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James Mattis’s Letter of Resignation

On Thursday, December 20, Secretary of Defense James Mattis submitted a letter of resignation to President Donald Trump. “Because you have the right to a Secretary of Defense whose views are better aligned with yours on these and other subjects,” he wrote, “I believe it is right for me to step down from my position.” The full text of the letter is reproduced below. Dear Mr. President: I have been

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Amoeba finds approximate solutions to NP-hard problem in linear time

Researchers have demonstrated that an amoeba—a single-celled organism consisting mostly of gelatinous protoplasm—has unique computing abilities that may one day offer a competitive alternative to the methods used by conventional computers.

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Ice-filled Martian crater is a permanent winter wonderland

The European Space Agency's Mars Express probe captured this striking view of ice-filled Korolev Crater, near the north pole of the Red Planet

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Trods EU-forbud vil Danmark bruge bidræber-pesticid på sukkerroer

Den danske sukkerbranche har fået Miljøstyrelsens tilladelse til at fortsætte med at bejdse frø til sukkerroer med et af de neonikotinoider, som skader bier.

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Satellite study proves global quantum communication will be possible

Researchers in Italy have demonstrated the feasibility of quantum communications between high-orbiting global navigation satellites and a ground station, with an exchange at the single photon level over a distance of 20,000km.

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Juul Accepts Altria Investment and Embraces Big Tobacco

Juul, maker of the best-selling e-cigarettes, agrees to accept a $12.8 billion investment from Altria, the maker of Marlboro cigarettes.

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Like other animals, humans have a breeding season—and it’s right now

Science ‘Tis the season for conception. It turns out reproduction is seasonal across all living organisms, from plants, to insects, to reptiles, to birds and mammals—including human beings.

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Gadgets: Smart tags help you stay organized

If getting organized is on your New Year's resolution list, the Adero is what you need.

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The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Diversity, Division, and Demagoguery: Looking Back at 2018

In today’s look back at the year’s best Atlantic politics stories, we’re sharing a deep dive on President Donald Trump’s elusive immigration adviser, an exploration of the Democratic Party’s ideological trajectory, and a look at the “white men’s club” leading America’s largest cities. Thanks for reading, and we’ll be back tomorrow with more standout stories to finish up the year. — Elaine Godfrey

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It’s only a matter of time before a drone takes down a passenger planeUK Gatwick Airport

And no, technology can’t fix the problem

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Climate Team, and Its Boss, Just Got Harder to Find at Top Health Agency

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said that it had folded its Climate and Health Program into a branch that studies asthma.

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James Mattis’s Final Protest Against the President

Secretary of Defense James Mattis is resigning over conflicts with President Trump over American policy overseas—the highest profile official to quit the administration over disagreements of principle with the president. In a resignation letter , Mattis laid out a series of differences with Trump, who he said deserved to have a secretary of defense who was aligned with him. Mattis cited the impor

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Radio Atlantic: What Happened to the GOP?

Subscribe to Radio Atlantic: Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Google Play Observing antidemocratic ‘power grabs’ by state Republicans, George Packer writes that “the corruption of the Republican Party in the Trump era seemed to set in with breathtaking speed. In fact, it took more than a half century to reach the point where faced with a choice between democracy and power, the party chose th

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Trump Proposes Food-Stamp Work Requirements That He Couldn’t Get Through Congress

Last week, after a marathon of debate, Congress passed another Farm Bill. To explain exactly what’s in the mammoth $867 billion package, it might be easier to describe what’s not in it. Between assistance for farmers , offsets for the ongoing agricultural trade war with China, hemp subsidies, and a reauthorization of most of the country’s food assistance programs for low-income people, the Farm B

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Fruitcake vs Aspic: Fruitcake wins!

It was quite a conundrum, that was for sure, You wouldn’t taste fruitcake and then ask for more. Nor would you give the old aspic a try, Without the feeling that perhaps you might die. But in the end there could only be one, And it turns out that the fruitcake was a little more fun! Congrats to team Fruitcake and thanks to all who participated!

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Max Planck Society Ends Elsevier Subscription

The move is a show of support for Project DEAL and the open-access movement.

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How to brain hack your New Year's resolution for success

Every New Year people resolve to improve their lives, only to peter out during the "February Fail." Studies have shown that people who employ cognitive-behavioral processes, or brain hacks, can increase their chances of success. We look at how hacking the habit loop, setting SMART goals, and silencing your inner perfectionist can help make 2019 your year. The new year approaches and with it comes

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How the brain reacts to loss of vision

submitted by /u/SophiaDevetzi [link] [comments]

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To Get Antibiotics Off Your Plate, Vote With Your Wallet

Obama-era regulation was supposed to curtail livestock antibiotics. But consumers are pushing Perdue, McDonalds, Tyson, Walmart, and more to change.

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How decorating for Christmas sends people to the ER

A study takes a stab at quantifying Christmas-related mishaps.

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Scientists create genetically-modified houseplant that removes carcinogens from air

Houseplants are rumored to be natural air purifiers, but most research suggests their benefits are only marginal. Genetically-modified plants might change that because they're able to produce special proteins that absorb and break down particular compounds. The results of the recent research show promise for future applications of the technique. None A NASA experiment, in 1989, famously showed th

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Cell-by-cell DNA science is 'Breakthrough of 2018'

The US journal Science on Thursday coined as "Breakthrough of the Year" for 2018 new technologies that reveal how DNA cues individual cells to grow through time.

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Police interactions linked to increased risk of client violence for female sex workers

The more abusive interactions street-based female sex workers (FSWs) have with police, the higher their risk of violence at the hands of clients, a new study by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health suggests.

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Seeing double: Tropical Cyclone Kenanga same strength as other storm

The Southern Indian Ocean is seeing double. Tropical Cyclone Kenanga was one of two storms at Category 2 hurricane strength in the Southern Indian Ocean on Dec. 20. Kenanga was sporting an eye on visible imagery from NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite, and so was Tropical Cyclone Cilida, located west of Kenanga.

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Cancer's metabolism subject of trailblazing study

No matter what form cancer takes in the body, it starts at the cellular level and grows via metabolism run amok.

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NASA telescopes take a close look at the brightest comet of 2018

As the brilliant comet 46P/Wirtanen streaked across the sky, NASA telescopes caught it on camera from multiple angles.

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News at a glance

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Runners-up

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Beyond blood

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Not as advertised

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Protecting the heart

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Connecting the dots

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Cascading regime shifts within and across scales

Regime shifts are large, abrupt, and persistent critical transitions in the function and structure of ecosystems. Yet, it is unknown how these transitions will interact, whether the occurrence of one will increase the likelihood of another or simply correlate at distant places. We explored two types of cascading effects: Domino effects create one-way dependencies, whereas hidden feedbacks produce

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Spectrally resolved helium absorption from the extended atmosphere of a warm Neptune-mass exoplanet

Stellar heating causes atmospheres of close-in exoplanets to expand and escape. These extended atmospheres are difficult to observe because their main spectral signature—neutral hydrogen at ultraviolet wavelengths—is strongly absorbed by interstellar medium. We report the detection of the near-infrared triplet of neutral helium in the transiting warm Neptune-mass exoplanet HAT-P-11b by using grou

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Ground-based detection of an extended helium atmosphere in the Saturn-mass exoplanet WASP-69b

Hot gas giant exoplanets can lose part of their atmosphere due to strong stellar irradiation, and these losses can affect their physical and chemical evolution. Studies of atmospheric escape from exoplanets have mostly relied on space-based observations of the hydrogen Lyman-α line in the far ultraviolet region, which is strongly affected by interstellar absorption. Using ground-based high-resolu

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Electron-scale dynamics of the diffusion region during symmetric magnetic reconnection in space

Magnetic reconnection is an energy conversion process that occurs in many astrophysical contexts including Earth’s magnetosphere, where the process can be investigated in situ by spacecraft. On 11 July 2017, the four Magnetospheric Multiscale spacecraft encountered a reconnection site in Earth’s magnetotail, where reconnection involves symmetric inflow conditions. The electron-scale plasma measur

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Single-component quasicrystalline nanocrystal superlattices through flexible polygon tiling rule

Quasicrystalline superlattices (QC-SLs) generated from single-component colloidal building blocks have been predicted by computer simulations but are challenging to reproduce experimentally. We discovered that 10-fold QC-SLs could self-organize from truncated tetrahedral quantum dots with anisotropic patchiness. Transmission electron microscopy and tomography measurements allow structural reconst

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Magnetic hysteresis up to 80 kelvin in a dysprosium metallocene single-molecule magnet

Single-molecule magnets (SMMs) containing only one metal center may represent the lower size limit for molecule-based magnetic information storage materials. Their current drawback is that all SMMs require liquid-helium cooling to show magnetic memory effects. We now report a chemical strategy to access the dysprosium metallocene cation [(Cp i Pr5 )Dy(Cp*)] + (Cp i Pr5 , penta-iso-propylcyclopent

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Elevated trawling inside protected areas undermines conservation outcomes in a global fishing hot spot

Marine protected areas (MPAs) are increasingly used as a primary tool to conserve biodiversity. This is particularly relevant in heavily exploited fisheries hot spots such as Europe, where MPAs now cover 29% of territorial waters, with unknown effects on fishing pressure and conservation outcomes. We investigated industrial trawl fishing and sensitive indicator species in and around 727 MPAs desi

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Root branching toward water involves posttranslational modification of transcription factor ARF7

Plants adapt to heterogeneous soil conditions by altering their root architecture. For example, roots branch when in contact with water by using the hydropatterning response. We report that hydropatterning is dependent on auxin response factor ARF7. This transcription factor induces asymmetric expression of its target gene LBD16 in lateral root founder cells. This differential expression pattern

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The strength of long-range ties in population-scale social networks

Long-range connections that span large social networks are widely assumed to be weak, composed of sporadic and emotionally distant relationships. However, researchers historically have lacked the population-scale network data needed to verify the predicted weakness. Using data from 11 culturally diverse population-scale networks on four continents—encompassing 56 million Twitter users and 58 mill

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A hidden cradle of plant evolution in Permian tropical lowlands

The latitudinal biodiversity gradient today has deep roots in the evolutionary history of Earth’s biota over geologic time. In the marine realm, earliest fossil occurrences at low latitudes reveal a tropical cradle for many animal groups. However, the terrestrial fossil record—especially from drier environments that are thought to drive evolutionary innovation—is sparse. We present mixed plant-fo

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NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity contributes to tumor control by a cytostatic drug combination

Molecularly targeted therapies aim to obstruct cell autonomous programs required for tumor growth. We show that mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and cyclin-dependent kinase 4/6 inhibitors act in combination to suppress the proliferation of KRAS-mutant lung cancer cells while simultaneously provoking a natural killer (NK) cell surveillance program leading to tumor cell death. The drug combi

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ATP-dependent force generation and membrane scission by ESCRT-III and Vps4

The endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRTs) catalyze reverse-topology scission from the inner face of membrane necks in HIV budding, multivesicular endosome biogenesis, cytokinesis, and other pathways. We encapsulated ESCRT-III subunits Snf7, Vps24, and Vps2 and the AAA+ ATPase (adenosine triphosphatase) Vps4 in giant vesicles from which membrane nanotubes reflecting the corre

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E-C coupling structural protein junctophilin-2 encodes a stress-adaptive transcription regulator

Junctophilin-2 (JP2) is a structural protein required for normal excitation-contraction (E-C) coupling. After cardiac stress, JP2 is cleaved by the calcium ion–dependent protease calpain, which disrupts the E-C coupling ultrastructural machinery and drives heart failure progression. We found that stress-induced proteolysis of JP2 liberates an N-terminal fragment (JP2NT) that translocates to the n

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Structures and gating mechanism of human TRPM2

Transient receptor potential (TRP) melastatin 2 (TRPM2) is a cation channel associated with numerous diseases. It has a C-terminal NUDT9 homology (NUDT9H) domain responsible for binding adenosine diphosphate (ADP)–ribose (ADPR), and both ADPR and calcium (Ca 2+ ) are required for TRPM2 activation. Here we report cryo–electron microscopy structures of human TRPM2 alone, with ADPR, and with ADPR an

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A linear cobalt(II) complex with maximal orbital angular momentum from a non-Aufbau ground state

Orbital angular momentum is a prerequisite for magnetic anisotropy, although in transition metal complexes it is typically quenched by the ligand field. By reducing the basicity of the carbon donor atoms in a pair of alkyl ligands, we synthesized a cobalt(II) dialkyl complex, Co(C(SiMe 2 ONaph) 3 ) 2 (where Me is methyl and Naph is a naphthyl group), wherein the ligand field is sufficiently weak

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Structure of human TFIID and mechanism of TBP loading onto promoter DNA

The general transcription factor IID (TFIID) is a critical component of the eukaryotic transcription preinitiation complex (PIC) and is responsible for recognizing the core promoter DNA and initiating PIC assembly. We used cryo–electron microscopy, chemical cross-linking mass spectrometry, and biochemical reconstitution to determine the complete molecular architecture of TFIID and define the conf

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Elegant trick improves single-cell RNA sequencing

Droplet microfluidics has revolutionized single-cell RNA sequencing, offering a low-cost, high-throughput method for single-cell genomics. However, this method has been limited in its ability to capture complete RNA transcription information.

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Experiment sends engineered plants to ISS

If humanity is going to push the boundaries of space exploration, we're going to need plants to come along for the ride. Not just spinach or potatoes, though—plants can do so much more than just feed us.

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Trump's Food-Stamp Policy Will Only Make Poverty Worse

Just in time for Christmas, the Trump administration has announced its intention to strip nutrition support from hundreds of thousands of poor adults. The change is meant to encourage work, the administration said. “Long-term reliance on government assistance has never been part of the American dream,” Sonny Perdue, the secretary of agriculture, argued in a press release. “As we make benefits ava

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Brain of Mysterious 'Little Foot' Human Relative Was Half-Man, Half-Ape

The brain of a very old human ancestor looks a lot like an ape's and a little like a human's.

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Photos: 50 Years Since Apollo 8 Showed Us Earthrise

On December 21, 1968, three humans climbed atop a massive rocket and left our planet for a six-day, round-trip journey to our nearest companion in the solar system, the moon. During the Apollo 8 mission, NASA astronauts Frank Borman, James Lovell, and William Anders flew hundreds of thousands of miles across translunar space, becoming the first human beings to see the entirety of the Earth at onc

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Elegant trick improves single-cell RNA sequencing

Researchers at Cornell — led by Iwijn De Vlaminck, assistant professor in the Meinig School of Biomedical Engineering — have come up with an elegant, low-cost method that solves that problem. And not only does it push single-cell genomics forward, it may allow for new avenues for studies of infection and immune biology.

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How China’s Elite Spies Stole the World’s SecretsDOJ Chinese US Navy

A new DOJ indictment outlines how Chinese hackers allegedly compromised data from companies in a dozen countries in a single intrusion.

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Watch the New 'Men in Black International' Trailer Now

Plus: 'To All the Boys I've Loved Before' gets a Netflix sequel and 'Aquaman' rules the box office.

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HIV prevention app shows promise in Romania

A mobile app could improve the lives of LGBTQ people who lack access to HIV prevention and education, say researchers. Corina Lelutiu-Weinberger, assistant professor at the Rutgers University School of Nursing, recently introduced the first mobile program aimed at improving the sexual, behavioral, and mental health of gay and bisexual men in Romania—a country where HIV is on the rise among this g

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Hold the fries! How calorie content makes you rethink food choices

Seeing pictures of food with calorie information not only makes food less appetizing but it also appears to change the way your brain responds to the food, according to a Dartmouth-led study published in PLOS ONE. When food images appeared with the calorie content, the brain showed decreased activation of the reward system and increased activation in the control system. In other words, foods that

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Beyond Einstein

Theoretical physicists have been questioning if black hole singularities exist through complex mathematical equations over the past several decades with little success until now. LSU Department of Physics & Astronomy Associate Professor Parampreet Singh and collaborators LSU Postdoctoral Researcher Javier Olmedo and Abhay Ashtekar, the Eberly Professor of Physics at Penn State developed new mathem

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Dinosaur-Era Shark Nabbed Flying Reptile, Losing a Tooth

A rogue tooth hints at a primeval encounter of sea and sky.

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StreetCred Is Challenging Google Maps—and It Wants Your Help

The mapping startup wants to pay a volunteer mapping army in cryptocurrency to carry out its data missions.

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What Are the Chances of a White Christmas?

What Are the Chances of a White Christmas? The probability of a snowy Christmas in any location depends on lots of factors — including the effects of climate change. Crater-Lake.jpg Crater Lake, Oregon Image credits: Adventures On Wheels via Flickr Rights information: CC BY 2.0 Earth Thursday, December 20, 2018 – 15:00 Ramin Skibba, Contributor (Inside Science) — Many Americans have fond memori

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DNA barcodes track shark fins to black market

DNA barcoding can identify shark and ray species in commercial products in order to monitor the trade in protected species, researchers report. Shark and ray products are traded around the world, with an estimated 100 million individuals caught each year for various purposes, including cultural cuisines and traditional Chinese medicines. In many Asian communities, shark fins are a delicacy and fe

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What Claire McCaskill's Exit Interview Reveals About the Democratic Party

Claire McCaskill has two words for her progressive critics: “Shut up.” In a Thursday interview with The New York Times , the outgoing Missouri senator described her frustration—among other grievances—that some of her fellow Democrats saw her as too quiet on the issue of abortion during the confirmation process for Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh. “Really? This is hard,” McCaskill said of ru

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The Necessary Chaos of Harvey Weinstein’s Ongoing Court Case

“The only reasonably prudent decision would be to stop this chaos now.” That was Benjamin Brafman, a lawyer for Harvey Weinstein, in a document filed to the New York Supreme Court, making the argument that the criminal case against his client should be dismissed. Weinstein is currently facing five criminal charges stemming from the allegations that he forcibly performed oral sex on a woman in 200

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Never Neglect a Dozer's Air Filter | Gold Rush

Learn from Big Rick why a dirty air filter can cause a dozer to lose power. Stream Full Episodes of Gold Rush: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/gold-rush/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/GoldRush/ https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Gold_Rush https://twitter.com/Discovery We're on Ins

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3 out of 4 Americans are lonely, study says

The pang of loneliness is far higher than even the gloomiest of previous estimates, according to a new study from researchers at the University of California, San Diego.

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Organic farming is 'much worse' for the climate than conventional food production, researchers say

A report from Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, found that organic food production leads to higher carbon emissions. This includes livestock as well as vegetables, as organic farming requires no fertilizer usage. Certain types of organic foods are less impactful than others, the researchers note. None History has not been kind to Earl Butz. From 1971–76, the Indiana native served as secr

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Dig Sector 12 is complete!

At long last, Sector 12 of The Dig is complete as of 12/20/2018! It was a big sector to be sure, in which we uncovered 174 cells. To celebrate, we’re hosting a 174 minute Happy Hour today starting at 4:00 PM EST. Regular HH bonuses apply. Join us! And with that, we’re down to the last “strip” of this portion of our data set! Think we’ll finish The Dig in 2019?

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The inventors of the polar bear treadmill are back with a new scientific contraption

Animals Watch Nora the polar bear swim for science. The endlessly patient creators of the bear treadmill are bringing you another animal research invention: the polar bear swim chamber.

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DNA Could Help Bring Home Remains of Ancient Aboriginal People

Genetic material from bones could be used to locate living descendants for the remains’ repatriation, researchers showed.

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New AI computer vision system mimics how humans visualize and identify objects

Researchers from UCLA Samueli School of Engineering and Stanford have demonstrated a computer system that can discover and identify the real-world objects it 'sees' based on the same method of visual learning that humans use.

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Seeing double: Tropical Cyclone Kenanga same strength as other storm

The Southern Indian Ocean is seeing double. Tropical Cyclone Kenanga was one of two storms at Category 2 hurricane strength in the Southern Indian Ocean on Dec. 20. Kenanga was sporting an eye on visible imagery from NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite, and so was Tropical Cyclone Cilida, located west of Kenanga.

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New study first to predict which oil and gas wells are leaking methane

A new study is the first to predict — with up to 87 percent accuracy — which oil and natural wells are most likely to be leaking methane.

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New brain changes in early Alzheimer's disease

Researchers have discovered new changes occurring in the human brain in the early stages of Alzheimer's disease. The researchers used a multiomic approach to determine RNA, protein, and phosphorylation levels and carried out further neurobioinformatic analyses on them.

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Antennal sensors allow hawkmoths to make quick moves

All insects use vision to control their position in the air when they fly, but they also integrate information from other senses. Biologists have now shown how hawkmoths use mechanosensors in their antennae to control fast flight maneuvers.

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Memory and cognition problems affect recovery in rehabilitation facilities

Recently, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) added new ways to measure patients' abilities to perform their daily routines in nursing facilities and other after-care settings. Studies have not examined how skilled nursing care residents who have cognitive difficulties perform on the new self-care and mobility measurements. Researchers designed a new study to fill that knowledge g

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Tysker fik slem overraskelse: Lytter andre med på din smart-højtaler?

Hvem har adgang til alle de data, du propper i dine smarthøjtalere? En tysk bruger har netop fået sig en slem overraskelse.

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The wall vs. legal marijuana: One is pointless, the other secures the border.

The report uses recent government data to examine the effects that marijuana legalization has had on drug and human smuggling by Mexican cartels. Overall, it appears that marijuana legalization has led to decreases in not only marijuana smuggling, but also smuggling of all drugs across the border. The report suggests that the benefits of marijuana legalization might also serve as a model for how

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NASA telescopes take a close look at the brightest comet of 2018

As the brilliant comet 46P/Wirtanen streaked across the sky, NASA telescopes caught it on camera from multiple angles.

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Cancer's metabolism subject of trailblazing study

Understanding that altered metabolism in cancer has received renewed research interest, according to Abe Stroock, the William C. Hooey Director and Gordon L. Dibble Professor in the Smith School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering. His latest research examines cancer metabolism at multiple scales, and lays theoretical groundwork for future studies.

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The idiosyncratic mammalian diversification after extinction of the dinosaurs

Researchers state that many mammals lineages coexisted with the dinosaurs before the end-Cretaceous mass extinction. Although many species of mammals also disappeared in the extinction event, several lineages survived.

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Scientists uncover how protein clumps damage cells in Parkinson's

Research into the root cause of Parkinson's aims to advance work on a disease-modifying treatment.

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Chemists create new quasicrystal material from nanoparticle building blocks

Brown University researchers have discovered a new type of quasicrystal, a class of materials whose existence was thought to be impossible until the 1980s.

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Not all marine protected areas are created equal

Europe's impressive network of marine protected areas (MPAs), which now cover 29 percent of territorial waters, is not as effective as has been thought at preserving the marine biodiversity it was created to protect.

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Science's 2018 Breakthrough of the Year: Tracking development cell by cell

Science has chosen single-cell analyses of gene activity through time as its 2018 Breakthrough of the Year, honoring a trifecta of methods that together are enabling researchers to determine, at the individual cell level, which genes are turned on and off as an early embryo develops.

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Hidden cradle of early plant evolution discovered in the Middle East

Several new plant fossils from present-day Jordan push back the ages of important seed plant lineages, suggesting these lineages survived the mass extinction event at the end of the Permian.

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Frog Picks Maternity Ward Like Goldilocks

The Bahia's broad-snout casque-headed tree frog needs a pool to raise its young that's just right. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Urine drug testing may be important in early phases of addiction treatment

A new study shows that urine drug testing can be a useful tool to treat patients with opioid use disorder in a primary care setting.

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Bacteria-based drug delivery system that outperforms conventional methods

An interdisciplinary team has created a drug delivery system that could radically expand cancer treatment options.

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Chemists discover new signatures to identify cystic fibrosis in infants sooner

Scientists have discovered several new biomarkers from a single drop of blood that could allow earlier and more definitive detection of cystic fibrosis (CF), a genetic disease which strikes both children and adults, causing chronic problems with the digestive system and the lungs.

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Better understanding of dog body language could make interactions safer

A better understanding of the way dogs communicate distress could be the first step in reducing the risk of dog bites for both children and adults, a new study has found.

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Researchers develop method to non-destructively measure the salt content of concrete structures

Using a compact neutron source, researchers have non-destructively measured the salt content of structures such as bridges, tunnels, and elevated roadways, which can suffer from degradation due to exposure to salt from seawater and other sources.

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More plants survived the world’s greatest mass extinction than thought

Fossil plants from Jordan reveal more plant lineages that made it through the Great Dying roughly 252 million years ago.

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There’ll be a domino effect as we trigger ecosystem tipping points

There are lots of interconnected tipping points linking the climate and environment, so drastic changes to the planet will have many unexpected consequences

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The Miami blue was fluttering toward extinction. Then the scientists showed up

One crisp, sunny afternoon this month, grad student Sarah Steele Cabrera headed down a sandy path at Long Key State Park carrying two nylon bug containers.

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Risks of 'domino effect' of tipping points greater than thought, study says

Scientists warn policymakers not to ignore links, and stress that ‘every action counts’ Policymakers have severely underestimated the risks of ecological tipping points , according to a study that shows 45% of all potential environmental collapses are interrelated and could amplify one another. The authors said their paper, published in the journal Science , highlights how overstressed and overla

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Do emoji have a place in serious 🔬 ✍️?

A new paper looks at the 👍️ and 👎️ of using emojis in biomedical documentation. It's the return of pictographs, millennia later. Do your thumbs even know how to avoid them? Did you know that the Oxford Dictionary selected the "face with tears of joy" emoji as Word of the Year for 2015? You know, this one: 😂. Putting aside for the moment that the symbol's official meaning is a phrase, not a wor

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Dog kennel designed by Ford blocks fireworks, thunder noise

Ford Motor Co. has developed a prototype quiet kennel for dogs by using noise-cancellation technology created for high-end vehicles sold in Europe.

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Chemists create new quasicrystal material from nanoparticle building blocks

The strange class of materials known as quasicrystals has a new member. In a paper published on Thursday, Dec. 20, in Science, researchers from Brown University describe a quasicrystalline superlattice that self-assembles from a single type of nanoparticle building blocks.

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Magnetoresistance ratio enhancement opens door to highly sensitive magnetic field sensors

By creating a new multilayer structure with an enhanced magnetoresisitance ratio, researchers show that it's possible to increase the sensitivity of magnetic field sensors.

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A major step closer to a viable recording material for future hard disk drives

By tweaking an iron-platinum alloy, researchers are trying to clear a few hurdles slowing the material's viability as a future perpendicular recording media.

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In response to heat, the more affluent use air-conditioners; low-income households use water

A new study has revealed that Singapore households from different socioeconomic groups vary significantly in their use of water and electricity for the relief of heat. The findings suggest that water provides heat relief for lower-income households while demand for electricity increases among the more affluent, likely through the use of air-conditioning, when temperatures rise. Results from the st

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First detection of rain over the ocean by navigation satellites

In order to analyse climate change or provide information about natural hazards, it is important to gather knowledge about the rain. Better knowledge of precipitation and its distribution could, for example, help protect against river flooding. A new approach uses, for the first time, information contained in radar signals from navigation satellites to detect rain over the sea. The technology coul

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Facebook, Google to pay Washington $450,000 to settle lawsuits over political-ad transparency

Tech giants Facebook and Google will pay Washington state more than $450,000 to settle twin lawsuits filed by Attorney General Bob Ferguson accusing the companies of failure to abide by state laws on political advertising transparency.

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Charter schools may discourage applications from ‘hard’ kids

New research shows that charter schools and traditional public schools of choice ignore application inquiries from students they perceive as more challenging to educate. The research also finds that charter schools ignore inquiries from special needs students at higher rates. Isaac McFarlin Jr., an assistant professor of education and economics at the University of Florida, and Peter Bergman, an

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AIDS: An approach for targeting HIV reservoirs

Current HIV treatments need to be taken for life by those infected as antiretroviral therapy is unable to eliminate viral reservoirs lurking in immune cells. Scientists have identified the characteristics of CD4 T lymphocytes that are preferentially infected by the virus. Thanks to metabolic activity inhibitors, the researchers have managed to destroy these infected cells, or 'reservoirs', ex vivo

4h

Stem cell-derived neurons stop seizures and improve cognitive function

About 3.4 million Americans, or 1.2 percent of the population, have active epilepsy. Although the majority respond to medication, between 20 and 40 percent of patients with epilepsy continue to have seizures even after trying multiple anti-seizure drugs. Even when the drugs do work, people may develop cognitive and memory problems and depression, likely from the combination of the underlying seizu

4h

For gait transitions, stability often trumps energy savings

Working with nine animal models, researchers find a preference for stability over energy conservation during speed-related gait transitions.

4h

Novel imaging technique brings diagnostic potential into operating room

Researchers have successfully visualized the tumor microenvironment of human breast tissue shortly after it was surgically removed from a patient in the operating room. The researchers achieved this using a new portable optical imaging system.

4h

World's smallest tic-tac-toe game board made with DNA

Researchers have developed new dynamic DNA origami technology.

4h

Test detects protein associated with Alzheimer's and CTE

An ultrasensitive test has been developed that detects a corrupted protein associated with Alzheimer's disease and chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), a condition found in athletes, military veterans, and others with a history of repetitive brain trauma. This advance could lead to early diagnosis of these conditions and open new research into how they originate.

4h

Australian study into how seals react to boats prompts new ecotourism regulations

Unable to differentiate between a predator and a tourist boat, seals react as soon as they sense a potential threat. The closer a vessel approaches, the more likely it is for the animals to rush to the water and the greater the risk of a stampede or predation in the sea. To inform management guidelines, researchers observed a colony on Kanowna Island, Bass Strait.

4h

Threat of 'nightmare bacteria' exhibiting resistance to last-resort antibiotic colistin

Researchers examined the dissemination of colistin-resistant bacteria among residents of rural communities in Vietnam to find that the prevalence of colistin-resistant Escherichia coli in the intestines was extremely high, at about 70 percent.

4h

Spectacular flying reptiles soared over Britain's tropical Jurassic past

Spectacular flying reptiles armed with long teeth and claws which once dominated the skies have been rediscovered, thanks to new research.

4h

Discovery could lead to munitions that go further, much faster

Researchers have discovered a new way to get more energy out of energetic materials containing aluminum, common in battlefield systems, by igniting aluminum micron powders coated with graphene oxide.

4h

Your next domestic flight could have a big window in the bathroom

Technology Aircraft windows affect everything from a plane's weight to how passengers perceive cleanliness. Everything you ever wanted to know about bathroom windows on airplanes.

4h

Questions Raised About Pertussis Reemergence

Scientists debate why the number of whooping cough cases is up, and whether the effectiveness of a vaccine introduced within the last two decades is to blame.

4h

Dogs help humans with disabilities socialize with others, researchers find

A pilot study has found that dogs help socialize those with intellectual disabilities at Australian group homes. Previous research finds that pets helps those who use wheelchairs "feel more secure and confident in public." People are far more likely to interact with someone with an intellectual disability if they were walking with a dog. None There are an estimated 5,000 people with a range of in

5h

Cold War Meditates on Exile, Nationalism, and Love

PARIS— Cold War , the latest feature by the Polish director Pawel Pawlikowski, is a stormy love story filmed in black and white and set between Poland and Paris during the early 1950s. It is also a film about a time when borders defined lives. Watching it now, at an unsettling time when borders seem to be making a comeback in Europe—with Brexit, namely—confirmed my sense that Pawlikowski is one o

5h

Apples pulls iPhone 7, 8 from German stores in patent spatApple iPhone Qualcomm

Apple is pulling older models of its iPhone from German stores after losing two patent cases brought by chipmaker Qualcomm, the company said Thursday.

5h

Health checkups for alpine lakes

The best tool for assessing the health of mountain lakes comes in a very small package. According to new research by University of Alberta biologists, alpine species of zooplankton are excellent bioindicators of lake health. And as extreme climatic events have been shown to increase with elevation, understanding the changing ecosystems of alpine lakes is more important than ever.

5h

For gait transitions, stability often trumps energy savings

A dog's gait, according to the American Kennel Club, is "the pattern of footsteps at various rates of speed, each distinguished by a particular rhythm and footfall." When dogs trot, for example, the right front leg and the left hind leg move together. This is an intermediate gait, faster than walking but slower than running.

5h

Rescue Highlights Dangers, and Possibilities, at Old Mining Sites

The rescue of three people from a mine in West Virginia focused new attention on the hundreds of thousands of former mines across the country.

5h

Health checkups for alpine lakes

The best tool for assessing the health of mountain lakes comes in a very small package. According to new research, alpine species of zooplankton are excellent bioindicators of lake health. And as extreme climatic events have been shown to increase with elevation, understanding the changing ecosystems of alpine lakes is more important than ever.

5h

Age is more than just a number: Machine learning may predict if you're in for a healthy old age

Researchers analyzed skin cells from the very young to the very old and looked for molecular signatures that can be predictive of age. By applying machine-learning algorithms to these biomarkers, they were able to predict a person's actual age with less than eight years error, on average.

5h

Study on low noise, high-performance transistors may bring innovations in electronics

A research study has demonstrated micro/nano-scale transistors made of two-dimensional atomic thin materials that show high performance and low noise. The devices are less than one-hundredth of the diameter of a single human hair and could be key to innovating electronics and precision sensing.

5h

Intellectual curiosity and confidence help children take on math and reading

Children's personalities may influence how they perform in math and reading, according to a new study.

5h

Vi sender flaget til tops for det periodiske system

PLUS. FN har udpeget 2019 til det internationale år for det periodiske system i anledning af 150-året for Dmitrij Mendelejevs første udgave af systemet.

5h

Researchers make world's smallest tic-tac-toe game board with DNA

Move over Mona Lisa, here comes tic-tac-toe.

5h

This blog is dead. Long live the blog.

Blogs are synonymous with the early internet. But what is a blog, and what has it become? A blog is a platform. And this one, Scicurious, is now gone.

5h

Satellite catches the eye of rapidly intensifying Tropical Cyclone Cilida

Tropical Cyclone Cilida appeared much more organized on satellite imagery as it moved across the southwestern Indian Ocean and continued to rapidly intensify. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite captured a visible image of Cilida that showed a cloud-covered eye.

5h

Why insecure people buy more things

The link between a poor interpersonal life and materialism has been known for decades, but the exact reason for this connection hasn't been clear. New research shows that two problematic attachment styles can push people towards seeking the love and affection they crave in material wealth. The study shows both how broken-hearted people use materialism as a crutch and how this dependency can be re

5h

Urine drug testing may be important in early phases of addiction treatment

A new study performed by Boston Medical Center shows that urine drug testing can be a useful tool to treat patients with opioid use disorder in a primary care setting.

5h

New pathways for implementing universal suicide risk screening in healthcare settings

In 2016 alone, more than 6,000 youth in the United States under the age of 25 died by suicide. Now a report, authored in part by researchers at the NIMH, provides guidance on how to implement universal suicide risk screening of youth in medical settings. The report describes a way for hospitals to address the rising suicide rate in a way that is flexible and mindful of limited resources.

5h

Bacteria rely on classic business model

The pneumonia causing pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa has developed a twin-track strategy to colonize its host. It generates two different cells — motile spreaders and virulent stickers. Researchers have now elucidated how the germ attaches to tissue within seconds and consecutively spreads. Just like the business model: settling — growing — expanding.

5h

Himalayan marmot genome offers clues to life at extremely high altitudes

Himalayan marmots can survive at altitudes up to 5,000 meters in the Himalayan regions of India, Nepal, and Pakistan and on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau of China, where many of them face extreme cold, little oxygen, and few other resources. Now, researchers have sequenced the first complete Himalayan marmot genome, which may help them to better explain how the marmots live in such extremes.

5h

Network orchestration: Researcher uses music to manage networks

A researcher uses sound as a simpler alternative to manage complicated network tasks.

5h

Understanding repetitive head impacts in sports

A new study has found that eyeball and eyelid movement, or oculomotor function, which is used to detect symptomless brain injury, can be impaired by mild, repetitive head impacts in football players. But the function may adapt mid-season, even as athletes continue to incur head impacts.

5h

Predicting the properties of a new class of glasses

ZIF glasses, a new family of glass, could combine the transparency of silicate glass with the nonbrittle quality of metallic glass, according to researchers.

5h

Genome published of the small hive beetle, a major honey bee parasite

Beekeepers and researchers will welcome the unveiling of the small hive beetle's genome by scientists. The small hive beetle (SHB) is a major parasite problem of honey bees for which there are few effective treatments. Completing the SHB genome takes on even more importance when you realize that among the SHB's close relatives are the destructive and invasive Asian longhorned beetle.

5h

Suboptimal, inconsistent treatment for anaphylaxis due to unknown cause

A new study is shedding light on anaphylaxis due to an unknown trigger (AUT) — an unpredictable and potentially fatal allergic reaction, about which surprisingly little is known.

5h

New memory study first to use intracranial recordings

New research is first memory study to use intracranial recordings to better understand how maturation of the prefrontal cortex drives memory development.

5h

Scientists program proteins to pair exactly

Proteins designed in the lab can now zip together in much the same way that DNA molecules zip up to form a double helix. The technique could enable the design of protein nanomachines that can potentially help diagnose and treat disease, allow for the more exact engineering of cells and perform a wide variety of other tasks. This technique provides scientists a precise, programmable way to control

5h

Number of people with dementia doubled in just 26 years

The number of people living with dementia globally more than doubled between 1990 and 2016 from 20.2 million to 43.8 million, report researchers. The researchers also found that 22.3 percent of healthy years lost due to dementia in 2016 were due to modifiable risk factors. Their study looks at the global, regional, and national burden of Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias from 1990-2016. The

5h

Could a urine test identify multiple sclerosis early?

A biomarker for multiple sclerosis could be an early warning for the disease, according to new research. Researchers have discovered that acrolein, a molecule previously suspected as a metabolic waste product that accumulates in people with certain neurological disorders such as multiple sclerosis and Parkinson’s disease, could possibly help diagnose MS. Multiple sclerosis affects an estimated 2.

5h

Researchers make world's smallest tic-tac-toe game board with DNA

Researchers in the lab of Lulu Qian, assistant professor of bioengineering, have developed new dynamic DNA origami technology.

5h

Novel imaging technique brings diagnostic potential into operating room

team of University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign researchers led by Professor Stephen Boppart has successfully visualized the tumor microenvironment of human breast tissue shortly after it was surgically removed from a patient in the operating room. The researchers achieved this using a new portable optical imaging system developed in Boppart's lab.

5h

NASA-NOAA Satellite catches the eye of rapidly intensifying Tropical Cyclone Cilida

Tropical Cyclone Cilida appeared much more organized on satellite imagery as it moved across the southwestern Indian Ocean and continued to rapidly intensify. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite captured a visible image of Cilida that showed a cloud-covered eye.

5h

For gait transitions, stability often trumps energy savings

Working with nine animal models, researchers find a preference for stability over energy conservation during speed-related gait transitions.

5h

Stem cell-derived neurons stop seizures and improve cognitive function

About 3.4 million Americans, or 1.2 percent of the population, have active epilepsy. Although the majority respond to medication, between 20 and 40 percent of patients with epilepsy continue to have seizures even after trying multiple anti-seizure drugs. Even when the drugs do work, people may develop cognitive and memory problems and depression, likely from the combination of the underlying seizu

5h

AIDS — an approach for targeting HIV reservoirs

Current HIV treatments need to be taken for life by those infected as antiretroviral therapy is unable to eliminate viral reservoirs lurking in immune cells. Institut Pasteur scientists have identified the characteristics of CD4 T lymphocytes that are preferentially infected by the virus. Thanks to metabolic activity inhibitors, the researchers have managed to destroy these infected cells, or 'res

5h

Health checkups for alpine lakes

The best tool for assessing the health of mountain lakes comes in a very small package. According to new research by University of Alberta biologists, alpine species of zooplankton are excellent bioindicators of lake health. And as extreme climatic events have been shown to increase with elevation, understanding the changing ecosystems of alpine lakes is more important than ever.

5h

På Lindholm dyrker man landmandens mareridt

På Lindholm findes der sygdomme, der kan lægge dansk landbrug ned. Øen blev valgt, fordi den var isoleret – men ikke nok til at sygdom ikke kunne slippe væk.

5h

Find out if your holiday travels will take you into a flu zone

Health It’s already getting bad in some parts of the country. Most of the time, you probably don’t care much at all about what the flu looks like in other states. But this time of year you should.

6h

Human extinction! Don't panic; think about it like a philosopher.

A new opinion piece in The New York Times argues that humanity is so horrible to other forms of life that our extinction wouldn't be all that bad, morally speaking. The author, Dr. Todd May, is a philosopher who is known for advising the writers of The Good Place. The idea of human extinction is a big one, with lots of disagreement on its moral value. Humans could go extinct. The idea has been fl

6h

Faint glow within galaxy clusters illuminates dark matter

A new look at Hubble images of galaxies could be a step toward illuminating the elusive nature of dark matter, the unobservable material that makes up the majority of the universe, according to a study published online today in the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.

6h

Land motion drives varying rates of sea level along the US East Coast

As sea levels rise around the world, they don't rise at the same universal rate. A team of researchers report in the journal Nature that along the US East Coast — where rates of sea level change are higher in the Mid-Atlantic region — these variations are the result of land motion driven by the ongoing effects of the end of the last ice age.

6h

Study from Indiana University aims to better understand repetitive head impacts in sports

A new study by Indiana University researchers has found that eyeball and eyelid movement, or oculomotor function, which is used to detect symptomless brain injury, can be impaired by mild, repetitive head impacts in football players. But the function may adapt mid-season, even as athletes continue to incur head impacts.

6h

Trump Shouldn’t Withdraw Troops—He Should Rebrand

At an Ohio rally in March, President Donald Trump announced that the United States would leave Syria “very soon.” Discussions within the administration after the remarks ultimately led Trump, by September, to commit to a broader plan to remain in the country to ensure the defeat of Islamic State. Despite that official recommitment, Trump’s words in Ohio did great damage, notably by eroding trust

6h

7 Arguments Against the Autonomous-Vehicle Utopia

Self-driving cars are coming. Tech giants such as Uber and Alphabet have bet on it, as have old-school car manufacturers such as Ford and General Motors. But even as Google’s sister company Waymo prepares to launch its self-driving-car service and automakers prototype vehicles with various levels of artificial intelligence , there are some who believe that the autonomous future has been oversold—

6h

Last day in Paradise: the untold story of how a fire swallowed a town

A bucolic community was reduced to ash by a new kind of wildfire – the deadliest in California’s history. Survivors recall that horrible day William Goggia awoke to a poisonous orange atmosphere so thick with smoke he couldn’t see the sun. It was 8am on Thursday 8 November. He heard the piercing metallic clang of propane tanks exploding in the distance. His sister, who lived nearby, called to ask

6h

6h

Dutch lawmakers pass ambitious law to reduce emissions

Dutch lawmakers overwhelmingly approved ambitious new climate legislation Thursday that aims to drastically drive down emissions of greenhouse gases.

6h

Beyond the black hole singularity

Our first glimpses into the physics that exist near the center of a black hole are being made possible using 'loop quantum gravity'– a theory that uses quantum mechanics to extend gravitational physics beyond Einstein's theory of general relativity.

6h

Mighty morphing materials take complex shapes

Scientists have created a liquid crystal elastomer that can be molded into shapes that shift from one to another when heated. The material is intended for biomedical and robotics applications.

6h

A lung-inspired design turns water into fuel

Scientists have designed an electrocatalytic mechanism that works like a mammalian lung to convert water into fuel. Their research could help existing clean energy technologies run more efficiently.

6h

Translating the 'language of behavior' with artificially intelligent motion capture

Researchers created LEAP, a flexible motion-capture tool that can be trained in a matter of minutes to track body parts over millions of frames of existing video with high accuracy, without any physical markers or labels.

6h

Virologists discover safer potential Zika vaccine

In mouse trials, a vaccine based on recombinant adenovirus protected against Zika without evidence of antibodies. Reports have shown Zika antibodies can worsen Dengue virus infection.

6h

Micropores let oxygen and nutrients inside biofabricated tissues

Micropores in fabricated tissues such as bone and cartilage allow nutrient and oxygen diffusion into the core, and this novel approach may eventually allow lab-grown tissue to contain blood vessels, according to researchers.

6h

Annual, biological rhythms govern milk production in dairy cows

The amount and composition of milk produced by dairy cows appears to be more regulated by internal, annual biological rhythms than by environmental factors such as heat and humidity, according to researchers who studied more than a decade of production records from herds across the country.

6h

The #MeToo movement shook up workplace policies in science

In the #MeToo era, the scientific community is confronting its own sexual harassment problems and looking to research for solutions.

6h

Starchy food may reduce autoimmune reactions in people with lupus

A study in mice shows that certain gut bacteria may exacerbate lupus, but eating starch can halt their growth, hinting at a possible treatment

6h

Harvard's Cass Sunstein: Algorithms can correct human biases

Algorithms help drive the modern world. Algorithms reflect human biases, but some — as Harvard's Cass Sunstein notes — can be built to help correct our biases. If you build the right algorithm, you might be able to help contribute to a better world. None Algorithms are part of the engine that drives the modern world. When you search for something on Google, you're relying on a search engine defin

6h

Facebook: backlash threatens world's biggest platformMark Zuckerberg Facebook

Facebook, the world's largest social network, faces a growing backlash over privacy and data protection, with revelations this week about sharing data with business partners adding to pressure.

6h

Letter: That’s My Mom!

Updated at 5:30 p.m. ET on December 20, 2018. Afghanistan in the 1950s and ’60s In 2013, Alan Taylor published photos taken in Afghanistan in the 1950s and ’60s , a period of modernization and liberalization in the country. * In one photo from 1962, students at the Faculty of Medicine in Kabul examine a plaster cast showing a part of the human body. Recently, Taylor heard from a woman who recogni

6h

To Save Obamacare, Repeal the Mandate

In declaring invalid the entire Affordable Care Act, Judge Reed O’Connor claimed he was respecting congressional intent. Didn’t Congress say the individual mandate was “essential” when it first adopted Obamacare? So if the mandate is now unconstitutional because it can no longer be sustained as a tax, O’Connor reasoned, Congress must have wanted the entire law to fall with it. The reasoning is sp

6h

‘6 Months Off Meds I Can Feel Me Again’

Kanye West has been tweeting again. Last weekend, the always provocative rapper posted several dozen times on Twitter, which is often his public megaphone of choice. Many of the tweets concerned a topic that has been central to both his creative output and his public persona: his mental health. West, who revealed his diagnosis of bipolar disorder in 2017, declared he had been off his medication f

6h

Let's Stop the Near-Drowning of Lab Animals

Scientists do it to test antidepressants, but it’s fantastically cruel—plus it doesn’t even work — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

Faint starlight in Hubble images reveals distribution of dark matter

Astronomers have employed a revolutionary method to detect dark matter in galaxy clusters. The method allows astronomers to 'see' the distribution of dark matter more accurately than any other method used to date and it could possibly be used to explore the ultimate nature of dark matter.

6h

Genome offers clues to esophageal cancer disparity

A change in the genome of Caucasians could explain much-higher rates of the most common type of esophageal cancer in this population, a new study finds. It suggests a possible target for prevention strategies, which preliminary work suggests could involve flavonoids derived from cranberries.

6h

Scientists use magnetic defects to achieve electromagnetic wave breakthrough

Scientists have created small regions of magnetic defects. When electromagnetic plane waves interact with these defects, they are converted into helical waves, which encode more information for further materials studies.

6h

Performance enhancer: Sports compression stockings a winning advantage

Sports compression stockings are so effective they might be considered performance enhancers for soccer players, new research finds.

6h

US indicts Chinese govt hackers over attacks in 12 countriesDOJ Chinese US Navy

The US Justice Department on Thursday indicted two Chinese hackers tied to Beijing's security services who allegedly targeted companies and agencies in a dozen countries, which US officials said showed President Xi Jinping had not fulfilled his pledge to stop cybercrime.

6h

Researchers create a bacteria-based drug delivery system that outperforms conventional methods

An interdisciplinary team of three Virginia Tech faculty members affiliated with the Macromolecules Innovation Institute has created a drug delivery system that could radically expand cancer treatment options.

6h

How is big data impacting sports analytics?

Sports in all its forms, from Major League Baseball to Fantasy Football is driven by and produces huge amounts of data, and advanced data mining and machine learning techniques are now having a major impact on sports data analytics. A fascinating collection of research and perspective articles on the design, development, and evaluation of methods and their use in sports analytics, both on the busi

6h

How is big data impacting sports analytics?

Sports in all its forms, from Major League Baseball to Fantasy Football is driven by and produces huge amounts of data, and advanced data mining and machine learning techniques are now having a major impact on sports data analytics.

6h

Bacteria-based drug delivery system that outperforms conventional methods

"Its (salmonella's) job as a pathogen is to penetrate through the tissue," Behkam said. "What we thought is if bacteria are so good at moving through the tissue, how about coupling nanomedicine with the bacterium to carry that medicine much farther than it'd passively diffuse on its own?"

6h

Network orchestration: SLU researcher uses music to manage networks

A Saint Louis University researcher uses sound as a simpler alternative to manage complicated network tasks.

6h

Researchers identify genes associated with polycystic ovary syndrome

The researchers identified three new sites in the genome that appear to be associated with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS).

6h

Impact of diet intervention on autoimmunity in mice

Could a change in diet be beneficial to people with autoimmune diseases such as lupus? Researchers have revealed how a dietary intervention can help prevent the development of this autoimmune disease in susceptible mice.

6h

A mountain of evidence on air pollution's harms to children

A new study organizes the available scientific evidence on the effects of air pollution on children's health. The article is the first comprehensive review of the associations between various fossil fuel combustion pollutants and multiple health effects in children in the context of assessing the benefits of air pollution and climate change policies.

6h

Gold-complexed ferrocenyl phosphines as potent antimalarials

Researchers have developed novel ferrocene-based molecules that impair the malaria parasite's metabolic function leading to parasite death.

6h

Times Insider: How We Created a New Way to Depict Addiction Visually

We used video clips illustrated by software to interpret heroin addicts’ own words about their experiences.

6h

Study finds chloroform emissions, on the rise in East Asia, could delay ozone recovery by up to eight years

Earlier this year, the United Nations announced some much-needed, positive news about the environment: The ozone layer, which shields the Earth from the sun's harmful ultraviolet radiation, and which was severely depleted by decades of human-derived, ozone-destroying chemicals, is on the road to recovery.

6h

A mountain of evidence on air pollution's harms to children

A new study led by researchers at the Columbia Center for Children's Environmental Health (CCCEH) organizes the available scientific evidence on the effects of air pollution on children's health. The paper in the journal Environmental Research is the first comprehensive review of the associations between various fossil fuel combustion pollutants and multiple health effects in children in the conte

6h

Beyond the black hole singularity

Our first glimpses into the physics that exist near the center of a black hole are being made possible using "loop quantum gravity"—a theory that uses quantum mechanics to extend gravitational physics beyond Einstein's theory of general relativity. Loop quantum gravity, originated at Penn State and subsequently developed by a large number of scientists worldwide, is opening up a new paradigm in mo

6h

Video: How kimchi gets its kick

Kimchi, the fermented cabbage dish beloved in Korea and around the world, has a signature pungent, sour tang.

6h

Research reveals 'fundamental finding' about Earth's outer core

The Earth's core is an exceptionally difficult place to study. Its depths descend a staggering 2,900 kilometers—about the distance from New York City to Denver—and its extreme, otherworldly conditions are extraordinarily challenging to simulate in the lab.

6h

Finding opioid alternatives in cone snail stings

Science To Baldomero Olivera, venom is nature's drug industry. Olivera is the lead scientist at a 25-person lab that studies cone-snail venom. His job is to figure out how it works, and transform it into drugs that could soothe and…

7h

MRI technique shows unique signatures of concussion in rugby players

The research team studied the brains of young female athletes and used a technique that combined multiple brain imaging measures to be able to look at structural and functional information at the same time. The result was a much more sensitive and complete picture of concussion injury.

7h

Forests, like humans, require a balanced diet

The world's forests are on a fast food diet of carbon dioxide, which is currently causing them to grow faster. But a researcher finds evidence suggesting that forest growth may soon peak as the trees deplete nitrogen in the soil over longer growing seasons.

7h

Restoring canals shown as cost-efficient way to reverse wetland loss

Scientists have determined a cost-effective way to prevent coastal erosion and protect Louisiana's wetlands.They propose a simple and inexpensive way to fill in canals that were once used for oil and gas mining.

7h

Peanuts that do more with less water

Researchers are studying peanut varieties to find a 'water conservation' trait. It would help the plant maintain a high yield during a drought.

7h

Newly discovered adolescent star seen undergoing 'growth spurt'

Astronomers have discovered a young star undergoing a rare growth spurt — giving a fascinating glimpse into the development of these distant stellar objects.

7h

Team creates and demonstrates first quantum sensor for satellite gravimetry

NASA and the Sunnyvale, California-based AOSense, Inc., have successfully built and demonstrated a prototype quantum sensor capable of obtaining highly sensitive and accurate gravity measurements—a stepping stone toward next-generation geodesy, hydrology, and climate-monitoring missions in space.

7h

Mighty morphing materials take complex shapes

Rice University scientists have created a rubbery, shape-shifting material that morphs from one sophisticated form to another on demand.

7h

Is the Psychology of Deadly Force Ready for the Courts?

In the absence of rigorous science, psychologists disagree about using the neurobiology of stress to defend police officers who kill — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

Device that works like a lung makes clean fuel from water

A device inspired by human lungs can split water into oxygen and hydrogen. If successfully scaled up it could help make clean fuel for hydrogen cars

7h

There may be a link between erectile dysfunction and type 2 diabetes

A DNA analysis links type 2 diabetes with erectile dysfunction, hinting that having a healthier lifestyle may reduce the chances of getting erectile problems

7h

Studies examine pediatric services in US emergency departments

Three papers from research teams led by a Massachusetts General Hospital physician examine the current readiness of US emergency departments (EDs) to care for children and describe an initiative that led to the appointment of a Pediatric Emergency Care Coordinator — a step considered the single best intervention to improve pediatric emergency care — in all Massachusetts EDs.

7h

Pay-it-forward model increases STD testing among gay men in China

Chinese gay men who were offered a free STD test and then asked to donate to the testing of another man were 48 percent more likely to get tested than men offered the standard of care, UNC researchers found. Learn how this approach could be applied for testing of other diseases.

7h

Paper sensors remove the sting of diabetic testing

An inkjet-printed device helps monitor a patient's blood sugar levels without painful needles.

7h

How sperm stem cells maintain their number

Researchers including Asstistant Professor Yu Kitadate and Professor Shosei Yoshida (developmental biologists at the National Institute for Basic Biology in Japan) and Professor Benjamin Simons (a theoretical physicist at the University of Cambridge in the UK) have revealed a novel mechanism for stem cell number control.

7h

Researchers from the CNIO and the Hospital 12 de Octubre make sense out of the chaos of melanoma

The study has discovered that numerous processes involved in the metastasis of melanoma, which were thought to be independent from each other, have a global coordinator: the p62 protein.The publication also discovered the involvement of another protein, FERMT2, in metastasis, and suggests that both, FEMT2 and p62, could represent indicators of bad prognosis in melanoma patients.These findings have

7h

Translating the 'language of behavior' with artificially intelligent motion capture

Princeton researchers created LEAP, a flexible motion-capture tool that can be trained in a matter of minutes to track body parts over millions of frames of existing video with high accuracy, without any physical markers or labels.

7h

Study examines head impacts, changes in eye function in high school football players

Head impacts in youth sports, even when they don't cause symptoms of concussion, are a public health concern because these so-called subconcussive head impacts may result in long-term neurological issues if they are sustained repeatedly. This study looked at changes in measurements of near point of convergence (NPC), which is the distance from your eyes to where both eyes can focus without double

7h

Yale Cancer Center scientists advise caution in immunotherapy research

In a new study, Yale Cancer Center (YCC) scientists suggest that as the number of clinical trials in cancer immunotherapy grows exponentially, some caution should be exercised as we continue to better understand the biology of these new therapeutic targets. The findings are published today in the journal Cell.

7h

Genetic study reveals how citrus became the Med's favorite squeeze

Genetic detective work has illuminated the important role of Jewish culture in the widespread adoption of citrus fruit by early Mediterranean societies.

7h

New threat to ozone recovery

A new MIT study, published in Nature Geoscience, identifies another threat to the ozone layer's recovery: chloroform — a colorless, sweet-smelling compound that is primarily used in the manufacturing of products such as Teflon and various refrigerants. The researchers found that between 2010 and 2015, emissions and concentrations of chloroform in the global atmosphere have increased significantly

7h

Study finds elevated risk of rare blood cancers after chemotherapy for most solid tumors

Findings from a new study by researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) show that patients treated with chemotherapy for most solid tumors during 2000-2014 experienced an increased risk of therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome/acute myeloid leukemia (tMDS/AML). The study was published December 20, 2018, in JAMA Oncology. NCI is part of the National Institutes of Health.

7h

Bacteria rely on classic business model

The pneumonia causing pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa has developed a twin-track strategy to colonize its host. It generates two different cells — motile spreaders and virulent stickers. Researchers at the University of Basel's Biozentrum have now elucidated how the germ attaches to tissue within seconds and consecutively spreads. Just like the business model: settling — growing — expanding.

7h

Gut-brain connection signals worms to alter behavior while eating

MIT neuroscientists have discovered how neurons in the digestive tract of the worm C. elegans signal the brain to slow down when it encounters an area of plentiful food.

7h

Convincing evidence that type 2 diabetes is a cause of erectile dysfunction

Evidence that type 2 diabetes is a cause of erectile dysfunction has been found in a large-scale genomic analysis.

7h

A lung-inspired design turns water into fuel

Scientists at Stanford University have designed an electrocatalytic mechanism that works like a mammalian lung to convert water into fuel. Their research, published Dec. 20 in the journal Joule, could help existing clean energy technologies run more efficiently.

7h

Himalayan marmot genome offers clues to life at extremely high altitudes

Himalayan marmots can survive at altitudes up to 5,000 meters in the Himalayan regions of India, Nepal, and Pakistan and on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau of China, where many of them face extreme cold, little oxygen, and few other resources. Now, researchers have sequenced the first complete Himalayan marmot genome, which may help them to better explain how the marmots live in such extremes. The fin

7h

Mount Sinai researchers discover new drug cocktail that increases human beta cell proliferation at rapid rates

Researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai have discovered a novel combination of two classes of drugs that induces the highest rate of proliferation ever observed in adult human beta cells — the cells in the pancreas that produce insulin. The result is an important step toward a diabetes treatment that restores the body's ability to produce insulin.

7h

45% of UK scientists don’t believe in God

Scientists in the United Kingdom are significantly less religious than the general population there, research finds. In addition, UK scientists at elite universities are more likely to never attend religious services than those at less prestigious schools. The study also indicates biologists are more likely to never attend religious services than physicists. The study uses data from a survey of b

7h

Centralt dokument mangler, før solcelleejere kan overføres til flexafregning

Flexafregning er den eneste gangbare løsning for solcelleejere fremover, og efter planen skal den nye ordning indføres fra nytår. Men med årsskiftet lige om hjørnet lader et vigtigt dokument fra Energistyrelsen stadig vente på sig.

7h

Faint starlight in Hubble images reveals distribution of dark matter

Astronomers using data from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope have employed a revolutionary method to detect dark matter in galaxy clusters. The method allows astronomers to 'see' the distribution of dark matter more accurately than any other method used to date and it could possibly be used to explore the ultimate nature of dark matter. The results were published in the journal Monthly Notices

7h

Mighty morphing materials take complex shapes

Rice University scientists have created a liquid crystal elastomer that can be molded into shapes that shift from one to another when heated. The material is intended for biomedical and robotics applications.

7h

How kimchi gets its kick (video)

Kimchi, the fermented cabbage dish beloved in Korea and around the world, has a signature pungent, sour tang. Those unique flavors come from not only salt and spices but also fermentation by friendly microbes. In this video, Reactions explores the chemistry of why kimchi is so delicious and even tries to make a batch: https://youtu.be/DG4afs7C1XI.

7h

Beyond the black hole singularity

Our first glimpses into the physics that exist near the center of a black hole are being made possible using 'loop quantum gravity'–a theory that uses quantum mechanics to extend gravitational physics beyond Einstein's theory of general relativity.

7h

A mountain of evidence on air pollution's harms to children

A new study led by researchers at the Columbia Center for Children's Environmental Health (CCCEH) organizes the available scientific evidence on the effects of air pollution on children's health. The paper in the journal Environmental Research is the first comprehensive review of the associations between various fossil fuel combustion pollutants and multiple health effects in children in the conte

7h

Genome offers clues to esophageal cancer disparity

A change in the genome of Caucasians could explain much-higher rates of the most common type of esophageal cancer in this population, a new study finds. It suggests a possible target for prevention strategies, which preliminary work suggests could involve flavonoids derived from cranberries.

7h

New research shows how a fatty diet can lead to life-threatening liver disease

A new study by USC scientists provides new insight on how dietary fat and cholesterol drive the development of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), a serious form of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

7h

NIH-developed test detects protein associated with Alzheimer's and CTE

An ultrasensitive test has been developed that detects a corrupted protein associated with Alzheimer's disease and chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), a condition found in athletes, military veterans, and others with a history of repetitive brain trauma. This advance could lead to early diagnosis of these conditions and open new research into how they originate, according to NIH scientists and

7h

Yale-led team examines impact of diet intervention on autoimmunity in mice

Could a change in diet be beneficial to people with autoimmune diseases such as lupus? A Yale-led team of researchers have revealed how a dietary intervention can help prevent the development of this autoimmune disease in susceptible mice. The study was published in Cell Host & Microbe.

7h

Blood editors announce top 10 manuscripts of 2018

The editors of Blood, the most-cited journal in hematology, have selected the top manuscripts of 2018.

7h

Bacteria rely on classic business model

The pneumonia-causing pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa has developed a twin-track strategy to colonize its host. It generates two cell types—motile spreaders and virulent stickers. Researchers at the University of Basel's Biozentrum have now elucidated how the germ attaches to tissue within seconds and consecutively spreads just like a business model: settling—growing—expanding. The study has been

7h

Himalayan marmot genome offers clues to life at extremely high altitudes

Himalayan marmots can survive at altitudes up to 5,000 meters in the Himalayan regions of India, Nepal, and Pakistan and on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau of China, where many of them face extreme cold, little oxygen, and few other resources. Now, researchers have sequenced the first complete Himalayan marmot genome, which may help them to better explain how the marmots live in such extremes.

7h

Gut-brain connection signals worms to alter behavior while eating

When a hungry worm encounters a rich food source, it immediately slows down so it can devour the feast. Once the worm is full, or the food runs out, it will begin roaming again.

7h

Genetic study reveals how citrus became the Med's favorite squeeze

Genetic detective work has illuminated the important role of Jewish culture in the widespread adoption of citrus fruit by early Mediterranean societies.

7h

A lung-inspired design turns water into fuel

Scientists at Stanford University have designed an electrocatalytic mechanism that works like a mammalian lung to convert water into fuel. Their research, published December 20 in the journal Joule, could help existing clean energy technologies run more efficiently.

7h

Who Gets to Look Out to the Edge of the Universe?

The cosmos would seem like a dull and desolate void if it weren’t for the Hubble Space Telescope. The space-based observatory has revealed a trove of colorful, cosmic wonders , from sparkling stars and galaxies , to glowing clouds of gas and dust, to the glittering shards left behind after a supernova. Hubble has found these cosmic jewels scattered across the universe and followed them back in ti

7h

What are you looking at? How attention affects decision-making

Scientists using eye-tracking technology have found that what we look at helps guide our decisions when faced with two visible choices, such as snack food options. But it is not as easy as saying we simply choose what we look at the most, the research found. Instead, our gaze amplifies our desire for choices we already like.

7h

Japan May Start Commercial Whale Hunting Again

Japan plans to leave the International Whaling Commission so that it can resume commercially hunting the marine giant, according to news reports from government sources.

7h

In Taliban’s wake, more Afghans say marriage can wait

Attitudes on child marriage and education have changed significantly in Afghanistan’s most underdeveloped regions since the overthrow of the Taliban, a study finds. The study, which appears in the Journal of Adolescent Health , includes interviews with nearly 1,400 Afghans ages 12-15 and their parents, all in relatively poor rural districts of the country. In just one generation, the responses in

7h

The real reason female entrepreneurs get less funding | Dana Kanze

Women own 39 percent of all businesses in the US, but female entrepreneurs get only two percent of venture funding. What's causing this gap? Dana Kanze shares research suggesting that it might be the types of questions start-up founders get asked when they're invited to pitch. Whether you're starting a new business or just having a conversation, learn how to spot the kinds of questions you're bein

7h

What can you do to protect your data on Facebook?Mark Zuckerberg Facebook

Facebook has shared users' private messages, contact information and other personal data with companies such as Microsoft and Spotify, according to a New York Times report that was alarming even in light of previous disclosures about the social network's practices.

7h

How Complex Wholes Emerge From Simple Parts

You could spend a lifetime studying an individual water molecule and never deduce the precise hardness or slipperiness of ice. Watch a lone ant under a microscope for as long as you like, and you still couldn’t predict that thousands of them might collaboratively build bridges with their bodies to span gaps . Scrutinize the birds in a flock or the fish in a school and you wouldn’t find one that’s

7h

Neural network taught to detect age and gender by video almost 20 percent more accurately

Researchers from the Higher School of Economics have created a technology to help neural networks identify certain people on video, detecting their age and gender more quickly and accurately. The development has already become the basis for offline detection systems in Android mobile apps. The results of the study were published in an article entitled 'Video-based age and gender recognition in mob

7h

One of the world's fastest cameras films motion of electrons

A team from the Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics at Kiel University has now succeeded in investigating the energy exchange of the electrons with their environment in real time, and thereby distinguishing individual phases. In their experiment, they irradiated graphite with an intense, ultrashort light pulse and filmed the impact on the behaviour of electrons. Their findings are publis

7h

Memory and cognition problems affect recovery in rehabilitation facilities

Recently, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) added new ways to measure patients' abilities to perform their daily routines in nursing facilities and other after-care settings. Studies have not examined how skilled nursing care residents who have cognitive difficulties perform on the new self-care and mobility measurements. Researchers designed a new study to fill that knowledge g

7h

Parkinson's disease experts devise a roadmap

A recently discovered protein, alpha-synuclein, has become one of the most attractive targets for developing new drugs with the potential to slow down or arrest the progression of Parkinson's disease. Experts in the field of Parkinson's research have now proposed a roadmap for preclinical and clinical trials investigating compounds targeting alpha-synuclein. Their consensus white paper is publishe

7h

Time to biochemical failure could be used as surrogate endpoint in treatment: LA prostate cancer

An analysis of the NRG Oncology clinical trial NRG-RTOG 9202 showed that the interval of time to biochemical failure (IBF), or the time it takes for previously treated cancer to return as indicated by prostate specific antigen (PSA) rise, could be used as a surrogate endpoint for locally advanced prostate cancer.

7h

Lipid raft components offer potential cholesterol-lowering drug target

Excessive dietary cholesterol (and its uptake) can cause hypercholesterolemia. In a new paper, researchers show that intestinal cholesterol absorption requires the complex lipid GM3. Disrupting GM3 synthesis can reduce the incidence of high cholesterol in mice fed a high-cholesterol diet, suggesting the pathway as a lipid-lowering drug target.

7h

Research reveals 'fundamental finding' about Earth's outer core

Researchers used high-powered supercomputing techniques to make a critical discovery about the chemical composition of the Earth's outer core.

7h

Electrically charged higgs versus physicists: 1-0 until break

The last missing particle of the Standard Model, the Higgs boson, was discovered in 2012 in the experiments at the Large Hadron Collider. Since then, searching for new, related particles has been underway. Predicted by various theories that go beyond known physics, Higgs bosons with positive or negative electric charge are among the favorites to be observed. But do these particles really exist?

7h

Americans Should Be ‘Screaming Mad’ About Amazon’s Free Money

You may have heard by now that Amazon’s new headquarters will soon call the New York and Washington, D.C., metropolitan areas home. This decision has engendered much criticism. But the Atlantic staff writer Derek Thompson doesn’t think the vitriol is enough. “We should all be screaming mad about the state of corporate handouts in this country,” Thompson says in the latest Atlantic Argument . He a

7h

Faint glow within galaxy clusters illuminates dark matter

A new look at Hubble images of galaxies could be a step toward illuminating the elusive nature of dark matter, the unobservable material that makes up the majority of the universe, according to a study published online today in the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.

7h

ALMA gives passing comet its close-up

As comet 46P/Wirtanen neared Earth on December 2, astronomers using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) took a remarkably close look the innermost regions of the comet's coma, the gaseous envelope around its nucleus.

8h

Scientists find nanoparticles with peculiar chemical composition

Scientists from Russia and China discovered a host of new and unexpected nanoparticles and found a way to control their composition and properties ‒ the findings break fresh ground in the use of nanoparticles. The results of their study were published in Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics.

8h

Apple risks iPhone ban in Germany after court case lossApple iPhone Qualcomm

A German court on Thursday ruled in favour of US chipmaker Qualcomm in a patent dispute case against Apple, which could lead to a ban on sales of iPhones in Germany.

8h

Changing communities may affect the success of Iceland's evacuation guidelines

Icelanders generally responded well to evacuation guidelines when the volcano Eyjafjallajökull erupted in 2010 and caused widespread disruption to international travel. However, since then the demography, economy and political structure of Iceland have changed. For example, tourism has become especially important in South Iceland in the past few years. New research led by Deanne Bird of the Univer

8h

Chemists discover new signatures to identify cystic fibrosis in infants sooner

Scientists at McMaster University have discovered several new biomarkers from a single drop of blood that could allow earlier and more definitive detection of cystic fibrosis (CF), a genetic disease which strikes both children and adults, causing chronic problems with the digestive system and the lungs.

8h

Chemists discover new signatures to identify cystic fibrosis in infants sooner

Scientists at McMaster University have discovered several new biomarkers from a single drop of blood that could allow earlier and more definitive detection of cystic fibrosis (CF), a genetic disease which strikes both children and adults, causing chronic problems with the digestive system and the lungs.

8h

Changing communities may affect the success of Iceland's evacuation guidelines

Icelanders generally responded well to evacuation guidelines when the volcano Eyjafjallajökull erupted in 2010 and caused widespread disruption to international travel. However, since then the demography, economy and political structure of Iceland have changed. For example, tourism has become especially important in South Iceland in the past few years.

8h

Major gaps remain in how traditional knowledge is used in salmon governance in Norway and Finland

A new article published today in the journal Arctic points to major challenges in the ways traditional knowledge is included in the management of Atlantic salmon in Norway and Finland.

8h

Discovery could lead to munitions that go further, much faster

Researchers from the U.S. Army and top universities discovered a new way to get more energy out of energetic materials containing aluminum, common in battlefield systems, by igniting aluminum micron powders coated with graphene oxide.

8h

New study first to predict which oil and gas wells are leaking methane

A new study in Environmental Geosciences is the first to predict — with up to 87 percent accuracy — which oil and natural wells are most likely to be leaking methane. Research published in Science estimated that natural gas wells are leaking 60 percent more methane than the EPA estimates, offsetting much of the fuel's climate benefit.

8h

Scientists discover new brain changes in early Alzheimer's disease

Researchers at the University of Eastern Finland have discovered new changes occurring in the human brain in the early stages of Alzheimer's disease. The researchers used a multiomic approach to determine RNA, protein, and phosphorylation levels and carried out further neurobioinformatic analyses on them. The findings, drawing on data from a Finnish biobank of brain tissue samples, were published

8h

Antennal sensors allow hawkmoths to make quick moves

All insects use vision to control their position in the air when they fly, but they also integrate information from other senses. Biologists at Lund University have now shown how hawkmoths use mechanosensors in their antennae to control fast flight maneuvers.

8h

Media alert: New articles in The CRISPR Journal

The CRISPR Journal, a new peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers, announces the publication of its December issue.

8h

New optical memory cell achieves record data-storage density

Researchers have demonstrated a new technique that can store more optical data in a smaller space than was previously possible on-chip. This technique improves upon the phase-change optical memory cell, which uses light to write and read data, and could offer a faster, more power-efficient form of memory for computers.

8h

Discovery could lead to munitions that go further, much faster

Researchers from the U.S. Army and top universities discovered a new way to get more energy out of energetic materials containing aluminum, common in battlefield systems, by igniting aluminum micron powders coated with graphene oxide.

8h

New study first to predict which oil and gas wells are leaking methane

Each year brings new research showing that oil and natural gas wells leak significant amounts of the potent greenhouse gas methane.

8h

Better understanding of dog body language could make interactions safer

A better understanding of the way dogs communicate distress could be the first step in reducing the risk of dog bites for both children and adults, a new study has found.

8h

A major step closer to a viable recording material for future hard disk drives

Magnetic recording is the primary technology underpinning today's large-scale data storage. Now, companies are racing to develop new hard disk devices (HDDs) capable of recording densities greater than 1 terabit per square inch.

8h

Australian study into how seals react to boats prompts new ecotourism regulations

Unable to differentiate between a predator and a tourist boat carrying humans curious to view a colony of seals while resting in their natural habitat, pinnipeds are quick to react defensively as soon as they sense what they perceive as a potential life threat. The closer the vessel approaches, the more likely it is for the animals to rush into the sea in an attempt to escape and the greater the r

8h

Scientists use magnetic defects to achieve electromagnetic wave breakthrough

Surfers spend much of their time watching long waves come onto the shoreline as they attempt to catch one right as it begins to curve and break.

8h

InSight places first instrument on Mars

NASA's InSight lander has deployed its first instrument onto the surface of Mars, completing a major mission milestone. New images from the lander show the seismometer on the ground, its copper-colored covering faintly illuminated in the Martian dusk. It looks as if all is calm and all is bright for InSight, heading into the end of the year.

8h

Quantum Maxwell's demon 'teleports' entropy out of a qubit

Researchers from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, ETH Zurich, and Argonne National Laboratory, U.S, have described an extended quantum Maxwell's demon, a device locally violating the second law of thermodynamics in a system located one to five meters away from the demon. The device could find applications in quantum computers and microscopic refrigerators that cool down tiny objects

8h

Why AI robot toys could be good for kids

A new generation of robot toys with personalities powered by artificial intelligence could give kids more than just a holiday plaything, according to a University of Alberta researcher.

8h

Fra nytår kan fjernvarmeselskaber ikke mere binde kunderne

Energiaftalens afsnit om forbrugerbindinger blev i dag til lov – men ikke med oppositionens velsignelse: Den stemte blankt

8h

Trigonometry Is Essential to Physics. Here Are the Basics

Good ol' trig: that bastion of angles and triangles is essential to calculating velocity, momentum, and much more.

8h

Scientists find nanoparticles with peculiar chemical composition

An international team from Russia and China discovered a host of new and unexpected nanoparticles and found a way to control their composition and properties the findings that break fresh ground in the use of nanoparticles.

8h

The production of Ac-225

This manuscript attempts to present an overview of availability sources of 225Ac and production methods by which additional supplies might be made available to the community of clinical researchers seeking their application in the treatment of human disease.

8h

Magnetoresistance ratio enhancement opens door to highly sensitive magnetic field sensors

Magnetic field sensors can enhance applications that require efficient electric energy management. Improving magnetic field sensors below the picoTesla range could enable a technique to measure brain activity at room temperature with millisecond resolution without superconducting quantum interference device technology, which requires cryogenic temperatures to work. Researchers explored enhancing t

8h

Current concepts and perspectives on connexin43: A mini review

This review discusses current knowledge on the functional and structural abnormalities in Cx43 associated with heart disease and cancer, aiming to highlight the importance of this connexin as an emerging therapeutic target. Here, the current knowledge on the pharmacology of Gap Junction Channels and Hemichannels were also summarized. Finally, we propose that this knowledge can be exploited to iden

8h

A major step closer to a viable recording material for future hard disk drives

Magnetic recording is the primary technology underpinning today's large-scale data storage, and companies are racing to develop new hard disk devices capable of recording densities greater than 1 terabit per square inch. In AIP Advances, from AIP Publishing, a group of researchers in India report their work tweaking the L10 phase, or crystallographic orientation, of an iron and platinum alloy as a

8h

NUS study: In response to heat, the more affluent use air-conditioners; low-income households use water

An NUS study has revealed that Singapore households from different socioeconomic groups vary significantly in their use of water and electricity for the relief of heat. The findings suggest that water provides heat relief for lower-income households while demand for electricity increases among the more affluent, likely through the use of air-conditioning, when temperatures rise. Results from the s

8h

Central role of transforming growth factor type beta 1 in skeletal muscle dysfunctions

In this review we present the critical and recent antecedents regarding the mechanisms and cellular targets involved in the effects of TGF-β1 in the muscle, in pathological processes such as the inhibition of regeneration, fibrosis and atrophy. In addition, an update on the development of new strategies with therapeutic potential to inhibit the deleterious actions of TGF-β in skeletal muscle is di

8h

Improved stem cell approach could aid fight against Parkinson's

Scientists have taken a key step towards improving an emerging class of treatments for Parkinson's disease.

8h

First detection of rain over the ocean by navigation satellites

In order to analyse climate change or provide information about natural hazards, it is important to gather knowledge about the rain. Better knowledge of precipitation and its distribution could, for example, help protect against river flooding. A new approach uses, for the first time, information contained in radar signals from navigation satellites to detect rain over the sea. The technology coul

8h

Chemotherapeutic drugs and plasma proteins: Exploring new dimensions

This review provides a bird's eye view of interaction of a number of clinically important drugs currently in use that show covalent or non-covalent interaction with serum proteins. Platinum drug-cisplatin interacts covalently and alters the function of the key plasma protease inhibitor molecule -alpha-2-macroglobulin and induces the conformational changes in the protein molecule and inactivates it

8h

Quantum Maxwell's demon 'teleports' entropy out of a qubit

An international team of researchers has described an extended quantum Maxwell's demon, a device locally violating the second law of thermodynamics in a system located 1-5 meters away from the demon. The device could find applications in quantum computers and microscopic refrigerators cooling down tiny objects with pinpoint accuracy.

8h

Enzyme's unfrozen adventure: In crystallo protein thermodynamics

Osaka University researchers and collaborators have reported the first in crystallo thermodynamic analysis of copper amine oxidase catalysis using a non-cryocooled technique. The method, which analyzes protein crystals coated with a water-soluble polymer, rather than cryogenically cooled crystals, can be temperature-controlled, allowing for conformational changes to be monitored over a range of te

8h

Leuven scientists tackle one immune disease after the other

In two recent studies, the same team of scientists has uncovered the mechanisms underlying two distinct immunological disorders affecting both children and adults. Stephanie Humblet-Baron (VIB-KU Leuven) was the researcher at the helm of both projects.

8h

Better understanding of dog body language could make interactions safer

A better understanding of the way dogs communicate distress could be the first step in reducing the risk of dog bites for both children and adults, a new study has found.

8h

Technology helps new pilots better communicate with air traffic control, increase safety

Learning to speak a new language can be difficult in any setting. Now, imagine trying to learn the language of the sky as a new pilot, while also navigating the instrument panel and learning to fly the plane safely.

8h

Comet hunters successfully observe Wirtanen with newly modernized instrument

Astronomers are being treated to an exciting view of Comet 46P/Wirtanen at W. M. Keck Observatory, with sharper-than-ever data images of this icy and rocky space visitor.

8h

New optical memory cell achieves record data-storage density

Researchers have demonstrated a new technique that can store more optical data in a smaller space than was previously possible on-chip. This technique improves upon the phase-change optical memory cell, which uses light to write and read data, and could offer a faster, more power-efficient form of memory for computers.

8h

Novel imaging technique brings diagnostic potential into operating room

A team of University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign researchers led by Bioengineering Professor Stephen Boppart has successfully visualized the tumor microenvironment of human breast tissue shortly after it was surgically removed from a patient in the operating room. The researchers achieved this using a new portable optical imaging system developed in Boppart's lab.

8h

ESA's solar-powered giant one year on

ESA's 35-metre antenna in Australia has now been powered by the sun for over a year, cutting costs and reducing carbon emissions by 330 tonnes—equivalent to 1.9 million km driven by car.

8h

Making the Holidays Accessible to All

A Paralympic silver medalist offers a few simple tips for making wheelchair users welcome — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

Selfish genes can act as both makers, breakers of species

A selfish streak in genes known to drive species apart might occasionally bring them closer together, says a new study from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and University of Rochester.

8h

From a plant sugar to toxic hydrogen sulfide

In a doctoral research project conducted at the Department of Biology, researchers have described the degradation of the dietary sugar sulfoquinovose by anaerobic bacteria to toxic hydrogen sulfide for the first time—increased production of hydrogen sulfide in the human intestinal system has been associated with inflammatory bowel disease and colon cancer.

8h

The myth of the American Frontier still shapes U.S. racial divides

When Americans study their 19th-century history, they tend to look at its great conflicts, especially the epic clash over slavery. They are less likely to recall its broad areas of agreement.

8h

Let go of toxic workplace 'emotional labour' in 2019

What will you leave behind in 2019? Here's one suggestion: toxic workplace emotional labour.

8h

Doing away with essays won't necessarily stop students cheating

It's never been easier for university students to cheat. We just need look to the scandal in 2015 that revealed up to 1,000 students from 16 Australian universities had hired the Sydney-based MyMaster company to ghost-write their assignments and sit online tests.

8h

Spectacular flying reptiles soared over Britain's tropical Jurassic past

Spectacular flying reptiles armed with long teeth and claws which once dominated the skies have been rediscovered, thanks a paleontology student's Ph.D. research.

8h

Threat of 'nightmare bacteria' exhibiting resistance to last-resort antibiotic colistin

Researchers examined the dissemination of colistin-resistant bacteria among residents of rural communities in Vietnam to find that the prevalence of colistin-resistant Escherichia coli in the intestines was extremely high, at about 70 percent. It was revealed that the prevalence of colistin-resistant bacteria in residents in Vietnam was extremely high and that colistin-resistant bacteria, whose cl

8h

Madrid is the autonomous community that spends the most on the Spanish Christmas Lottery

The people of Madrid spend close to 470 million euros on the Spanish Christmas Lottery, approximately 20 percent of the total. This is one of the figures highlighted by the 'Yearbook of Gambling in Spain,' a report recently presented by Universidad Carlos III de Madrid and CODERE.

8h

Age is more than just a number: Machine learning may predict if you're in for a healthy old age

A collaborative team at the Salk Institute analyzed skin cells from the very young to the very old and looked for molecular signatures that can be predictive of age. By applying machine-learning algorithms to these biomarkers, they were able to predict a person's actual age with less than eight years error, on average.

8h

Australian study into how seals react to boats prompts new ecotourism regulations

Unable to differentiate between a predator and a tourist boat, seals react as soon as they sense a potential threat. The closer a vessel approaches, the more likely it is for the animals to rush to the water and the greater the risk of a stampede or predation in the sea. To inform management guidelines, researchers observed a colony on Kanowna Island, Bass Strait. Their study is published in the o

8h

A new way to cut the power of tumors

Instead of tackling tumors head-on, a team of researchers from the University of Geneva and the Amsterdam UMC, location VUmc chose to regulate their vascularization by intervening with cellular receptor overexpressed specifically in cancer blood vessels. By acting on the development of the blood vessels within the tumor, scientists hope to modulate vasculature and deliver the treatments extremely

8h

Small family-run livestock farms stand out in Cordoba's dehesa

A University of Cordoba study maps out the characteristics of dehesa farms associated with feeding cooperatives in Los Pedroches and Upper Guadiato.

8h

Researchers develop method to non-destructively measure the salt content of concrete structures

Researchers have used a method, using the RANS compact neutron source, to non-destructively measure the salt content of structures such as bridges, tunnels, and elevated roadways, which can suffer from degradation due to exposure to salt from seawater and other sources.

8h

Performance enhancer: Sports compression stockings a winning advantage

A scientist from James Cook University in Australia has found sports compression stockings are so effective they might be considered performance enhancers for soccer players.

8h

Scientists use magnetic defects to achieve electromagnetic wave breakthrough

In a new study, Argonne scientists have created small regions of magnetic defects. When electromagnetic plane waves interact with these defects, they are converted into helical waves, which encode more information for further materials studies.

8h

The Atlantic Hires Renowned Publishing Design Team Peter Mendelsund and Oliver Munday

Peter Mendelsund has been named creative director of The Atlantic , and his frequent design partner Oliver Munday will become the publisher’s new senior art director. Mendelsund, a longtime associate art director for Alfred A. Knopf, is widely recognized as one America’s preeminent designers. He now brings his vision and portfolio to The Atlantic, where he will direct the design and visuals acros

8h

Feeling young isn’t always a reason to choose chemo

For older adults in a recent study, age was only one of the complex factors influencing their decisions to receive chemotherapy. For example, investigators encountered an 80-year-old patient who told investigators that he felt 20 and a 74-year-old who felt like he was 40 with a goal of outliving his 90-year-old father. The study volunteers were eligible if they had undergone cancer surgery and if

8h

You should negotiate with your cable company to get a lower bill

DIY Cheaper television and internet are just a phone call away. Since you signed up for television and internet, your bills have been skyrocketing. Here’s how to talk the cable company back down to a more reasonable price.

8h

Plastic waste disintegrates into nanoparticles, study finds

There is a considerable risk that plastic waste in the environment releases nano-sized particles known as nanoplastics, according to a new study from Lund University. The researchers studied what happened when takeaway coffee cup lids, for example, were subjected to mechanical breakdown, in an effort to mimic the degradation that happens to plastic in the ocean.

9h

Snowed in: Wolves stay put when it's snowing

Wolves travel shorter distances and move slower during snowfall events, according to new research. The effects were most pronounced at night, when wolves hunt, and behavior returned to normal within a day.

9h

Bacterial protein could help find materials for your next smartphone

A newly discovered protein could help detect, target, and collect lanthanides, rare-earth metals used in smartphones, from the environment.

9h

Mile-wide, potentially hazardous asteroid 2003 SD220 to swoosh by Earth on Saturday

A potentially hazardous asteroid (PHA), designated 2003 SD220 (or 163899), is expected to fly by the Earth on Saturday, December 22, at around 1:04 UTC. The space rock, estimated to be about a mile wide (1.6 kilometers), will pass by our planet at a distance of approximately 7.34 lunar distances (LD), what corresponds to 1.75 million miles (2.81 million kilometers).

9h

Annual, biological rhythms govern milk production in dairy cows

The amount and composition of milk produced by dairy cows appears to be more regulated by internal, annual biological rhythms than by environmental factors such as heat and humidity, according to Penn State researchers who studied more than a decade of production records from herds across the country.

9h

Predicting the properties of a new class of glasses

ZIF glasses, a new family of glass, could combine the transparency of silicate glass with the nonbrittle quality of metallic glass, according to researchers at Penn State and Cambridge University in the U.K.

9h

Micropores let oxygen and nutrients inside biofabricated tissues

Micropores in fabricated tissues such as bone and cartilage allow nutrient and oxygen diffusion into the core, and this novel approach may eventually allow lab-grown tissue to contain blood vessels, according to a team of Penn State researchers.

9h

Genome published of the small hive beetle, a major honey bee parasite

Beekeepers and researchers will welcome the unveiling of the small hive beetle's genome by Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists and their colleagues. The small hive beetle (SHB) is a major parasite problem of honey bees for which there are few effective treatments.

9h

Why does nuclear fission produce pear-shaped nuclei?

Researchers at University of Tsukuba and Australian National University resolved a longstanding puzzle of nuclear fission why nuclear fission of heavy (actinide) nuclei results predominantly in asymmetric mass-splits. These findings may explain surprising bservations of asymmetric fission of lighter than lead nuclei.

9h

Suboptimal, inconsistent treatment for anaphylaxis due to unknown cause

A new Canadian study, led by a team at the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (RI-MUHC), is shedding light on anaphylaxis due to an unknown trigger (AUT)–an unpredictable and potentially fatal allergic reaction, about which surprisingly little is known.

9h

Genome published of the small hive beetle, a major honey bee parasite

Beekeepers and researchers will welcome the unveiling of the small hive beetle's genome by Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists and their colleagues. The small hive beetle (SHB) is a major parasite problem of honey bees for which there are few effective treatments. Completing the SHB genome takes on even more importance when you realize that among the SHB's close relatives are the destru

9h

Predicting the properties of a new class of glasses

ZIF glasses, a new family of glass, could combine the transparency of silicate glass with the nonbrittle quality of metallic glass, according to researchers at Penn State and Cambridge University in the UK.

9h

Annual, biological rhythms govern milk production in dairy cows

The amount and composition of milk produced by dairy cows appears to be more regulated by internal, annual biological rhythms than by environmental factors such as heat and humidity, according to Penn State researchers who studied more than a decade of production records from herds across the country.

9h

Micropores let oxygen and nutrients inside biofabricated tissues

Micropores in fabricated tissues such as bone and cartilage allow nutrient and oxygen diffusion into the core, and this novel approach may eventually allow lab-grown tissue to contain blood vessels, according to a team of Penn State researchers.

9h

Certain moral values may lead to more prejudice, discrimination

People who value following purity rules over caring for others are more likely to view gay and transgender people as less human, which leads to more prejudice and support for discriminatory public policies, according to a new study published by the American Psychological Association.

9h

Climate change is putting wildlife at risk in the world's oldest lake

Climate change and human disturbance are putting wildlife in the world's oldest and deepest lake at risk, according to a new study by the University of Nottingham and University College London.

9h

Drone used to smuggle drugs into Kuwait

Kuwaiti authorities have arrested a man who used a drone to smuggle in drugs from a neighbouring country, the anti-narcotics department said Thursday.

9h

Study shows how plants evolve for faster growth

Scientists at the University of Sheffield have taken a step forward in understanding how evolution has changed the photosynthesis process in wild plants to help them grow more rapidly.

9h

Uber resumes autonomous vehicle tests in PittsburghUber Self Pittsburgh

Uber is resuming autonomous vehicle tests in an area near downtown Pittsburgh.

9h

Defects in nanoparticles help to drive the production of hydrogen, a clean-burning fuel

Nanomaterials that speed up the production of hydrogen gas have been created by A*STAR and NTU researchers. This work could help to develop more efficient technologies for making this clean fuel.

9h

Storbritannien ude af Galileo: Står uden navigationsatellitter om få måneder

Premierminister Theresa May smækker med døren og forlader forhandlinger om at lade Storbritannien forblive i det europæiske satellitprogram Galileo. Nu vil briterne bygge deres eget navigationssystem efter have brugt over 10 milliarder kroner på Galileo.

9h

Researcher finds a cheap way to identify invasive coconuts from space

Conservation scientists can use free satellite imagery to track invasive plant species on remote Pacific islands, according to new research.

9h

A molecular hammock for cotranslational modification

Proteins do most of the real work in cells and are modified in accordance with functional requirements. An LMU team has now shown how proteins are chemically altered on the ribosome, even before they fold into the active conformations.

9h

Spinifex promises stronger condoms

Spinifex grass could be used to create thinner, stronger latex for gloves and condoms, as well as more durable seals and tyres, an Australian scientist says.

9h

Tech Is Killing Street Food

Rosa Leon works as a tamale vendor in San Jose, California. But she has to do so on the sly, selling only at night. She considered obtaining permits, but she was daunted by the process. Now, the urban farm-and-food nonprofit Veggielution is helping her apply for them. In Bangalore, India, Sukumar N. T. sells gobi Manchurian, a fiery Indian-Chinese dish, from a mobile cart. He’s been on this corne

9h

Cosmic ray telescope launches from Antarctica

The eye of the tiger is flying high above Antarctica once again.

9h

Spectacular flying reptiles soared over Britain's tropical Jurassic past

Spectacular flying reptiles armed with long teeth and claws which once dominated the skies have been rediscovered, thanks to a palaeontology student's PhD research.

9h

Sapphires and rubies in the sky

Researchers at the Universities of Zurich and Cambridge have discovered a new, exotic class of planets outside our solar system. These so-called super-Earths were formed at high temperatures close to their host star and contain high quantities of calcium, aluminium and their oxides—including sapphire and ruby.

9h

Researchers discover the initial stages of the folding mechanism of membrane proteins

An international team including the University of Valencia has proven that the folding of membrane proteins begins before they are inserted into biological membranes, a fact that has been central to biochemical research for decades. The study, published in Nature Communications, was coordinated by Ismael Mingarro, professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

9h

Best Movies (2018): The Essential Films You Didn't See

This year had great blockbusters—'Black Panther'! 'A Star Is Born'!—but there are a few top-notch movies you might've missed.

9h

Glitter-snegl, truet fugl og dragetusindben: Her er tre nye dyr fra 2018

Nogle er farverige og glitrende, mens andre dufter af død. Bliv klogere på nye arter, der alle er undersøgt af danske forskere.

9h

The 160K Natural Organism Library houses a wealth of novel compounds for biological research

A library based at A*STAR containing more than 160,000 biological specimens is a treasure trove of biologically active compounds for wide ranging applications.

9h

TV fiction reflects and reproduces national identities in times of crisis

In times of crisis, TV fiction becomes concerned with changes in the social world, but also with how responses to these changes are visible in a national identity. These conclusions are drawn in a thesis from the university of Gothenburg.

9h

A newly discovered catalyst promises cheaper hydrogen production

A new catalyst could dramatically decrease the cost of producing hydrogen, one of the cleanest renewable fuels. Based on molybdenum sulfide, the catalyst was developed by a group at the A*STAR Institute of Materials Research and Engineering, led by Shi Jie Wang.

9h

Scientists synthesize molecule capable of eliminating hepatitis C virus

The compound called GA-Hecate also acts on bacteria, fungi and cancer cells and will be tested against Zika and yellow fever viruses.

9h

The coming of age of plasma physics

The story of the generation of physicists involved in the development of a sustainable energy source, controlled fusion, using a method called magnetic confinement.

9h

Austerity results in 'social murder' according to new research

The consequence of austerity in the social security system — severe cuts to benefits and the 'ratcheting up' of conditions attached to benefits — is 'social murder', according to new research.

9h

Preventing concrete bridges from falling apart

A new study examines the adverse effects of the adsorption of natural gas constituents found in our environment — and mixtures of several such gases — into one of the materials that make up concrete: cement hydrate. The author found that the preservation of concrete infrastructure from the corrosive effects would require effective pre-treatment.

9h

Leveraging the power of CRISPR-Cas9 to awaken antibiotics from their silent gene clusters

The bacterium Streptomyces roseosporus is the source of many common antibiotics such as daptomycin, which is active against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and glycopeptide-resistant enterococci. A*STAR researchers have just unearthed a new antibiotic, auroramycin, from a silent biosynthetic gene cluster discovered in the S. roseosporus genome, and believe there are many more ju

9h

No mistaking Australian steak – food agility project tackles food fraud

Three tonnes of Australian beef packed in Casino NSW and bound for China is being tracked and verified using blockchain and Internet of Things technologies.

9h

Climate change is putting wildlife at risk in the world's oldest lake

Climate change and human disturbance are putting wildlife in the world's oldest and deepest lake at risk, according to a new study by the University of Nottingham and University College London.

9h

New study touts agricultural, environmental benefits of biochar

The many benefits of a biomass-made material called biochar are highlighted in a new publication in which Ghasideh Pourhashem, assistant professor at NDSU's Department of Coatings and Polymeric Materials and Center for Sustainable Materials Science, is the lead author.

9h

Why does nuclear fission produce pear-shaped nuclei?

Nuclear fission is a process in which a heavy nucleus split into two. Most of the actinides nuclei (plutonium, uranium, curium, etc) fission asymmetrically with one big fragment and one small. Empirically, the heavy fragment presents on average a xenon element (with charge number Z=54) independently from the initial fissioning nucleus. To understand the mechanism that determines the number of prot

9h

The potential of nanomaterials to activate the body's antitumor immune response investigated

The importance of research into the role of the immune system in the development and therapy of oncological diseases was emphasized by the Royal Swedish Academy, which recently named James Allison and Tasuku Honjo recipients of the 2018 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for launching an effective new way to attack cancer by treating the immune system rather than the tumor. In recent decades, i

9h

Juul Closes Deal with Tobacco Giant AltriaMarlboro Juul Altria

Altria is paying $12.8 billion to acquire a 35 percent stake of the popular vaping start-up. Public health advocates criticized the union.

9h

‘It Satisfies Every Childlike Curiosity’

Editor’s Note: Fifty years ago this month, the three-man crew of Apollo 8 swung around the moon’s far side and encountered a vision never before seen by human eyes: the sunlit Earth, juxtaposed against an ashen lunar plain, and a backdrop of infinite black space. Frank Borman, Apollo 8’s commander, has expressed frustration that he and his fellow astronauts failed to convey, with words, the cosmi

9h

Is It Unethical to Give Your Cat Catnip?

Catnip can induce changes in cat behavior. An expert argues that giving it to cats raises questions about human power and animal autonomy.

9h

Robots with sticky feet can climb up, down, and all around

Researchers have created a micro-robot whose electroadhesive foot pads, inspired by the pads on a gecko's feet, allow it to climb on vertical and upside-down conductive surfaces, like the inside walls of a commercial jet engine. Groups of them could one day be used to inspect complicated machinery and detect safety issues sooner, while reducing maintenance costs.

9h

Chemical catalyst turns 'trash' into 'treasure,' making inert C-H bonds reactive

New research demonstrates the ability to use a dirhodium catalyst to selectively functionalize C-H bonds in a streamlined manner, while also maintaining virtually full control of the three-dimensional shape of the molecules produced.

9h

Researchers develop gold-complexed ferrocenyl phosphines as potent antimalarials

A team of researchers from the Singapore University of Technology and Design (SUTD) and Nanyang Technological University (NTU) have developed novel ferrocene-based molecules that impair the malaria parasite's metabolic function leading to parasite death.

9h

Analyzing 3-D neutron polarization under high pressure

A joint research team consisting of NIMS, JAEA and the Institut Laue Langevin has developed a high-pressure cell composed of completely nonmagnetic materials. The team then succeeded for the first time in analyzing neutron polarization in three dimensions at an extremely high pressure of several gigapascals using the cell. This technique is applicable to detailed analysis of electron spin arrangem

9h

What Winter Solstice Rituals Tell Us About Indigenous People

For indigenous peoples, winter solstice has been a time to honor their ancient sun deity. Their rituals reveal a deep understanding of the natural world, from the mounds of Cahokia to the games of Blackfeet Indians.

9h

Bacterial protein can hunt smartphone materials

A newly discovered protein could help detect, target, and collect the rare-earth metals used in smartphones, report researchers. Two new studies describe the protein, which is 100 million times better at binding to lanthanides—the rare-earth metals in smartphones and other technologies—than to other metals like calcium. The first study, which appears in the Journal of the American Chemical Societ

10h

Small changes in oxygen levels have big implications for ocean life

Oceanographers have found that even slight levels of ocean oxygen loss, or deoxygenation, have big consequences for tiny marine organisms called zooplankton.

10h

Targeted treatment slows progression of rare connective tissue tumor

A drug called sorafenib stopped progression of desmoid tumors for 80 percent of patients taking the drug over a two-year period as part of a phase 3 trial.

10h

Satellite study proves global quantum communication will be possible

Researchers in Italy have demonstrated the feasibility of quantum communications between high-orbiting global navigation satellites and a ground station, with an exchange at the single photon level over a distance of 20,000 km. The milestone experiment proves the feasibility of secure quantum communications on a global scale, using the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS).

10h

Diabetes drug could be used to treat common heart failure syndrome

Researchers have discovered that metformin, a drug commonly used to treat type 2 diabetes, might also be used to treat a common heart failure syndrome that is predicted to affect over 8 percent of people ages 65 or older by the year 2020. The study shows that metformin relaxes a key heart muscle protein called titin, allowing the heart to properly fill with blood before pumping it around the body.

10h

Nightlights for stream dwellers? No, thanks

When the critters that live in and around streams and wetlands are settling into their nighttime routines, streetlights and other sources of illumination filter down through the trees and into their habitat, monkeying with the normal state of affairs, according to new research.

10h

The oldest large-sized predatory dinosaur comes from the Italian Alps

Early Jurassic predatory dinosaurs are very rare, and mostly small in size. Saltriovenator zanellai, a new genus and species is the oldest known ceratosaurian, and the world's largest (1 ton) predatory dinosaur from the Lower Jurassic (Sinemurian, ~198 Mya).

10h

TSA airport security screening will get a lot more accurate just in time for some holiday travelers

Airport security is getting an upgrade. Soon, instead of stepping into cylindrical body scanners and staying perfectly still with hands overhead, travelers will be able to pass through an open-sided scanner that works much more quickly, NBC News reported Monday.

10h

10h

The EU just finalized an agreement to ban tons of single-use plastics

Environment What next? In Brussels on Wednesday, EU leaders signed a provisional agreement to ban 10 major single-use plastic products and mandate cleanup of other items.

10h

How climate change is affecting small Sierra Nevada lakes

Scientists at the University of California, Davis, are taking the temperature—and other measurements—of lakes of all sizes and shapes throughout the mountains of California to see how climate change is affecting them and what, perhaps, can be done about it.

10h

Winter Cycling Gear: Jackets, Waterproof Pants, Gloves, Lights

Just because it's bitter and nasty outside doesn’t mean you have to ride the bus. Stock up on this list of helmets, jackets, and warm stuff.

10h

Uber's Self-Driving Cars Are Back on Pittsburgh StreetsUber Self Pittsburgh

Nine months after an Uber self-driving car killed a woman in Arizona, the company has resumed testing in Pittsburgh.

10h

We've Got the Screen Time Debate All Wrong. Let's Fix It

The narrative around tech addiction has been driven more by fear than facts. But that's finally starting to change.

10h

Hacking Diplomatic Cables Is Expected. Exposing Them Is Not

Spies try to access government communications all the time. But an incident this week tested the limits of what happens when those compromises get discovered.

10h

Researchers use DNA nanomachines to discover subgroups of lysosomes

The story of the lysosome is a classic smear campaign. Once dismissed as the garbage disposal of the cell—it does break down unneeded cell debris—it is now valued by scientists who realized all that dirty work also controls survival, metabolism, longevity and even neurodegenerative diseases.

10h

Carbon labeling can reduce greenhouse gases even if it doesn't change consumer behavior

In a new commentary piece published Dec. 18 in Nature Climate Change, Michael Vandenbergh, David Daniels Allen Distinguished Professor of Law and director of the Climate Change Research Network, examines how carbon labeling can help reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in a variety of ways. The article, "From Myths to Action," is coauthored by Kristian Steensen Nielsen of the Copenhagen Business

10h

Is a refrigerated food chain a net win or loss for climate emissions?

Few inventions have had a greater impact on our daily lives, and especially on the food we eat, than refrigeration.

10h

There Is No Such Thing as Conscious Thought

Philosopher Peter Carruthers insists that conscious thought, judgment and volition are illusions. They arise from processes of which we are forever unaware — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

10h

Russian Scientists Hope to Restore Ice Age Steppe with 'Pleistocene Park.' Will It Work?

Russian scientists are bringing back ancient grasslands in Siberia.

10h

Self-driving rovers tested in Mars-like Morocco

Robots invaded the Sahara Desert for Europe's largest rover field test, taking place in a Mars-like part of Morocco. For two weeks three rovers and more than 40 engineers tested automated navigation systems at up to five different sites.

11h

Nasa's InSight deploys 'Marsquake' instrument

The InSight mission begins to lay out the sensors that will listen to the Red Planet's "heartbeat".

11h

Higher radiation dose needed to X-ray obese patients increases cancer risk

Extremely obese people are needing a far higher dose of radiation during x-ray examinations than people of normal weight, increasing their risk of cancer, new research has shown.

11h

Newborn insects trapped in amber show first evidence of how to crack an egg

Fossilised newborns, egg shells, and egg bursters preserved together in amber provide the first direct evidence of how insects hatched in deep time, according to a new article published today in the journal Palaeontology.

11h

Improving crop yields while conserving resources

When it comes to the health of the planet, agriculture and food production play an enormous role. According to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, roughly 37 percent of land worldwide is used for agriculture and food production, and 11 percent of the Earth's land surface is used specifically for crop production. Finding ways to make agriculture more sustainable and efficie

11h

These Baby Sharks Swim from One Uterus to Another to Eat Their Unfertilized Siblings

The little sharks swim around inside their mom, switching between her multiple uteruses. When they get hungry they eat her unfertilized eggs.

11h

Ancient Aramaic Incantation Describes 'Devourer' that Brings 'Fire' to Victims

The stone container dates back 2,800 years and is inscribed with scorpions and centipedes as well as the incantation.

11h

Researchers develop non-destructive method to measure the salt content of concrete structures

Researchers from the RIKEN Center for Advanced Photonics (RAP) have used a method, using the RANS compact neutron source, to non-destructively measure the salt content of structures such as bridges, tunnels, and elevated roadways, which can suffer from degradation due to exposure to salt from seawater and other sources.

11h

Q&A: Tracking the history of El Niño

In December 2018, forecasters announced a high likelihood that this winter will bring El Niño, which occurs when unusually warm Pacific waters create changes in weather patterns around the world. The phenomenon causes predictable fluctuations in temperature, winds and rainfall, and can be an important indicator for crop yields. But what do we really know about El Niño beyond contemporary times? Ho

11h

Development of MEMS sensor chip equipped with ultra-high quality diamond cantilevers

A NIMS-led research group succeeded in developing a high-quality diamond cantilever with among the highest quality (Q) factor values at room temperature ever achieved. The group also succeeded for the first time in the world in developing a single crystal diamond microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) sensor chip that can be actuated and sensed by electrical signals. These achievements may populari

11h

London tester intelligente overvågningskameraer

Politistyrkerne i London afprøver overvågningskameraer, som kan genkende og gemme ansigter.

11h

The 21 (and Counting) Biggest Facebook Scandals of 2018Mark Zuckerberg Facebook

Bet you already forgot half of Facebook's crises this year.

11h

The 'Future Book' Is Here, but It's Not What We Expected

Visionaries thought technology would change books. Instead, it's changed everything about publishing a book.

11h

A SpaceX Booster Went for a Swim and Came Back as Scrap Metal

The space company spent several days retrieving and inspecting a rocket booster that made an unplanned ocean landing. Now it appears to be toast.

11h

DNA from ancient aboriginal Australian remains enables their repatriation

For many decades, Aboriginal Australians have campaigned for the return of ancestral remains that continue to be stored in museums worldwide.

11h

Thermal energy storage: Material absorbs heat as it melts and releases it as it solidifies

MIT researchers have demonstrated a new way to store unused heat from car engines, industrial machinery, and even sunshine until it's needed. Central to their system is what the researchers refer to as a "phase-change" material that absorbs a large amount of heat as it melts and releases it as it resolidifies.

11h

The battle over new nerve cells in adult brains intensifies

It’s not yet time to abandon the idea that adult human brains make new nerve cells.

11h

How busting some moves on the dance floor is good for your brain

Whether you do the robot, shake your tail feather or go full ballroom, dancing has benefits that go way beyond having a good time

11h

Rogue drones have brought Gatwick airport to a standstillUK Gatwick Airport

Tens of thousands of passengers are unable to travel as drones were spotted flying near Gatwick Airport, UK. Police have yet to find the perpetrators

11h

Newborn insects trapped in amber show first evidence of how to crack an egg

Fossilised newborns, egg shells, and egg bursters preserved together in amber provide the first direct evidence of how insects hatched in deep time, according to a new article published today in the journal Palaeontology.

11h

11h

3-D Printing on Mars

It could make the vital job of building the habitats settlers need to stay alive vastly easier — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

Life on Mars: Will humans trash the planet like we have Earth?

Mountains of garbage, plastics that take thousands of years to disintegrate, oil spills in pristine environments from drilling into the soil or underneath the ocean: When we go to Mars, is it inevitable we'll repeat the same mistakes on Earth?

11h

Apollo 8, 50 Years Later: The Greater Leap

The first flight to take astronauts around the moon looms larger than the first to land — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

Ny supercomputer placerer Danmark i øverste liga inden for life science

Danmarks Tekniske Universitet (DTU) og Københavns Universitet (KU) sikrer Danmark en ny supercomputer….

11h

Dansk undersøgelse virkede: EU forbyder fire phthalater

Dansk undersøgelse af sundhedsskadelig kemi i toåriges hverdag fører til en begrænsning, der reelt vil virke som et forbud.

11h

Professor gruer for gratis adgang til forskningsartikler

Danske videnskabsfolk råber vagt i gevær over utilsigtede konsekvenser ved en plan, som vil give gratis adgang til offentligt finansieret forskning inden 2020.

11h

Molecule discovery holds promise for gene therapies for psoriasis

Scientists at the University of Birmingham have discovered a protein that could hold the key to novel gene therapies for skin problems including psoriasis – a common, chronic skin disease that affects over 100 million people worldwide.

12h

Parkinson's disease protein buys time for cell repair

Loss of the protein Parkin causes certain forms of Parkinson's disease, a neurodegenerative condition involving death of neurons.Walter and Eliza Hall Institute researchers in Australia showed that Parkin stifles cell death by blocking BAK, a protein which is a central player in cell death.Understanding the interactions between Parkin and BAK may lead to new therapeutic approaches to slow the prog

12h

Google misleads kids and parents about apps, complaint filed with FTC says

Accusing Google of misleading practices about kids' apps, nearly two dozen child- and consumer-advocacy groups on Wednesday asked the FTC to investigate the Android maker.

11min

The Criminal-Justice Bill Had Broad Bipartisan Support and Still Almost Died

Though it’s a fairly modest measure with exceedingly broad support, the criminal-justice bill passed by the Senate on Tuesday evening barely made it out alive. Its near-demise illustrates how extreme partisanship and the permanent campaign have made reform legislation require a perfect storm in Washington. “It has died a thousand times and had life breathed back into it a thousand and one times,”

14min

There’s No Real System to Counter Rogue Drones

Aeromexico Flight 773 from Guadalajara was just about to land last week when crew members heard a “pretty loud bang,” according to a cabin recording. A mysterious aerial collision had left the nose of the passenger jet badly mangled. By the time it landed safely in Tijuana, there was no confirmed culprit but one likely suspect: a drone. If confirmed, the incident would represent one of a very sma

14min

The 27 Best Music Moments of 2018

Editor’s Note : Find all of The Atlantic ’s “Best of 2018” coverage here . It’s harder than ever to hear music in a vacuum. In this info-swamped era, the sound coming out of the speakers will be processed in the context of broad stories ( uh oh, is this song about Robert Mueller? ), and personal ones ( uh oh, is this song about my ex? ). The list below includes many of our favorite tunes of 2018,

14min

Dinosaurs are alive! Here’s how we know, and why it matters

For most of the 20th century, figuring out the origin of birds was a great challenge of evolutionary biology — they didn't seem to fit anywhere. Then, in the late 20th century, a group of scientists discovered that birds evolved from theropod dinosaurs, which were large, bipedal meat-eaters like the Velociraptor or the T-Rex. The bird-from-dinosaur theory was considered to be a crackpot idea but

16min

France fines Uber 400,000 euros over huge data breach

France's data protection agency said Thursday that it had fined the US ride-hailing group Uber 400,000 euros ($460,000) over a 2016 data breach that exposed the personal data of some 57 million clients and drivers worldwide.

29min

Look Back at How Much Space News Got Packed Into 2018

Many of the stories this year that kept our eyes pointed toward the stars, no matter what was happening on the ground.

35min

What We Learned in 2018: Health and Medicine

Developments in medicine and health that we’re still thinking about at year’s end.

35min

What We Learned in 2018: Science

Developments in science that we’re still thinking about at year’s end.

35min

Nebraska virologists discover safer potential Zika vaccine

In mouse trials, a vaccine based on recombinant Adenovirus protected against Zika without evidence of antibodies. Reports have shown Zika antibodies can worsen Dengue virus infection.

58min

Embattled Noble Group completes $3.5 bn overhaul

Embattled commodities trader Noble Group has completed a $3.5 billion restructuring, it said Thursday, as the firm seeks to draw a line under a long-running crisis that pushed it to the brink of bankruptcy.

1h

Then one foggy Christmas eve, reindeers got connected

Rudolph and friends no longer need to rely on the famous reindeer's red nose to avoid getting lost. Now they have wireless technology.

1h

Nu skal 85.000 solcelleejere afregnes efter omstridt model

En ny afregningsmetode vil forringe vilkårene for de solcelleejere, der indtil nu er blevet årsafregnet. Retssag på vej.

1h

Midtjylland har fundet ny regionsdirektør

Pernille Blach Hansen bliver ny regionsdirektør i Region Midtjylland.

2h

S. Korea cab drivers protest Uber-like ride share app

Tens of thousands of taxi drivers in South Korea went on a nationwide strike Thursday, snarling up traffic in Seoul, in the latest protest at a planned Uber-like ride-sharing service.

2h

At Jesus's birthplace, an app is born to ease crowds

Bethlehem is buzzing, with more tourists expected this Christmas than have visited the Biblical city in years, causing the kind of problem that modern technology was almost born to deal with.

2h

Argentina puts 65-million-year-old dinosaur replica on display

Argentine paleontologists unveiled on Wednesday the replica of a 65-million-year-old skeleton of a plesiosaur marine reptile found in a Patagonian lake in 2009.

2h

Japan 'mulling IWC withdrawal' to resume commercial whaling

Japan is considering pulling out of the International Whaling Commission (IWC), officials told AFP on Thursday, as Tokyo reportedly gears up to resume commercial whaling activity next year.

2h

100 years ago, airmail took flight

On December 25, 1918 a daring French industrialist launched the world's first ever airmail service, flying between the southwestern French city of Toulouse and Barcelona in northeastern Spain.

2h

Smiling at danger, China's finless porpoise fights to survive

In an oxbow lake along the middle reaches of the Yangtze River, a breathy sigh pierces the surface stillness as one of China's most endangered animals comes up for a gulp of hazy air.

2h

Pinterest planning 2019 stock market debut: report

Popular online bulletin board Pinterest is getting ready for a stock market debut early next year at a valuation of $12 billion or more, according to a Wall Street Journal report.

2h

Shares in SoftBank mobile unit rebound after earlier plunge

Shares in the mobile unit of Japanese technology giant SoftBank rebounded after steep early declines on a rollercoaster second trading day Thursday, after a bruising debut saw stocks close 14.5 percent lower.

2h

Astronauts land from ISS stint marred by air leak, rocket failure

Three astronauts landed back on Earth on Thursday after a troubled stint on the ISS marred by an air leak and the failure of a rocket set to bring new crew members.

2h

Travelers face chaos as drones shut London's Gatwick airportLondon Gatwick Airport

Thousands of passengers were delayed, diverted or stuck on planes Thursday as the only runway at Britain's Gatwick Airport remained closed into a second day after drones were spotted over the airfield.

2h

Building a sustainable future, one brick at a time

This is due to balanced 'electrochemical' reduction and oxidation processes occurring inside the brick at the two faces. As long as electrodes at these faces are at different temperatures, the electrochemical reactions occur and electricity is generated. The compounds inside are not consumed, do not run out and can never be overcharged. As long as there is a temperature difference there can be ele

2h

Chemical synthesis breakthrough holds promise for future antibiotics

University of Colorado Boulder chemistry researchers have developed a novel way to synthesize and optimize a naturally-occurring antibiotic compound that could one day be used to fight lethal drug-resistant infections such as Staphylococcus aureus, commonly known as MRSA.

2h

2018’s weirdest stories: Friendly horses, toddler robots and moonmoons

New Scientist has covered some strange scientific findings this year. Here is our round-up of the weirdest and wackiest

3h

Gladsaxe arbejder videre på overvågningsalgoritme – trods nej fra ministerium

Afslag på frikommune-ansøgning og regeringens nylige udmelding om at ligge modellen i skuffen får ikke kommunen til stoppe arbejdet.

4h

Giving birth associated with 14 percent higher risk of heart disease and stroke

Giving birth is associated with a 14 percent higher risk of heart disease and stroke compared to having no children, reports a study published today in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, a journal of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC).

4h

Legislative Alchemy 2018: Chiropractors rebranding as primary care physicians continues

Chiropractors are not properly educated and trained to be primary care physicians. Yet, their campaign to rebrand themselves as PCPs via legislation continues.

5h

Rødgran, nordmann, øko eller i potte: Her er din juletræsguide

Og helt ærligt: Det gør ikke den store forskel for klima eller miljø, hvad du vælger. Så længe det ikke er plastik, siger forsker.

5h

The joy of giving lasts longer than the joy of getting

The happiness we feel after a particular event or activity diminishes each time we experience that event, a phenomenon known as hedonic adaptation. But giving to others may be the exception to this rule, according to research forthcoming in Psychological Science , a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.

5h

Chemical synthesis breakthrough holds promise for future antibiotics

University of Colorado Boulder chemistry researchers have developed a novel way to synthesize and optimize a naturally-occurring antibiotic compound that could one day be used to fight lethal drug-resistant infections such as Staphylococcus aureus, commonly known as MRSA.

5h

Development of MEMS sensor chip equipped with ultra-high quality diamond cantilevers

A NIMS-led research group succeeded in developing a high-quality diamond cantilever with among the highest quality (Q) factor values at room temperature ever achieved. The group also succeeded for the first time in the world in developing a single crystal diamond microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) sensor chip that can be actuated and sensed by electrical signals. These achievements may populari

5h

Always tired? Your immune system may be overactive.

Chronic fatigue syndrome affects millions of people worldwide, but scientists still aren't quite sure what causes it. A new study tracked people suffering from Hepatitis C (HCV) as they underwent a treatment course. The results showed that people with overactive immune responses developed chronic fatigue months following the treatment, and that the fatigue persisted even after their immune respon

6h

Vind med Ingeniørens julekalender: 20. december

Vær med i Ingeniørens julekalender 2018. Hver dag med nye præmier!

7h

The Grimch: Marathon Results!

Congratulations Eyewirers on a New Marathon Record! You finished this Grimchy green cell in an astonishing 2 hours 23 minutes! After finishing this first cell, you continued with your holiday cube cheer and finished a second marathon cell in 11 hours 13 minutes! Cheers to Cubes!

7h

Trilobites: The Bullet Lodged in His Knee. Then the Injuries Really Began.

In an unusual medical case, a bullet left in the knee of a patient for 14 years led to joint damage and lead poisoning.

9h

Juul May Get Billions in Deal With One of World’s Largest Tobacco Companies

A deal between the e-cigarette start-up and Altria, the maker of Marlboros, would create a powerful partnership in marketing and lobbying.

9h

Top Cancer Doctor Resigns as Editor of Medical Journal

Dr. José Baselga, the former chief medical officer of Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, was asked to resign after he failed to disclose corporate ties in dozens of scientific articles.

9h

Planetary astronomers identify cycle of spectacular disturbances at Jupiter's equator

New research finds a pattern of unique events at Jupiter's equator.

10h

Are the late Stephen Hawking's religious beliefs typical of U.K. scientists?

The late Stephen Hawking famously didn't believe in God. Neither does the renowned Richard Dawkins. But is that typical for U.K. scientists?

10h

Aggressive behavior brings emotional pain to the sadist

Sadists derive pleasure or enjoyment from another person's pain, yet new research shows that sadistic behavior ultimately deprives the sadists of happiness.

10h

Warning against 'volcano tourism' risks

Thrill-seeking tourists are putting themselves in danger getting too close to volcanoes.

10h

Tornado Touches Down Near Seattle, Causing Damage But No Deaths

The Port Orchard twister was extremely rare, especially for December, says the National Weather Service. No serious injuries were reported, but homes and other buildings were affected by the storm. (Image credit: Ted S. Warren/AP)

10h

New study reveals 'startling' risk of stroke

Globally, one in four people over age 25 is at risk for stroke during their lifetime, according to a new scientific study. Researchers found a nearly five-fold difference in lifetime stroke risk worldwide, with the highest risk in East Asia and Central and Eastern Europe, and lowest in sub-Saharan Africa. The lifetime stroke risk for 25-year-olds in 2016 ranged from 8 percent to 39 percent, depend

10h

Extinction Rebellion: The story behind the activist group

They've blocked bridges, held die-ins and closed roads – all in the name of stopping climate change.

10h

Satellite study proves global quantum communication will be possible

Researchers in Italy have demonstrated the feasibility of quantum communications between high-orbiting global navigation satellites and a ground station, with an exchange at the single photon level over a distance of 20,000km.The milestone experiment proves the feasibility of secure quantum communications on a global scale, using the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS). It is reported in ful

10h

The Atlantic Daily: From the Brink

What We’re Following Facing Facebook: For years, Facebook has been sharing user data, including private messages, with other large technology platforms including Netflix, Spotify, and Microsoft’s Bing search engine, according to a New York Times report. Few of these data-sharing partnerships have even proven useful for Facebook, writes Alexis Madrigal, and the revelations are, most of all, a test

10h

Carrying Tasers increases police use of force, study finds

A new study has found that London police officers visibly armed with electroshock 'Taser' weapons were more likely to be assaulted, and used force 48% more often, than those on unarmed shifts.

11h

Warming warning over turtle feminization

Up to 93% of green turtle hatchlings could be female by 2100, as climate change causes "feminisation" of the species, new research suggests.

11h

Matter can travel to the future thru black holes, predicts new theory

Scientists calculate that black holes don't have singularities at their centers. Instead, the theory of loop quantum gravity predicts that black holes shoot out matter across the galaxy. The matter dispersal comes much later in the future. None Black holes are undoubtedly weird enough to imagine but two recent papers say we don't understand how they work at all. They go against the previous theor

11h

This is why rocket launches always get delayed

Space Weather, weather, and sometimes boats. Four different rocket launches were scheduled to take off on Tuesday, and exactly none of those rockets actually took off.

12h

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: A Look Back at the Year in Politics: Gun Control, Gingrich, and the Georgia Governor's Race

Another year in American politics is coming to a close, and what a year it’s been! We saw congressional investigations, turmoil in the administration, debates over consequential policy issues such as immigration and health care, and midterm elections with record-high turnout. For the rest of the week, instead of our usual newsletter format, we’ll be sharing a selection of some of The Atlantic ’s

12h

New study reveals 'startling' risk of stroke

Globally, one in four people over age 25 is at risk for stroke during their lifetime, according to a new scientific study.Researchers found a nearly five-fold difference in lifetime stroke risk worldwide, with the highest risk in East Asia and Central and Eastern Europe, and lowest in sub-Saharan Africa. The lifetime stroke risk for 25-year-olds in 2016 ranged from 8 percent to 39 percent, dependi

12h

Lawsuit adds to Facebook woes on data protectionFacebook Netflix Spotify

Facebook's woes mounted Wednesday as it faced a lawsuit alleging privacy violations related to data leaked to a consultancy working on Donald Trump's 2016 campaign, and as a new report suggested it shared more data with partners than it has acknowledged.

12h

10 atheist quotes that will make you question religion

Belief systems arise to address the time and social conditions of each era and culture. Your relationship to your community and environment is very influential in what you believe. Neuroscience explains many of the questions as to why we believe in the first place. None When I was studying for my degree in religion, I was most fascinated by what people believe. The fact that members of the same s

13h

You Gotta Scratch That Itch

A particular set of brain neurons may be behind registering itch and inducing us to scratch. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

13h

Facebook gave Spotify and Netflix access to users’ private messagesFacebook Netflix Spotify

The report is based on internal documents and interviews with former employees of Facebook and its corporate partners. It shows how Facebook gave more than 100 tech companies access to user data that goes beyond the scope that the social media giant had previously disclosed. Below are some tips for how you can prevent Facebook from sharing your personal data. None A new report shows how Facebook

13h

Number of Pets in Infancy Tied to Lower Allergy Risk

A study finds the effect is dose-dependent, with each additional pet further lowering the odds of developing allergies.

13h

A Devious Phishing Scam Targets Apple App Store Customers

Be on the lookout for emails that claim to be from the App Store.

13h

Big Pharma Picks up on Medical Marijuana

A Novartis subsidiary is partnering with a Canadian cannabis company to sell medical marijuana worldwide.

13h

FACT CHECK: Facebook defines 'permission' looselyFacebook Netflix Spotify

Facebook gave companies such as Apple, Amazon and Yahoo extensive access to users' personal data, effectively exempting them from the company's usual privacy rules, according to a New York Times report .

13h

After big earthquake, aftershocks continue to rattle Alaska

Nearly three weeks after a 7.0-magnitude earthquake shook up southcentral Alaska, the state continues to register frequent aftershocks.

13h

Should you be for-profit or nonprofit? Why not both?

Over the past fifteen years, I've had the opportunity to provide strategy for well over a hundred social change start-ups seeking to make the world a better place. The most common question they ask, "Should we be a for-profit or a nonprofit." My answer, "Why not consider both?" Let's review the advantages and disadvantages. The nonprofit option The nonprofit option is the most popular choice with

13h

Facebook Didn’t Sell Your Data, It Gave It Away

The New York Times has once again gotten its hands on a cache of documents from inside Facebook , this time detailing data-sharing arrangements between the company and other corporations, which had “more intrusive access to users’ personal data than [Facebook] has disclosed” for most of the past decade, the article revealed. Microsoft’s search engine, Bing, got Facebook users’ friends, whether or

13h

Prisoners who are sanctioned more are more likely to re-offend

Many prisons today use sanctions to discipline prisoners, including segregating them from other inmates, transferring them away from other inmates, and removing them from rehabilitation programs. A new longitudinal study that sought to determine the effect of these sanctions on recidivism found that prisoners who had greater exposure to formal sanctions were more likely to re-offend 1, 2, and 3 ye

13h

An Invasive Midge Could Wreak Havoc on Antarctica

The insects have already transformed parts of Signy Island in the South Atlantic Ocean and could drastically change Antarctic ecosystems if introduced by humans.

13h

New research indicates that whale teeth are still present past mid-gestation, which is somewhat surprising

The humpback whale and a handful of similar whale species have a feeding mechanism utterly unique in the animal kingdom.

13h

Facebook’s Privacy Message Undermined by the Times—Again

Facebook has spent much of 2018 apologizing to people. A recent *New York Times* investigation calls all those apologies into question.

13h

To Find Good News In The Universe Just Look To The Clouds

Astrophysicist Adam Frank likes to spread the universe's good news. Today's — the clouds in the sky exhibit a ceaseless power of creative transformation.

14h

Better security achieved with randomly generating biological encryption keys

Data breaches, hacked systems and hostage malware are frequently topics of evening news casts—including stories of department store, hospital, government and bank data leaking into unsavory hands—but now a team of engineers has an encryption key approach that is unclonable and not reverse-engineerable, protecting information even as computers become faster and nimbler.

14h

NASA analyzes newly formed Tropical Cyclone Cilidaa

An infrared look by NASA's Aqua satellite revealed where the strongest storms were located within recently formed Tropical Cyclone Cilida. Cilida formed in the Southern Indian Ocean on Dec. 18.

14h

Deep Beneath Your Feet, They Live in the Octillions

The real journey to the center of the Earth has begun, and scientists are discovering subsurface microbial beings that shake up what we think we know about life.

14h

URI researchers: Small changes in oxygen levels have big implications for ocean life

Oceanographers at the University of Rhode Island have found that even slight levels of ocean oxygen loss, or deoxygenation, have big consequences for tiny marine organisms called zooplankton.

14h

Study finds dinosaurs battled overheating with nasal air-conditioning

Researchers have long wondered how gigantic, heavily armored dinosaurs, such as the club-tailed ankylosaurs that lived in sweltering climates, avoided overheating. Now, as seen in the December 19 issue of PLOS ONE, researchers, led by a paleontologist from New York Institute of Technology College of Osteopathic Medicine at Arkansas State University (NYITCOM at A-State), have posed a new theory.

14h

Invasive asexual midges may upset Antarctica’s delicate moss banks

Fast-multiplying insects with earthworm powers have invaded Antarctica, and scientists are worried about how their waste could affect the continent.

14h

9 jaw-dropping facts about naked mole rats to celebrate the bloody ascent of their new queen

Animals Long may she reign. Naked mole rats are a real freaky bunch, as it turns out.

14h

You can now drag and drop whole countries to compare their size

Our world maps lie to us: North America and Europe aren't really that big and Africa really is much bigger. It's all the fault of Mercator: even if the man himself wasn't necessarily Eurocentric, his projection is. This interactive map tool reveals countries' true sizes without having to resort to the Peters projection. Is Texas really bigger than Poland? Does Russia stretch further east to west

14h

Invasive asexual midges may upset Antarctica’s delicate moss banks

Fast-multiplying insects with earthworm powers have invaded Antarctica, and scientists are worried about how their waste could affect the continent.

14h

New memory study first to use intracranial recordings

Research led by Wayne State University is first memory study to use intracranial recordings to better understand how maturation of the prefrontal cortex drives memory development.

14h

Hardware-software co-design approach could make neural networks less power hungry

Engineers have developed a neuroinspired hardware-software co-design approach that could make neural network training more energy-efficient and faster. Their work could one day make it possible to train neural networks on low-power devices such as smartphones, laptops and embedded devices.

14h

Better security achieved with randomly generating biological encryption keys

Data breaches, hacked systems and hostage malware are frequently topics of evening news casts — including stories of department store, hospital, government and bank data leaking into unsavory hands — but now a team of engineers has an encryption key approach that is unclonable and not reverse-engineerable, protecting information even as computers become faster and nimbler.

15h

Tau protein suppresses neural activity in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease

A study sheds new light on how the hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease — amyloid-beta plaques and neurofibrillary tangles containing the protein tau — produce their damaging effects in the brain.

15h

Edging closer to personalized medicine for patients with irregular heartbeat

Biomedical engineers have determined which patients would benefit the most from a commonly used drug treatment.

15h

Holey graphene as Holy Grail alternative to silicon chips

Novel spintronics applications could stem from introducing holes into graphene to form triangular antidot lattices, granting the material new magnetic properties.

15h

Drugs of abuse: Identifying the addiction circuit

What happens in the brain of a compulsive drug user? Neurobiologists have discovered that the brain circuit connecting the decision-making region to the reward system is stronger in compulsive animals. The researchers also found that by decreasing the activity of this circuit, compulsive mice were able to regain control and that conversely, by stimulating the connection a mouse that initially rema

15h

Climate change affects breeding birds

The breeding seasons of wild house finches are shifting due to climate change, a Washington State University researcher has found.

15h

Loss of intertidal ecosystem exposes coastal communities

Artificial intelligence and extensive satellite imagery have allowed researchers to map the world's intertidal zones for the first time, revealing a significant loss of the crucial ecosystem. The study has shown that global foreshore environments declined by up to 16 percent between 1984 and 2016.

15h

Study offers new view of how cartels work

Less data-sharing among firms can actually lead to more collusion, economists find.

15h

Elon Musk’s Boring Co. unveiled its prototype tunnel. Here are the first reviews.Elon Musk Boring Company

The Boring Company invited journalists to take a test ride on its mile-long prototype tunnel in Hawthorne, California. The tunnel transports regular cars along electric skates at about 35 mph. Although the prototype doesn't match up with early concepts of The Loop, most reviewers seemed to suggest the system could prove viable, once the kinks are smoothed out. None In December 2016, Elon Musk twe

15h

Watch: Headsets track stress as new nurses learn

A new project uses headsets to measure how students’ brains and bodies react in stressful situations. As part of the New York University’s Holodeck Project, Winslow Burleson, a professor in the Rory Meyers College of Nursing, and his SuperComputing Collaboration team are advancing simulation-based education by testing new technologies. “We’re really creating the future of what the next generation

15h

Huge armored dinosaurs battled overheating with nasal air-conditioning

Researchers show that the heavily armored, club-tailed ankylosaurs had a built-in air conditioner in their snouts.

15h

Mortality rates rising for Gens X and Y too

Declining life expectancies in the US include Gen X and Y Americans, in addition to the older Baby Boomers. But the causes of premature mortality vary by race, gender and ethnicity, according to a new study. The researchers examined data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Mortality Multiple Cause Files for the years 1990-2016.

15h

Whale research helps answer long-sought scientific question

Scientists previously determined that fetal humpback whales develop the very beginnings of teeth, but they never erupt from the gums the way they do in human babies. Now, thanks to one SDSU graduate student's research, they have a better understanding of why this occurs.

15h

NASA analyzes newly formed Tropical Cyclone Cilidaa

An infrared look by NASA's Aqua satellite revealed where the strongest storms were located within recently formed Tropical Cyclone Cilida. Cilida formed in the Southern Indian Ocean on Dec. 18.

15h

Process makes stem-cell-derived heart cells light up

A faster, more cost-efficient, and more accurate method of examining the effectiveness of human pluripotent stem-cell-derived cardiac muscle cells has been discovered, according to researchers from Penn State.

15h

We’re creeping back up to mid ‘90s-level gun death rates

Health Nearly 40,000 people died in 2017 from firearms. The 21st century has been fairly smooth sailing as far as gun deaths go, but in the last few years we’ve begun to ruin our track record. Data from the Centers for…

15h

Trilobites: Watch a Robotic Hand Play the Piano With a More Human Touch

It hasn’t mastered Chopin or Debussy, but it can eke out a decent “Jingle Bells.”

15h

Matter: ‘Spirits Won’t Rest’: DNA Links Ancient Bones to Living Aboriginal Australians

Museums around the world hold the remains of Aboriginal Australians, many of them stolen. Now geneticists may have found a way to return the bones to their homes.

15h

Is giving all college students meningitis vaccines worth it?

Vaccinating all new college students against meningitis B may cost too much right now to justify preventing relatively few cases of the sometimes-deadly disease, according to a new study. But a computer model researchers have developed also suggests that if vaccine developers could significantly lower the price, universal vaccination on college campuses might be worthwhile. “Despite the poor prog

15h

Battery-free tags let you control games with your clothes

RFID-embedded clothing could control avatars in video games or tell you when you should sit up straight. Researchers have found ways to track body movements and detect shape changes using arrays of radio-frequency identification (RFID) tags in clothing. RFID tags are nothing new, which is part of their appeal for these applications, says Haojian Jin, a PhD student in Carnegie Mellon University’s

15h

15h

World’s Oldest Flower Unfurled Its Petals More Than 174 Million Years Ago

Dinosaurs that lived during the early Jurassic period could stop and smell the flowers if they so desired, according to a new study that describes the oldest fossil flower on record.

15h

Prisoners who are sanctioned more are more likely to re-offend

A new longitudinal study that sought to determine the effect of these sanctions on recidivism found that prisoners who had greater exposure to formal sanctions were more likely to re-offend 1, 2, and 3 years after release; formal sanctions involve punishment for misconduct after a rules infraction board finds an inmate guilty.

15h

Edging closer to personalized medicine for patients with irregular heartbeat

Biomedical engineer Jon Silva led an international team that determined which patients would benefit the most from a commonly used drug treatment.

15h

Tau protein suppresses neural activity in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease

A study from Massachusetts General Hospital investigators sheds new light on how the hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease — amyloid-beta plaques and neurofibrillary tangles containing the protein tau — produce their damaging effects in the brain.

15h

Better security achieved with randomly generating biological encryption keys

Data breaches, hacked systems and hostage malware are frequently topics of evening news casts — including stories of department store, hospital, government and bank data leaking into unsavory hands — but now a team of engineers has an encryption key approach that is unclonable and not reverse-engineerable, protecting information even as computers become faster and nimbler.

15h

Lower oxygen levels to impact the oceanic food chain

The North Pacific Ocean is losing oxygen, pushing species significant to the marine ecosystem to shallower water where there's more sunlight, higher temperatures and greater risk of predators.

15h

Helping make brain surgery safer

A biopsy needle that can help surgeons identify and avoid blood vessels in the brain during surgery has undergone initial tests in humans.

15h

The Man Who Smelled Like Rancid Creamed Corn to Usher In a New Scientific Era

When the nurse slipped the IV needle into his arm, Matt Sharp was calm. Yes, he knew the risks: As one of the first humans ever to receive the experimental treatment, he could end up with mutant cells running amok in his body. But he was too enamored of the experiment’s purpose to worry about that. For two decades, Sharp had been living with HIV. He’d watched the height of the AIDS crisis claim d

15h

Trump Just Screwed Up the One Thing He Did Better Than Obama

The Trump administration has unexpectedly decided to rapidly withdraw U.S. forces from Syria, where they have been fighting ISIS . This decision, which demonstrates that the president’s National Security Strategy does not govern his policies, will have deleterious effects across the strategic waterfront: throwing Syria policy into chaos; rewarding Iranian regional destabilization and Russian inte

15h

These Dinosaurs' Noses Made Breathing Complicated for a Very Good Reason

About 75 million years ago, in what is now Alberta, Canada, a dinosaur called Euoplocephalus took its final breath. That exhalation, like every other, was fleeting and insubstantial, but eons later, scientists can still reconstruct the path it took out of the dinosaur’s head. And that path, it turns out, was extraordinarily convoluted. Euoplocephalus was one of the ankylosaurs—a group of tank-lik

15h

New environmental watchdog to get legal teeth after Brexit

The new Office for Environmental Protection will have similar enforcement powers to EU regulators.

16h

Contributors

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16h

Sac with spiral surface patterns facilitate substance delivery

Scientists have determined the conditions under which it becomes easier for sac to pass through biological membranes and potentially deliver molecules attached to these them at specific locations.

16h

Precision experiment first to isolate, measure weak force between protons, neutrons

A team of scientists has for the first time measured the elusive weak interaction between protons and neutrons in the nucleus of an atom. They had chosen the simplest nucleus consisting of one neutron and one proton for the study. Through a unique neutron experiment, experimental physicists resolved the weak force between the particles at the atom's core, predicted in the Standard Model that descr

16h

Why is sea level rising faster in some places along the US East Coast than others?

Sea levels are rising globally from ocean warming and melting of land ice, but the seas aren't rising at the same rate everywhere. Sea levels have risen significantly faster in some US East Coast regions compared to others. A new study reveals why.

16h

Researchers make liquid crystals do the twist

Researchers have for the first time measured an effect that was predicted more than 40 years ago, called the Casimir torque.

16h

Sapphires and rubies in the sky

Researchers have discovered a new, exotic class of planets outside our solar system. These so-called super-Earths were formed at high temperatures close to their host star and contain high quantities of calcium, aluminium and their oxides — including sapphire and ruby.

16h

Robot hand that plays Jingle Bells could help us make better limbs

A 3D-printed rigid replica of a human hand can play classic tunes on the piano like Jingle Bells without ever moving individual fingers

16h

The more pets you meet as a baby, the lower your risk of allergies

Children that are exposed to multiple cats and dogs in their first year of life go on to have lower rates of asthma, hay fever and eczema later in life

16h

The Bug-Like HAMR Robot Walks Upside Down Using Electricity

The magic ingredient isn’t glue, or a material that mimics the pad of a gecko’s foot, but voltage. Specifically, electroadhesion.

16h

Can Facebook advertising prevent cancer?

Results from Colorado Cancer Screening Program study shows that text and social media can help to reach hard-to-reach populations with information about colorectal cancer screening

16h

Mortality rates rising for Gens X and Y too

Declining life expectancies in the US include Gen X and Y Americans, in addition to the older Baby Boomers. But the causes of premature mortality vary by race, gender and ethnicity, according to a new study from Duke University. The researchers examined data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Mortality Multiple Cause Files for the years 1990-2016.

16h

Scientists synthesize molecule capable of eliminating hepatitis C virus

The compound called GA-Hecate also acts on bacteria, fungi and cancer cells and will be tested against Zika and yellow fever viruses.

16h

Lower oxygen levels to impact the oceanic food chain

Tiny fish known to survive where most marine life could not, may no longer be able to thrive under diminishing oxygen levels.

16h

Cost to walk away from Facebook for a year? More than $1,000, new study finds

How valuable is Facebook to its users, and how can you measure the value of the site when access is free? Three economists and a social media researcher pooled their work and expertise to assess Facebook's value to its users, in contrast to its market value or its contribution to gross domestic product.

16h

Study shows huge armored dinosaurs battled overheating with nasal air-conditioning

Being a gigantic dinosaur presented some challenges, such as overheating in the Cretaceous sun and frying your brain. Researchers from Ohio University and NYITCOM at Arkansas State show in a new article in PLOS ONE that the heavily armored, club-tailed ankylosaurs had a built-in air conditioner in their snouts.

16h

How to Have Great Sex in a Committed Relationship

Savvy Psychologist Dr. Ellen Hendriksen talks with sex therapist Dr. Stephen Snyder about how to keep the flame burning for years to come — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

16h

Contributors

[no content]

16h

How much money would you want to quit Facebook for a year? Most people say $1,000

Despite all the recent scandals, so many of us still stick with Facebook. This study might explain why.

16h

E-bandage generates electricity, speeds wound healing in rats

Skin has a remarkable ability to heal itself. But in some cases, wounds heal very slowly or not at all, putting a person at risk for chronic pain, infection and scarring. Now, researchers have developed a self-powered bandage that generates an electric field over an injury, dramatically reducing the healing time for skin wounds in rats.

16h

Getting yeast to make artificial sweets

The holiday season can be a time of excess, but low- or no-calorie sweeteners could help merry-makers stay trim. Stevia is a zero-calorie sweetener that is sometimes called 'natural' because it is extracted from the leaves of a South American plant. Now, a report describes a way to prepare large quantities of stevia using yeast, which would cut out the plant middleman and could lead to a better ta

16h

Team locates nearly all US solar panels in a billion images with machine learning

Researchers have identified the GPS locations and sizes of almost all US solar power installations from a billion images. Using the data, which is public, they identified factors that promote the use of solar energy and those that discourage it.

16h

Groups of pilot whales have their own dialects

A new study has found that short-finned pilot whales living off the coast of Hawai'i have their own sorts of vocal dialects, a discovery that may help researchers understand the whales' complex social structure.

16h

Brain confetti: Why our sense of smell declines in old age

As mammals age, their sense of smell deteriorates. Scientists have now investigated why this is the case. For their study, the researchers tracked the development of stem cells in the brains of mice using what are known as confetti reporters. They then analyzed the complex data obtained using intelligent algorithms.

16h

Why natural disasters make men take more risks

The 2011 earthquake in Japan was among the most intense earthquakes to occur in recorded history. Thanks to regularly distributed surveys, however, it also became a unique research opportunity to compare civilians' behaviors from before the earthquake with their behavior after. Now, researchers have found data that suggests being exposed to a natural disaster tends to make men more prone to engag

16h

'Blind' on Climate, Trump Inspires Name for Sightless, Slimy, Worm-Like Creature

A blind, worm-like amphibian species has a new and presidential name.

16h

Storm in a teacup in Britain over eco-friendly bags

Britons are up in arms over new environmentally-friendly teabags that leave a bitter taste in the mouth as they split open, spilling their contents into teacups across the land.

16h

Ryanair wants to sack all Eindhoven-based crew: union

Ryanair has filed for the collective dismissal of all Dutch-based staff at its now shuttered base at Eindhoven airport, a union representing pilots said Wednesday.

16h

Queen guitarist Brian May releases tribute to NASA spacecraft

Jamming and astrophysics go hand-in-hand for Queen lead guitarist Brian May, who announced Wednesday he is releasing a musical tribute to a far-flung NASA spacecraft that is about to make history.

16h

Marmoset monkeys expect the melody's closing tone

In speech and music, words and notes depend on each other. Humans are highly sensitive to such dependencies, but the evolutionary origins of this capacity are poorly understood. Cognitive biologists have conducted playback experiments with common marmoset monkeys and found that sensitivity to dependencies might have been present in the shared ancestor of marmosets and humans.

16h

450 fossilized millipedes found in 100-million-year-old amber

Over 450 millipedes, fossilized in 100-million-year-old Burmese amber, were recently discovered by a research team. Using micro-CT technology, the scientists identified 13 out of the 16 main groups of modern millipedes amongst them. For half of these groups, the findings also represent the oldest known fossils.

16h

Plastic waste disintegrates into nanoparticles

There is a considerable risk that plastic waste in the environment releases nano-sized particles known as nanoplastics, according to a new study. The researchers studied what happened when takeaway coffee cup lids, for example, were subjected to mechanical breakdown, in an effort to mimic the degradation that happens to plastic in the ocean.

16h

Researchers zero in on potential therapeutic target for diabetes, associated diseases

A recent study shows how a novel regulatory mechanism serves as an important biomarker for the development of diabetes, as well as a potential therapeutic target for its prevention.

16h

Twofold overweight risk for five-year-olds given milk cereal drinks in infancy

In five-year-old children, the risk for overweight is almost twice as high if they at 12 months had consumed milk cereal drinks every day, a study in the journal Acta Paediatrica shows.

16h

Lasting impact of concussions on young adults

Researchers have found that young adults who experienced repetitive mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), or concussions, can experience persistent cognitive changes as well as altered brain activity.

16h

Some prehistoric horses were homebodies

A strontium analysis of fossilized horse teeth from Florida found that the animals did not travel far from where they were born. Researchers also found evidence that prehistoric horses fed along the coast like wild horses do today at places like Assateague Island National Seashore.

16h

The secret life of cloud droplets

Do water droplets cluster inside clouds? Researchers confirm two decades of theory with an airborne imaging instrument.

16h

The 25 Most-Read WIRED Stories of 2018

From Facebook to Mueller, from Theranos to Yanny and Laurel, WIRED readers flocked to the articles that defined a new era.

16h

Uber loses UK case on worker rights, expected to appeal

Uber pledged Wednesday to challenge a U.K. Court of Appeal decision that drivers should be classed as workers rather than self-employed employees, a verdict that has potentially wide-ranging implications for the rapidly growing gig economy and the rules that govern it.

16h

Local official sues Facebook over data misuse

The top legal officer in the US capital city has sued Facebook over privacy violations related to personal data leaked to the Cambridge Analytica consultancy working on Donald Trump's 2016 campaign.

16h

NASA finds extreme rainfall in Tropical Cyclone Kenanga

NASA found very cold cloud top temperatures within the Southern Indian Ocean's Tropical Cyclone Kenanga that indicate powerful thunderstorms reaching high into the troposphere. Those storms were generating very heavy rainfall as confirmed by the Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite.

16h

Why is sea level rising faster in some places along the US East Coast than others?

Sea levels are rising globally from ocean warming and melting of land ice, but the seas aren't rising at the same rate everywhere. Sea levels have risen significantly faster in some U.S. East Coast regions compared to others. A new study led by the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) reveals why.

16h

Precision experiment first to isolate, measure weak force between protons, neutrons

A team of scientists has for the first time measured the elusive weak interaction between protons and neutrons in the nucleus of an atom. They had chosen the simplest nucleus consisting of one neutron and one proton for the study.

16h

The coming of age of plasma physics

Once upon a time, people thought that electrons and ions always stuck together, living happily ever after. However, under low density of matter or high temperatures, the components of matter are no longer bound together. Instead, they form plasma, a state of matter naturally occurring in our universe, which has since been harnessed for everyday applications such as TV screens, chip etching and tor

16h

Preventing concrete bridges from falling apart

Extremes of temperature, rain, exposure to corrosive substances—all of these environmental factors contribute to the degradation of concrete. Specifically, a gas present in our environment, called hydrogen sulphide, turns into sulphuric acid, a corrosive substance, when combined with rainwater.

16h

Bacterial protein could help find materials for your next smartphone

A newly discovered protein could help detect, target, and collect from the environment the rare-earth metals used in smartphones. Two new studies by researchers at Penn State describe the protein, which is 100 million times better at binding to lanthanides—the rare-earth metals used in smartphones and other technologies—than to other metals like calcium. The first study, which appears in the Journ

16h

Why is sea level rising faster in some places along the US East Coast than others?

Sea levels are rising globally from ocean warming and melting of land ice, but the seas aren't rising at the same rate everywhere. Sea levels have risen significantly faster in some US East Coast regions compared to others. A new study led by the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) reveals why.

16h

Drugs of abuse: Identifying the addiction circuit

What happens in the brain of a compulsive drug user? Neurobiologists at UNIGE have discovered that the brain circuit connecting the decision-making region to the reward system is stronger in compulsive animals. The researchers also found that by decreasing the activity of this circuit, compulsive mice were able to regain control and that conversely, by stimulating the connection a mouse that initi

16h

Researchers make liquid crystals do the twist

Researchers from the University of Maryland have for the first time measured an effect that was predicted more than 40 years ago, called the Casimir torque.

16h

Loss of intertidal ecosystem exposes coastal communities

Artificial intelligence and extensive satellite imagery have allowed researchers to map the world's intertidal zones for the first time, revealing a significant loss of the crucial ecosystem.The University of Queensland and University of New South Wales study has shown that global foreshore environments declined by up to 16 percent between 1984 and 2016.

16h

Scientists program proteins to pair exactly

Proteins designed in the lab can now zip together in much the same way that DNA molecules zip up to form a double helix. The technique could enable the design of protein nanomachines that can potentially help diagnose and treat disease, allow for the more exact engineering of cells and perform a wide variety of other tasks. This technique provides scientists a precise, programmable way to control

16h

Chemical catalyst turns 'trash' into 'treasure,' making inert C-H bonds reactive

The Nature paper is the latest in a series from Emory University demonstrating the ability to use a dirhodium catalyst to selectively functionalize C-H bonds in a streamlined manner, while also maintaining virtually full control of the three-dimensional shape of the molecules produced.

16h

Are the late Stephen Hawking's religious beliefs typical of U.K. scientists?

The late Stephen Hawking famously didn't believe in God. Neither does the renowned Richard Dawkins. But is that typical for U.K. scientists?

16h

Social animals have more parasite infections but lower infection-related costs

Animals living in large groups tend to have more parasites than less social animals do, but according to a new study in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, they may also be better protected from the negative effects of those parasites.

16h

Peanuts that do more with less water

The beloved peanut usually grows in sandy soil where there might not be much moisture. But some varieties of peanut perform better in drought than others. They use less water when there isn't much to go around, and remain productive as drought deepens. Crop scientists are trying to find the peanut varieties best at it.

16h

Computer hardware designed for 3D games could hold the key to replicating human brain

Researchers have created the fastest and most energy efficient simulation of part of a rat brain using off-the-shelf computer hardware.

17h

RNA proofreading mistakes drive group of autoimmune diseases

Study shows how mistakes in an RNA proofreading system can generate out-of-control interferon signaling, setting off development of autoimmune disease.

17h

Social animals have more parasitic infections but lower infection-related costs

Animals living in large groups tend to have more parasites than less social animals do, but according to a new study, they may also be better protected from the negative effects of those parasites.

17h

Nutrients in blood linked to better brain connectivity, cognition in older adults

A new study links higher levels of several key nutrients in the blood with more efficient brain connectivity and performance on cognitive tests in older adults.

17h

Anticancer vaccines gain new lease of life with personalization techniques

Anticancer vaccines have gained a new lease of life with techniques to personalize them to individual patients. Cutting edge developments in this re-energized field were recently revealed.

17h

Snowed in: Wolves stay put when it's snowing, study shows

Wolves travel shorter distances and move slower during snowfall events, according to new research by University of Alberta biologists. The effects were most pronounced at night, when wolves hunt, and behaviour returned to normal within a day. Wolf tracks across snow in northeastern Alberta.

17h

Groups of pilot whales have their own dialects

In humans, different social groups, cities, or regions often have distinct accents and dialects. Those vocal traits are not unique to us, however. A new study from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) has found that short-finned pilot whales living off the coast of Hawai'i have their own sorts of vocal dialects, a discovery that may help researchers understand the whales' complex social

17h

Austerity results in 'social murder' according to new research

The consequence of austerity in the social security system—severe cuts to benefits and the 'ratcheting up' of conditions attached to benefits—is 'social murder', according to new research by Lancaster University.

17h

Study: Prehistoric horses were homebodies

Unlike today's zebras, prehistoric horses in parts of North America did not make epic migrations to find food or fresh water, according to a new study by the University of Cincinnati.

17h

Restoring canals shown as cost-efficient way to reverse wetland loss

LSU Boyd Professor of Oceanography and Coastal Sciences R. Eugene Turner has determined a cost-effective way to prevent coastal erosion and protect Louisiana's wetlands. Along with LSU alumna and now University of Central Florida Postdoctoral Fellow Giovanna McClenachan, Turner proposes a simple and inexpensive way to fill in canals that were once used for oil and gas mining. Their research was pu

17h

E-bandage generates electricity, speeds wound healing in rats

Skin has a remarkable ability to heal itself. But in some cases, wounds heal very slowly or not at all, putting a person at risk for chronic pain, infection and scarring. Now, researchers have developed a self-powered bandage that generates an electric field over an injury, dramatically reducing the healing time for skin wounds in rats. They report their results in ACS Nano.

17h

New research suggests forests, like humans, require a balanced diet

The world's forests are on a fast food diet of carbon dioxide, which is currently causing them to grow faster. But a researcher at West Virginia University, along with an international team of scientists, finds evidence suggesting that forest growth may soon peak as the trees deplete nitrogen in the soil over longer growing seasons.

17h