Search Posts

Nyheder2018december23

Quantum Communication Can Travel Faster—It's Not Just a Myth
A new experiment showed for the first time that quantum messages can indeed be speedier than what's seen in regular computing.
5h
Forskere: Skru op for bakteriedræbende lys og ned for antibiotika
Dansk forskningsprojekt viser, at en kombineret behandling med ultraviolet lys og antibiotika er så effektiv, at 90 procent af medicinen kan spares væk.
5h
I år kom klimaet for alvor på dagsordenen
PLUS. I 2018 fik klima- og energipolitikken så stor opmærksomhed som aldrig før, og vi fik en længe ventet, bred energiaftale med alle Folketingets partier – men ingen klimaplan, som mange ellers havde håbet på.
Connected cars accelerate down data-collection highway
That holiday trip over the river and through the woods to grandmother's house could turn into nice little gift for automakers as they increasingly collect oodles and oodles of data about the driver.

6h

The science stories that shook 2018
Our guest scientists pick the breakthroughs and discoveries that defined their year, from insights into human evolution to our first trip aboard an asteroid Take a deep breath. Dive into the emerald water. It’s 13 minutes and 70 metres down to lunch. Are you dead yet? Not if you are one of the Bajau “sea nomads ” of south-east Asia, who have been free-diving like this for more than 1,000 years, re

2h

Divining roots: Revealing how plants branch out to access water
New research has discovered how plant roots sense the availability of moisture in soil and then adapt their shape to optimise acquisition of water.
DNA-test under juletræet? Virksomhed sælger resultaterne til medicinalgigant
Det er svært at gennemskue, hvem der får adgang til vores genetiske data og andre personlige informationer, når vi køber private DNA-tests, vurderer overlæge.

now

Spørg Fagfolket: Hvorfor ser vi en strålekrans omkring stjernerne?
En læser undrer sig over, hvorfor vi på fotografier ofte ser en strålekrans rundt om stjernen, som jo ellers er rund. Var det mon den, hyrderne i Bethlehem så? Det svarer Ole J. Knudsen fra Aarhus Universitet på.

24min

You can help beat cancer
Meet Claire, a PhD researcher developing cancer treatments. Find out why she needs your help to beat cancer

1h

Koks i hukommelsen: Var julen hvidere, da far var dreng?
Vi har haft hvid jul overraskende få gange gennem tiden ifølge DMI. Men din hukommelse fortæller muligvis noget andet, siger forsker.

3h

Vind med Ingeniørens julekalender: 23. december
Vær med i Ingeniørens julekalender 2018. Hver dag med nye præmier!

5h

6h

'Volcano' tsunami kills at least 43 in Indonesia
At least 43 people have been killed and nearly 600 injured in a tsunami in Indonesia that may have been caused by a volcano known as the "child" of the legendary Krakatoa, officials said Sunday.

6h

Slack: Some accounts mistakenly deactivated during update
Slack says it mistakenly deactivated accounts for some of the users of its work-focused messaging service this week as it implemented a system update to comply with U.S. economic sanctions and trade embargoes.

6h

Eleanor Maccoby, Pathbreaker on How Boys and Girls Differ, Dies at 101
An eminent psychologist, she focused on various factors in the development of the sexes, finding that social settings magnified differences.

7h

Howler monkey study examines mechanisms of new species formation
A new study of interbreeding between two species of howler monkeys in Mexico is yielding insights into the forces that drive the evolution of new species.

9h

5 holidays to celebrate this year that aren’t Christmas
Christmas is an all consuming holiday, celebrated even in cultures where Christianity never took root. However, some people just can't take it anymore. Some of them even invented new holidays as alternatives. While some of the holidays are celebrated half jokingly, they all offer an escape from an often overbearing Christmas season. Christmas can be maddening. Between the endless barrage of tacky

11h

From 1990 to 2016, dementia has more than doubled
The incidence of dementia is rising at an alarming rate While it's primarily diagnosed over age 50, it starts decades earlier Modifying behavior to avoid a handful of known risk factors can help reduce the chance of getting dementia A multi-university study lead by the University of Melbourne and the University of Washington has found that the number of people living with dementia worldwide shot

11h

GeoBits: Unearthly, Bizarre and Shiny Edition
The latest roundup of geologic goodness — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

12h

Crayfish experience something like anxiety when they shed their armour
Crayfish have to shed their armour to grow, leaving them temporarily undefended. During this time, they show signs of anxiety – but human anti-anxiety drugs change this

14h

The Lunar Farside and the Cosmic Dark Age
China's Chang'e 4 mission to the moon has something else up its sleeve — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

14h

Russisk robot var et menneske: Her er fem andre videnskabelige fupnumre
Fra falskt abemenneske til klippe-klistre-dinosaur. Gang på gang er vi blevet snydt af opfindsomme svindelnumre forklædt som videnskab.

15h

Hamish the polar bear turns one
Hamish the polar bear celebrates his first birthday in his Highland home.

16h

Christmas plastic workshop to help reduce festive waste
Workshops have been held in Whitley Bay to help reduce the use of plastic over Christmas.

16h

Can Intelligence Buy You Happiness?
New research suggests that IQ leads to greater well-being by enabling one to acquire the financial and educational means necessary to live a better life. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

16h

2019 Preview: 30 cold cases to be solved using DNA ancestry websites
Arrests will finally be made in connection to dozens of decades-old murder and rape cases, as thousands more people upload their DNA to family tree websites

17h

Slucifer Is Busting at the Seams | Gold Rush
With no water, Slucifer is building up with material, causing it to break down. Stream Full Episodes of Gold Rush: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/gold-rush/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/GoldRush/ https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Gold_Rush https://twitter.com/Discovery We're on

17h

Hundredårsjagten på det perfekte dæksel – prolog og kapitel 1
PLUS. En fortælling i tre dele om en matematisk udfordring.

18h

Too far right and left? DC think tank releases manifesto for radical centrism
Niskanen Center, a Washington think tank, argues for avoiding the extremes of political positions. The analysts propose that both a regulated free market and bolstered social insurance programs are important. If we don't correct course soon, the American political system may never recover, warn the authors. None If you've had enough of all the political bickering coming from all sides, a Washingt

18h

Brazil court overrules injunction on Boeing-Embraer tie-up
A Brazilian court on Saturday shot down a fresh injunction by a judge over a plan by planemakers Boeing of the US and Embraer of Brazil to create a $5.26-billion joint venture, Brazil's state news agency said.

18h

Getting into the spirit: how Christmas makes us think of ghosts
Yuletide ghost stories have shaped my life – as well as my understanding of what happens next… Scrooge was famously haunted by three spectral visitors at Christmas time, but the tradition of telling ghost stories at midwinter goes back much further than Dickens. People have been gathering around the fire to tell stories at Yule, the pagan festival to mark the winter solstice, for centuries. As th

18h

NASA probe will hurtle past the most distant object we’ve ever visited
In 2015, NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft whizzed past Pluto. Now it is about to arrive at Ultima Thule, a tiny space rock 6.6 billion kilometres away from Earth

18h

The Most-Read WIRED Business Stories of 2018
Scandals of all stripes dominated the news, from Facebook's data leaks to Google's diversity war.

18h

Space Photos of the Week: Juno Spies Jupiter's Mesmerizing Clouds
The gas giant could hold clues to the formation of our solar system.

18h

This Year’s Must-Read Letters to the Editor
Over the course of 2018, thousands of Atlantic readers wrote us letters about articles in our magazine and on our website. Here are some of the most memorable. A Pediatrician Tells His Former Patient: “I Am Disappointed in Myself” “I never initiated discussions relating to sexuality, abuse, or rape.” “ I Want to Grow Up to Be Someone That Fights for Families Like Yours” Teenagers in California re

18h

Family Weekly: How Tinder Sparked a Dating Revolution
This Week in Family In 2013, the dating app Tinder became available to all smartphone users. Five years later, it’s clear that the app has changed how a generation of Americans approach dating and courtship , says the Atlantic staff writer Ashley Fetters. “Meanwhile, the underlying challenges—the loneliness, the boredom, the roller coaster of hope and disappointment—of being ‘single and looking,’

19h

The right and wrong ways to clear ice and snow from your car
DIY Not every melting solution is a good one. You head out in the morning, only to discover that your car sports a layer of ice, snow, or both. Here are the best ways to rescue your vehicle—and a few to avoid.

19h

Christmas 'Hippo' Asteroid Is Buzzing Earth, Its Closest Flyby in 400 Years
A small asteroid is flying safely by Earth Saturday (Dec. 22) and according to the folks at NASA, it looks just like the mighty hippo in new radar images.

19h

10 Amazing Things We Learned About Humans in 2018
The human body is amazingly complex, which is why, even in this day and age, we continue to learn new things about ourselves.

19h

The Science of Bath Bombs (and How to Make Them)
Here's the science behind that satisfying fizz of a bath bomb, plus, how to make your own at home.

19h

7 Illusions That Blew Our Minds in 2018
An arrow points right. Turn it 180 degrees, it still points right. Turn it again… it points right.

19h

'Max Einstein' Will Help Kids Today Relate to the Genius
The latest from James Patterson and Chris Grabenstein looks at the scientist's work through the eyes of a 12-year-old girl.

19h

A NASA Hack, a PewDiePie Fan, and More Security News
Amazon sends Echo recordings to the wrong person, Russians tried to get US Treasury dirt on Clinton donors, and more of the week's top security news.

19h

The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel’s Rejection of ‘Having It All’
This article contains spoilers through Season 2 of The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel. In the first act of Stephen Sondheim’s Sunday in the Park With George , a painter sings “Finishing the Hat,” a melancholic but sweepingly lovely confession that art will always come first. The impulse, for George, to paint—to finish the hat, the dog, the grass, the sky—even when it costs him love, is paramount. “When th

20h

Area 51 and the epistemology of the unexplained
What if aliens have been visiting us all along? "Skeptical optimism" and investigations into the unknown Neurodiversity and deficiencies as sources of power None Between subjective experience and the things most people can accept as objective facts, there yawns a cavernous gulf. Imagine you're on a stage in front of 50,000 strangers trying to explain what it felt like to fall in love for the firs

20h

The Best of the Physics arXiv (week ending December 22, 2018)
This week’s most thought-provoking papers from the Physics arXiv.

20h

Super-Fast Airport Scanners Are Coming—Eventually
They'll use AI and millimeter wave technology to speed you through the lines and even monitor crowds from afar.

20h

In 2018, Movies Finally Got the Internet Right—Well, Mostly
From 'The Incredibles 2' to indie breakouts like 'Eighth Grade,' Hollywood is finally starting to understand how completely technology shapes our lives.

20h

Researchers Show Parachutes Don't Work, But There's A Catch
A study found parachutes were no more effective than backpacks in preventing harm to people jumping from aircraft. The researchers' tongue-in-cheek experiment makes a deeper point about science. (Image credit: Michael Htten/EyeEm/Getty Images)

20h

'Relaxation Music' Works–But So Does Chopin
So-called 'relaxation music' is only about as effective as a soothing Chopin piece at lulling listeners into a relaxed state. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

20h

Udenfor med dig! Sådan undgår du vinterdepression
Lys er vigtigt for os. Derfor bliver nogle af os ramt af vinterdepression i de mørke vintermåneder. Men der er gode råd, som kan gøre dig vinterklar.

21h

Ingeniører jagter bryggefejl med tunge og næse
Jagten på fejl er sat ind, når Niras' smagspanel tester øl fra bryggerier verden over. For brygmester Jesper Kailow Hejselbæk er håbet, at han også kan hjælpe med at udbedre fejlene.

21h

Mere og mere forskning trækkes tilbage: En tredjedel skyldes snyd
Ny dansk forskning viser, at der er sket en voldsom stigning i antallet af forskningsartikler, der trækkes tilbage på grund af fejl – herunder snyd.

21h

Trump's Unacknowledged Victory in Stemming the Flow of Asylum Seekers
President Donald Trump seems determined to force a government shutdown over partial funding for his proposed border wall, and it is not hard to see why. As Mark Krikorian, the director of the Center for Immigration Studies, a restrictionist think tank, observed in an interview with The Washington Post , Trump is exquisitely sensitive to ridicule from those he sees as his staunchest supporters. As

21h

Democrats in New York Are Ready to Deploy Their Newfound Power
NEW YORK —How blue can New York go? The Empire State has an understandable reputation as one of the nation’s foremost progressive bastions, having cast its presidential vote for a Democrat in each of the past eight elections—a longer streak than any large state in the country, including California. But for most of that time—indeed, for all but three of the past 70 years—Republicans have controlle

21h

What a Border-Wall GoFundMe Campaign Says About America
The federal government has partially shut down , and Donald Trump still doesn’t have money for a border wall. Earlier this week, the president rejected a funding bill that would keep nine federal departments operational, and Congress scrambled to find a fix by a deadline of midnight on Friday—but to no avail. The rejected bill didn’t include a desired $5 billion for Trump’s long-promised wall alo

21h

WIRED’s Favorite Gear of 2018: iPhone XR, Google Home Hub, and More
From our favorite phone to the best smart-home innovation, this is all of 2018's best gear.

21h

2018 Was the Year That Tech Put Limits on AI
As employees and researchers push back, companies including Google and Microsoft are pledging not to use powerful AI technology in certain ways.

21h

Why do wombats poo cubes and turkeys spirals? One woman is finding out
Engineer Patricia Yang won an IgNobel prize for flushing out a universal law of animal urination. Next up? Discovering why wombat stools come out as cubes

21h

The Kurds: Betrayed Again by Washington
The warning signs were there all along, yet President Donald Trump’s brusque decision to pull U.S. forces out of northeast Syria nevertheless stunned Syria’s Kurds. Overnight, their dream of establishing an autonomous Kurdish region has been dashed, and they must now choose between a return to the mountains in a bid for survival, or staying put, awaiting a resurgent Assad regime and what it has i

22h

Rare albino orangutan 'Alba' returns to the wild
Alba, the world's only known albino orangutan, has been through many months of rehabilitation.

22h

You Can't Serve Both Trump and America
The story is told of Jim Mattis, when he was the commanding general at Quantico, relieving a young lance corporal on Christmas. The rest of that wintry day, those entering the front gate of the Marine base were startled to see that the sentry was a general, checking passes and waving cars through so that a young man could spend the holiday with his family. It is the kind of behavior animated by s

22h

Resist the Lure of Theological Politics
There is something corrupting not just about the struggle for power through politics but about politics itself. Philosophers and pundits have long condemned the political as both profane and belittling, the near opposite of the pure and higher spiritual pursuits. In his valediction for the great, controversial scholar Edward Said, Christopher Hitchens wrote : “Indeed, if it had not been for the i

22h

Building a Chinese-Food Empire
Andrew Cherng started working in the United States at 18, while he pursued an undergraduate degree in mathematics at Baker University, in Kansas. Starting in 1967, he began spending his summers in New York City, working in a restaurant where his father had connections. It was his first real job. The work was fast-paced, his English wasn’t perfect, and New Yorkers were ruthless, he says. After Che

22h

22h

Why “I’m not racist” is only half the story
White guilt is a roadblock to equality, says Robin DiAngelo. It takes race conversations off the table and maintains the status quo. "How do so many of us who are white individually feel so free of racism and yet we live in a society that is so profoundly separate and unequal by race?" asks DiAngelo. Stop feeling bad—that's not productive. Instead, start doing something to dismantle the systemic

22h

The very best of 2018! 10 videos to get smarter, faster
365 days, 365 videos — it's been another huge year for big ideas. We've tallied up the 10 most popular, as chosen by you, plus the most controversial and most talked about videos of 2018. Enjoy! Jordan Peterson: The fatal flaw in leftist American politics Superhumans: The remarkable brain waves of high-level meditators Why Michio Kaku wants to avoid alien contact at all costs Bored out of your mi

22h

Earthrise: the story behind our planet's most famous photo
When Bill Anders took this photograph from the Apollo spacecraft on Christmas Eve in 1968, our relationship with the world changed forever This photograph is now half a century old. It was taken by the astronaut Bill Anders on Christmas Eve 1968 as the Apollo 8 spacecraft rounded the dark side of the moon for a fourth time. When Earth came up over the horizon, Anders scrabbled for his Hasselblad

23h

Christmas story: Unauthorized Bread by Cory Doctorow
In our exclusive extract, dripping with human kindness (well, butter) our heroine Salima receives her daily bread – eventually

23h

Quiz: Kan du tippe 13 rigtige om 2019?
Vind tre flasker god rødvin i Ingeniørens julequiz: Kan du regne ud, hvad der kommer til at ske i det kommende år? Vi skal have dine svar senest 8. januar 2019.

1d

Gensaks i en gråzone – hvad dælen stiller vi op med Crispr?
PLUS. Genredigeringsværktøjet Crispr er efterhånden en moden teknologi. Men lovgivningen er stadig fyldt med uafklarede gråzoner.

1d

Howler monkey study examines mechanisms of new species formation
A new University of Michigan study of interbreeding between two species of howler monkeys in Mexico is yielding insights into the forces that drive the evolution of new species.

1d

Protected Chilean sea lions are the 'enemy' of fishermen
Off the coast of Chile, fisherman face competition from a cunning carnivorous hunter that has decimated their industry due to its voracious appetite.

1d

Scott Pruitt never gave up EPA plans to debate climate science, records show
White House denied administrator’s ‘red team, blue team’ idea Emails: staff considered questioning greenhouse gases finding In Scott Pruitt’s final weeks as the administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency, his political advisers were still considering ways to formally raise doubts about climate change science, agency records show. Related: Deadly weather: the human cost of 2018's climate

1d

1d

30% of children received trust issues from 'Santa'
New survey looks at how former children feel about being lied to by parents about Santa. 72 percent of former believers keep the Santa myth alive for their own kids. At press time, about 1,200 people have taken the survey. "During the last two years I have been overwhelmed by people getting in touch to say they were affected by the lack of trust involved when they discovered Santa wasn't [SPOILER

1d

U-M howler monkey study examines mechanisms of new species formation
A new University of Michigan study of interbreeding between two species of howler monkeys in Mexico is yielding insights into the forces that drive the evolution of new species.

1d

Smartphone, spilkonsol eller tablet i julegave: "De her teknologier er ikke kun legetøj"
Træder dit barn ind i det digitale univers alene, kan det gå galt. Sæt dig ind i tingene og følg med, lyder rådet fra ekspert.

1d

Earthrise at 50: the photo that changed how we see ourselves
Picture taken by the Apollo 8 mission at the height of the space race gave a new perspective on Earth’s place in the universe Picture the Earth from space: the striking bright blue of the oceans, the swirls of white clouds. It’s really very easy for any of us to conjure this image in our minds today, but it wasn’t always so. The Earth in all its splendid majesty was seen for the first time on Chr

1d

World's first no-kill eggs go on sale in Berlin
Scientists can now quickly determine a chick’s gender before it hatches, potentially ending the need to cull billions of male chicks worldwide The world’s first ever no-kill eggs are now on sale in Berlin after German scientists found an easy way to determine a chick’s gender before it hatches, in a breakthrough that could put an end to the annual live shredding of billions of male chicks worldwi

1d

Vind med Ingeniørens julekalender: 22. december
Vær med i Ingeniørens julekalender 2018. Hver dag med nye præmier!

1d

Researchers monitor electron behavior during chemical reactions for the first time
Researchers demonstrated their ability to observe electrons' movements during a chemical reaction.

1d

3D-printed robot hand plays the piano
Scientists have developed a 3D-printed robotic hand which can play simple musical phrases on the piano by just moving its wrist. And while the robot is no virtuoso, it demonstrates just how challenging it is to replicate all the abilities of a human hand, and how much complex movement can still be achieved through design.

1d

Elegant trick improves single-cell RNA sequencing
Droplet microfluidics has revolutionized single-cell RNA sequencing, offering a low-cost, high-throughput method for single-cell genomics. However, this method has been limited in its ability to capture complete RNA transcription information. Researchers have now come up with an elegant, low-cost method that solves that problem. And not only does it push single-cell genomics forward, it may allow

1d

Leprosy declines in Morocco after implementation of preventive drug
Since 2012, the number of cases of leprosy in Morocco has declined by more than 16 percent per year. That change can be attributed to the implementation, beginning in 2012, of single dose rifampicin as a preventive to spread leprosy through households, researchers report.

1d

Human mortality 'plateau' may be statistical error, not hint of immortality
Human error, not human biology, largely accounts for the apparent decline of mortality among the very old, according to a new report. The result casts doubt on the hypothesis that human longevity can be greatly extended beyond current limits.

1d

Scientists uncover how protein clumps damage cells in Parkinson's
Research into the root cause of Parkinson's aims to advance work on a disease-modifying treatment.

1d

The idiosyncratic mammalian diversification after extinction of the dinosaurs
Researchers state that many mammals lineages coexisted with the dinosaurs before the end-Cretaceous mass extinction. Although many species of mammals also disappeared in the extinction event, several lineages survived.

1d

Gut-brain connection signals worms to alter behavior while eating
Neuroscientists have discovered how neurons in the digestive tract of the worm C. elegans signal the brain to slow down when it encounters an area of plentiful food.

1d

Genetic study reveals how citrus became the Med's favorite squeeze
Genetic detective work has illuminated the important role of Jewish culture in the widespread adoption of citrus fruit by early Mediterranean societies.

1d

Cancer Doctors See Encouraging Signs for Ruth Bader Ginsburg
Justice Ginsburg is recovering well after surgery to remove two malignant nodules from her lung, but tests will tell whether she needs more treatment.

1d

When we let politics put paid to Prospero | Brief letters
Rocket science | Crosswords | Gravy on the border | Egypt, Bucks | Hollywood, Birmingham Terence Hall is incorrect regarding the lack of success of Blue Streak ( Letters , 20 December). It was the grandfather of Black Arrow which launched the British satellite, Prospero , in 1971. We are the only country in the world to put a satellite into orbit and cancel the programme when a politician stated t
27min
2019 Preview: DNA testing will lead to a decline in genetic disorders
A large trial of a pre-pregnancy DNA test could be the first step towards marked declines in inherited disorders being passed on to future generations
1h
How Volcanic Activity Can Spawn TsunamisIndonesia Krakatoa
No earthquakes were recorded before the tsunami struck, the Indonesian authorities said. But there had been an eruption on the volcanic island of Anak Krakatau about half an hour before.
1h
Why 2018 Was a Breakout Year for Open Source Deals
Microsoft bought GitHub. IBM bought Red Hat. Those and other deals show how central open source software has become to companies big and small.
1h
Elon Musk's SpaceX launches military rocket after four attempts
The rocket launch marked the space transportation company’s first national security space mission for the US A SpaceX rocket carrying a military navigation satellite blasted off from Florida’s Cape Canaveral on Sunday, marking the space transportation company’s first national security space mission for the US. The Falcon 9 rocket carrying a roughly $500m GPS satellite built by Lockheed Martin Cor
2h
Cirkulær økonomi: Kvaliteten af havplast er en udfordring
Omfattende plastforurening truer verdens have, og man tester forskellige metoder til at opsamle plasten. Genanvendelse af havplasten er dog vanskeligt, viser dansk projekt.
2h
Cannibalistic African clawed frog eats tadpoles of its relatives
The African clawed frog likes to dine on its own tadpoles – but it prefers those belonging to the endangered Cape platanna frog
2h
The Most-Read WIRED Culture Stories of 2018
Netflix gets real about its programming, MoviePass struggles, and, of course, Yanny vs. Laurel divides the internet.
2h
Switching to a new fitness app? Here's how to bring your data with you.
DIY Change up your platform. You've stored months or years of fitness data in an app. If you switch to a new ecosystem, you need to take that with you. Here's how to transfer your health data.
3h
Building a Homemade 3-Ski Sled | Alaska: The Last Frontier
Otto builds a 3-ski sled for Shane and Kelli at Eivin's shop! Stream Full Episodes of Alaska: The Last Frontier: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/alaska-the-last-frontier/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AlaskaTLF/ https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AlaskaTLF https://twitter.com/Discove
3h
Robocars, Elon, and More This Year in the Future of Cars
2018's biggest transportation stories include mathematicians willing to chat airplane peeing, clock-watching RAF pilots, and, of course, Mr. Musk.
3h
A Looming Government Shutdown Tops the Week's Internet News
As 2018 came to a close, the government was heading for a shutdown—a fitting end to a tumultuous year.
3h
Best Movies 2018: 'A Star Is Born' to Fill the 'Star Wars' Void
From 'Avengers' to 'Roma' it was an engrossing, and emotional, year at the multiplex.
3h
Way to Be Weird, Earth: 10 Strange Findings About Our Planet in 2018
This year brought many new discoveries about our oddball planet.
4h
10 Things We Learned About the Brain in 2018
The brain sculpts not only who we are but also the world that we experience. It tells us what to see, what to hear and what to say.
4h
Visions of a Better World
Noam Chomsky, Richard Dawkins, Martin Rees and others answer the question: What’s your utopia? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
4h
In 10 Years, the Large Hadron Collider Was a Smash — with More Discoveries to Come
Here's what the world's most powerful atom smasher has accomplished in the past 10 years and the fascinating physics it could still reveal.
4h
Why Exaggeration Jokes Work
Everything is formed by habit. The crow’s feet that come from squinting or laughter, the crease in a treasured and oft-opened letter, the ruts worn in a path frequently traveled—all are created by repeatedly performing the same action. Even neurons are formed by habit. When continuously exposed to a fixed stimulus, neurons become steadily less sensitive to that stimulus—until they eventually stop
4h
The First Holiday Without a Loved One
After Maryanne Pope’s husband, John, died in September 2000, the first Christmas without him, just a few months later, was a struggle. She used to cherish decorating a Christmas tree in her Calgary, Canada, home, but that year, there was no joy to be found. “Putting up a tree didn’t feel right to me. There was absolutely nothing to celebrate,” says Pope, the author of A Widow’s Awakening . “Plus,
4h
The 1950s Holiday Classic You Won't Hear at the Mall This Year
Starting around Thanksgiving, one can hardly run an errand or ride an elevator without being serenaded by Christmas music. The songs cover familiar seasonal territory—silver bells, open sleighs, roasting chestnuts—as well as a timeless emotion: desire. Just think of Eartha Kitt flirting with “Santa Baby,” Mariah Carey donning a Santa hat to sing “All I Want for Christmas Is You,” or George Michae
4h
Folie à deux and Homicide for the Holidays
Nothing says home for the holidays like a series of murders committed by family members with a shared delusion. So sit back, sip your hot apple cider or spiked egg nog, and revel in family dysfunction worse than your own. {Well! There is an actual TV show called Homicide for the Holidays , which I did not know. Kind of makes my title seem derivative… but it was coincidental.} “Folie à deux”, or
5h
I Tried to Pick America’s Future Political Stars and Didn’t Come Close
One went to Congress, served on the House Rules and the Ways and Means Committees—and now toils as a county commissioner. Another was a scion of a powerful business and political family, became lieutenant governor, narrowly missed being elected to Congress—and now gives speeches about depression and is working on a novel. A third hoped to be on the Federal Reserve board—and is now pursuing Japane
5h
Six spectacular ice phenomena to look out for this winter
From candy-cane snow rollers to fragile flowers, ice can take on magical, complex guises. Here are six that might catch your eye this winter
5h
Why It's Hard to Escape Amazon's Long Reach
The ecommerce company is also a cloud computing provider, TV producer, fashion designer, wind-farm backer, and organizer of crowdsourced micro-labor tasks.
5h
Closca's Bike Helmet Collapses a Common Bike-Sharing Problem
The helmet that collapses to half its size is easy to stash in a backpack—and have ready for any way and time you ride.
5h
Bakterier i atmosfæren dækker dele af Danmark med sne
Du tror måske, du ved hvorfor det sner. Men det er lidt mere kompliceret end som så.
6h
Vaccine for Honeybees Could Be a Tool to Fight Population Decline
Scientists hope the vaccine can make bees more resilient against diseases that can wipe out entire colonies.
6h
The 50 Best Podcasts of 2018
Editor’s Note : Find all of The Atlantic ’s “Best of 2018” coverage here . The word podcast has by now become completely untethered from its namesake—the iPod. Analytics that were once uncapturable have become fairly comprehensive ( downloads from Apple Podcasts surpassed 50 billion this year) and specific ( Chicago streams more podcasts on Spotify than any other U.S. city does), which has brough
6h
The Virtue Signalers Won’t Change the World
F eminist history is typically described in three waves: The struggle to secure voting rights, then workplace rights, and third—roughly—to upend stereotypes. The battle against racism and its effects is often described in a similar three-part timeline, with movements against slavery and segregation, and then—vaguely—the post-civil-rights era. The ambiguity of that last term masks that third-wave
6h
How overparenting backfired on Americans
American childhood is going, going… gone, says Professor Jonathan Haidt. In the mid-'90s there was a sharp shift to overprotective parenting. In previous generations, kids were allowed to out of the house unsupervised from age 5-8, which has now become age 12-16. As a result, their independence, resilience, and problem-solving skills suffer. "Give childhood back to kids so that they do what they
6h
Plight of the Living Dead review – The making of real zombies
From cockroaches to humans, few creatures are immune from the complex strategies of the mind-stealing parasites at the centre of a gripping Christmas tale
7h

Vil du være med til at finde de mest interessante nyheder? Send email herom til BioNyt

Se nyheder fra en tidligere dato

Tegn abonnement på

BioNyt Videnskabens Verden (www.bionyt.dk) er Danmarks ældste populærvidenskabelige tidsskrift for naturvidenskab. Det er det eneste blad af sin art i Danmark, som er helliget international forskning inden for livsvidenskaberne.

Bladet bringer aktuelle, spændende forskningsnyheder inden for biologi, medicin og andre naturvidenskabelige områder som f.eks. klimaændringer, nanoteknologi, partikelfysik, astronomi, seksualitet, biologiske våben, ecstasy, evolutionsbiologi, kloning, fedme, søvnforskning, muligheden for liv på mars, influenzaepidemier, livets opståen osv.

Artiklerne roses for at gøre vanskeligt stof forståeligt, uden at den videnskabelige holdbarhed tabes.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


CAPTCHA Image
Reload Image