum disorders and schizophrenia.

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Chinese scientists get first look at geometric phase effect in a chemical reaction

Researchers from the University of Science and Technology of China and the Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics carried out a combined experimental and theoretical investigation of the H+HD to H2+D reaction. They got first look at geometric phase effect in a chemical reaction.

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MIT team invents method to shrink objects to the nanoscale

MIT researchers have invented a new way to fabricate nanoscale 3D objects of nearly any shape. They can also pattern the objects with a variety of useful materials, including metals, semiconducting quantum dots, and DNA.

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'Imploding' 3D printed nanomaterials in a shrinking gel

By 3d printing nanomaterials inside an 'imploding' hydrogel and shrinking them down to ten times their former size, researchers demonstrate a new method of nanofabrication that overcomes many of the previous' limitations, a new study reports.

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Revealed by a multidisciplinary effort: History of maize domestication not what we thought

The domestication of maize, a process which began in what is now central Mexico nearly 9,000 years ago, was far more complex and nuanced than once previously thought, a new study finds. The results of an analysis of the ancient grain's genetic heritage reveals southwestern Amazonia as a secondary improvement center for early maize.

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Illuminating the brain architecture of neuropsychiatric risk: The latest from PsychENCODE

Neuropsychiatric disorders have highly complex causes that involve hundreds of genes — a feature that hindered development of related treatments.

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New scientific evidence builds a stronger case for the Endangerment Finding

In the years since the US Environmental Protection Agency's 2009 (EPA) establishment of the 'Endangerment Finding,' a landmark redefinition of harmful greenhouse gasses to pollution, scientific information concerning the impacts and risks of climate change has continued to accumulate.

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New technology paints in-depth picture of organisms' response to climate change

Revolutionary new technology created at the University of Plymouth could fill a major gap in our understanding of how organisms' early development will be impacted by climate change.

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New study says scientific basis for EPA's Endangerment Finding is stronger than ever

New study published in Science this week has found that the evidence used to support the EPA's 2009 Endangerment Finding on greenhouse gases is even stronger and more conclusive now. This finding comes three months after a senior Republican senator said that the Trump Administration might still try to repeal the landmark decision.

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Four studies by Mount Sinai investigators featured in upcoming special issue of Science

Publications reflect Mount Sinai Health System's investment in the exploration of brain genome organization and function.

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Scientists overhaul corn domestication story with multidisciplinary analysis

Scientists are revising the history of one of the world's most important crops. Drawing on genetic and archaeological evidence, researchers have found that a predecessor of today's corn plants still bearing many features of its wild ancestor was likely brought to South America from Mexico more than 6,500 years ago. Farmers in Mexico and the southwestern Amazon continued to improve the crop over th

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Could Medical Procedures Transmit Alzheimer's?

A protein associated with the degenerative disease was passed to eight patients decades ago in contaminated growth hormones — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Starry eyes

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Tragedy revisited

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Reimagining the human

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IgE B cells unmasked

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A cage for catalysts

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Revealing hidden spin-momentum locking in a high-temperature cuprate superconductor

Cuprate superconductors have long been thought of as having strong electronic correlations but negligible spin-orbit coupling. Using spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, we discovered that one of the most studied cuprate superconductors, Bi2212, has a nontrivial spin texture with a spin-momentum locking that circles the Brillouin zone center and a spin-layer locking that allows st

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Ultralow-loading platinum-cobalt fuel cell catalysts derived from imidazolate frameworks

Achieving high catalytic performance with the lowest possible amount of platinum is critical for fuel cell cost reduction. Here we describe a method of preparing highly active yet stable electrocatalysts containing ultralow-loading platinum content by using cobalt or bimetallic cobalt and zinc zeolitic imidazolate frameworks as precursors. Synergistic catalysis between strained platinum-cobalt co

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3D nanofabrication by volumetric deposition and controlled shrinkage of patterned scaffolds

Lithographic nanofabrication is often limited to successive fabrication of two-dimensional (2D) layers. We present a strategy for the direct assembly of 3D nanomaterials consisting of metals, semiconductors, and biomolecules arranged in virtually any 3D geometry. We used hydrogels as scaffolds for volumetric deposition of materials at defined points in space. We then optically patterned these sca

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Evolution of a highly active and enantiospecific metalloenzyme from short peptides

Primordial sequence signatures in modern proteins imply ancestral origins tracing back to simple peptides. Although short peptides seldom adopt unique folds, metal ions might have templated their assembly into higher-order structures in early evolution and imparted useful chemical reactivity. Recapitulating such a biogenetic scenario, we have combined design and laboratory evolution to transform

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Observation of the geometric phase effect in the H + HD -> H2 + D reaction

Theory has established the importance of geometric phase (GP) effects in the adiabatic dynamics of molecular systems with a conical intersection connecting the ground- and excited-state potential energy surfaces, but direct observation of their manifestation in chemical reactions remains a major challenge. Here, we report a high-resolution crossed molecular beams study of the H + HD -> H 2 + D re

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Atmospheric 14C/12C changes during the last glacial period from Hulu Cave

Paired measurements of 14 C/ 12 C and 230 Th ages from two Hulu Cave stalagmites complete a precise record of atmospheric 14 C covering the full range of the 14 C dating method (~54,000 years). Over the last glacial period, atmospheric 14 C/ 12 C ranges from values similar to modern values to values 1.70 times higher (42,000 to 39,000 years ago). The latter correspond to 14 C ages 5200 years less

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1.9-million- and 2.4-million-year-old artifacts and stone tool-cutmarked bones from Ain Boucherit, Algeria

East Africa has provided the earliest known evidence for Oldowan stone artifacts and hominin-induced stone tool cutmarks dated to ~2.6 million years (Ma) ago. The ~1.8-million-year-old stone artifacts from Ain Hanech (Algeria) were considered to represent the oldest archaeological materials in North Africa. Here we report older stone artifacts and cutmarked bones excavated from two nearby deposit

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A femtomolar-range suicide germination stimulant for the parasitic plant Striga hermonthica

The parasitic plant Striga hermonthica has been causing devastating damage to the crop production in Africa. Because Striga requires host-generated strigolactones to germinate, the identification of selective and potent strigolactone agonists could help control these noxious weeds. We developed a selective agonist, sphynolactone-7, a hybrid molecule originated from chemical screening, that contai

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High-affinity allergen-specific human antibodies cloned from single IgE B cell transcriptomes

Immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibodies protect against helminth infections but can also cause life-threatening allergic reactions. Despite their role in human health, the cells that produce these antibodies are rarely observed and remain enigmatic. We isolated single IgE B cells from individuals with food allergies and used single-cell RNA sequencing to elucidate the gene expression and splicing patte

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Multiproxy evidence highlights a complex evolutionary legacy of maize in South America

Domesticated maize evolved from wild teosinte under human influences in Mexico beginning around 9000 years before the present (yr B.P.), traversed Central America by ~7500 yr B.P., and spread into South America by ~6500 yr B.P. Landrace and archaeological maize genomes from South America suggest that the ancestral population to South American maize was brought out of the domestication center in M

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Neuron-specific signatures in the chromosomal connectome associated with schizophrenia risk

To explore the developmental reorganization of the three-dimensional genome of the brain in the context of neuropsychiatric disease, we monitored chromosomal conformations in differentiating neural progenitor cells. Neuronal and glial differentiation was associated with widespread developmental remodeling of the chromosomal contact map and included interactions anchored in common variant sequence

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Genome-wide de novo risk score implicates promoter variation in autism spectrum disorder

Whole-genome sequencing (WGS) has facilitated the first genome-wide evaluations of the contribution of de novo noncoding mutations to complex disorders. Using WGS, we identified 255,106 de novo mutations among sample genomes from members of 1902 quartet families in which one child, but not a sibling or their parents, was affected by autism spectrum disorder (ASD). In contrast to coding mutations,

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Transcriptome and epigenome landscape of human cortical development modeled in organoids

Genes implicated in neuropsychiatric disorders are active in human fetal brain, yet difficult to study in a longitudinal fashion. We demonstrate that organoids from human pluripotent cells model cerebral cortical development on the molecular level before 16 weeks postconception. A multiomics analysis revealed differentially active genes and enhancers, with the greatest changes occurring at the tr

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Integrative functional genomic analysis of human brain development and neuropsychiatric risks

To broaden our understanding of human neurodevelopment, we profiled transcriptomic and epigenomic landscapes across brain regions and/or cell types for the entire span of prenatal and postnatal development. Integrative analysis revealed temporal, regional, sex, and cell type–specific dynamics. We observed a global transcriptomic cup-shaped pattern, characterized by a late fetal transition associa

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Spatiotemporal transcriptomic divergence across human and macaque brain development

Human nervous system development is an intricate and protracted process that requires precise spatiotemporal transcriptional regulation. We generated tissue-level and single-cell transcriptomic data from up to 16 brain regions covering prenatal and postnatal rhesus macaque development. Integrative analysis with complementary human data revealed that global intraspecies (ontogenetic) and interspec

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Transcriptome-wide isoform-level dysregulation in ASD, schizophrenia, and bipolar disorder

Most genetic risk for psychiatric disease lies in regulatory regions, implicating pathogenic dysregulation of gene expression and splicing. However, comprehensive assessments of transcriptomic organization in diseased brains are limited. In this work, we integrated genotypes and RNA sequencing in brain samples from 1695 individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), schizophrenia, and bipolar d

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Comprehensive functional genomic resource and integrative model for the human brain

Despite progress in defining genetic risk for psychiatric disorders, their molecular mechanisms remain elusive. Addressing this, the PsychENCODE Consortium has generated a comprehensive online resource for the adult brain across 1866 individuals. The PsychENCODE resource contains ~79,000 brain-active enhancers, sets of Hi-C linkages, and topologically associating domains; single-cell expression p

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Scientists Say Gene-Edited Babies Claim Is 'Wake-Up Call' For World

U.S. National Academy of Medicine, U.S. National Academy of Sciences, and Chinese Academy of Sciences call for international gene-editing standards. Critics blast statement as inadequate. (Image credit: Anthony Wallace/AFP/Getty Images)

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Want to Build a Nanobot? This New Shrinking Technique Could Help

Want to Build a Nanobot? This New Shrinking Technique Could Help Research innovation brings Shrinky Dink-like method to the nanoscale. shrinkray_flats2.gif Image credits: Abigail Malate, Staff Illustrator Rights information: Copyright, American Institute of Physics Technology Thursday, December 13, 2018 – 14:00 Yuen Yiu, Staff Writer (Inside Science) — Researchers from MIT have come up with a ne

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Corn domestication took some unexpected twists and turns

A DNA study challenges the idea people fully tamed maize in Mexico before the plant spread.

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Monitoring the environment with artificial intelligence

Microorganisms perform key functions in ecosystems and their diversity reflects the health of their environment. Researchers use genomic tools to sequence the DNA of microorganisms in samples, and then exploit this considerable amount of data with artificial intelligence. They build predictive models capable of establishing a diagnosis of the health of ecosystems and identify species that perform

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Neuroscientists uncover sensory switches controlling infanticide and parental behavior

Many species of mammals have evolved what appear to be paradoxical behaviors towards their young. Like humans, most exhibit nurturing, protective behaviors, and in some circumstances even act as surrogate parents. However, virgin males often engage in infanticide as a strategy to propagate their own genes. How are these conflicting social behaviors controlled?

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Watching brain cells fire

Brain scientists have plenty of ways to track the activity of individual neurons in the brain, but they're all invasive. Now, researchers have found a way to literally watch neurons fire — no electrodes or chemical modifications required.

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Chemical biologists unearth cause of a rare brain disorder

In pontocerebellar hypoplasia type 1b, two key biological structures are blocked from binding to one another — which ultimately stunts critical brain growth.

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Widespread brain alterations in children with callousness

Children with elevated levels of callous traits — such as a lack of remorse and disregard for other people's feelings — show widespread differences in brain structure compared with children with lower levels of the traits, according to a new study.

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Tale of two trees: New web tool estimates gene trees with ease

Scientists introduce ORTHOSCOPE, a new web-based tool capable of inferring gene function, estimating gene trees and identifying sets of ancestral genes in just minutes.

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Potential range for new invasive tick covers much of Eastern US

Since the arrival of the Asian longhorned tick (Haemaphysalis longicornis) in North America was first reported in New Jersey in early 2018, it has been found in eight other states in the US and, by the looks of a new study comparing North American habitat with the invasive tick's native territory, it shouldn't be a surprise if it shows up in many more.

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New study says scientific basis for EPA's Endangerment Finding is stronger than ever

A new study published by Science this week has found that scientific evidence supporting the EPA's 2009 Endangerment Finding for greenhouse gases is even stronger and more conclusive now. This finding could strengthen challenges to proposed efforts to rollback emissions standards and carbon emissions regulations in the United States.

15h

Scientists overhaul corn domestication story with multidisciplinary analysis

Smithsonian scientists and collaborators are revising the history of one of the world's most important crops. Drawing on genetic and archaeological evidence, researchers have found that a predecessor of today's corn plants still bearing many features of its wild ancestor was likely brought to South America from Mexico more than 6,500 years ago. Farmers in Mexico and the southwestern Amazon continu

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Team invents method to shrink objects to the nanoscale

MIT researchers have invented a way to fabricate nanoscale 3-D objects of nearly any shape. They can also pattern the objects with a variety of useful materials, including metals, quantum dots, and DNA.

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Scientists get first look at geometric phase effect in a chemical reaction

In the simplest chemical reaction in nature, the a well-known conical intersection exists between the ground and first excited state. Therefore, the H + H2 reaction and its isotopic variants have long been the benchmark system in the study of the geometric phase (GP) effect in chemical reactions.

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New technology paints in-depth picture of organisms' response to climate change

Revolutionary new technology created at the University of Plymouth could fill a major gap in our understanding of how organisms' early development will be impacted by climate change.

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Incredible shrinking 3D printer can make really tiny objects

A method for 3D printing minuscule objects produces them at a larger size and then shrinks them to one thousandth of the original volume

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2018: The Year in Volcanic Activity

This year, Hawaii’s Kilauea volcano provided a spectacular demonstration of nature’s power, as earthquakes, eruptions, and lava flows took place and fissures developed from May through August, forcing evacuations and destroying hundreds of homes. But Kilauea was not alone—out of an estimated 1,500 active volcanoes, 50 or so erupt every year, spewing steam, ash, toxic gases, and lava. In 2018, oth

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The Grimch: Accuracy Happy Hours

The Grimch was off scheming to shut down the site And it seemed to be working much to his delight! But whatever he did with whatever his powers He couldn’t stop either of two happy hours! Session 1 – 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM on 12/14 Session 2 – 10:00 PM to midnight on 12/14 Swag (generously sponsored by @susi): Most accurate player completing at least 20 cubes wins 1 t-shirt and 1 sticker sheet! Secon

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Screen Time for Kids Might Not Be Such a Bad Thing

Every generation faces disruptive technologies, yet many see today’s version as the end of civilization — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Snow over Antarctica buffered sea level rise during last century

A new NASA-led study has determined that an increase in snowfall accumulation over Antarctica during the 20th century mitigated sea level rise by 0.4 inches. However, Antarctica's additional ice mass gained from snowfall makes up for just about a third of its current ice loss.

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Megacity traffic soot contributes to global warming

Soot from road traffic in emerging countries can reach high altitudes, where it can be transported over long distances and thus contributes to global warming. The reduction of pollutants from road traffic such as soot particles from diesel cars should therefore have high priority in order to both protect the health of the population in the growing conurbations of emerging countries and reduce glob

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Dive over Jupiter's cloud-tops with Nasa's Juno craft

Nasa's Juno mission to Jupiter has reached its halfway mark and revealed spectacular views of the planet's polar storms.

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After a natural disaster, houses get bigger not better

Environment A new analysis of five coastal communities made this troublesome pattern visible. A new study suggests that the majority of coastal areas in the United States build back bigger houses in the wake of a natural disaster.

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Early animals: Death near the shoreline, not life on land

Our understanding of when the very first animals started living on land is helped by identifying trace fossils — the tracks and trails left by ancient animals — in sedimentary rocks that were deposited on the continents.

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How particles arrange themselves into complex structures

Complexity in nature, whether in chlorophyll or in living organisms, often results from self-assembly and is considered particularly robust. Compact clusters of elemental particles can be shown to be of practical relevance, and are found in atomic nuclei, nano particles or viruses. Researchers have decoded the structure and the process behind the formation of one class of such highly ordered clust

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How teens deal with stress may affect their blood pressure, immune system

Most teens get stressed out by their families from time to time, but whether they bottle those emotions up or put a positive spin on things may affect certain processes in the body, including blood pressure and how immune cells respond to bacterial invaders, according to researchers.

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Organic food worse for the climate?

Organically farmed food has a bigger climate impact than conventionally farmed food, due to the greater areas of land required, a new study finds.

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For a longer battery life: Pushing lithium ion batteries to the next performance level

Conventional lithium ion batteries have reached performance limits. Scientists have now developed a new nanostructured anode material for lithium ion batteries, which extends the capacity and cycle life of the batteries. Based on a mesoporous mixed metal oxide in combination with graphene, the material could provide a new approach how to make better use of batteries in large devices such as electr

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New device could help answer fundamental questions about quantum physics

Researchers have developed a new device that can measure and control a nanoparticle trapped in a laser beam with unprecedented sensitivity.

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High-efficiency discovery drives low-power computing

Challenge any modern human to go a day without a phone or computer, and you'd be hard pressed to get any takers. Our collective obsession with all things electronic is driving a dramatic daily drain on the world's power. In fact, if we continue on pace with our current ever-increasing energy consumption, by the year 2035, we will use all of the world's energy to run our computers – an impossible/u

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Large restaurant portions a global problem, study finds

A multi-country study finds that large portion sizes in fast food and full service restaurants is not a problem unique to the US. The researchers found that 94 percent of full service meals and 72 percent of fast food meals studied in five countries contained 600 calories or more.

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New techniques better determine how ancient viral DNA influences human genes

New laboratory techniques can identify which of our genes are influenced by DNA snippets that are left behind in our genetic code by viruses.

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Septin proteins act as cellular police to identify, imprison and kill 'superbug' Shigella

A protein family found naturally in our cells could help stop the spread of dangerous drug resistant infections by using 'detective' like powers to collect evidence of bacterial infection and imprison it, according to new research.

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Researchers Identify Irisin's Receptor in Bone and Fat

They hope to develop the "exercise hormone" into therapeutics that harness the benefits of exercise for people unable to do so.

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The Gods That Will Fail

TOKYO —Five years ago in a hipster coffee shop in Oakland, I met with a representative of Master Ryuho Okawa, a Japanese spiritualist who claims about 11 million followers. The representative—he said he was the “foreign minister” for Okawa’s church—asked if I believed in extraterrestrial life. I said yes. “Good,” he said. He then asked if I believed that aliens had visited Earth. “Maybe,” I said.

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Hvorfor kan man høre vand dryppe?

Nej, det skyldes ikke dråbens fysiske kontakt med vandoverfladen. Britiske forskere kommer med en ny overraskende uddybning af tidligere forklaringer.

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Data use draining your battery? Tiny device to speed up memory while also saving power

Millions of new memory cells could be part of a computer chip and save power for smart devices, thanks to the discovery of a previously unobserved functionality in a super thin material.

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The home healthcare frontier: new study explores nurses' knowledge attitudes toward infection control

Home healthcare workers' beliefs about infection prevention influence whether they comply with prevention protocols more than their actual knowledge of how to comply, according to new research published in the American Journal of Infection Control (AJIC), the journal of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC).

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Oldest known plant virus found at ancient settlement

Researchers studying ancient corncobs found at a Native American archeological site have recovered a 1,000-year-old virus, the oldest plant virus ever reported.

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Researchers shine new light on disease-spreading mosquitoes

Physicists are now exploring laser-based technology traditionally used for studying conditions in the atmosphere — such as Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) — to shine a light on the subtlest of features of mosquito activity and better track populations that may carry a viral threat.

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Moun­tain birds de­clin­ing in Europe

Population data for European mountain birds have been for the first time combined in a recent study, with worrying results: the abundances of mountain-specialist birds has declined by as much as 10% in the 2000s.

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Regular trips out guard against depression in old age

Regular visits to the cinema, theatre or to museums could dramatically reduce the chances of becoming depressed in older age a new study has found. Researchers found a clear link between the frequency of 'cultural engagement' and the chances of someone over 50 developing depression. It is the first such study to show that cultural activities not only help people manage and recover from depression

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Physical activity in the evening does not cause sleep problems

Contrary to popular belief, there is no reason to avoid exercising in the evening, an analysis of the scientific literature has revealed.

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Fifty years of decline in Queensland's coastal sharks

Queensland's coastal shark numbers are continuing a 50-year decline, in sharp contradiction of suggestions of 'exploding' shark populations, according to a new analysis. Researchers analyzed data from the program, which has used baited drumlines and nets since 1962 to minimize human-shark interactions, and now spans 1,760 km of the Queensland coastline.

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