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Nyheder2018december22

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The Republican Majority's Last Act: A Government Shutdown

The federal government on Friday evening stood on the verge of its second partial shutdown of the year, as congressional leaders and the White House scrambled to reopen negotiations hours before a midnight deadline. The talks represent the final act of unified Republican control in Washington—and a bookend to showdowns of years past over federal spending and immigration. With President Trump dug

25min

Lean electrolyte design is a game-changer for magnesium batteries

Researchers have discovered a promising new version of high-energy magnesium batteries, with potential applications ranging from electric vehicles to battery storage for renewable energy systems.

4min

Divining Roots: revealing how plants branch out to access water

New research has discovered how plant roots sense the availability of moisture in soil and then adapt their shape to optimise acquisition of water.
A novel mechanism that regulates cellular injury by phagocytes during inflammation

Phagocytes such as macrophages and neutrophils contain multiple lysosomes, which possess a variety of digestive enzymes. Upon stimulation, phagocytes secrete these digestive enzymes through a process called lysosomal exocytosis to lyse external pathogens or tumor cells. A research team has identified myoferlin as a critical regulator of this process. Furthermore, they found that it plays an import

18min

Air pollution in Mexico City is associated with the development of Alzheimer disease

A new study heightens concerns over the evolving and relentless Alzheimer's pathology observed in young Metropolitan Mexico City (MMC) urbanites.

18min

Responsible innovation key to smart farming

Responsible innovation that considers the wider impacts on society is key to smart farming, according to academics. Scientists argue that the concept of responsible innovation should underpin the so-called fourth agricultural revolution, ensuring that innovations also provide social benefits and address potentially negative side-effects.

18min

What helps people live well with dementia

Psychological aspects, such as optimism, self-esteem, loneliness and depression were closely linked to ability to optimize quality of life and wellbeing in both people with dementia and carers. Experience in other areas of life influences psychological well-being and perceptions of living well. Physical health and fitness was important for both groups. For both carers and people with dementia soci

18min

Does alcohol on greeting cards undermine public health messages about harmful drinking?

Birthday and Christmas cards featuring alcohol or harmful drinking 'reflect and reinforce a social attitude that excess alcohol consumption is acceptable and associated with celebration,' warn experts in The BMJ today.

25min

The Atlantic Daily: Departures and Disarray

Programming note: The Daily will take a break on December 24 and December 25, and return each day with selections of the best Atlantic stories from this past year for the remainder of 2018. It’ll be back in full swing on January 2, 2019. What We’re Following Any Given Friday: The White House foreign-policy team is in a bit of disarray—with Defense Secretary James Mattis’s resignation capping off

45min

Female penises evolved twice in bark lice

In a group of bark lice, a penis has evolved twice — in the females. In their nutrient-scarce environment, 'seminal gifts' are an incentive for females to force mating, leading to the co-evolution of female penises and male vaginas.

1h

Laser diode combats counterfeit oil

The olive oil sector has witnessed a rise in fraudulent activities such as falsely labeling inferior products as high quality. To combat this practice, a research team has developed a tool based on laser diodes and chaotic algorithms to detect whether the label on a bottle corresponds or not to the content inside.

1h

How sperm stem cells maintain their number

Researchers have revealed a novel mechanism for stem cell number control.

1h

Oxygen might not lead us to aliens after all

Space A new study shows us why we may want to rethink how we search for extraterrestrial life. A new study published in ACS Earth and Space Chemistry suggests the presence of atmospheric oxygen on another planet is far from a sure sign.

1h

Huge Martian Crater 'Korolev' Appears Topped With Miles Of Pristine Snow

The European Space Agency's new images show a 51-mile-wide ice-filled depression in the surface of Mars caused by the impact of a meteorite or other celestial body. (Image credit: Björn Schreiner/ESA/DLR/FU Berlin)

1h

Gingrich Shut Down the Government in a Fit of Pique 23 Years Ago

I’ve had it in my desk drawer for 23 years: a pink plastic pacifier, tucked into a piece of glossy card stock, with a cartoon of a diaper-clad Newt Gingrich brandishing a baby bottle and stomping his foot, and the caption, Now Boarding … Rows 30-35! It’s a treasured artifact of the 1995 government shutdown, when Gingrich confessed he’d forced the closing of the federal government partly because B

1h

300 blind mice uncover genetic causes of eye disease

Hundreds of new genes linked to blindness and other vision disorders have been identified in a screen of mouse strains. Many of these genes are likely important in human vision and the results could help identify new causes of hereditary blindness in patients.

1h

Genetics of California mountain lions: Research to inform future conservation

Mountain lions in California exhibited strong population genetic structure, and some California populations had extremely low levels of genetic diversity, with some exhibiting estimates as low as the endangered Florida panther.

1h

A safe, wearable soft sensor

Researchers have developed a soft, non-toxic wearable sensor that unobtrusively attaches to the hand and measures the force of a grasp and the motion of the hand and fingers.

1h

Influences of maternal diabetes on fetal heart development

A comprehensive review offers a 'state of the science' look at the impact of maternal diabetes, and potential gene-environmental influences in that context, on fetal heart development.

1h

Surfer's ear points to ancient pearl divers in Panama

Surfer's ear, associated with cold weather and water sports, led a bioarchaeologist at the Smithsonian in Panama to suspect that ancient shoreline residents were diving for pearls in an area of cold-water upwelling.

1h

Take a Number: Long-Acting Contraceptives Gaining Acceptance Among U.S. Women

At any given time, two-thirds of American women aged 15 to 49 are using contraception. More of them are turning to I.U.D.’s and implantable devices.

2h

Gifts for your bearded friends

Gadgets Help your bearded colleagues take control of their facial hair. Gifts for your bearded friends and colleagues to help them take control of their facial hair.

2h

Twisting light to enable high-capacity data transmission

For the first time, researchers have used tiny gears made of germanium to generate a vortex of twisted light that turns around its axis of travel much like a corkscrew. Because germanium is compatible with the silicon used to make computer chips, the new light source could be used to boost the amount of data that can be transmitted with chip-based optical computing and communication.

2h

Droughts boost emissions as hydropower dries up

Recent droughts caused increases in emissions of carbon dioxide and harmful air pollutants from power generation in several western states as fossil fuels came online to replace hampered hydroelectric power. A new study quantifies the impact.

2h

College binge drinkers are posting while drunk, 'addicted' to social media

College students who binge drink are frequently posting on social media while intoxicated and show signs of social media "addiction," according to a new study.

2h

Antibiotic overuse is high for common urology procedures

A new study suggests that antibiotics are being overused in up to 60 percent of patients undergoing common urological procedures. The study shows that the high rates of overuse were mostly due to extended use of antibiotics following the procedure.

2h

People with schizophrenia experience emotion differently from others, 'body maps' show

Researchers are working to understand how people with schizophrenia experience emotion through their bodies.

2h

How dietary fiber and gut bacteria protect the cardiovascular system

The fatty acid propionate helps defend against the effects of high blood pressure, including atherosclerosis and heart tissue remodeling, a study on mice has found. Gut bacteria produce the substance — which calms the immune cells that drive up blood pressure — from natural dietary fiber.

2h

New AI computer vision system mimics how humans visualize and identify objects

Researchers have demonstrated a computer system that can discover and identify the real-world objects it 'sees' based on the same method of visual learning that humans use.

2h

An inside look at the first solo trip to the deepest point of the Atlantic

Science To reach the bottom of all five oceans, this Texas businessman commissioned “the most significant vehicle since Apollo 11.” “Five Deeps" began when Vescovo asked Triton Subs if they could make him a vehicle capable of reaching any point in the world’s oceans. This was a big ask. Three years…

2h

Camera trap study reveals the hidden lives of island carnivores

Researchers placed 160 cameras on 19 of the 22 Apostle Islands in northern Wisconsin to see which carnivores were living there. After taking more than 200,000 photos over a period of three years, the team discovered that several carnivores are living on various islands in this remote archipelago in Lake Superior.

2h

Bees can count with small number of nerve cells in their brains, research suggests

Bees can solve seemingly clever counting tasks with very small numbers of nerve cells in their brains, according to researchers.

2h

Pollutants from wildfires affect crop and vegetation growth hundreds of kilometers from impact zone

The startling extent to which violent wildfires, similar to those that ravaged large swathes of California recently, affect forests and crops way beyond the boundaries of the blaze has been revealed.

2h

Dust threatens Utah's 'greatest snow on earth'

New research found that dust deposition speeds up snowmelt in Utah's Wasatch Mountains. Scientists found that a single dust storm on April 13, 2017, deposited half of all dust for the season. The additional sunlight absorbed by the dust-darkened snow surface led to snow melting a week earlier.

2h

How the Grimch Stole Eyewire: Awards

The Grimch tried his best to foil the site, And he did do some damage, but try as he might, The players played on and on in defiance And taught the Grimch all about citizen science! So now it is time to find out how you scored, Here’s the best of the best, it’s time for awards! Accuracy Happy Hours Grimchy Cubes Games Makers Trivia Fruitcake vs Aspic Marathon Participants

2h

Study examines primary drivers of increased hospitalizations of homeless individuals

A new study led by investigators from Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) and Brigham and Women's Hospital examines patterns, causes and outcomes of acute hospitalizations between 2007 and 2013 for homeless individuals and non-homeless control groups in three populous and diverse U.S. states: Florida, California and Massachusetts.

2h

FDA Cracks Down on Purveyors of Stem Cell Treatments

The agency cites safety concerns with customers of Genetech who reported getting E. coli infections and sends letters to other stem cell companies reminding them to follow the rules.

2h

Holiday asteroid imaged with NASA radar

The December 2018 close approach by the large, near-Earth asteroid 2003 SD220 has provided astronomers an outstanding opportunity to obtain detailed radar images of the surface and shape of the object and to improve the understanding of its orbit.

3h

The brain's support cells show defective development in Huntington's disease

The neurological disorder Huntington's disease causes behavioral and motor changes, which among other things are a result of dysfunctional maturation or formation of glial cells, the brain's support cells, researchers demonstrate in a new study based on mice trials. The researchers' long-term goal is to be able to use the research results to develop a treatment for Huntington's disease using glial

3h

Forecasters may be looking in wrong place when predicting tornadoes

Weather forecasters may be looking in the wrong place when working to issue tornado warnings, new research has demonstrated.

3h

Wildlife struggle to cope with extreme weather

The mass death of flying foxes in extreme heat in North Queensland last month underscores the importance of wildlife research released today. The new research sheds light on how various species have responded to major climate events.

3h

Baby star's fiery tantrum could create the building blocks of planets

A massive stellar flare on a baby star has been spotted by astronomers, shedding light on the origins of potentially habitable exoplanets.

3h

Human blood cells can be directly reprogrammed into neural stem cells

Scientists have succeeded for the first time in directly reprogramming human blood cells into a previously unknown type of neural stem cell. These induced stem cells are similar to those that occur during the early embryonic development of the central nervous system. They can be modified and multiplied indefinitely in the culture dish and can represent an important basis for the development of reg

3h

NASA telescopes take a close look at the brightest comet of 2018

As the brilliant comet 46P/Wirtanen streaked across the sky, NASA telescopes caught it on camera from multiple angles.

3h

Study finds Tropical Cyclone Winston damaged fisheries as well as homes in Fiji

A newly published study by WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society) has found that impacts of Tropical Cyclone Winston on the coastal communities of Fiji went beyond the immediate loss of lives and infrastructure. The cyclone also had a lingering effect on the fisheries many communities depend on, particularly on the availability of commercially important crustaceans.

3h

The World Has A New Largest-Known Prime Number

The Mersenne prime was discovered by a computer in Ocala, Fla., on Dec. 7. Mathematicians have spent the past two weeks verifying the calculations.

3h

The coolest experiment in the universe

NASA's Cold Atom Laboratory on the International Space Station is the first facility in orbit to produce clouds of "ultracold" atoms, which can reach a fraction of a degree above absolute zero. Nothing in nature is known to hit the temperatures achieved in laboratories like CAL, which means the orbiting facility is regularly the coldest known spot in the universe.

3h

NASA's InSight places first instrument on Mars

NASA's InSight lander has deployed its first instrument onto the surface of Mars, completing a major mission milestone. New images from the lander show the seismometer on the ground, its copper-colored covering faintly illuminated in the Martian dusk.

3h

Statins are more effective for those who follow the Mediterranean diet

For those who have already had a heart attack or a stroke, the combination of statins and Mediterranean Diet appears to be the most effective choice to reduce the risk of mortality, especially from cardiovascular causes.

3h

Artificial intelligence system learns to diagnose, classify intracranial hemorrhage

A team of investigators has developed a system using artificial intelligence to quickly diagnose and classify brain hemorrhages and to provide the basis of its decisions from relatively small image datasets.

3h

Why Facebook is developing a cryptocurrency for WhatsApp usersFacebook WhatsApp Bitcoin

Facebook is reportedly developing a stablecoin for WhatsApp users in India. A stablecoin is a class of cryptocurrency that's pegged to a stable asset like fiat currency or gold. India currently has more than 200 million WhatsApp users, and it sees more than $60 billion in global remittances every year. None Facebook is reportedly developing a cryptocurrency that would facilitate financial transac

3h

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Once More Unto the Shutdown

We’re ending the year as it began: with the U.S. government headed toward another shutdown, this time chiefly over funding for President Donald Trump’s proposed border wall. Meanwhile, Defense Secretary Jim Mattis said he will resign at the end of February, citing disagreements with the president over foreign policy. Mattis is just the latest in a long line of senior administration staff, from Jo

3h

Pediatric leukemia 'super drug' could be developed in the coming years

Northwestern Medicine scientists have discovered two successful therapies that slowed the progression of pediatric leukemia in mice, according to three studies published over the last two years in the journal Cell, and the final paper published Dec. 20 in Genes & Development. When a key protein responsible for leukemia, MLL, is stabilized, it slows the progression of the leukemia, the most recent

3h

Eyewire Release Report 12/21/2018

Happy Friday! To give you a comprehensive picture of everything new on Eyewire, here are all changes since the last report a few weeks ago. When competitions are awarded, you should now automatically receive a notification detailing the results! This feature may be tweaked here and there going forward, but we hope you find it useful. Deleting pinned notifications from your notification list shoul

3h

The best science jokes to make you laugh, groan, and Google

Entertainment Why did the bored internet user click on the link? You're about to find out. LOL is not on the Periodic Table.

3h

Q&A: Seafood, in the Pink

Frozen fish often loses its healthy color, even though it’s perfectly good. The culprit: ice crystals.

4h

Study supports safety of overlapping surgery for outpatient orthopaedic procedures

At least for brief periods, overlapping surgery is safe for patients undergoing outpatient or 'same-day' orthopaedic surgery procedures, reports a study in the Dec. 19, 2018 issue of the Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio in partnership with Wolters Kluwer.

4h

The Worrisome Word in Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s Cancer Diagnosis

On Friday, surgeons in New York removed the lower lobe of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s left lung. According to a statement from the Supreme Court, two nodules—which had been discovered in a CT scan after Ginsburg broke three ribs last month—were determined to be malignant. Images before the surgery showed no evidence of cancer elsewhere in her body, and doctors at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer

4h

Trump, Unchecked

Unlike H. R. McMaster, Rex Tillerson, and Nikki Haley, James Mattis was never going to go quietly. He has read too much history and is too cognizant of his duty for that. His letter of resignation was all the more devastating for its understatement. For more than a year, senior administration officials have constructed the fiction that the United States is following a foreign policy of competing

4h

Not Tonight: Why Americans Are Having Less Sex

U up? Nah. (Image credit: barnimages.com / CC BY 2.0)

4h

Inside a Historic Win on Election Day 2018

On Election Day 2018, Malcolm Kenyatta, a third-generation activist from North Philadelphia, hoped to become a Pennsylvania state representative in the 181st District, which has a 26 percent deep-poverty rate. He made history by becoming the first openly LGBT candidate of color elected to state office in Pennsylvania. Tim Harris, a friend of Kenyatta’s from college, had followed the activist’s tr

4h

Study finds Tropical Cyclone Winston damaged fisheries as well as homes in Fiji

A newly published study by WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society) has found that impacts of Tropical Cyclone Winston on the coastal communities of Fiji went beyond the immediate loss of lives and infrastructure. The cyclone also had a lingering effect on the fisheries many communities depend on, particularly on the availability of commercially important crustaceans.

4h

Why a little bit of leftovers really kills our self-control

New research looks at the tendency to overeat when we only have a little bit of food left over—and how we justify it by convincing ourselves that it’s not as unhealthy as it is. “Many of us were raised with this ‘clean your plate’ mentality, stemming from a desire to ensure one is not being wasteful or their children are eating well; however, this can also lead to overconsumption,” says Kelly Haw

4h

Ruth Bader Ginsburg just had cancer surgery—here's why she should be okay

Health The Supreme Court Justice had malignant pulmonary nodes removed. Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg had two cancerous nodules removed from her lung today at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York.

4h

Artificial Intelligence in NBA Basketball

Artificial Intelligence in NBA Basketball Data science and machine learning are helping basketball players up their game. Noah-Sensor-Above-Court.jpg Noah Basketball's camera-based system tracks the arc of a player's shot and other details to evaluate a shooter's skill. Image credits: Courtesy Noah Basketball Sports Friday, December 21, 2018 – 14:30 Marcus Woo, Contributor (Inside Science) — Gro

4h

Turbulence in exceptionally hot solar corona

Astrophysicists are keen to learn why the corona is so hot. Scientists have completed research that may advance the search.

4h

Cholesterol-lowering drugs reduce brown adipose tissue

Scientists have shown that statins, one of the most commonly prescribed classes of pharmaceuticals, reduce beneficial brown adipose tissue. But this is no reason to demonize these drugs, the researchers insist.

4h

Holiday asteroid imaged with NASA radar

The December 2018 close approach by the large, near-Earth asteroid 2003 SD220 has provided astronomers an outstanding opportunity to obtain detailed radar images of the surface and shape of the object and to improve the understanding of its orbit.

4h

Type 2 Diabetes May Be Linked to Erectile Dysfunction

It makes “good biological sense"

4h

What are frankincense and myrrh?

Environment The mysteries of these botanicals go way beyond the Magi. Frankincense and myrrh are both tree resins. In their time, they were worth as much as gold, and fought over like oil today. Despite thousands of years of use, the…

4h

Chemical engineers publish paper challenging theories of glass transition

Greg McKenna, Horn Professor and the John R. Bradford Chair in the Department of Chemical Engineering in Texas Tech University's Edward E. Whitacre Jr. College of Engineering, has published his paper, "Testing the Paradigm of an Ideal Glass Transition: Dynamics of an Ultra-stable Polymeric Glass," in the journal Science Advances. The paper's results go against longstanding theories.

4h

Surfer's ear points to ancient pearl divers in Panama

While examining a skull from an ancient burial ground in a pre-Columbian village in Panama, Nicole Smith-Guzmán, bioarchaeologist at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI), was surprised to discover an example of surfers' ear: a small, bony bump in the ear canal common among surfers, kayakers and free divers in cold climates. After inspecting more skulls, she concluded that a select gr

4h

Forskertalenter skal puffes ud af comfort zonen

Københavns Universitet søsætter nyt talentudviklingsprogram, UCPH Forward, der fra…

4h

Satellite sees Tropical Cyclone Cilida north of Mauritius

Tropical Cyclone Cilida appeared as a large and powerful hurricane on imagery from NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite on Dec. 21. Cilida is located north of the island of Mauritius in the Southern Indian Ocean.

5h

Ruling that blocked grizzly bear hunt plans appealed by US

U.S. government attorneys filed notice Friday that they are appealing a court ruling that restored protections for grizzly bears in the Northern Rockies and blocked plans to hold the first public hunts for the animals in decades.

5h

Privacy and other matters with Facebook's video-call gadget

It's rare that a new gadget these days serves a true need. Rather, it creates a want.

5h

Satellite sees Tropical Cyclone Cilida north of Mauritius

Tropical Cyclone Cilida appeared as a large and powerful hurricane on imagery from NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite on Dec. 21. Cilida is located north of the island of Mauritius in the Southern Indian Ocean.

5h

People really do drink more booze in cold, dark places

People living in colder regions with less sunlight drink more alcohol than their warm-weather counterparts, research shows. The study, which appears in Hepatology , finds that as temperature and sunlight hours dropped, alcohol consumption increased. Climate factors also were tied to binge drinking and the prevalence of alcoholic liver disease, one of the main causes of mortality in patients with

5h

Tony Is Losing Gold in the Runoff | Gold Rush

After running pay-dirt nonstop for two days, Tony does a spot check. He discovers the gold is so fine that it's failing to settle in the sluice box. Stream Full Episodes of Gold Rush: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/gold-rush/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/GoldRush/ https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter:

5h

Surfer's ear points to ancient pearl divers in Panama

Surfer's ear, associated with cold weather and water sports, led a bioarchaeologist at the Smithsonian in Panama to suspect that ancient shoreline residents were diving for pearls in an area of cold-water upwelling.

5h

Liver disease could be picked up much sooner by nurse-led tests in GP surgeries

Research carried out by scientists at the University of Southampton has shown that simple tests in GP surgeries could potentially double the diagnosis rate of liver disease where patients are not displaying any symptoms.

5h

'Frozen' copper behaves as noble metal in catalysis: study

A new study by scientists from the Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics shows that the electron structure of Cu can be changed, assisted by high energy plasma, making Cu exhibit significantly different catalytic behaviors than normal Cu in selective hydrogenation reactions.

5h

Photos of the Week: Halo Moon, Crouching Boy, Festive Penguins

Keyboard art in the Ivory Coast, darts fans in London, a new Boring Company tunnel in California, a coast-guard rescue in Turkey, a terrible fire in Brazil, huge protests in Budapest, a giant Santa in Shanghai, a naturalization ceremony in Los Angeles, and much more

5h

Guitarist Has Brain Surgery, and Strums All the Way Through

Musa Manzini, a jazz bassist, was awake and playing slowly as surgeons performed an “awake craniotomy,” which allowed them to remove a brain tumor without causing damage.

5h

Interpreting emotions: A matter of confidence

We are exposed to the facial expressions of the people. But do we interpret them correctly? And do we trust our own judgment? This trust is essential for avoiding potentially dangerous situations. Researchers have been testing how confident we feel when judging other people's emotions, and what areas of the brain are used. These results demonstrate that beliefs of our own emotional interpretation

5h

Description of rotating molecules made easy

By turning highly complex equations into sets of simple diagrams, Feynman diagrams have established themselves as one of the sharpest tools in a theoretical physicist's toolbox. Scientists have now extended the technique: originally devised for subatomic particles, the simplest objects imaginable, the technique can now work with molecules. The research is expected to drastically simplify the descr

5h

Looking at molecules from two sides with table-top femtosecond soft-X-rays

Researchers have successfully combined a table-top laser-based extreme high-order harmonic source for short-pulse soft-X-ray absorption spectroscopy in the water window with novel flatjet technology. They are the first to demonstrate the simultaneous probing of carbon and nitrogen atoms in organic molecules in aqueous solution.

5h

Simple method rescues stressed liver cells

Isolated human hepatocytes are essential tools in preclinical and clinical liver research, but cell quality is highly variable. Now, researchers have devised a simple protocol that improves hepatocyte quality and enables cells from a wider quality spectrum to be used in standard and advanced cell culture.

5h

Strong interactions produce a dance between light and sound

Light and high-frequency acoustic sound waves in a tiny glass structure can strongly couple to one another and perform a dance in step.

5h

Quantum tricks to unveil the secrets of topological materials

'Topological materials' produce electron states that can be very interesting for technical applications, but it is extremely difficult to identify these materials and their associated electronic states. A 'crystal' made of light waves can now be used to deliberately drive the system out of equilibrium. By switching between simple and complicated states, the system reveals whether or not it has top

5h

Getting the most out of spinach: Maximizing the antioxidant lutein

Eat your spinach in the form of a smoothie or juice — this is the best way to obtain the antioxidant lutein, according to new research. High levels of lutein are found in dark green vegetables, and researchers at the university have compared different ways of preparing fresh spinach in order to maximize the levels of lutein in finished food.

5h

Chemists create new quasicrystal material from nanoparticle building blocks

Brown University researchers have discovered a new type of quasicrystal, a class of materials whose existence was thought to be impossible until the 1980s.

5h

Chloroform emissions could delay ozone recovery by up to 8 years

A new study identifies another threat to the ozone layer's recovery: chloroform — a colorless, sweet-smelling compound that is primarily used in the manufacturing of products such as Teflon and various refrigerants. The researchers found that between 2010 and 2015, emissions and concentrations of chloroform in the global atmosphere have increased significantly.

5h

The way we serve food can boost cooperation

A new study asks: Could the way we serve and eat meals boost cooperation? The answer appears to be yes. When people in a business negotiation share not just a meal but also a plate, they collaborate better and reach deals faster, according to the new research from professor Ayelet Fishbach from the University of Chicago Booth School of Business and Cornell University’s Kaitlin Woolley (a Booth Ph

5h

Influences of maternal diabetes on fetal heart development

In a comprehensive review recently published in Birth Defects Research, Vidu Garg, MD, and Madhumita Basu, PhD, offer a "state of the science" look at the impact of maternal diabetes, and potential gene-environmental influences in that context, on fetal heart development.

5h

'Frozen' copper behaves as noble metal in catalysis: study

As a non-noble metal, copper oxidizes more easily to a positive valence (Cu+ or Cu2+) than same-family elements Au or Ag. In general, this chemical property is mainly determined by electron structure. Can we change the chemical properties of an element by regulating its electron structure? Can Cu act as a noble metal in catalytic reactions?

5h

GM houseplant sucks cancer-linked chemicals from the air

Researchers have genetically modified a common houseplant—pothos ivy—to remove chloroform and benzene from the air around it. We like to keep the air in our homes as clean as possible, and sometimes we use HEPA air filters to keep offending allergens and dust particles at bay. But some hazardous compounds are too small for these filters to trap. Small molecules like chloroform, which is present i

5h

Tons of dead fish wash up in Rio de Janeiro lagoon

Residents of a high-end neighborhood in Rio de Janeiro woke up to the unpleasant smell of 13 tons of rotting dead fish floating in the city's Rodrigo de Freitas lagoon.

5h

Drone threat a steep learning curve for airport chiefs

Aviation chiefs are going to be on a steep learning curve to counter the security threat posed by drones after a costly and humiliating shutdown of London's Gatwick airport.

5h

Ford recalls 874,000 pickups in US, Canada on fire risk

Ford is recalling 874,000 of its best-selling F-series pickup trucks due to fire risk from the engine block heater system, the company announced Friday.

5h

More young and other traits help mammals adapt to urban environments

Species of mammals that live in urban environments produce more young compared to other mammals. But next to this common 'winning trait', mammals deal with different strategies to successfully inhabit cities.

5h

Sight-saving treatment for eye infection or trauma

Scientists have developed a novel eye drop that rapidly reduces sight-threatening scarring to the surface of the eye.

5h

Forget-me-not: Scientists pinpoint memory mechanism in plants

Plant scientists have unraveled a mechanism that enables flowering plants to sense and 'remember' changes in their environment.

5h

Reducing head impacts in youth football

The high head impact and concussion rates in football are of increasing concern, especially for younger players. Recent research has shown that limiting contact in football practice can reduce the number of head impacts. But what is the correct formula to lessen exposure while still developing the skills necessary to safely play the game?

5h

Structure and function of photosynthesis protein explained in detail

Researchers have solved the structure and elucidated the function of photosynthetic complex I. This membrane protein complex plays a major role in dynamically rewiring photosynthesis.

5h

What do we see in a mirror?

Researchers have developed metasurfaces with extreme angle-asymmetric response. The new device can be a good or bad reflector depending on the angle the light hits it.

5h

9 most common New Year’s resolutions — and how to make them happen

The top three New Year's resolutions for 2018 were to eat healthier, get more exercise, and save more money. Care to guess what the top three are this year? We check in with experts to devise strategies for tackling the most common New Year's resolutions. Knowing exactly what you want to accomplish and how you will do it can help increase your chances of success in 2019. With New Year's rounding

6h

A safe, wearable soft sensor

Harvard University researchers have developed a soft, non-toxic wearable sensor that unobtrusively attaches to the hand and measures the force of a grasp and the motion of the hand and fingers.

6h

The Year in Letters

The Atlantic’ s readers wrote eloquently and passionately about a wide range of news events, stories, and complicated ideas this year. Here’s a look back at some of what they had to say. February After the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, Heather Sher, a radiologist who treated some of the victims, wrote about her experience in the emergency room . “As a doct

6h

Gadget Lab Podcast: 2018 Was the Year of 'Oops!' in Tech

Wired’s Gadget Lab team sums up this year in tech. Plus: An interview with the CEO of a futuristic fitness company.

6h

A big space crash likely made Uranus lopsided

Uranus is a lopsided oddity, the only planet to spin on its side. Scientists now think they know how it got that way: It was pushed over by a rock at least twice as big as Earth.

6h

Flights suspended again at London Gatwick after drone report

In a new nightmare for holiday travel, flights were suspended again at London's Gatwick Airport after reports that another drone had been spotted over the airport late Friday afternoon, the airport and British police said.

6h

Researchers explore genetics of California mountain lions to inform future conservation

Fragmentation of wildlife populations is increasing on a global scale, and understanding current genetic structure, genetic diversity and genetic connectivity is key to informing future wildlife management and conservation.

6h

Camera trap study reveals the hidden lives of island carnivores

Researchers placed 160 cameras on 19 of the 22 Apostle Islands in northern Wisconsin to see which carnivores were living there. After taking more than 200,000 photos over a period of three years, the team discovered that several mammalian predators are living on various islands in this remote archipelago in Lake Superior.

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Camera trap study reveals the hidden lives of island carnivores

Researchers placed 160 cameras on 19 of the 22 Apostle Islands in northern Wisconsin to see which carnivores were living there. After taking more than 200,000 photos over a period of three years, the team discovered that several carnivores are living on various islands in this remote archipelago in Lake Superior.

6h

NASA's GPM satellite examines weakening Tropical Cyclone Kenanga

Tropical Cyclone Kenanga is now on a weakening trend and NASA's GPM core satellite provided a look at the rainfall and cloud heights within the storm.

6h

Electric fish in augmented reality reveal how animals 'actively sense' world around them

Researchers have used augmented reality technology to unravel the mysterious dynamic between active sensing movement and sensory feedback.

6h

The New Old Age: This Type of Illiteracy Could Hurt You

More than half of older Americans lack the skills to gather and understand medical information. Providers must simplify, researchers say.

6h

Inside CERN’s Large Hadron Collider

Beneath the fields of Switzerland and France lies the largest machine ever built. Tour the Large Hadron Collider in virtual reality.

6h

Gifts for someone who you just met

Gift Guides …who maybe is going to get you a gift. Gifts for someone who you just met who maybe is going to get you a gift.

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Photos of the Year

From 500-million-year-old fat to a newly discovered virus, here are some stunners from The Scientist in 2018.

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Incoming Democrat Wants to Make Climate a 2020 Election Issue

California Representative-elect, Mike Levin, thinks climate can rally voters in the next presidential race — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Researchers explore genetics of California mountain lions to inform future conservation

Mountain lions in California exhibited strong population genetic structure, and some California populations had extremely low levels of genetic diversity, with some exhibiting estimates as low as the endangered Florida panther.

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300 blind mice uncover genetic causes of eye disease

Hundreds of new genes linked to blindness and other vision disorders have been identified in a screen of mouse strains. Many of these genes are likely important in human vision and the results could help identify new causes of hereditary blindness in patients.

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Electric fish in augmented reality reveal how animals 'actively sense' world around them

In a new study, NJIT and Johns Hopkins researchers have used augmented reality technology to unravel the mysterious dynamic between active sensing movement and sensory feedback.

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Trump, Brexit, climate change: despair is everywhere. Yet still I can marvel at our humanity | Jonathan Freedland

From the response to Windrush to scientific wonders – at times like this we need to remind ourselves what we are capable of Lord knows, there are reasons to be cheerless this Christmas. If you’re British, you have your pick of sources of misery. You could be anxious that we are less than 100 days away from a car-crash, no-deal Brexit that will see us short of medicine and food, the public advised

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New Study Questions Whether Death Rate Levels Off in Old Age

A demographer's model suggests the "mortality plateau" in the extreme elderly could be explained by clerical errors. Not everyone agrees.

7h

Facebook efter ny skandale: Medierne misforstår sagen

New York Times afslørede tirsdag, at Facebook deler brugerdata uden samtykke, men medierne tager fejl, mener Facebook. Dansk forsker kalder sagen uigennemskuelig.

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System lets A.I. play chemist to save months of work

A new system combines artificial neural networks with infrared thermal imaging to control and interpret chemical reactions with precision and speed that far outpace conventional methods. Machine learning algorithms can predict stock market fluctuations, control complex manufacturing processes, enable navigation for robots and driverless vehicles, and much more. Now, researchers are tapping a new

7h

Teething necklaces, gels, and rings can be dangerous. Here’s what to use instead.

Health The FDA warns that jewelry marketed as baby-safe is anything but. The FDA has issued a warning this week about the number of reports they’ve received about babies sustaining serious injuries and even dying from teething jewelry.

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NASA's GPM satellite examines weakening Tropical Cyclone Kenanga

Tropical Cyclone Kenanga is now on a weakening trend and NASA's GPM core satellite provided a look at the rainfall and cloud heights within the storm.

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Americans are sleeping less than they were 13 years ago

A survey suggests that nearly one-third of American adults are sleeping fewer than 6 hours a night, and minority groups are most affected.

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This bank in Italy accepted cheese as collateral. Here's why.

When giving out a secured loan, most banks ask for a form of collateral to recoup their losses in case the borrower defaults. Most people put up their homes as collateral, but one bank in Italy accepts wheels of delicious, sharp, and valuable cheese. It might seem bizarre, but it's not the first time unusual items have been used as collateral. None If you were to take out a loan for buying a home

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The Scientist's Most Stunning Infographics of 2018

From cellular self-digestion to the effects of exercise on the brain, our features editor picks her favorite art custom-made for the magazine.

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People with schizophrenia experience emotion differently from others, 'body maps' show

Vanderbilt University researchers are working to understand how people with schizophrenia experience emotion through their bodies.

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Christmas in La-La Land

LOS ANGELES—A cold coming they had of it, T. S. Eliot’s wise men did. I think of that line on crisp, clear December nights in Los Angeles, when the towering, century-old palm trees make our neighborhood seem as if it could pass for the Fertile Crescent, or at least the close-by Paramount Studios backlot where White Christmas was filmed. Christmas in the Mediterranean climate of Southern Californi

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The Top 10 Ocean Conservation Victories of 2018

(Just kidding, there were only three this year) — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Science Needs More Public Faces

Social media provides a relatable platform to bring in a broader understanding and acceptance of the work of scientists and how it impacts society — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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More Babies Are Conceived Over the Holiday Season Than Other Times of Year

Is the crisp autumn air, or the joy (or anxiety) of the holiday season, triggering more unprotected sexual intercourse? Or is it something else …

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Statins reduce your ‘good’ brown fat

Statins reduce beneficial brown adipose tissue, according to new research. But this is no reason to demonize these drugs, the researchers insist. A certain proportion of the adult population has not only white adipose (or fatty) tissue, but also brown fat. This brown adipose tissue helps to convert sugar and fat into heat. People with brown adipose tissue are better at regulating their body tempe

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WATCH: First-Ever Footage of a Lizard Breathing Underwater

Lizards can't breathe underwater — or can they?

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Bone Building Needs Bit of Breakdown First

The hormone irisin encourages bone remodeling, in part by first triggering another substance that encourages some bone breakdown. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The Disturbing Trend Behind America’s Soaring Gun Deaths

In 2015 and 2016, Americans faced an alarming statistic: After a couple of decades of overall decline, major data centers reported a sharp uptick of crime in big cities. Donald Trump spoke with dystopian foreboding in his 2016 inaugural address about the “ American carnage ” wreaking havoc in the country’s metropolises; earlier, at one campaign event , he asserted that “places like Afghanistan” w

8h

Why Kirstjen Nielsen Sounds Like the Hulk

On a worrisome day in Washington—with a government shutdown looming and the defense secretary resigning—a clip of Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen served as unexpected comic relief. Nielsen, speaking before the House Judiciary Committee on Thursday, responded to a question from Representative Tom Marino by saying, “From Congress I would ask for wall. We need wall.” "I would ask for wa

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Large-scale study identifies shared genetic architecture for polycystic ovary syndrome diagnosis

An international consortium of researchers identify genetic underpinnings associated with PCOS to understand and better diagnose it.

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Antibiotic overuse is high for common urology procedures

A new study suggests that antibiotics are being overused in up to 50 percent of patients undergoing common urological procedures. The study, led by Daniel Livorsi, M.D., University of Iowa assistant professor of internal medicine, shows that the high rates of overuse were mostly due to extended use of antibiotics following the procedure. The findings were published Dec. 21 in JAMA Network Open.

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How kindergartens serve as 'gendergartens'

Sociologists at the Higher School of Economics showed that preschool education has its own hidden curriculum: kindergarten teachers transmit social norms to children, including conservative ideas of femininity and masculinity. Girls are expected to have 'proper' character and behavior, to be obedient and pretty, take an interest in music and dance, and to like the color pink.

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Study compares scheduled vs. emergency-only dialysis among undocumented immigrants

A unique opportunity made it feasible for uninsured patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) who received emergency-only dialysis in Dallas, Texas, to enroll in private, commercial health insurance plans in 2015 and that made it possible for researchers to compare scheduled vs. emergency-only dialysis among undocumented immigrants with ESRD.

8h

Millions of Google searches for sexual harassment, assault since #MeToo

An estimated 40 to 54 million Google searches for sexual harassment and assault were recorded in the United States in the eight months after public accusations against film producer Harvey Weinstein and the ensuing #MeToo movement. Searches related to reporting and preventing such actions also were up based on the results of a study that monitored and analyzed search activity.

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Study analyzes clinical trials of medications to control knee osteoarthritis pain

Managing osteoarthritis requires long-term treatment for symptoms such as pain and changes in joint structure that can lead to disability. This study analyzed the combined results of 47 randomized clinical trials that lasted at least 12 months for 33 drug interventions and 22,000 patients with knee osteoarthritis.

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Is program to reduce hospital readmissions associated with a change in patient deaths?

The Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program (HRRP) was created under the Affordable Care Act and hospitals face financial penalties for higher-than-expected 30-day readmission rates for patients with heart failure, heart attack and pneumonia. Lower hospital readmission rates for those conditions have been associated with the program but it was unclear if the program was associated with a change in

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Readmissions reduction program may be associated with increase in patient-level mortality

A policy designed to reduce hospital readmissions through financial penalties was associated with a significant increase in post-discharge mortality for patients with heart failure and pneumonia, according to a large-scale study by researchers in Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center's (BIDMC) Smith Center for Outcomes Research in Cardiology.

8h

Study looks at ED visits to examine opioid prescribing in pediatric patients

Opioids for pain management in pediatric patients are sometimes necessary but their use has raised concerns about the effects of opioids and later abuse. This analysis examined opioid prescribing rates using information from the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey from 2006 to 2015 on more than 69,000 emergency department visits for patients younger than 18. Prescribing rates decrease

8h

Lean electrolyte design is a game-changer for magnesium batteries

Researchers from the University of Houston and the Toyota Research Institute of America have discovered a promising new version of high-energy magnesium batteries, with potential applications ranging from electric vehicles to battery storage for renewable energy systems.

8h

How common is Hepatitis C infection in each US state?

Hepatitis C virus infection is a major cause of illness and death in the United States and injection drug use is likely fueling many new cases. This study, which used survey and vital statistics data, suggests about 1 percent of adults (0.93 percent) were living with hepatitis C from 2013 to 2016, and how common infections were varied by state and region.

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Two Type 2 diabetes drugs linked to higher risk of heart disease

Two drugs commonly prescribed to treat Type 2 diabetes carry a high risk of cardiovascular events such as heart attack, stroke, heart failure or amputation, according to a new Northwestern Medicine study. The drugs are commonly prescribed to patients after they have taken metformin but need a second-line medication. This is the first study to compare how each of the six major second-line drugs imp

8h

Stabilizing 2D layered perovskites for photovoltaics: setting up a defensive wall

A research team, led by Prof. GUO Xin and Prof. LI Can from the Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics (DICP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, improved the stability of PSCs by removing the gaps, called van der Waals gaps, in widely studied Ruddlesden-Popper (RP) phase two-dimensional (2D) layered perovskite materials.

8h

Out There: Apollo 8’s Earthrise: The Shot Seen Round the World

Half a century ago today, a photograph from the moon helped humans rediscover Earth.

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Earthrise: 50 Years Since Apollo 8

On Christmas Eve, 1968, astronauts orbiting the moon saw Earth rising for the first time.

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2019 Preview: Renewable energy race to ramp up as oil use skyrockets

As global demand for energy grows, we will need to switch to renewables even faster to avoid climate catastrophe

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Lean electrolyte design is a game-changer for magnesium batteries

Researchers from the University of Houston and the Toyota Research Institute of America have discovered a promising new version of high-energy magnesium batteries, with potential applications ranging from electric vehicles to battery storage for renewable energy systems.

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Stabilizing 2-D layered perovskites for photovoltaics: Setting up a defensive wall

Setting up a defensive wall in a soccer game is a primary sports challenge. No coach likes a gap between defensive players in the wall. Scientists are tackling a similar problem to improve the stability of perovskite solar cells (PSCs).

8h

These 2018 findings could be big news — if they turn out to be true

Discoveries about fossils, the Big Bang and more could shake up the scientific world – if they turn out to be true.

8h

The Trump Administration’s Lowest Point Yet

Since the start of the Donald Trump administration, a morbid watch has been kept: Though the president is adept at creating his own crises, either intentionally or not , experts noted that he had not faced a full-scale crisis that was not of his own making. Those are the times that test presidents. How would Trump react when his moment came ? It’s fitting that during Advent, the season of waiting

8h

New metasurfaces look bright in one direction, while dark in the opposite direction

Researchers at Aalto University have developed metasurfaces with extreme angle-asymmetric response. The surface reflections depend on the angle at which light hits it.

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Image: Hubble's cosmic holiday wreath

This festive NASA Hubble Space Telescope image resembles a holiday wreath made of sparkling lights. The bright southern hemisphere star RS Puppis, at the center of the image, is swaddled in a gossamer cocoon of reflective dust illuminated by the glittering star. The super star is ten times more massive than the sun and 200 times larger.

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Report reveals seasonal iron depletion in U.K. coastal waters

Scientists from the University of Plymouth have found that a lack of summertime iron could be having a major impact on the overall health of our coastal waters and shelf seas.

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Getting the most out of spinach – maximising the antioxidant lutein

Eat your spinach in the form of a smoothie or juice – this is the best way to obtain the antioxidant lutein, according to research from Linköping University, Sweden. High levels of lutein are found in dark green vegetables, and researchers at the university have compared different ways of preparing fresh spinach in order to maximise the levels of lutein in finished food. The findings are published

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Twisting light to enable high-capacity data transmission

For the first time, researchers have used tiny gears made of germanium to generate a vortex of twisted light that turns around its axis of travel much like a corkscrew. Because germanium is compatible with the silicon used to make computer chips, the new light source could be used to boost the amount of data that can be transmitted with chip-based optical computing and communication.

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Museums should honor the everyday, not just the extraordinary | Ariana Curtis

Who deserves to be in a museum? For too long, the answer has been "the extraordinary" — those aspirational historymakers who inspire us with their successes. But those stories are limiting, says museum curator Ariana Curtis. In a visionary talk, she imagines how museums can more accurately represent history by honoring the lives of people both extraordinary and everyday, prominent and hidden — a

9h

Bees can count with just four nerve cells in their brains

Bees can solve seemingly clever counting tasks with very small numbers of nerve cells in their brains, according to researchers at Queen Mary University of London.

9h

Twisting light to enable high-capacity data transmission

For the first time, researchers have used tiny gears made of germanium to generate a vortex of twisted light that turns around its axis of travel much like a corkscrew. Because germanium is compatible with the silicon used to make computer chips, the new light source could be used to boost the amount of data that can be transmitted with chip-based optical computing and communication.

9h

Research highlights what helps people live well with dementia

Psychological aspects, such as optimism, self-esteem, loneliness and depression were closely linked to ability to optimise quality of life and wellbeing in both people with dementia and carers. Experience in other areas of life influences psychological well-being and perceptions of living well. Physical health and fitness was important for both groups. For both carers and people with dementia soci

9h

Artificial intelligence system learns to diagnose, classify intracranial hemorrhage

A team of investigators from the Massachusetts General Hospital Department of Radiology has developed a system using artificial intelligence to quickly diagnose and classify brain hemorrhages and to provide the basis of its decisions from relatively small image datasets.

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Air pollution in Mexico City is associated with the development of Alzheimer disease

A new study by researchers at the Universities of Montana, Valle de México, Boise State, Universidad Veracruzana, Instituto Nacional de Pediatría and Paul-Flechsig-Institute for Brain Research heightens together with German company Analytik Jena concerns over the evolving and relentless Alzheimer's pathology observed in young Metropolitan Mexico City (MMC) urbanites.These findings are published in

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Bees can count with just four nerve cells in their brains

Bees can solve seemingly clever counting tasks with very small numbers of nerve cells in their brains, according to researchers at Queen Mary University of London.

9h

Professor efter forbud mod ftalater: Husk stadig udluftning

Kroppen optager sundhedsskadelige stoffer gennem både huden og åndedrættet, og derfor kan rengøring og gennemtræk hjælpe meget. Men ikke alt.

9h

Breaking up (with Facebook) is hard to do: Here's how

Every relationship has a breaking point. Even yours with Facebook.

9h

Why the issue of drug resistance in animal farming means a fight against urban elites

Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) has been framed as one of the biggest threats to humanity in the 21st century. By 2050, more humans could die because of AMR than cancer. But despite alarming concerns from the early 1960s and warnings that the issue of antimicrobial resistance could cross barriers between animal species, the problems of antimicrobial use in animal farming have for long been ignored

9h

Supercurrents gone chiral: new type of superconducting junction

Unconventional superconductors form one of the big mysteries in physics. Among them is strontium ruthenate, which stands out as a controversial superconductor. During his Ph.D., Leiden physicist Kaveh Lahabi has provided new insights into the nature of superconductivity in this material, leading to a new type of superconducting junction. Lahabi obtained his Ph.D. cum laude.

9h

Chemical bond versus electromagnetic waves

Vibrating carbon monoxide molecules adsorbed at the surface of a salt crystal stop moving after a few milliseconds. Scientists now discovered this is dominantly due to the emission of electromagnetic waves. The role of the chemical bond at the surface thereby appears to be less important than previously thought. Jörg Meyer from the Leiden Institute for Chemistry has contributed to the fundamental

9h

The DRC's Ebola Outbreak Is an End-of-Year Nightmare

A major election, holiday travel, and violent clashes in the Democratic Republic of Congo are confounding all attempts to contain Ebola's spread.

9h

Mars: Pictures reveal 'winter wonderland' on the red planet

Earth is not the only planet with icy scenes this festive season, the European Space Agency says.

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Tiny bubbles of bacterial mischief

Margarethe (Meta) Kuehn studies vesicles—little bubbles that bud off bacterial membranes. All sorts of things may be tightly packed into these bubbles: viruses, antigens, and information a bacterium will need to make cells vulnerable to infection.

9h

Robin hushed: Wind turbines are making songbirds change their tune

Wind turbines are a leading source of green energy which could supply 12% of the world's energy by 2020. But their use is often criticised for its impact on wildlife, particularly birds. Larger birds can collide with turbines and some have even learned to avoid flying near them.

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Quantum tricks to unveil the secrets of topological materials

Electrons are not just little spheres, bouncing through a material like a rubber ball. The laws of quantum physics tell us that electrons behave like waves. In some materials, these electron waves can take on rather complicated shapes. The so-called "topological materials" produce electron states that can be very interesting for technical applications, but it is extremely difficult to identify the

9h

The Books Briefing: A Readable Feast

You could say that meals—especially holiday meals—are stories in themselves. Beyond the suspense of waiting for a cake to come out of the oven, or the satisfying denouement served in a steaming bowl of soup, there’s a wealth of symbolism (not to mention potential for drama) in gathering to share life-sustaining, life-affirming food. Gustave Flaubert uses turkeys and plum jam to mark the passing y

9h

The Quiet Integrity of James Mattis

Since Jim Mattis grounds himself in the classics, it seems fitting to mark his resignation with a passage from Epictetus: “Authentic freedom places demands on us.” The quiet integrity with which he has done his job modeled a stoicism rare in our febrile political climate and sadly lacking elsewhere in the Trump administration. Mattis’s resignation letter may have been his most important act as th

9h

Forecasters may be looking in wrong place when predicting tornadoes, Ohio research shows

Weather forecasters may be looking in the wrong place when working to issue tornado warnings, new research led by Ohio University has demonstrated.

9h

Getting the most out of spinach — maximizing the antioxidant lutein

Eat your spinach in the form of a smoothie or juice — this is the best way to obtain the antioxidant lutein, according to research from Linköping University, Sweden. High levels of lutein are found in dark green vegetables, and researchers at the university have compared different ways of preparing fresh spinach in order to maximize the levels of lutein in finished food. The findings are publishe

9h

Cholesterol-lowering drugs reduce brown adipose tissue

ETH Zurich scientists have shown that statins, one of the most commonly prescribed classes of pharmaceuticals, reduce beneficial brown adipose tissue. But this is no reason to demonize these drugs, the researchers insist.

9h

New findings reveal the behavior of turbulence in the exceptionally hot solar corona

Astrophysicists are keen to learn why the corona is so hot. Scientists at PPPL have completed research that may advance the search.

9h

Researchers suggest ways to reduce head impacts in youth football

The high head impact and concussion rates in football are of increasing concern, especially for younger players.Recent research has shown that limiting contact in football practice can reduce the number of head impacts. But what is the correct formula to lessen exposure while still developing the skills necessary to safely play the game?

9h

Study: Increased risk of heart attack, stroke in months leading up to a cancer diagnosis

Older adults with cancer are more likely to have had a heart attack or stroke in the months prior to their cancer diagnosis compared with similar adults who do not have cancer during the same period, according to a report published online today in Blood.

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New findings reveal the behavior of turbulence in the exceptionally hot solar corona

The sun defies conventional scientific understanding. Its upper atmosphere, known as the corona, is many millions of degrees hotter than its surface. Astrophysicists are keen to learn why the corona is so hot, and scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) have completed research that may advance the search.

9h

Forecasters may be looking in wrong place when predicting tornadoes, research shows

Weather forecasters may be looking in the wrong place when working to issue tornado warnings, new research led by Ohio University has demonstrated.

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When a brand is like a secret lover

Have you ever worried that people would judge you for buying a certain brand or frequenting a certain store, and tried to keep this information secret?

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Scientists have developed high-strength material for aircraft industry

Scientists of the Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU) and the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS) have designed a new, high-strength ceramic material that can withstand prolonged exposure to supersonic airflow at temperatures above 2600°C.

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Strong interactions produce a dance between light and sound

Light and high-frequency acoustic sound waves in a tiny glass structure can strongly couple to one another and perform a dance in step.

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Dust threatens Utah's 'greatest snow on earth'

Utah's Wasatch Mountains are famous for having "The Greatest Snow on Earth." Snow-seekers in pursuit of world-class skiing and snowboarding contribute over a billion dollars annually to the economy. Snowmelt also provides the majority of water to rapidly growing populations along the Wasatch Front, including Salt Lake City. Understanding what controls snowmelt timing and magnitude is critical for

9h

Derfor kan en enkelt droneoperatør forstyrre julen for titusindvis af flypassagerer

Ulovlige droner omkring London-lufthavnen Gatwick har sat en stopper for flytrafikken. Britisk militær har taget jamming-teknologier i brug, men hverken droner eller bagmænd er endnu fundet.

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Quanta’s Science and Math Crossword Puzzle

Last December, we published our 2017 Science and Math Crossword as a holiday gift to Quanta readers. This year, I’m happy to say, it’s back by popular demand. The 2018 crossword is similar to the 2017 crossword in many ways. Like last year’s, the new crossword is a celebration of the excellent scientific articles that Quanta served up all year, and it’s also my tribute to Quanta ’s writers and ed

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New Horizons scientists puzzled by lack of a 'light curve' from their Kuiper Belt flyby target

NASA's New Horizons spacecraft is bearing down on Ultima Thule, its New Year's flyby target in the far away Kuiper Belt. Among its approach observations over the past three months, the spacecraft has been taking hundreds of images to measure Ultima's brightness and how it varies as the object rotates.

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Want citizens to care about climate change? Write them a cheque

Climate scientists insist in a recent report that fundamental changes in how energy is consumed and supplied are urgently required to avoid serious damage to life and property from rising temperatures, rising sea levels and greater frequency of extreme weather events (hurricanes, drought-induced wildfires, etc.).

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Earthrise, a photo that changed the world

December 24 is the 50th anniversary of Earthrise, arguably one of the most profound images in the history of human culture. When astronaut William Anders photographed a fragile blue sphere set in dark space peeking over the moon, it changed our perception of our place in space and fuelled environmental awareness around the world.

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How the perception of unfair economic inequality leads to civic unrest

Why are there not more mass demonstrations across the United States with a president as controversial as Donald Trump? The President's thoughts, tariffs, and tweets affect global economies, societies, and sensibilities. Amid all the anger, frustration, and unfairness felt by large sections of the American public, the lack of street demonstrations is surprising.

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On the right path to fusion energy

A new report on the development of fusion as an energy source, written at the request of the U.S. Secretary of Energy, proposes adoption of a national fusion strategy that closely aligns with the course charted in recent years by MIT's Plasma Science and Fusion Center (PSFC) and privately funded Commonwealth Fusion Systems (CFS), a recent MIT spinout.

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Julekort fra Mars: Et krater fyldt med is og et køreklart måleapparat

Både amerikanske og europæiske sonder har sendt friske billeder hjem fra vores naboplanet Mars.

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The Year in Math and Computer Science

Youth ruled the year in mathematics. The Fields Medals — awarded every four years to the top mathematicians no older than 40 — went out to four individuals who have left their marks all over the mathematical landscape. This year one of the awards went to Peter Scholze, who at 30 became one of the youngest ever to win. But at times in 2018, even 30 could feel old. Two students, one in graduate sch

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Statins are more effective for those who follow the Mediterranean diet

For those who have already had a heart attack or a stroke, the combination of statins and Mediterranean Diet appears to be the most effective choice to reduce the risk of mortality, especially from cardiovascular causes. It is the result of an Italian study conducted at the I.R.C.C.S. Neuromed, Pozzilli, Italy on over 1,000 adults recruited in the Moli-sani Study, published in the International Jo

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The brain's support cells show defective development in Huntington's disease

The neurological disorder Huntington's disease causes behavioral and motor changes, which among other things are a result of dysfunctional maturation or formation of glial cells, the brain's support cells, researchers from the University of Copenhagen demonstrate in a new study based on mice trials. The researchers' long-term goal is to be able to use the research results to develop a treatment fo

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Quantum tricks to unveil the secrets of topological materials

'Topological materials' produce electron states that can be very interesting for technical applications, but it is extremely difficult to identify these materials and their associated electronic states. A 'crystal' made of light waves can now be used to deliberately drive the system out of equilibrium. By switching between simple and complicated states, the system reveals whether or not it has top

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With First-Ever Landing on Moon's Farside, China Enters "Luna Incognita"

The Chang’e-4 mission could have major effects on Earthbound science and politics — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The 5 Years That Changed Dating

On the 20th anniversary of The New York Times ’ popular Vows column, a weekly feature on notable weddings and engagements launched in 1992, its longtime editor wrote that Vows was meant to be more than just a news notice about society events. It aimed to give readers the backstory on marrying couples and, in the meantime, to explore how romance was changing with the times. “Twenty years ago, as n

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Alien Architects Didn't Build This Pre-Incan Complex, 3D Models Show

Scientists recently restored an ancient structure in Bolivia to its former splendor.

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Which is worse: Food waste or emissions from refrigeration?

New research weighs the emissions trade-offs of creating an unbroken refrigerated supply chain, or “cold chain,” in sub-Saharan Africa Few inventions have had a greater impact on our daily lives, and especially on the food we eat, than refrigeration. But there are still places in the world, such as sub-Saharan Africa, where a cold chain that keeps perishable food cold from farm to market is not y

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The Year in Biology

Metcalfe’s law, which states that the value of a network grows with the square of its number of nodes, is a mainstay of telecommunications theory. But it also relates to biology because the web of life is a network, too. Each passing year brings to light new varieties of interconnections and relationships among the ever-widening diversity of organisms, cells, genes and biomolecules known to scien

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Botanical artist brings rare plants back to life

Artist Lucy Smith draws plants so that they can be recorded for science at the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.

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Unmeltable chocolate and bean-to-bar: A cocoa expert highlights three sweet trends

'Tis the season to eat chocolate. And for the chocolate industry, there's nothing sweeter, since this is the time of year when it enjoys a spike in sales and, at least for some, rising profits.

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Swedish research multiplies the life of rechargeable NiMH batteries

Researchers at Stockholm University have developed a method to multiply the lifespan of nickel-metal hydride batteries. This means that the batteries can handle a great many more charging cycles without losing capacity. The new method also means that the batteries can easily be restored once they have begun to wear out, unlike other rechargeable batteries that must be melted down for recycling.

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Social ‘bursts’ influence how fast disease spreads

A new mathematical model could cure the potential to underestimate how quickly diseases spread. Its creators discovered that current predictive models may miss the influence of a critical aspect of the social behavior of individuals. In contrast to the current models—which generally assume a constant rate of spread—the new model takes into account the propensity for individual social interactions

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New T-wave detector uses waves of the electronic sea in graphene

A team of researchers from Russia, Great Britain, Japan and Italy has created a graphene-based terahertz detector. The study was published in Nature Communications.

9h

First detection of rain over the ocean by navigation satellites

In order to analyse climate change or provide information on natural hazards, for example, it is important for researchers to gather knowledge about rain. Better knowledge of precipitation and its distribution could, for example, help protect against river flooding. On land, monitoring stations can provide data by collecting precipitation. At sea, it's not so easy.

9h

Anti-hacker team develops data sharing scheme for cloud storage

In cloud computing, there is still a pressing issue of data security. Scientists from the Laboratory of Problem-Oriented Cloud Computing at South Ural State University have developed an algorithm of improving information security, which allows to avoid providers' conspiracy.

9h

The Year in Physics

A decade ago, it was practically gospel truth among physicists that the universe began with a sudden unfurling of space known as cosmic inflation. Physicists also widely believed that the cosmos’s missing dark matter consists of invisible clouds of heavy, inert particles dubbed WIMPs, and that the laws of nature respect supersymmetry, a tidy mirroring of matter and forces. The only thing left to

9h

Seven apps to level up your resume

DIY Make your job applications stand out. To land that job, you need a resume that displays your work experience and strengths in an eye-catching way. These apps will help you build one that really stands out.

10h

»Uberørt« ingeniørformand vil rydde op i skandaleramt A-kasse

Formanden for IDA, Thomas Damkjær Petersen, forsøger at blive ny formand for Akademikernes A-Kasse, hvis samlede ledelse har trukket sig.

10h

Predicting enhancers from multiple cell lines and tissues: Different developmental stages

In this paper, we proposed a method based on support vector machines (SVMs) to investigate enhancer prediction on cell lines and tissues from EnhancerAtlas. Specifically, we focused on predicting enhancers on different developmental stages of heart and lung tissues. It is easier to predict enhancers from tissues of adult stage than from tissues of fetal stage, which is proven on both heart and lun

10h

What really happens at femtosecond junctions?

When beams of ultra-short laser pulses running in the same direction intersect with each other at a noticeable angle, various interactions occur between the pulses. These physical phenomena are complicated, and their mathematical description becomes computationally complex. To carry out the appropriate simulations, entire computer clusters have to be engaged. The latest version of Hussar software

10h

What do we see in a mirror?

Researchers at Aalto University developed metasurfaces with extreme angle-asymmetric response. The new device can be a good or bad reflector depending on the angle the light hits it.

10h

Human blood cells can be directly reprogrammed into neural stem cells

Scientists from the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) and the stem cell institute HI-STEM* in Heidelberg have succeeded for the first time in directly reprogramming human blood cells into a previously unknown type of neural stem cell. These induced stem cells are similar to those that occur during the early embryonic development of the central nervous system. They can be modified and multiplied

10h

Interpreting emotions: A matter of confidence

We are exposed to the facial expressions of the people. But do we interpret them correctly? And do we trust our own judgment? This trust is essential for avoiding potentially dangerous situations. Researchers from UNIGE have been testing how confident we feel when judging other people's emotions, and what areas of the brain are used. These results demonstrate that beliefs of our own emotional inte

10h

Laser diode combats counterfeit oil

The olive oil sector has witnessed a rise in fraudulent activities such as falsely labeling inferior products as high quality. To combat this practice, a research team led by the Complutense University of Madrid has developed a tool based on laser diodes and chaotic algorithms to detect whether the label on a bottle corresponds or not to the content inside.

10h

Huge reserves of iron in Western Siberia might originate from under an ancient sea

World's largest Bakchar iron ore deposit is located at the place of an ancient sea in West Siberia, Russia. Its proven reserves are over 28 billion tons. Scientists search for an answer to a global question: Where from and how was there the accumulation of a huge amount of iron. Researchers propose the origin of the Bakchar ironstone deposit by upward migration of a mixture of Fe-rich brine and hy

10h

Strong interactions produce a dance between light and sound

Light and high-frequency acoustic sound waves in a tiny glass structure can strongly couple to one another and perform a dance in step.

10h

Baby star's fiery tantrum could create the building blocks of planets

A massive stellar flare on a baby star has been spotted by University of Warwick astronomers, shedding light on the origins of potentially habitable exoplanets.

10h

Why Hong Kong, Japan and Iceland are the best countries for human development

Since its introduction in 1990, UN's Human Development Index has contributed to a better understanding of development, but has its flaws. Bocconi University's Simone Ghislandi and colleagues developed a new index that takes into account only the inequality-adjusted life expectancy at birth: at life expectancy parity, a country with many disadvantaged people dying young and many rich people dying o

10h

New insight into what a mother gives to her baby in the womb besides genes

Beginning in the womb, a mother transmits a slew of molecules, microbes and cells to her baby. New insight underscores the importance of their transmission in regulating the development of organs like the brain, heart and immune system. Their dysregulation can increase the risk of birth defects and diseases as diverse as food allergy and schizophrenia. These topics are examined in a new special is

10h

China bike-sharing pioneer Ofo hits the skids

Bicycle cemeteries, blocked pavements and angry users: the bike-sharing craze is beginning to look like an economic disaster in China, where fierce competition appears set to drive a pioneer of the sector into the ditch.

10h

Navigating NASA's first mission to the Trojan asteroids

In science fiction, explorers can hop in futuristic spaceships and traverse half the galaxy in the blink of a plot hole. However, this sidelines the navigational acrobatics required in order to guarantee real-life mission success.

10h

Electrically charged Higgs versus physicists: 1-0 until break

The last missing particle of the Standard Model, the Higgs boson, was discovered in 2012 in experiments at the Large Hadron Collider. Since then, searching for new, related particles has been underway. Predicted by various theories that go beyond known physics, Higgs bosons with positive or negative electric charge are among the candidates to be observed. But do these particles really exist?

10h

Thailand to honor beautiful, violent Siamese fighting fish

The Siamese fighting fish, a popular beauty in home aquariums and a popular bet for gamblers for their violent territoriality, is set to become Thailand's national aquatic animal.

10h

Researcher captures rare radar images of Comet 46P/Wirtanen

Barely visible to the naked eye, Comet 46P/Wirtanen keeps some secrets so close that only radar can uncover them.

10h

Electronically programmable photonic molecule

Physical systems with discrete energy levels are ubiquitous in nature and form fundamental building blocks of quantum technology. Artificial atom-like and molecule-like systems were previously demonstrated to regulate light for coherent and dynamic control of the frequency, amplitude and the phase of photons. In a recent study, Mian Zhang and colleagues engineered a photonic molecule with two dist

10h

New report examines key steps in removing carbon dioxide from air

Peter Kelemen is a geologist and the Arthur D. Storke Memorial Professor at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory. A member of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) and an expert in carbonation of rock from Earth's mantle, Kelemen wrote a chapter on carbon mineralization for a new NAS report, Negative Emissions Technologies and Reliable Sequestration: A Research Agenda. The report was commissioned by

10h

Mars Express gets festive: A winter wonderland on Mars

This image shows what appears to be a large patch of fresh, untrodden snow – a dream for any lover of the holiday season. However, it's a little too distant for a last-minute winter getaway: this feature, known as Korolev crater, is found on Mars, and is shown here in beautiful detail as seen by Mars Express.

10h

To cut depression stigma, consider the Grinch and Scrooge

Examining the motivations of the Grinch and Ebenezer Scrooge can help us better understand why people might feel lonely and disinterested during the holiday season, says psychiatrist Anthony Tobia. It’s an important lesson for people who struggle with depression, as well as for their loved ones and mental health providers. These narratives can remove the stigma from feelings of depression and iso

10h

Lucianne Walkowicz: Should We Be Using Mars As A Backup Planet?

Lucianne Walkowicz is all for space exploration, but says we shouldn't expect Mars to save us from a damaged Earth. She warns us not to lose sight of preserving the home we already have. (Image credit: James Duncan Davidson/TED)

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Lisa Nip: How Can We Engineer The Human Body To Survive On Mars … And Beyond?

Space is an extreme environment filled with radiation, and next to no oxygen. To survive there, Lisa Nip says humans are going to have to change themselves … genetically. (Image credit: John Werner)

10h

Stephen Petranek: How Will Humans Live On Mars?

Stephen Petranek says, in the next decade, we will send humans to colonize Mars. He lays out the technology–from water-extraction to bricks made of Martian soil–that'll make life possible there. (Image credit: TED)

10h

James Green: Could The Building Blocks Of Life Exist Elsewhere In Our Solar System?

Earth may not be the only place in our solar system with life, says James Green. New data shows life might have existed on Mars, and could exist now. But what does that mean for us on Earth? (Image credit: James Green)

10h

Using climate information to protect vulnerable populations in Bangladesh

While traveling to Europe, Asia, and Africa as a graduate student, Melody Braun saw the effects that climate change was already having on vulnerable communities, and she realized that she wanted to work closely with these communities. Now she is a senior research staff associate at the International Research Institute for Climate and Society (IRI) at Columbia's Earth Institute. She is also one of

10h

There aren't plenty of fish in the sea, so let's eat all that we catch

"Tis the season for seafood. While those in colder parts of the world tuck into turkey and hot dinners, in the southern hemisphere we get festive with prawn cocktails at Christmas and smoked salmon for New Year's. Maybe crayfish and crab. Perhaps oysters and octopus. Or barramundi and more prawns on the barbie.

10h

A novel mechanism that regulates cellular injury by phagocytes during inflammation

Phagocytes such as macrophages and neutrophils contain multiple lysosomes, which possess a variety of digestive enzymes. Upon stimulation, phagocytes secrete these digestive enzymes through a process called lysosomal exocytosis to lyse external pathogens or tumor cells. A research team led by investigators at Kanazawa University identified myoferlin as a critical regulator of this process. Further

10h

Simple method rescues stressed liver cells

Isolated human hepatocytes are essential tools in preclinical and clinical liver research, but cell quality is highly variable. Now, researchers from Uppsala University have devised a simple protocol that improves hepatocyte quality and enables cells from a wider quality spectrum to be used in standard and advanced cell culture. The findings are published in Archives of Toxicology.

10h

Structure and function of photosynthesis protein explained in detail

An international team of researchers has solved the structure and elucidated the function of photosynthetic complex I. This membrane protein complex plays a major role in dynamically rewiring photosynthesis. The team from the Max Planck Institute for Biochemistry, Osaka University and Ruhr-Universität Bochum together with their collaboration partners report the work in the journal "Science", publi

10h

Researchers monitor electron behavior during chemical reactions for the first time

In a recent publication in Science, researchers at the University of Paderborn and the Fritz Haber Institute Berlin demonstrated their ability to observe electrons' movements during a chemical reaction.

10h

PKU physicists bridge the equilibrium topological phases and non-equilibrium quantum dynamics

The emergent non-equilibrium topological patterns are shown in quench dynamics induced in a broad class of equilibrium topological phases, and provide universal dynamical characterization of such topological states.

10h

New T-wave detector uses waves of the electronic sea in graphene

A team of researchers from Russia, Great Britain, Japan, and Italy has created a graphene-based terahertz detector. Their device doubles up as a sensitive detector and a spectrometer operating in the terahertz range, and it's also a tool for studying plasmons in two-dimensional materials. All of these things existed before, but they took up a whole optical table. Researchers packed the same functi

10h

Preparation, characterization and in vitro biological activity of Soyasapogenol B

FTIR, particle size and TEM analysis confirmed that SSB was successfully loaded onto functionalized MWCNTs. Moreover, the different niosome formulations based on functionalized MWCNTs were prepared with sustainable SSB release in. The cytotoxicity could be minimized in case of chitosan and TEOS functionalization.

10h

How dietary fiber and gut bacteria protect the cardiovascular system

The fatty acid propionate helps defend against the effects of high blood pressure, including atherosclerosis and heart tissue remodeling, a study on mice has found. Gut bacteria produce the substance — which calms the immune cells that drive up blood pressure — from natural dietary fiber.

10h

North-star perspectives for Actinium-225 production at commercial scale

Resolution of both supply and cost issues allows clinical research to proceed through clinical trials and potentially produce one or more effective therapies for cancer or infectious diseases that could benefit the public.NorthStar Medical Technologies, LLC, has investigated several routes that could lead to commercial scale production of actinium-225.The outlook for future supplies of actinium-22

10h

Looking at molecules from two sides with table-top femtosecond soft-X-rays

Researchers at the Max Born Institute for Nonlinear Optics and Short Pulse Spectroscopy (MBI) have successfully combined a table-top laser-based extreme high-order harmonic source for short-pulse soft-X-ray absorption spectroscopy in the water window with novel flatjet technology. They are the first to demonstrate the simultaneous probing of carbon and nitrogen atoms in organic molecules in aqueou

10h

Kidney patients are the most complex patients

A study published in JAMA Network Open showed: nephrologists treat the most complex patients. As ERA-EDTA president Professor Carmine Zoccali explains, kidney patients are highly vulnerable and need special care, but nephrology is a neglected discipline in many European healthcare systems. According to the ERA-EDTA it is time for a better financial funding of nephrology as well as more efforts to

10h

Description of rotating molecules made easy

By turning highly complex equations into sets of simple diagrams, Feynman diagrams have established themselves as one of the sharpest tools in a theoretical physicist's toolbox. Scientists at IST Austria have now extended the technique: originally devised for subatomic particles, the simplest objects imaginable, the technique can now work with molecules. The research, which was published in the jo

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10h

Nu har staten samlet hele gasnettet på egne hænder

Det statslige Energinet køber det sidste af de selvstændige naturgasselskaber, HMN, for knap to milliarder kroner.

10h

Spareøvelser på kommende Kattegatbro bringer unikt naturområde i fare

En vejbro over Kattegat bliver dyrere end estimeret i foråret. Dermed kan den kun betales af brugerne alene, hvis der findes besparelser på projektet. Det får beboere på Vestsjælland til at frygte for den unikke natur på Røsnæs.

10h

In 1968, Apollo 8 realised the 2,000-year-old dream of a Roman philosopher

Half a century of Christmases ago, the NASA space mission Apollo 8 became the first manned craft to leave low Earth orbit, atop the unprecedentedly powerful Saturn V rocket, and head out to circumnavigate another celestial body, making 11 orbits of the moon before its return. The mission is often cast in a supporting role – a sort of warm up for the first moon landing. Yet for me, the voyage of Bo

10h

Remember the discovery of methane in the martian atmosphere? Now scientists can't find any evidence of it, at all

In 2003, scientists from NASA's Goddard Space Center made the first-ever detection of trace amounts of methane in Mars' atmosphere, a find which was confirmed a year later by the ESA's Mars Express orbiter. In December of 2014, the Curiosity rover detected a tenfold spike of methane at the base of the Gale Crater, and uncovered evidence that indicated that Mars has a seasonal methane cycle, where

10h

Arcimoto's Electric FUV 3-Wheeler Makes City Driving a Blast

The battery-powered ride may not revolutionize how we get around, but it could make life on the road a lot more enjoyable.

10h

See Peru's Pastoruri Glacier Melting via Drone-Mounted LEDs

Photographer Reuben Wu devised a creative way to shoot Peru's Pastoruri glacier at night.

10h

One of the world's fastest cameras captures motion of electrons

During the conversion of light into electricity, such as in solar cells, a large part of the input light energy is lost. This is due to the behaviour of electrons inside of materials. If light hits a material, it stimulates electrons energetically for a fraction of a second, before they pass the energy back into the environment. Because of their extremely short duration of a few femtoseconds—a fem

10h

Industrial fishing in marine protected areas poses significant threats to endangered sharks and other species

What began as a Dalhousie Ph.D. student's investigation into North Atlantic shark populations turned into an eye-opening discovery that shows a number of European Union-designated marine protected areas (MPAs) are falling short of protecting threatened biodiversity. The research will be published in Science this week (Dec. 21).

10h

Cold atoms offer a glimpse of flat physics

These days, movies and video games render increasingly realistic 3-D images on 2-D screens, giving viewers the illusion of gazing into another world. For many physicists, though, keeping things flat is far more interesting.

10h

Next generation of scientists for modelling and analysing complex systems

Quantitative models based on nonlinear dynamics and complex systems are frequently used in various areas ranging from climate research to neuroscience to power networks. Such systems, including biological organisms, consist of interacting units with oscillatory elements. For example, several measurable quantities in living systems such as blood flow, respiration and brain activity are oscillatory

10h

Winter solstice: The astronomy of Christmas

From the Neolithic to present times, the amount of sunlight we see in a day has had a profound impact on human culture. We are fast approaching the winter solstice for the Northern hemisphere, which takes place on December 21. This is the longest night of the year – once celebrated as "Yule" by the pagan people of Northern Europe before it became Christmas.

10h

Female penises evolved twice in bark lice

In a group of bark lice, a penis has evolved twice — in the females. In their nutrient-scarce environment, 'seminal gifts' are an incentive for females to force mating, leading to the co-evolution of female penises and male vaginas.

10h

A subtle strategy to spend more responsibly

Couples who spend from joint accounts are more likely to spend their money on utilitarian purchases rather than pleasurable items.

10h

Heroes and villains influence what you buy

The findings from a new study show that consumers are influenced to buy certain products based on the heroes or villains shown on the labels.

10h

Wildlife struggle to cope with extreme weather

The mass death of flying foxes in extreme heat in North Queensland last month underscores the importance of University of Queensland wildlife research released today.The UQ research sheds light on how various species have responded to major climate events.

10h

Is the US a tinderbox ready to ignite?

What is the tipping point at which tolerance for hardship and injustice turns into civic discontent in the form of street demonstrations, and how it might be closer than it seems.

10h

Standout Science Visualizations, the Quest for Quasicrystals and Other New Science Books

Book recommendations from the editors of Scientific American — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

10h

Antennal sensors allow hawkmoths to make quick moves

All insects use vision to control their position in the air when they fly, but they also integrate information from other senses. Biologists at Lund University have now shown how hawkmoths use mechanosensors in their antennae to control fast flight manoeuvres.

10h

Measuring individual argon atoms helps in understanding ocean ventilation

The age of the water in the world's oceans is critical for understanding ocean circulation, especially for the transport of gases from the atmosphere into the deep ocean. Researchers from Heidelberg University recently used an atomic physics technique they developed to determine the age of deep ocean water ranging from 50 to 1,000 years. This new dating method, which measures individual argon atom

10h

Explorer Reaches the Deepest Point in the Atlantic Ocean

Having traversed the tops of the world, he's now going deep.

10h

We discovered more about the honeybee 'wake-up call'—and it could help save them

Worldwide honeybee populations are in peril – and it's a dire situation for humans. Threats from climate change, toxic pesticides, and disease have all contributed to a steep honeybee population decline since 2006. And as a third of the food we eat is a direct result of insect pollination – including by honeybees – there could be serious consequences for us if the species goes extinct.

10h

How to halve the environmental impact of your Christmas dinner

The roast Christmas dinner is a valued tradition for many families in the UK and across the globe.

10h

Power plants produce more ultrafine dust than traffic

Ultrafine particles affect both health and climate. In urban areas, road traffic is considered to be the main source of the small particles. However, a long-term measurement campaign of researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) outside of cities has now revealed a source that particularly affects regional climate: modern coal-fired power plants. In the Bulletin of the American Meteoro

10h

'Kondo metamagnet' is first in a family of eccentric quantum crystals

There's an oddball in most families, but Rice University physicist Emilia Morosan has discovered an entire clan of eccentric compounds that could help explain the mysterious electronic and magnetic workings of other quantum materials engineers are eying for next-generation computers and electronics.

11h

When a brand is like a secret lover

Consumers who hide the fact that they use certain brands can increase in individual's connection to the brand.

11h

Four People Who Could Be the Next Defense Secretary

Rumors about James Mattis’s impending departure as President Donald Trump’s defense secretary have swirled for months. On Thursday, those rumors became reality. Whoever succeeds Mattis—who resigned in protest over the president’s military policy—will face the same challenges as the outgoing defense secretary: an impetuous president, fraying alliances, and rising dangers from adversaries old and n

11h

NASA's Webb Telescope wrapped in a mobile clean room

Before moving NASA's James Webb Space Telescope, and to assure that it's kept clean and safe, Webb got a very special wrapping treatment. The wrapping acts as a "mobile clean room," safeguarding the technological marvel from contaminants.

11h

David vs. Goliath: What a tiny electron can tell us about the structure of the universe

What is the shape of an electron? If you recall pictures from your high school science books, the answer seems quite clear: an electron is a small ball of negative charge that is smaller than an atom. This, however, is quite far from the truth.

11h

Disappointment About Gifts Is Good for Kids Who Have Enough

Disappointment is a natural human emotion that occurs after a perceived failure.

11h

Structure and function of photosynthesis protein explained in detail

An international team of researchers has solved the structure and elucidated the function of photosynthetic complex I. This membrane protein complex plays a major role in dynamically rewiring photosynthesis. The team from the Max Planck Institute for Biochemistry, Osaka University and Ruhr-Universität Bochum together with their collaboration partners report the work in the journal Science, publish

11h

Best of Last Year—The top Phys.org articles of 2018

It was another great year for science, and physics was front and center, as a team at the University of Oxford announced that they may have solved one of the biggest mysteries in modern physics. They came up with a new theory that could explain the missing 95 percent of the cosmos, and in so doing bring balance to the universe. Their theory unites dark matter and dark energy, resulting in a fluid,

11h

Happy Holidays!

Please note our office will be closed from December 24-January 1. See you in the new year!

11h

Researcher suggests rivers may cause earthquakes

Ryan Thigpen, an assistant professor in the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences in the University of Kentucky College of Arts and Sciences, has co-authored a paper that describes how river erosion may lead to more earthquakes.

11h

Same genes allow humans and domestic animals to survive in Arctic conditions

Juha Kantanen, a research professor at the Natural Resources Institute Finland (Luke), has collected a large set of biological materials and data for the study of the genomes of Northern domestic animals, reindeer, cattle and horses during his expeditions in a project called Arctic Ark.

11h

Major gaps remain in how traditional knowledge is used in salmon governance in Norway and Finland

A new article published today in the journal Arctic points to major challenges in the ways traditional knowledge is included in the management of Atlantic salmon in Norway and Finland. Comparing different policy and research approaches in the two countries in relation to international expectations towards traditional knowledge inclusion (i.e. the Convention on Biodiversity and at the Arctic policy

11h

Sulfate helps plants cope with water scarcity

Plants absorb the mineral sulfate from groundwater. An international research team led by scientists from Heidelberg University has uncovered how sulfate controls the production of the drought stress hormone ABA in plants and thus contributes to their drought-resistance. These findings improve scientists' understanding of how the drought-stress signal travels from the roots to the leaves. The stud

11h

'A rose with a thousand petals' … what makes an aphorism – and is this a golden age?

Forget haikus, epigrams, proverbs, maxims, adages and riddles. If you’re needing a sliver of wisdom, try an aphorism. There are certainly plenty around … “Be the change you want to see in the world.” “Raise your words, not your voice. It is rain that grows flowers, not thunder.” “Winners are not those who never fail, but those who never quit.” Social media, these days, burgeons with such words of

11h

Tree resin could replace fossil fuels in everything from printer ink to shoe polish

Nexus Media News Genetically engineered trees could supply the chemicals needed to make glue, paint, varnish and other household goods. Tree resin could replace the oil and gas byproducts used in adhesives, cleaning supplies and other household goods. To lower the cost of resin, scientists want to…

11h

Study: You're Going to Keep Aging Until You Die

Once you reach a very advanced age, you reach a sort of "aging plateau," according to some experts. A new study argues that this is wrong.

11h

Wildlife struggle to cope with extreme weather

The mass death of flying foxes in extreme heat in North Queensland last month underscores the importance of University of Queensland wildlife research released today.

11h

How different types of knowledge impact the growth of new firms

Diversifying into new industries is vital to an economy's ability to grow and generate wealth. But to branch out into new industrial activities, a city, region or country must first have a pool of people with the right mix of knowledge and experience to make those pioneering firms a success.

11h

Elby S1 9-Speed E-Bike Review: Heavy and Expensive, but Great

Elby asked: How do you get people on an electric bike who have never biked before?

11h

Aquaman Has No Business Being This Good

Far be it from me to judge other nations, but there’s something rotten at the core of Atlantis, the underwater setting of the new DC Comics blockbuster Aquaman . The realm’s monarchical system of primogeniture has handed the throne to a warmongering maniac named Orm (played by Patrick Wilson). Relationships with the crab people of the Brine kingdom and the spiky monsters of the underwater trenche

11h

Low Quality Studies Belie Hype about Research Boom in China

Few Chinese researchers are regarded as global leaders, as the pressure for rapid output prevails — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

The coolest experiment in the universe

What's the coldest place you can think of? Temperatures on a winter day in Antarctica dip as low as -120ºF (-85ºC). On the dark side of the Moon, they hit -280ºF (-173ºC). But inside NASA's Cold Atom Laboratory on the International Space Station, scientists are creating something even colder.

11h

Mercury levels in fish fluctuate along with water levels in lakes

A new study has found an unexpected connection between water levels in lakes and toxic mercury levels in fish. When droughts cause water levels to drop, the levels of mercury found in fish also plummet. In wetter weather, water levels rise and levels of mercury in fish increase.

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Latest step toward world's largest telescope that will observe 'first stars and galaxies ever formed'

A cutting-edge instrument developed by scientists at the University of Oxford has passed critical tests and gained a powerful adaptive optics system.

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Study projects a dramatic increase in annual high-heat days in the U.S. Northeast by the century's end

Long-term assessment of likely regional and local climate impacts is critical to enabling municipalities, businesses, and regional economies to prepare for potentially damaging and costly effects of climate change—from prolonged droughts to more frequent and intense extreme events such as major storms and heatwaves.

11h

Seeds of giant galaxies formed in the early universe

Modern galaxies show a wide diversity, including dwarf galaxies, irregular galaxies, spiral galaxies, and massive elliptical galaxies. This final type, massive elliptical galaxies, provides astronomers with a puzzle. Although they are the most massive galaxies with the most stars, almost all of their stars are old. At some time during the past the progenitors of massive elliptical galaxies must ha

11h

Bulletin details pre- and post-fire soils research

A new University of Wyoming bulletin contributes to the growing knowledge base of ecosystem recovery following high-intensity forest fires.

11h

New insights into pion condensation and the formation of neutron stars

In 1973, Russian physicist A.B. Migdal predicted the phenomenon of pion condensation above a critical, extremely high—several times higher than that for normal matter— nuclear density. Although this condensation has never been observed, it is expected to play a key role in the rapid cooling process of the core of neutron stars. These city-size heavy stellar objects are so dense that on Earth, one

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Baby star's fiery tantrum could create the building blocks of planets

A massive stellar flare on a baby star has been spotted by University of Warwick astronomers, shedding light on the origins of potentially habitable exoplanets.

12h

Svenske deleløbehjul lander i København efter nytår

200 e-scooters, også kendt som elektriske løbehjul, bliver tilgængelige på Vesterbro og Nørrebro i starten af 2019, oplyser svensk selskab. Men kommunen har endnu ikke givet tilladelse, understreger enhedschef.

12h

The Genetic Legacy of the Spanish Inquisition

In 1492, best known as the year Columbus sailed the ocean blue, Spain also decided to expel all practicing Jews from its kingdom. Jews who did not leave—and were not murdered—were forced to become Catholics. Along with those who converted during earlier pogroms, they became known as conversos. As Spain expanded its empire in the Americas, conversos made their way to the colonies too. The stories

12h

How the Press Sustains the Forever War

When President Donald Trump was asked to identify America’s “biggest foe globally” earlier this year, he singled out the European Union . He regularly directs harsh criticism at the leaders of western-European allies, yet lavishes extravagant praise on murderous autocrats, even becoming the first president to profess “ love ” for a North Korean dictator. There’s no doubt, in other words, that out

12h

3 tips for avoiding ‘wine teeth’

Why do some people’s teeth stain after drinking red wine—and how can you prevent it while enjoying a glass or two during the holidays? The answer lies in understanding the relationship between the nature of wine and your tooth enamel, says Uchenna Akosa, a dentist who heads Rutgers University Health University Dental Associates in New Brunswick, New Jersey, the faculty practice of Rutgers School

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Brækvirus topper i julen: 5 råd til at undgå smitsom julebuffet

Mangelfuld håndvask og lemfældig omgang med knive, gafler og skeer lægger mange danskere ned med Roskildesyge.

12h

In Project Maven's Wake, the Pentagon Seeks AI Tech Talent

The Defense Department wants to use AI in warfare. In the aftermath of Project Maven, it still needs Big Tech’s help.

12h

A Courting Peacock Can Shake Its Partner’s Head From Afar

A peacock’s tail is so ostentatious that you could easily miss other parts of its anatomy that, on any other bird, would be unmissable. On the heads of both male and female peafowl, there’s a crest of stiff, spatula-like feathers that resemble the helmet of a Roman centurion. It’s a flamboyant, standout trait that, under the circumstances, is just another decoration among many equally eye-catchin

12h

Trump Needs a Secretary of Defense Who Agrees With Him

James Mattis was an unusual choice for secretary of defense, an explicitly civilian role. It wasn’t so long ago that Mattis was the commander of Centcom, America’s sprawling military presence in the Middle East and Central Asia. Sure enough, there was a widespread sense in the Pentagon that Mattis was more inclined to trust senior military officials, many of whom he came to know over the course o

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Hominin v monkey deathmatch ended in a draw when they fell down a hole

Fossils suggest that a 3.6-million-year-old early human ancestor called "Little Foot" may have died in a violent encounter with a primitive baboon

12h

Mars Express beams back images of ice-filled Korolev crater

Trapped layer of cold air keeps water frozen in 50-mile-wide impact crater The stunning Korolev crater in the northern lowlands of Mars is filled with ice all year round owing to a trapped layer of cold Martian air that keeps the water frozen. The 50-mile-wide crater contains 530 cubic miles of water ice, as much as Great Bear Lake in northern Canada, and in the centre of the crater the ice is mo

12h

Gel made from birch bark reduces skin scarring from cuts and burns

A dressing made from birch bark – which has long been used in traditional medicine to wrap wounds – allows cuts and burns to heal faster with less scarring

12h

Seeking the perfect cocktail? Let science be your bartender

Your fizz lost its fizz and your sling its swing? Using network theory and a dash of psychology, New Scientist has created drinks recipes to leave you shaken and stirred

12h

YouTube Is a Metaphor for the Great American Dumpster Fire

YouTube has had a harrowing, high-profile year, and its growing pains reflect the garbage mess that is America in 2018.

12h

Women are finally getting equal access to the Hubble Space Telescope

For years, women were not receiving a fair share of access to the Hubble Space Telescope, but making requests anonymous has led to parity with men for the first time

12h

Who Wins When Cash Is No Longer King?

Of the most popular coffee shops in San Francisco’s Financial District, only one is manned by a robot . Every morning, in a glass-and-wood booth on the corner of One Bush Street, customers queue around a whirring hydraulic arm, waiting for it to serve them cappuccino. It’s an odd sight. Cafe X has three San Francisco locations, and all are cashless and fully automated, with orders taken via app.

12h

The day I tasted climate change

Every one of us will have a moment when global warming gets personal.

12h

Pterosaurs may have been covered in fur and primitive feathers

A new study provides evidence of plumelike structures in ancient flying reptiles.

12h

The Ethics of Paternalism

Should policy makers intervene to make people stop doing things that are bad for them? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

12h

The idiosyncratic mammalian diversification after extinction of the dinosaurs

Mass extinction typically conjures a picture of a meteor falling to Earth and decimating the dinosaurs along with everything else. However, this is not exactly what happened. Different groups of living beings were affected differently by the various mass extinctions that have occurred during the planet's history.

12h

How sperm stem cells maintain their numbers

The steady production of sperm relies on the number of sperm stem cells in the testis remaining constant. Researchers including Assistant Professor Yu Kitadate and Professor Shosei Yoshida (developmental biologists at the National Institute for Basic Biology within the National Institutes of Natural Sciences in Japan) and Professor Benjamin Simons (a theoretical physicist at the University of Camb

12h

Paper sensors remove the sting of diabetic testing

A technique that enables biologically active enzymes to survive the rigors of inkjet printing presents a promising alternative to routine blood screening finger jabs for diabetic blood sugar levels. The KAUST-led team used this approach to make disposable devices that can measure glucose concentrations in human saliva.

12h

Enzyme's unfrozen adventure: In crystallo protein thermodynamics

Enzymes—biocatalysts made of proteins—are hugely important molecules that catalyze the reactions and processes in living organisms. Ongoing work to understand their structures and reaction mechanisms is therefore vital to broaden our knowledge and contribute to scientific and medical advances.

12h

In response to heat, the more affluent use air-conditioners while low-income households use water

Singapore households from different socioeconomic groups vary significantly in their use of water and electricity for heat relief, according to a recent study conducted by Associate Professor Alberto Salvo from the Department of Economics at the National University of Singapore (NUS) Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences.

12h

More young and other traits help mammals adapt to urban environments

Species of mammals that live in urban environments produce more young compared to other mammals. But along with this advantage, mammals have other strategies to successfully inhabit cities. This is what Radboud University ecologist Luca Santini and colleagues found in a study that they will publish in Ecology Letters on 21 December. "This is the first step of many to understand why certain mammals

12h

Mærsk-partners plastoprydning i Stillehavet sejler

The Ocean Cleanups flydebom opsamler godt nok plasten, men den forsvinder igen.

13h

Plant Hallucinogen Holds Hope for Diabetes Treatment

A potent molecular cocktail containing a compound from ayahuasca spurs rapid growth of insulin-producing cells — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

13h

Scuba-diving lizard can stay underwater for at least 16 minutes

The water anole of Costa Rica dives underwater to escape from predators such as birds by blowing out and re-inhaling a large bubble of air

13h

Derfor trækker det igen ud med den tyske godkendelse af Femern-tunnelen

En retssag om en motorvej og problemerne med at finansiere tunnelen gør, at der skal en ekstra kvalitetssikring af den tyske miljøgodkendelse til, inden de 1.200 sider kan trykkes og lægges frem for borgerne.

13h

For første gang får lastbiler krav om at sænke CO2-udslippet

Nye lastbiler i EU skal udlede 15 procent mindre CO2 i 2025 og 30 procent mindre i 2030, lyder det fra ministerrådet. Danmark håber, at Europa-Parlamentet kan skærpe kravene

13h

The Special Counsel Is Bearing Down on Roger Stone

Roger Stone, a longtime adviser to President Donald Trump, appears to be at the center of Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s probe into a potential conspiracy between the Trump campaign and Russia because of his uncanny predictions throughout 2016 about WikiLeaks, which published Democratic documents stolen by Russia during the election. The self-proclaimed “dirty trickster” said several times in 2

13h

Kirsten Gillibrand’s Invocation of ‘Intersectionality’ Backfires

On December 4, Senator Kirsten Gillibrand tweeted something that was consistent with her established mode of communication: It was self-serving; it helped to distance her from her former identity as a lawyer for Big Tobacco and as a Democratic congresswoman from a conservative district who had supported gun rights and opposed any form of amnesty for illegal immigrants; and it wrapped her in the b

13h

Much Ado About 2,200 Troops in Syria

Rarely has the repositioning of 2,200 American troops out of a far-flung military theater caused such a ruckus. Donald Trump’s abrupt decision to withdraw U.S. ground forces from Syria left his hawkish allies in the Republican Party, along with much of the American foreign-policy establishment, positively aghast. It even prompted Trump’s secretary of defense, James Mattis, to resign on Thursday.

13h

Vice Is a Goofy and Pedantic Dick Cheney Biopic

My problems with Vice , the writer-director Adam McKay’s zany yet hectoring biopic of Dick Cheney, begin with its title. It might be apt for a movie about Vice Media, for instance. (There would appear to be plenty to work with .) Or perhaps for a film about policing Times Square in the 1970s and ’80s. But as much as the film tries to persuade us otherwise, no one refers to the vice president of t

13h

A Shutdown Would Be a Fitting End to the GOP Majority

Anyone who says that the era of divided government will begin when Democrats take control of the House next month clearly hasn’t been watching Congress closely for the past few years. There’s already been divided government—it’s just divisions among Republicans that have defined the era. Speaker Paul Ryan is on the verge of handing over the gavel to Nancy Pelosi, but first the GOP majority was de

13h

If you lost friends in the 2016 election, watch this

As the saying goes: Diversity isn't rocket science—it's harder. Living in a diverse civil society isn't just about embracing the things we like, says Eboo Patel. That's the 'egg rolls and samosas' view. Diversity means cooperating through disagreements. Have you ever judged someone harshly, ended a relationship or avoided one because of a fundamental disagreement? "Does the fact of that disagreem

13h

We tried teaching an AI to write Christmas movie plots. Hilarity ensued. Eventually.

Using a neural network to create ridiculous plot lines takes a lot of work—and reveals the challenges of generating human language.

13h

Pollutants from wildfires affect crop and vegetation growth hundreds of kilometers from impact zone

The startling extent to which violent wildfires, similar to those that ravaged large swathes of California recently, affect forests and crops way beyond the boundaries of the blaze has been revealed.

14h

Forget-me-not: Scientists pinpoint memory mechanism in plants

Plant scientists at the Universities of Birmingham and Nottingham have unravelled a mechanism that enables flowering plants to sense and 'remember' changes in their environment.

14h

University of Birmingham develops sight-saving treatment for eye infection or trauma

Scientists at the University of Birmingham have developed a novel eye drop that rapidly reduces sight-threatening scarring to the surface of the eye.

14h

Fire air pollution weakens forest productivity

Fire impacts on global carbon cycle. The damage to ecosystem productivity not only occurs in fire regimes, but also over the downwind areas through long-range transport of air pollution. Such negative impacts may exacerbate in the future as fire activities are expected to escalate in a warming climate.

14h

Studie: Hjernens støtteceller har defekt udvikling ved Huntingtons sygdom

Den neurologiske lidelse Huntingtons sygdom medfører ændringer i adfærd og motorik,…

14h

DSB vil have data, der kan kortlægge rejsemønstre over hele landet

Med mobilitetsdata fra eksempelvis teleselskaber vil DSB kortlægge rejsemønstre og bruge dem i den fremtidige planlægning af den kollektive transport. Data skal indsamles på tværs af alle transportformer og over hele Danmark.

14h

Ole Birk: Ny undersøgelse viser, at bilisterne alene kan betale Kattegat-bro

Hvis der findes lidt besparelser hist og pist, kan ny vejbro over Kattegat blive betalt af brugerne alene, siger transportministeren ved offentliggørelsen af ny screeningsrapport. Blå blok sætter forundersøgelse til 60 mio. kr. i gang.

14h

Scientists Find A Brain Circuit That Could Explain Seasonal Depression

Research suggests the winter blues are triggered by specialized light-sensing cells in the retina that communicate directly with brain areas involved in mood. (Image credit: Omikron /Getty Images/Science Source)

14h

Mattis Always Understood Trump’s Severe Defects

In the spring of 2016, not long after The Atlantic published an article I had written about President Barack Obama’s foreign-policy record , I visited the Hoover Institution, a think tank on the campus of Stanford University, where James Mattis had sequestered himself in exceedingly comfortable exile. He was writing a book, teaching a bit, and trying to suppress, with intermittent success, the re

14h

Forget-me-not: Scientists pinpoint memory mechanism in plants

Plant scientists at the Universities of Birmingham and Nottingham have unravelled a mechanism that enables flowering plants to sense and 'remember' changes in their environment.

14h

Pollutants from wildfires affect crop and vegetation growth hundreds of kilometers from impact zone

Pollutants from wild fires affect crop and vegetation growth hundreds of kilometres from impact zone, research shows

14h

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