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Nyheder2018december19

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Exercise may be as effective as prescribed drugs to lower high blood pressure

Exercise may be as effective as prescribed drugs to lower high (140 mm Hg) blood pressure, suggests a pooled analysis of the available data, in what is thought to be the first study of its kind, and published online in the British Journal of Sports Medicine.

13h

'Pause' in global warming was never real, new research proves

Claims of a 'pause' in observed global temperature warming are comprehensively disproved in a pair of new studies published today.

13h

Nu skal vi måle efter 10 gange så mange pesticidrester i grundvandet

Dagens målinger af kemikalier i grundvandet er utilstrækkelige. Ny liste indeholder 363 stoffer, vi skal have overblik over.

7h

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Synthesis of medium-sized ring structured compounds

NUS chemists have discovered new reaction pathways to synthesise medium-sized heterocyclic compounds for the development of therapeutic drug molecules.

2min

NeuNetS: Automating neural network model synthesis for broader adoption of AI

On December 14, 2018, IBM released NeuNetS, a fundamentally new capability that addresses the skills gap for development of latest AI models for a wide range of business domains. NeuNetS uses AI to automatically synthesize deep neural network models faster and easier than ever before, scaling up the adoption of AI by companies and SMEs. By fully automating AI model development and deployment, NeuN

2min

New satellite tech offers a more detailed map of moving Antarctic glaciers

Scientists can now measure ice flow in Antarctica in far more detail, thanks to the help of a new satellite technology.

2min

Physicists provide first model of moon's rotational dynamics, accounting for the solid inner core

A new model of the moon's rotational dynamics—the first that takes into account the moon's solid inner core—helps explain why it appears to wobble on its axis.

8min

Alcoholic beverages are frequently considered migraine triggers

A study of 2,197 patients who experience migraines, alcoholic beverages were reported as a trigger by 35.6 percent of participants.

9min

Food insecurity linked with binge-eating disorder and obesity

Food insecurity — difficulty affording enough food to support regular, balanced meals — was associated with increased likelihoods of binge-eating disorder and obesity in a recent study.

9min

Dancing may help older women maintain the ability to perform daily tasks

A new study examined the potential effects of 16 different exercise types for reducing disability for activities of daily living (ADL) in older women.

9min

New insights on animal movement in fire-prone landscapes

A new article considers how fire histories affect animals' movement and shape the distribution of species.

9min

Do personality traits of compulsive users of social media overlap with problem drinking?

A study found certain similarities and differences in personality traits when comparing compulsive use of social media with problematic or risky alcohol use.

9min

Kidney failure on the rise in Australians under 50 with type 2 diabetes

A study of more than 1.3 million Australians with diabetes has found that kidney failure is increasing in people with type 2 diabetes aged under 50 years, leading to reduced quality of life and placing growing demand on the country's kidney dialysis and transplantation services.

18min

Researchers develop a new houseplant that can clean your home's air

Researchers at the University of Washington have genetically modified a common houseplant to remove chloroform and benzene from the air around it.

18min

Rabbit gene helps houseplant detoxify indoor air

Our homes are supposed to be safe havens from the outside world. However, studies have shown that household air is more polluted than either office or school air, exposing children and home workers to higher levels of carcinogens than the general population. Now, researchers have made a genetically modified houseplant that can efficiently remove at least two toxins from the air. They report their

18min

Unpacking the history of how Earth feeds life, and life changes Earth

At a fleeting glance, the study of life – biology – seems very separate from that of rocks, or geology.

20min

The Cheesy Endurance of the Made-for-TV Holiday Movie

Here is the plot of the 2018 Lifetime film A Very Nutty Christmas , as summarized by the network that airs it: Hard-working bakery owner Kate Holiday (Melissa Joan Hart), has more cookie orders than she has time to fill this holiday season, and when her boyfriend suddenly breaks up with her, any shred of Christmas joy she was hanging onto, immediately disappears. After Kate hangs the last ornamen

22min

Workplace discrimination claims fare poorly in arbitration, study says

The use of arbitration to adjudicate worker complaints – and avoid costly litigation through the slow, unwieldy public court system – has been a controversial practice since its usage began to increase in the 1990s. And according to a new paper co-written by a University of Illinois expert in workplace dispute resolution, certain types of cases fare worse than other types that are resolved through

26min

SBM in 2018 and Beyond

A look back at SBM in 2018 and the future of SBM.

31min

Too impatient to meditate? A mild shock to the scalp could help.

Health The benefits of being mindful take time, but there might be a way to speed them up. Despite its seeming simplicity (just empty your mind and focus on your breathing) and potential benefits, meditation is much easier said than done. A small cadre of…

32min

House plants don’t clean your air that much – but this GM pothos might

The air-cleaning properties of house plants have been over-hyped. A GM house plant that breaks down indoor pollutants linked to cancer may do a better job

32min

The sugar that makes up DNA could be made in space

Deoxyribose, the sugar of DNA, was created in a lab simulating ice in space.

34min

Rabbit gene helps houseplant detoxify indoor air

We like to keep the air in our homes as clean as possible, and sometimes we use HEPA air filters to keep offending allergens and dust particles at bay.

38min

NASA satellites spot young star in growth spurt

An adolescent star in the midst of a dramatic growth phase has been observed with the help of two NASA space telescopes. The youngster belongs to a class of stars that gain mass when matter swirling around the star falls onto its surface. The in-falling matter causes the star to appear about 100 times brighter. Astronomers have found only 25 stars in this class, and only about half of those have b

38min

Researchers use sound waves to prevent small chemical reactors from clogging up

Companies are keen to use miniature chemical reactors to make pharmaceuticals and fine chemicals, but are discouraged by their tendency to clog up. Researchers at KU Leuven, Belgium, have now devised an elegant way of using sound waves to keep the chemicals flowing.

38min

The Best Strollers (2019): Umbrella, Lightweight, Jogging, Bike Trailers

Whether you're pushing your kid down the beach, pulling them on a snowy track, or hauling them with a bike, we have the stroller for you.

38min

41min

Does political party trump ideology?

It's the political scientist's often-asked chicken and egg: does a person's political party or policy attitudes come first?

50min

Turning old clothes into high-end building materials

Researchers at UNSW Sydney have developed an effective process to turn old clothing and textiles into high-quality building products such as flat panels.

50min

Paper outlines how L.A. County can adapt its water supply for climate change

The climate is changing, Earth's population is growing and more people are living in cities. That means urban areas—particularly those in arid or semiarid regions—need to update their water supply systems.

50min

Proton scattering reveals the secrets of strongly-correlated proton-neutron pairs in atomic nuclei

The nuclear force that holds protons and neutrons together in the center of atoms has a non-central component—the tensor force, which depends on the spin and relative position of the interacting particles.

50min

Multicultural creatures of habit: Long-term study reveals migratory patterns of bats

Every year, trillions of animals migrate for thousands of kilometres between their summer and winter habitats. Among them are several species of bats whose journeys in the dark of the night unfold largely unnoticed by humans and have only partially been investigated by science. A reconstruction of individual migration patterns of the common noctule (Nyctalus noctula) in Central Europe has now reve

50min

The Brain's Autopilot Mechanism Steers Consciousness

Freud’s notion of a dark, libidinous unconscious is obsolete. A new theory holds that the brain produces a continuous stream of unconscious predictions — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

55min

Regulating the rapidly developing fruit fly

From birth, it takes humans almost two decades to reach adulthood; for a fruit fly, it takes only about 10 days. During a fly embryo's initial stages of development, the insect looks different from minute to minute, and its body plan is defined in just a few hours. Caltech researchers have now gained new insights into how a fly's genes influence this fast period of development—work that ultimately

56min

Photochemical deracemization of chiral compounds achieved

Enantiomeric molecules resemble each other like right and left hands. Both variants normally arise in chemical reactions. But frequently, only one of the two forms is effective in biology and medicine. Completely converting this mixture into the desired enantiomer has been deemed impossible. However, via a photochemical method, a team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now achieved

56min

To the moon and back: Apollo 8 and the future of lunar exploration

Apollo 8 was supposed to be a test flight, meant to simulate atmospheric re-entry from the moon but never meant to go there. Hurtling toward Earth at 2,407.5 miles per hour is hairy business and NASA, having never done so before, needed practice. But then the USSR successfully launched two of its own moonshots (unmanned Zond 5 and 6) on the heels of President Kennedy's call for men on the moon by

56min

Unique insights into an exotic matter state

The properties of matter are typically the result of complex interactions between electrons. These electrically charged particles are one of the fundamental building blocks of nature. They are well researched, and theoretical physics has determined the electronic structure of the majority of matter. However, the behavior of matter under extreme conditions is still largely unexplained. Such conditi

56min

What causes extreme heat in North China?

Extreme heat over the North China Plain is happening with increasing frequency in recent years, posing a substantial threat to human health and social activities. Thus, the mechanism behind the formation of extreme heat is of broad concern. A collaborative research team from China has published a new analysis that shows the horizontal heat flux in the mixed layer plays a crucial role in extreme he

1h

Focus on this: Team increases X-ray laser focusing ability

An X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) is an X-ray produced by a beam of free electrons that have been accelerated almost to the speed of light. XFELs produce laser beams with exceedingly high peak power intensity, which makes them attractive for applications in fundamental research, such as X-ray nonlinear optics and protein crystal structure determination, and also in medicine. It is important to p

1h

Ancient Japanese pottery includes an estimated 500 maize weevils

Researchers have discovered an ancient Japanese pottery vessel from the late Jomon period (4500-3300 BP) with an estimated 500 maize weevils incorporated into its design. The vessel was discovered in February 2016 from ruins in Hokkaido, Japan. This extremely rare discovery provides clues on the cultivation and distribution of chestnuts, food in the Jomon era, and the spirituality of ancient Japan

1h

New composite advances lignin as a renewable 3-D printing material

Scientists at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory have created a recipe for a renewable 3-D printing feedstock that could spur a profitable new use for an intractable biorefinery byproduct: lignin.

1h

Playing video games may help researchers find personalized medical treatment for sepsis

A deep learning approach originally designed to teach computers how to play video games better than humans could aid in developing personalized medical treatment for sepsis, a disease that causes about 300,000 deaths per year and for which there is no known cure.

1h

Study offers new view of how cartels work

Suppose you were building a cartel—a group of business interests who coordinate to fix high prices that consumers must pay. How would you design it? Received economic wisdom says transparency among cartel members is crucial: If colluding suppliers share information, they can keep prices high and monitor members of the cartel to make sure no one deviates from the cartel's norms.

1h

Report investigates 'shifting the peaks' of electricity consumption via three residential appliances

A University of Otago study has examined the potential for New Zealand residential electricity consumption to be shifted to reduce costs for consumers, demand on infrastructure and avoid future carbon emissions.

1h

Space telescope detects water in a number of asteroids

Using the infrared satellite AKARI, a Japanese research team has detected the existence of water in the form of hydrated minerals in a number of asteroids for the first time. This discovery will contribute to the understanding of the distribution of water in the solar system, the evolution of asteroids, and the origin of water on Earth.

1h

Mice give predators the cold shoulder

Starve or be eaten? For small animals, this challenge must be faced every day. Searching for food is a risky business, and small animals must balance their need to eat as much as possible against the risk of being eaten themselves. New research from Western Sydney University shows how mice, and likely other small prey, resolve this problem with the help of an energy-saving mechanism known as torpo

1h

Image: Elf on the ISS

There is no escaping the holidays, even in space.

1h

Forskere: Praktiserende læger har fordomme om personer med svær overvægt

Praktiserende læger diskriminerer ikke i deres behandling, men synes at have negative fordomme over for personer med svær overvægt. Det konkluderer tre forskere fra Københavns Universitet på baggrund af et nyt studie.

1h

'Miracle' Dinosaur Whose Bones Survived Being Blown Up Discovered in Italian Alps

The four-fingered beast is the largest, oldest predatory dinosaur on record.

1h

Photos: Carnivorous Dinosaurs Discovered in Italian Alps

The newly identified dinosaur Saltriovenator zanellai was found in the Italian Alps.

1h

The oldest large-sized predatory dinosaur comes from the Italian Alps

Early Jurassic predatory dinosaurs are very rare, and mostly small in size. Saltriovenator zanellai, a new genus and species described in the peer-reviewed journal PeerJ — the Journal of Life and Environmental Sciences by Italian paleontologists, is the oldest known ceratosaurian, and the world's largest (1 ton) predatory dinosaur from the Lower Jurassic (Sinemurian, ~198 Mya).

1h

The Scandal That Reveals the Fiction of America’s Educational Meritocracy

Until two weeks ago, T. M. Landry College Preparatory School was the most enigmatic school in America. Small and with minimal resources, this private school was known for one thing: placing an extraordinary number of black, low-income students in America’s most elite colleges and universities. Almost everything else about it was mysterious. The school’s founders and namesakes, the married couple

1h

China’s tech boom has inspired a wave of internet-related art

These artists are critiquing how technology promotes consumerism , shapes identity , and enables new forms of censorship .

1h

China vs. the US: Who wins and who loses

An interview with Yasheng Huang, MIT professor and expert on entrepreneurship in China.

1h

The US and China aren’t in a “cold war” so stop calling it that

In our globalized economy, the term is not only outdated, it’s harmful.

1h

Science vs the state: a family saga at the Caltech of China

Three generations of personal and political history show the tensions between the Communist Party’s need for knowledge and its need for ideological control.

1h

China’s tech giants want to go global. Just one thing might stand in their way.

Multibillion-dollar companies like Alibaba and Tencent have thrived thanks to a government that provided incentives but otherwise let them grow. Can they count on that in the future?

1h

Aboard the giant sand-sucking ships that China uses to reshape the world

Massive ships, mind-boggling amounts of sand, and an appetite for expansionism in the South China Sea: the recipe for a land grab like no other.

1h

The man turning China into a quantum superpower

Jian-Wei Pan, China’s “father of quantum”, is masterminding its drive for global leadership in technologies that could change entire industries.

1h

Why Japan Is a Rare Holdout in Asia’s Cash-Free Future

China and South Korea are hurtling toward a cashless future. But in Japan, where physical money is a crucial artifact, the transition is complicated.

1h

How Amazon, Apple, and Google Played the Tax-Break Game

Amazon conducted a very public beauty contest for mini-headquarters, while Apple and Google worked more quietly for planned expansions.

1h

The oldest large-sized predatory dinosaur comes from the Italian Alps

Early Jurassic predatory dinosaurs are very rare, and mostly small in size. Saltriovenator zanellai, a new genus and species described in the peer-reviewed journal PeerJ – the Journal of Life and Environmental Sciences by Italian paleontologists, is the oldest known ceratosaurian, and the world's largest (one ton) predatory dinosaur from the Lower Jurassic (Sinemurian, ~198 Mya).

1h

This Humongous Fungus Has Been Around Since the Birth of Socrates

A humongous fungus lurking underground in Michigan is exceptionally old, tremendously heavy and has a curiously low mutation rate, a new study finds.

1h

China launched more rockets into orbit in 2018 than any other country

And in the next few years it plans to launch the world’s biggest space telescope, the world’s heaviest rocket, and a space station to rival the ISS.

1h

Editors letter: China’s technology ambitions—and their limits

Our special issue on China asks: What is China good at, and can it meet its goal of attaining global supremacy in key areas of technology?

1h

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Ny praksisejer på Langeland vil give borgerne kontinuitet

Praktiserende læge Osman Aden Mohamed har købt Syddanmarks første regionsklinik i Rudkøbing. Med købet håber han at kunne tilbyde patienterne en bedre kontinuitet end hidtil – og dermed en bedre behandling.

1h

How to Approach the Problem of 'Oumuamua

The first interstellar object ever found provides an excellent test of the scientific process — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

Elon Musk unveils prototype high-speed LA transport tunnel

The entrepreneur says his system will see modified electric cars travel at high speed underground.

1h

Newfound Object Is the Farthest Solar System Body Ever Spotted

A newly discovered object is the most-distant body ever observed in the solar system — and the first object ever found circling at more than 100 times the distance from Earth to the sun.

1h

Saturn Is Losing Its Rings

Chances are, you wouldn't recognize Saturn without its trademark thick band of rings. But if you could travel 300 million years into the future, you would need to, because by then, chances are those rings would be gone — and they could disappear even fast

1h

Getting the Dirt on Creation–Inside OSIRIS-REx's First Close Look at Bennu

NASA’s first sample-return mission to an asteroid is a voyage into the genesis of our solar system—and, perhaps, the precursors to life’s origins on Earth — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

Trump’s Lawless Border

The Trump administration would like everyone to know that it will shoulder no blame for the death of a 7-year-old child in the government’s care. “Does the administration take the responsibility for a parent taking a child on a trek through Mexico to get through this country? No,” said the White House spokesman Hogan Gidley , responding to questions about Jakelin Caal Maquín’s death from dehydrat

2h

What Australia Knows About Recessions

It’s beginning to feel a lot like 2007. Or 2000. Or 1990. Or 1981. Stock prices are limping along, housing sales have gone soft , and banks are pulling back from risky loans . The sugar rush from President Donald Trump’s extraordinary round of fiscal stimulus is about to wear off, as the Federal Reserve continues to tap up interest rates. At the same time, global growth is slowing thanks to the t

2h

Democrats Want Universal Background Checks on Guns

During the November elections, a number of Democratic House candidates made gun control a central theme of their midterms campaigns, and dozens more gave the issue strong emphasis on the trail. Next month, they might have a chance to follow through on their campaign promises with legislation requiring federal background checks on all gun sales. The legislation isn’t likely to become law. It will

2h

The 17 Best Films of 2018

Editor’s Note : Find all of The Atlantic ’s “Best of 2018” coverage here . 2018 was not a big year for big films, but it was a big year for smaller ones. Yes, A Star Is Born was a major hit, and deservedly so. But the bulk of the movies on our two critics’ lists were not Hollywood Oscar bait but intimate fables meticulously told: a septuagenarian bank robber who just can’t quit or a pastor losing

2h

Cheers! Saying thanks is good for you and those around you

The fad of privately recording your gratitude in a journal was all the rage, but it turns out if you actually pass on your thanks to others, the benefits are multiplied

2h

Dark Matter Theorists Explore Axions as WIMPs Come up Short

After a year of disappointing experiments, the dominant theory in dark matter physics is losing its sheen while others gain prominence.

2h

E-cigarettes caught fire among teens

High schoolers’ use of e-cigarettes shot up from 2017 to 2018, and public health officials are concerned that a new generation is at risk for nicotine addiction.

2h

Consciousness, panpsychism, and AGI: What is it like to be a hat?

Panpsychism is the idea that there is an element of consciousness in everything in the universe. The theory goes like this: You're conscious. Ben Goertzel is conscious. And his hat is conscious too. What if consciousness isn't about the brain at all, but it's as inherent to our universe as space-time? "Now, panpsychism, to me, is not even that interesting, it's almost obvious — it's just the foun

2h

5G-frekvenser holder køreplanen trods udskudt auktion

På trods af forsinkelse og mørklægning, bliver de to vigtige frekvensbånd 700 og 900 Mhz klar til brug i 2020.

2h

Exercise may lower high blood pressure as much as medication

An analysis of nearly 400 trials suggests that exercise might be as effective for people with high blood pressure as taking the most commonly-used drugs

2h

»Glem Mars. Vi kommer aldrig længere end til Månen«

Christian Rovsing var Danmarks Radios kommentator under månerejserne. Den 33-årige civilingeniør var bekymret for astronauternes helbred, da Apollo-æraen tog fart, og tror heller ikke i dag, at vi vil klare de lange rumrejser.

3h

»Havde jeg vidst, hvor rumfarten var i 2018, var jeg blevet skuffet«

Hendes hus hedder MECO (Main Engine Cut Off), og efter 30 års arbejde i Nasa er danske Mariann Albjerg ikke i tvivl: Vi kommer tilbage til Månen. Snart.

3h

»Apollo 11 var vores ‘Rumrejsen 2001’ – alt blev muligt«

Cand.scient. Henrik Stub var yngstemand i radioens ekspertpanel under månelandingen og var som alle andre grebet af »berusende begejstring«. I dag erkender han, at alle overså, at Apollo slet ikke var et rumprojekt, men et politisk projekt.

3h

Persondata-overblik på vej: Nu skal danskerne kunne se, hvilke data kommunerne har om dem

Fem kommuner tester en ny løsning, der giver borgerne adgang til at se, hvilke oplysninger kommunen behandler om dem.

3h

China warns US against 'weaponising' space

China said Wednesday it opposed the "weaponisation" of space as it criticised US President Donald Trump's orders to create a new command centre for controlling military space operations.

3h

Changing climate, longer growing seasons complicate outlook for coniferous forests

For decades, ecologists have differed over a longstanding mystery: Will a longer, climate-induced growing season ultimately help coniferous forests to grow or hurt them? A new University of Colorado Boulder study may help researchers find a more definitive answer.

3h

Research sheds new light on what drove last, long-term global climate shift

The quest to discover what drove the last, long-term global climate shift on Earth, which took place around a million years ago, has taken a new, revealing twist.

3h

Who do we trust when human and machine intelligence disagree

A faulty sensor – and the automated action it led to – are being blamed for the loss of Lion Air flight JT 610. Is it time for AI to take a back seat, asks Peter Lemme

3h

Hospitalsfejl førte til dødsfald: Børneafdeling havde advaret om patientsikkerheden

Børneafdelingen på Hvidovre Hospital har advaret ledelsen fire gange om farlig travlhed. Selvom ledelsen mener, at den har reageret, endte travlheden i et dødsfald.

3h

From eye drops to potential leukaemia treatment

An active ingredient in eye drops that were being developed for the treatment of a form of eye disease has shown promise for treating an aggressive form of blood cancer. Scientists at the Wellcome Sanger Institute and their collaborators have found that this compound, which targets an essential cancer gene, could kill leukaemia cells without harming non-leukemic blood cells. The results reveal a p

3h

Research sheds new light on what drove last, long-term global climate shift

The quest to discover what drove the last, long-term global climate shift on Earth, which took place around a million years ago, has taken a new, revealing twist.

3h

Changing climate, longer growing seasons complicate outlook for coniferous forests

For decades, ecologists have differed over a longstanding mystery: Will a longer, climate-induced growing season ultimately help coniferous forests to grow or hurt them? A new University of Colorado Boulder study may help researchers find a more definitive answer.

3h

High sodium intake may contribute to increased heart-disease deaths in China

Nearly a fifth of cardiovascular disease deaths among adults in a northern province of China in 2011 may be attributed to the blood pressure-raising effect of high-sodium diets. An initiative to reduce dietary sodium intake in the region suggested thousands of deaths may be averted with reduced sodium intake.

3h

For One City Manager, Climate Becomes A Matter Of Conscience

Steven Falk of Lafayette, Calif., has resigned because he says he cannot carry out policies that fail to address the urgent threat of a changing climate. (Image credit: Dan Charles/NPR)

3h

Why Aren't More Users Of Opioids Or Meth Screened For Hepatitis C?

As the number of people who inject drugs and share needles has soared, the rate of infection with Hep C has climbed too. Yet many drug treatment patients aren't tested for the liver-damaging virus. (Image credit: BSIP/UIG/Getty Images)

3h

Ny Facebook-afsløring: Netflix og Spotify kunne se, skrive og slette Facebook-brugeres private beskeder

Facebook undtog over 150 firmaer fra deres almindelige privacy-regler, fordi de havde stemplet virksomhederne som partnere i en eller anden forstand.

3h

Danske mikrofoner skal sikre lydsporet under Nasas næste Mars-landing

Mikrofoner fra danske DPA Microphones skal sikre, at vi for første gang kan høre, hvordan det lyder, når et fartøj lander på Mars.

3h

From robotic companions to third thumbs, machines can change the human brain

People's interactions with machines, from robots that throw tantrums when they lose a colour-matching game against a human opponent to the bionic limbs that could give us extra abilities, are not just revealing more about how our brains are wired – they are also altering them.

3h

Robots are being programmed to adapt in real time

A robust, adaptable robot that responds to its environment on the fly and overcomes obstacles such as a broken leg without human intervention could be used to rescue people from an earthquake zone or clean up sites that are too hazardous for humans.

3h

EU agrees to ban most single-use plastics

EU countries and the European Parliament on Wednesday agreed details of a ban on single-use plastics, including plates, cutlery and drinking straws, in a bid to cut marine pollution.

3h

Norway sees boom in electric cars, fueled by the government

A silent revolution has transformed driving in Norway.

3h

OVERBLIK: Nu smider robotterne for alvor afskærmningen

Små samarbejdende robotter vælter frem i industrien. Nye samarbejdende robotmærker udfordrer den fynske robot­klynges markedsdominans.

4h

Podcast-special: Små samarbejdende robotter vælter frem

Universal Robots har de seneste ti år været verdens førende producent af samarbejdende robotter, der kan arbejde uden afskærmning. Men nu myldrer det frem med konkurrenter til den danske robotsucces. Og de var alle repræsenteret på robotmessen i Sydkorea.

4h

The very first dinosaurs probably evolved in South America

Dinosaurs conquered every major landmass, making it difficult to work out where they originally came from – but two studies both conclude they were southerners

4h

Schweiziske eksperter: Kabler i italiensk katastrofebro var tæret halvt igennem

Kablerne inde i stagene på Morandi-broen, der kollapsede i august, var alvorligt gennemtærede viser foreløbige undersøgelser fra to schweiziske institutioner

5h

Rehydration: Mexican forensic scientists' crime-fighting weapon

Jorge's putrefied corpse would have been buried in an unmarked grave but for a rehydration technique pioneered in Mexico that allowed him to be identified by his tattoos and given the send-off his family wanted.

5h

Sinking Greek village highlights nation's addiction to coal

If earthquakes struck in slow motion, the results might be visible in a place like the Greek village of Anargyri, a hardscrabble enclave in a black landscape gutted by coal mining.

5h

Stick insects: Egg-laying techniques reveal new evolutionary map

Known for exceptional mimicry, stick insects have evolved a range of egg-laying techniques to maximize egg survival while maintaining their disguise—including dropping eggs to the ground, skewering them on leaves, and even enlisting ants for egg dispersal. Scientists have now combined knowledge on these varied techniques with DNA analysis to create the best map of stick-insect evolution to date. C

5h

Stick insects: Egg-laying techniques reveal new evolutionary map

Scientists have created the best map of stick-insect evolution to date by combining DNA analysis and knowledge of their varied egg-laying techniques. The first stick insects flicked or dropped their eggs while hiding in the foliage, but they have evolved new egg-laying techniques after colonizing different habitats. Previous evolutionary theories, based on anatomical similarities, are inaccurate,

5h

SoftBank mobile unit in record IPO but market debut flops

Japanese technology giant SoftBank celebrated the world's second-biggest IPO for its mobile unit Wednesday but the newly traded shares endured a torrid time in their debut session, plunging nearly 15 percent.

5h

End of an era as Germany's last black coal mine closes

Germany will close its last black coal mine on Friday, turning the page on two centuries of mining history in the Ruhr region that helped fuel the country's post-war "economic miracle".

5h

Open Scientific Collaboration May Be Helping North Korea Cheat Nuclear Sanctions

New research shared exclusively with NPR suggests that Pyongyang is refining its weapons technology through open scientific research. China leads the way in scientific collaboration with North Korea. (Image credit: KCNA /Reuters)

5h

Outrage as six baby seals decapitated in New Zealand

Six baby seals have been found decapitated in New Zealand in what wildlife rangers on Wednesday branded a "cruel and senseless" act against a protected species.

5h

Pennsylvania lets Uber self-driving cars back on roads

Authorities in the US state of Pennsylvania have given Uber the green light to resume testing self-driving cars, the ride-sharing giant said Tuesday, after a fatal crash in Arizona prompted a pause.

5h

New Zealand warns Google over naming murder accused

New Zealand warned Google to "take responsibility" for its news content Wednesday, after the internet giant broke a court order suppressing the name of a man charged with murdering a British backpacker.

5h

How Germany will turn lights out at last black coal mine

After more than 150 years, Germany's last black coal mine will close in the Ruhr region, posing a gigantic geological and environmental challenge to the former industrial heartland.

5h

Study highlights the effects of social class microaggressions on individuals

Although overt expressions of hostility are considered to be ill-mannered and undesirable behaviors, covert discrimination and degradation continue to be directed at individuals, communicating that recipients are less than dominant culture individuals, that they do not belong, and that their realities are invalid. These hostilities are known as microaggressions.

5h

Uncovering a key mechanism in assembly of Avian Sarcoma Virus, a 100-year-old oncogenic virus often used to study HIV-1

A key step in retroviral growth inside a cell, as described by Jamil Saad, Ph.D., and colleagues, is portrayed on the cover of The Journal of Biological Chemistry. It is a visual image, in molecular detail, of their journal article inside that looks at avian sarcoma virus, or ASV.

5h

Researchers find gender separation affects sense of smell

A University of Wyoming researcher and his team have discovered that separating male and female mice, over time, changes the way they smell.

6h

New insights on animal movement in fire-prone landscapes

A new Biological Reviews article considers how fire histories affect animals' movement and shape the distribution of species.

6h

Loss of forest intactness increases extinction risk in birds

Fragmentation within intact forests has a higher impact on vertebrate biodiversity than equivalent losses in already degraded landscapes, but the relationship between forest 'intactness' and extinction risk has not been quantified.

6h

Powder could help cut CO2 emissions

Scientists at the University of Waterloo have created a powder that can capture CO2 from factories and power plants.

6h

Tesla-stifter afslører underjordisk løsning på trafikpropper

Elon Musk fremviser første sektion af sit højhastighedsnetværk, hvor biler sendes gennem tunneler.

6h

How does your garden grow in space?

Astronauts in low-earth orbit could use a fresh salad to brighten up all those freeze-dried meals. But the microgravity space environment can affect plant growth in ways we're only beginning to understand. In research presented in a recent issue of Applications in Plant Sciences, Drs. Anna-Lisa Paul and Robert Ferl, and colleagues at the University of Florida Space Plants Lab, showed that two diff

6h

Region H: Samlede pris for implementering af Sundhedsplatformen var 1,3 mia. kroner

Region Hovedstaden har fremlagt regnskab for implementeringen af Sundhedsplatformen. Det løber op i 1,3 milliarder kroner – og det er under budget, anfører regionen.

7h

Australian drug regulator takes action over claims products can treat disease

Therapeutic Goods Administration takes on Peptides Clinics Australia for alleged advertising breaches For the first time in almost a decade Australia’s drugs regulator has begun court action against a supplements seller, after the online company claimed its products could help people build muscle while also treating anxiety, depression, heart damage, joint diseases, bone diseases and other ailmen

7h

The Swiftly Closing Borders of Europe

GAP, FRANCE —In a wood-paneled courtroom in this small town in the French Alps, a local judge dealt a hefty setback last week to the European Union’s treasured principle of open borders, one that has underpinned the bloc. And to do it, she fell back on a law that dates back to one of the darkest periods in European history. In sentencing two immigrants’-rights activists to jail time and handing s

7h

Elon Musk Unveils the Boring Company’s Car-Flinging TunnelElon Musk Boring Company

The Tesla and SpaceX CEO showed off the details of his latest scheme to slay traffic.

7h

Saturn mister sine ringe tre gange hurtigere end først troet

Planetens egen tyngdekraft trækker ringene fra hinanden. Men bare rolig – de er først helt væk om 100 millioner år.

7h

A swarming asexual midge is island hopping towards Antarctica

Biologists say biosecurity measures need to be stepped up to prevent a non-biting midge reaching Antarctica, because it could radically change the continent

8h

How does your garden grow in space?

Understanding how plants respond to microgravity is critical to providing fresh food during space exploration initiatives. Researchers at the University of Florida Space Plants Lab compared two methods – RNA-Seq and microarray — of analyzing which genes are expressed (the 'transcriptome') in plant tissue, specifically in the root tip. The results reveal how plants adapt to the microgravity space

8h

Powder could help cut CO2 emissions

Scientists at the University of Waterloo have created a powder that can capture CO2 from factories and power plants.The powder, created in the lab of Zhongwei Chen, a chemical engineering professor at Waterloo, can filter and remove CO2 at facilities powered by fossil fuels before it is released into the atmosphere and is twice as efficient as conventional methods.

8h

Flu is serious for pregnant women and others at high risk

Those at high-risk for flu complications such as hospitalization and death — including pregnant women — should be tested and treated as soon as possible, suggest new influenza guidelines released by the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA).

8h

High cost of re-operation after breast-conserving surgery

A small number of women require re-operation after breast-conserving surgery (BCS) for breast cancer, if the surgical margins are not free from cancer. A new BJS (British Journal of Surgery) analysis reveals the expense of re-operation. If re-operation rates can be minimized, there may be considerable efficiency savings.

8h

New study demonstrates effectiveness and safety of vaginal estrogen

Despite its proven effectiveness in treating the genital symptoms of menopause, low-dose vaginal estrogen therapy remains underused largely because of misperceptions regarding its safety. However, a new study that followed women from the Nurses' Health Study demonstrates that its use is not associated with a higher risk of cardiovascular disease or cancer. Results are published online today in Men

8h

Nightlights for stream dwellers? No, thanks

When the critters that live in and around streams and wetlands are settling into their nighttime routines, streetlights and other sources of illumination filter down through the trees and into their habitat, monkeying with the normal state of affairs, according to new research from The Ohio State University.

8h

Birthweight and early pregnancy body mass index may risk pregnancy complications

Women who were born with a low birthweight are at increased risk of pregnancy complications, according to a new Obesity study.

8h

Study highlights the effects of social class microaggressions on individuals

Although overt expressions of hostility are considered to be ill-mannered and undesirable behaviors, covert discrimination and degradation continue to be directed at individuals, communicating that recipients are less than dominant culture individuals, that they do not belong, and that their realities are invalid. These hostilities are known as microaggressions. A new Counselor Education & Supervi

8h

Do personality traits of compulsive users of social media overlap with problem drinking?

A study published in the Australian Journal of Psychology found certain similarities and differences in personality traits when comparing compulsive use of social media with problematic or risky alcohol use.

8h

New insights on animal movement in fire-prone landscapes

A new Biological Reviews article considers how fire histories affect animals' movement and shape the distribution of species.

8h

Loss of forest intactness increases extinction risk in birds

Fragmentation within intact forests has a higher impact on vertebrate biodiversity than equivalent losses in already degraded landscapes, but the relationship between forest 'intactness' and extinction risk has not been quantified. In a new Animal Conservation study, researchers assessed the threat to forest-dependent birds (about 23 percent of all the world's birds) in relation to the proportion

8h

Dancing may help older women maintain the ability to perform daily tasks

A new study published in the Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports examined the potential effects of 16 different exercise types for reducing disability for activities of daily living (ADL) in older women.

8h

Mind-body exercises may improve cognitive function as adults age

Mind-body exercises — especially tai chi and dance mind-body exercise — are beneficial for improving global cognition, cognitive flexibility, working memory, verbal fluency, and learning in older adults. The findings come from a meta-analysis of all relevant published studies. The Journal of the American Geriatrics Society analysis included 32 randomized controlled trials with 3,624 older adults

8h

Food insecurity linked with binge-eating disorder and obesity

Food insecurity — difficulty affording enough food to support regular, balanced meals — was associated with increased likelihoods of binge-eating disorder and obesity in a recent International Journal of Eating Disorders study.

8h

Alcoholic beverages are frequently considered migraine triggers

In a European Journal of Neurology study of 2,197 patients who experience migraines, alcoholic beverages were reported as a trigger by 35.6 percent of participants.

8h

Lung transplant patients face elevated lung cancer risk

In an American Journal of Transplantation study, lung cancer risk was increased after lung transplantation, especially in the native (non-transplanted) lung of single lung transplant recipients.

8h

Aggressive behavior brings emotional pain to the sadist

Sadists derive pleasure or enjoyment from another person's pain, yet new research shows that sadistic behavior ultimately deprives the sadists of happiness.

8h

Exposure to cannabis alters the genetic profile of sperm

New research from Duke Health suggests men in their child-bearing years should consider how THC could impact their sperm and possibly the children they conceive during periods when they've been using the drug.Much like previous research that has shown tobacco smoke, pesticides, flame retardants and even obesity can alter sperm, the Duke research shows THC also affects epigenetics, triggering struc

8h

Disordered crystals are promising for future battery technology

Tiny, disordered particles of magnesium chromium oxide may hold the key to new magnesium battery energy storage technology, which could possess increased capacity compared to conventional lithium-ion batteries, find UCL and University of Illinois at Chicago researchers.

8h

When 'alien' insects attack Antartica

Of the known alien (non-native) species found in Antarctica, a non-biting species of midge currently presents one of the highest risks to terrestrial ecosystems, researchers have found.

8h

When 'alien' insects attack Antarctica

Of the known alien (non-native) species found in Antarctica, a non-biting species of midge currently presents one of the highest risks to terrestrial ecosystems, researchers have found.

8h

Nightlights for stream dwellers? No, thanks

Artificial light at night isn't just a health problem for those of us sitting in bed scrolling through Instagram instead of hitting the sack—it hurts entire outdoor ecosystems.

8h

How Google took on China—and lost

It used to be that while Google wanted China, China really needed Google. Not any more.

8h

Disordered crystals are promising for future battery technology

Tiny, disordered particles of magnesium chromium oxide may hold the key to new magnesium battery energy storage technology, which could possess increased capacity compared to conventional lithium-ion batteries, find UCL and University of Illinois at Chicago researchers.

8h

How China got a head start in fintech, and why the West won’t catch up

Payment apps like Alipay and WeChat transformed daily life in China. The West won’t see a similar payments revolution—and that might even be a good thing.

8h

Vind med Ingeniørens julekalender: 19. december

Vær med i Ingeniørens julekalender 2018. Hver dag med nye præmier!

9h

Opioids not much better than placebos at treating pain, study says

The study examined more than 26,000 people experiencing chronic pain. Opioids were only marginally better than placebos at treating pain and improving physical functioning. It's estimated that at least 2 million Americans have opioid use problems. None Opioids are only slightly more effective than placebos at treating pain, according to a new study. The study tracked the more than 26,000 people,

10h

Canadian Government Ending Networks of Centres of Excellence Program

The funding future is uncertain for researchers studying topics including cancer, stem cells, and the Arctic.

11h

Weather stops plastic waste car reaching South Pole

A car made from waste plastic has been forced to abort its mission to the South Pole because of bad weather.

11h

Allergan Halts Sales in Europe of Textured Breast Implants Linked to Rare Cancer

The company’s product, in use worldwide, has been under scrutiny since women began developing a type of lymphoma.

11h

Targeting chemical signals between the gut and brain could lead to new treatment for obesity

New research published in the Journal of Physiology has shed light on how to disrupt chemical signals that affect how much someone eats, which could lead to a method for helping manage obesity.

12h

Note to Michael Flynn: Federal Court Is Not Twitter

Former National-Security Adviser Michael Flynn on Tuesday got an unpleasant lesson on the difference between politically effective arguments and legally astute ones. Backed by an array of well-wishers, including President Donald Trump, and buoyed by widespread conservative arguments that the FBI had violated his rights, Flynn walked into a federal courtroom in Washington, D.C., hoping for the pro

12h

Wooden clothes?

A university in Finland has invented a process to turn waste wood into material for clothing.

12h

Multicultural creatures of habit

Every year trillions of animals migrate for thousands of kilometres between their summer and winter areas. Among them are several species of bats whose journeys in the dark of the night unfold largely unnoticed by humans and have only partially been investigated by science. A reconstruction of individual migration patterns of the common noctule (Nyctalus noctula) in Central Europe has now revealed

13h

Global warming didn't pause — researchers disentangle 'hiatus' confusion

The reality of ongoing climate warming might seem plainly obvious today after a summer of weather extremes in the whole northern hemisphere. A few years back however, some media and some experts were entangled in debates about an alleged pause in global warming. In two new studies, a group of international scientists joined forces to disentangle any possible 'hiatus' confusion, affirming that ther

13h

Three generations, 1,000s of miles: Scientists unlock mystery of a dragonfly's migration

New research describes the annual life cycle of the common green darner dragonfly, finding that it takes three generations and two long-distance migrations to complete one year in the life of this species. Scientists used citizen science data and hundreds of dragonfly specimens from museums around the country to come to their conclusions, which could inform conservation efforts as insect populatio

13h

'Pause' in global warming was never real, new research proves

Claims of a 'pause' in observed global temperature warming are comprehensively disproved in a pair of new studies published today.An international team of climate researchers reviewed existing data and studies and reanalyzed them. They concluded there has never been a statistically significant 'pause' in global warming. This conclusion holds whether considering the 'pause' as a change in the rate

13h

British Journal of Cancer press notice

This release contains media summaries for upcoming papers published in the British Journal of Cancer.

13h

The Atlantic Daily: Discipline

What We’re Following Huawei in the World: In a rare and critical moment since the arrest in Canada of Huawei’s chief financial officer, whom the U.S. is accusing of violating American sanctions on Iran, an official from the Chinese telecoms giant is publicly engaging with foreign reporters . Huawei is a key player in China’s quest to become a technology powerhouse, as well as in growing economic

13h

Three generations, 1,000s of miles: Scientists unlock mystery of a dragonfly's migration

Thanks to photos and films featuring clouds of stunning orange and black monarch butterflies flying across North America, many people today are familiar with how monarchs migrate. The migration patterns of other insects, however, remain more mysterious, for both the public and scientists alike. A new paper in Biology Letters describes a dragonfly's full life cycle for the first time, in compelling

13h

Workplace 'resilience' programs might not make any difference

Workplace resilience programmes, designed to bolster mental health and wellbeing, and encourage employees to seek help when issues arise, might not make any difference, suggests research published online in Occupational & Environmental Medicine.

13h

Food allergies linked to increased disease activity in multiple sclerosis

Food allergies are associated with heightened levels of disease activity in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), shows research published online in the Journal of Neurology Neurosurgery & Psychiatry.

13h

People with extreme political views have trouble thinking about their own thinking

Science Your super liberal and super conservative relatives might all have one thing in common. Radical political views of all sorts seem to shape our lives to an almost unprecedented extent. But what attracts people to the fringes?

14h

Use a Slo-Mo Video to Calculate How Fast Glass Shatters

Using footage shot by The Slow Mo Guys, you can get a pretty good estimate of the speed at which cracks travel through a sheet of glass.

14h

AT&T's 5G+ Service Will Only Kinda Sorta Be What We Hope For

The new 5G+ service won't be as fast as the emerging network can be, and will only be available in limited areas.

14h

A Terrifying Copycat

In 1989, the aspiring filmmaker Rolfe Kanefsky, who was then 19 years old, cobbled together $100,000 to make his dream movie. Thus, the first self-aware, meta-textual horror film was born. Although There's Nothing Out There was groundbreaking and garnered the attention of high-ranking studio executives, due to a series of unfortunate events, it tanked at the box office. It was dead on arrival. Ch

14h

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: When Ducey Picked McSally

Written by Olivia Paschal ( @oliviacpaschal ) and Elaine Godfrey ( @elainejgodfrey ) Today in 5 Lines A federal judge agreed to delay former National Security Advisor Michael Flynn’s sentencing for lying to the FBI. Flynn requested the delay, signaling his fear that he might serve prison time despite his cooperation with three separate investigations. Democrats rejected an offer from Senate Major

14h

Removing sweets from checkouts linked to dramatic fall in unhealthy snack purchases

Policies aimed at removing sweets and chips from checkouts could lead to a dramatic reduction to the amount of unhealthy food purchased to eat 'on the go' and a significant reduction in that purchased to take home, suggests new research.

14h

Southwest forest trees will grow much slower in the 21st century

Southwest forests may decline in productivity on average as much as 75 percent over the 21st century as climate warms. The finding is based on a treasure trove of about 20,000 unanalyzed tree cores discovered in a Utah laboratory about a decade ago.

14h

Using CRISPR technology for conditional gene regulation

CRISPR allows scientists to precisely target and edit DNA within living cells, which could help them correct anomalies that cause inherited diseases. A team has now developed a method to use CRISPR/Cas9 technology to set off a cascade of activities in cells, a phenomenon known as conditional gene regulation.

14h

Gender separation affects sense of smell

Olfactory sensory receptors in mice change as a function of exposure to odors emitted from members of the opposite sex, researchers have discovered.

14h

Uncovering a key mechanism in assembly of Avian Sarcoma Virus, a relative of HIV-1

Researchers used NMR to detail how the matrix domain of the Avian Sarcoma Virus Gag protein binds to certain phospholipids. These phospholipids are vital for Gag protein binding to the plasma membrane of a cell, as the virus replicates and takes its first step toward virus formation and budding. ASV is widely used as a model to study mechanisms of HIV infection and replication.

14h

Scientists develop method to visualize a genetic mutation

A team of scientists has developed a method that yields, for the first time, visualization of a gene amplifications and deletions known as copy number variants in single cells. Significantly allows early detection of rare genetic events providing high resolution analysis of the tempo of evolution.

14h

Gifts that get better as they age

Gadgets About 99 percent of consumer goods aren't in use six months later. Let's strive for something different. Stop buying things that will get throw away six months later, and start buying stuff that could turn into family heirlooms.

15h

MRI effective for monitoring liver fat in obese patients

MRI provides a safe, noninvasive way to monitor liver fat levels in people who undergo weight loss treatments for obesity, according to a new study.

15h

Machine learning-detected signal predicts time to earthquake

Machine-learning research reveals the detection of seismic signals accurately predicting the Cascadia fault's slow slippage, a type of failure observed to precede large earthquakes in other subduction zones.

15h

Experimental findings support a connection between mucins in the lung and pulmonary fibrosis

A team of investigators has identified a connection between mucus in the small airways and pulmonary fibrosis.

15h

Study of traditional medicine finds high use in Sub-Saharan Africa despite modern medicine

Researchers who have undertaken the first systematic review of into the use of traditional, complementary and alternative medicines (TCAM) in Sub-Saharan Africa found its use is significant and not just because of a lack of resources or access to 'conventional medicine'.

15h

Genetic cause of ALS and frontotemporal dementia blocked by RNA-binding compound

A new compound blocks the most common genetic cause of familial ALS and frontotemporal dementia. Results suggest that the target currently being pursued by many research groups may not actually be the one driving neuron death.

15h

Sound could replace lasers in surgery

Scientists announce the ability to simultaneously manipulate individual levitated objects. Using high-frequency sound waves may provide a safer alternative to laser microsurgery. Video of the research looks like a cartoon, but it's all real. For a while now, scientists have presented demonstrations of sound's ability to levitate and move suspended particles. It's pretty cool stuff, and you can fi

15h

Netflix's ‘Roma’ Rollout Teaches the Company Some Lessons

Alfonso Cuarón's epic is the biggest theatrical release Netflix has undertaken—and the process has laid bare some weaknesses in the company's offline strategy.

15h

A new study proves parachutes are useless

Scientists working at medical schools across the United States discovered that parachutes don't lower the death rate of people jumping out of airplanes. The study flies in the face of decades of anecdotal evidence. The findings should be carefully applied, due to "minor caveats" with the experimental structure. There is an old joke that says "If your parachute doesn't deploy, don't worry: you hav

15h

Uncovering a key mechanism in assembly of Avian Sarcoma Virus, a relative of HIV-1

Researchers used NMR to detail how the matrix domain of the Avian Sarcoma Virus Gag protein binds to certain phospholipids. These phospholipids are vital for Gag protein binding to the plasma membrane of a cell, as the virus replicates and takes its first step toward virus formation and budding. ASV is widely used as a model to study mechanisms of HIV infection and replication.

15h

Researchers find gender separation affects sense of smell

Olfactory sensory receptors in mice change as a function of exposure to odors emitted from members of the opposite sex, University of Wyoming researchers have discovered.

15h

The importance of 'edge populations' to biodiversity

More than two-thirds of Canada's biodiversity is made up of species that occur within the country's borders only at the very northern edge of their range. Biologists have long debated how much effort should be dedicated to conserving these 'edge populations.' One argument in their favor is that they may be especially well suited to lead northward range shifts for their species as the climate warms

15h

Recruiting ants to fight weeds on the farm

Harvester ants that eat weed seeds on the soil's surface can help farmers manage weeds on their farms, according to an international team of researchers, who found that tilling less to preserve the ants could save farmers fuel and labor costs, as well as preserve water and improve soil quality.

15h

Low-income, rural kids at higher risk for second- or third-hand smoke exposure

Infants and toddlers in low-income, rural areas may be at higher risk for second- and third-hand smoke than previously reported, according to new research.

15h

Two ways cancer resists treatment are actually connected, with one activating the other

Researcher shows the two most common means of resistance to BRAF and MEK inhibitors are actually connected processes and can be targeted by other therapies.

15h

Upwind wind plants can reduce flow to downwind neighbors

New research highlights a previously unexplored consequence of the global proliferation of wind energy facilities: a wake effect from upwind facilities that can reduce the energy production of their downwind neighbors.

15h

Oroville Dam earthquakes in February 2017 related to spillway discharge

A closer look at small earthquakes that took place at the Oroville Dam in California's Sierra Nevada foothills in February 2017 — near the time when the dam's spillway failed — suggest that the seismic activity was related to reservoir discharge that opened and closed fractures in the rock below the spillway.

15h

HPV discovery raises hope for new cervical cancer treatments

Researchers have made a discovery about human papillomavirus (HPV) that could lead to new treatments for cervical cancer and other cancers caused by the virus, the most common sexually transmitted disease.

15h

Pathogen predicament: How bacteria propel themselves out of a tight spot

Scientists have deciphered how some types of 'swimming' bacteria have evolved to be able to escape when trapped in small spaces. The discovery could pave the way to finding new methods to stop the spread of certain bacteria, including species that cause food poisoning and stomach ulcers.

15h

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