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How the stunning Earthrise became the world’s most famous photograph

On Christmas Eve 1968, Apollo 8 became the first crewed spacecraft to circle the moon. Emerging from its dark side, one astronaut reached for his camera

9h

10 great minds we lost in 2018

We lost a great deal of internet pioneers and geniuses of physics in 2018. Creations of fiber optic cables, men on the moon and the unsung heroes of the life sciences made their mark on the scientific enterprise. The loss of men like Stephen Hawking leaves a hole in the sciences, but his work and many others will continue to inspire the generations to come. Death is an inevitability every passing

3h

Podcast-special: Månen trækker igen i verdens rumfartsnationer

I 50-året for den amerikanske Apollo 11-mission lægges der igen planer om bemandede ture til Månen, og denne gang har Kina også meldt sig ind i rumkapløbet.

5h

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Britain bans puppy and kitten sales by pet shops

Britain is forbidding puppies and kittens from being sold by pet shops in a bid to crack down on animal exploitation and abuse.

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'Run to the hills': Tsunami fears spark chaos in Indonesia town

Hundreds of panicked residents, many sobbing and clutching small children, tried to flee Sumber Jaya village Tuesday as word spread that another tsunami was about to smash into the shattered Indonesian community.

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2019 Preview: Electric cars of all shapes and sizes will hit the road

Various kinds of electric cars are on their way from manufacturers who have never made them before, such as Volkswagen, Volvo and Audi

13min

Bacon-cancer link: head of UN agency at heart of furore defends its work

IARC’s outgoing director attacks vested interests of critics but admits it could have communicated better The head of the UN agency that provoked a massive outcry and some ridicule when it declared that bacon, red meat and glyphosate weedkiller caused cancer has defended its work, denying the announcements were mishandled and insisting on its independence. Its outgoing director, Christopher Wild,

18min

Coffee vs. Tea: The Rematch!

It’s another VS rematch from Eyewire days gone by! Starting at 11 AM EST on 12/27 and going for 24 hours, we’re revisiting something warm and cozy for the holiday season: what else but Coffee vs. Tea? Last time , Team Tea triumphed, but perhaps this time Team Coffee will have a (turbo) shot. Choose your team wisely: Coffee Name originates from Italian caffè , which in turn comes from Ottoman Turk

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Lost ‘Darwinia’ islands could be origin of species in the Galapagos

Millions of years before the Galapagos existed, another island chain may have shaped the evolution of the unusual wildlife that later inspired Charles Darwin

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The Most-Read WIRED Ideas Stories of 2018

Readers dived into a feminist reading of Elizabeth Holmes' downfall, a story about Silicon Valley's hidden caste system, and the perplexing case of a deadly yeast.

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The most environmentally-friendly ways to get rid of your Christmas tree

DIY This holiday season, help save the planet. Let's keep Christmas-tree carbon locked up in the wood. Here's how to get rid of your Christmas tree without damaging the environment.

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The Mind-Bending Final Confrontation of Annihilation

Over the next week, The Atlantic ’s “And, Scene” series will delve into some of the most interesting films of the year by examining a single, noteworthy cinematic moment from 2018. Next up is Alex Garland’s Annihilation . (Read our previous entries here .) The denouement of Jeff VanderMeer’s novel Annihilation is Lovecraftian in its sci-fi inscrutability. The main character, an unnamed biologist,

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16 Decades of Atlantic Christmases

Since publishing its first issue in 1857, The Atlantic has marked 160 Christmases. Contributors, by dint of the magazine’s New England and Christian roots, made a point each year to memorialize the birth of Jesus and the many traditions celebrating it in every section and medium of the publication. For more than 16 decades, there have been myriad articles, stories, poems, book reviews, recipes, a

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Letters: ‘People Got to Expecting Our Caravan of Crazy Every Year’

Unusual Winter-Holiday Traditions Last month, The Atlantic asked readers to share their strangest, silliest holiday traditions. The Family section commissioned illustrations for a handful of the responses ; we’ve rounded up some of the other weird and wonderful submissions here. When our children were young, they helped my wife make an “angel” to go on top of the tree. It ended up resembling a ch

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Best TV Scenes (2018): 'Killing Eve,' 'Atlanta,' and More

From 'Homecoming' to Teddy Perkins to "take me to the hole!" we've rounded up all of the year's biggest small-screen memories.

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Inside the dark web: why it’s odder than you can imagine

We all know about the dark web’s illegal markets and shady deals. But from playing better chess to protecting political freedom, it's full of surprises

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Genetic study of eating disorders could pave way for new treatment

Researchers explore whether genes and early eating habits may trigger disordered eating Researchers are trying to identify the role genetics and early eating habits play in conditions such as bulimia and anorexia . Eating disorders, which often arise before adulthood, have been increasing in recent years and about a quarter of young people report having symptoms, according to MQ: Transforming Men

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'Hunger Hormone' Ghrelin Aids Overindulgence

Ghrelin, the hormone that makes you hungry, also makes food, and food smells, irresistibly appealing. Karen Hopkin reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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10 Times Science Proved the World is Amazing in 2018

Our world is enchanted — and if you need proof, just turn to science.

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10 Fascinating Biblical-Era Discoveries from 2018

In 2018, archaeologists found the face of Jesus, discovered the visage of an ancient king, and might have uncovered a long-lost kingdom.

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10 Things We Learned About the First Americans in 2018

2018 was full of scientific discoveries about the first Americans, including how and when they arrived.

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Forsker: Gensplejset plante kan fjerne kemikalier fra luften i din stue

Der ophobes farlige stoffer i luften, når vi laver mad eller går i bad. Nu har amerikanske forskere måske fundet en ’grøn’ løsning.

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Check out the weirdest New Year's Eve facts we could find

Science A Weirdest Thing holiday spectacular. What’s the weirdest thing you learned this week? Well, whatever it is, we promise you’ll have an even weirder answer if you listen to PopSci’s newest podcast.

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Don't Ask When Self-Driving Cars Will Arrive—Ask Where

Autonomous vehicles are already on the road. Whether they're "here" depends on where you are.

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How the right Christmas lunch can help save Earth from climate change

There’s nothing like Christmas to make you think about food. The first of our 12 Days of Culture reveals how you can make the right decision about what’s on your plate

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Thinking about Climate on a Dark, Dismal Morning

Hope is the knowledge that we can prevent bad things—but also the realization that we might choose not to — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The High-Stakes World of Christmas Tamales

At first glance, a tamal might seem simple enough: masa dough stuffed with filling, wrapped in a husk or a leaf and steamed. But as those who have made tamales know, their simplicity is a ruse. It’s a process that takes hours and often days to complete, requiring nimble fingers to wrap the palm-sized packages of dough and watchful eyes on them while they steam—an ordeal best left for the holidays

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The Trump Administration Is Closing the Door on Migrant Children

Gilberto Flores had to leave. A teacher at his school in Jocoro, El Salvador, had just been dismembered by his own students after he was outed as a gay man. Gangs were dumping bodies in the streets around his home. Not long before, Flores had come out to his school as openly gay. His mother, who is still in El Salvador, didn’t think it was safe for him to stay. He was 14 years old when he left hi

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If Beale Street Could Talk and the Urgency of Black Love

If Beale Street Could Talk , the 1974 James Baldwin novel, begins with a bittersweet announcement of new life. “Alonzo, we’re going to have a baby,” Clementine “Tish” Rivers tells her fiancé from across the cold glass of a New York City jail’s visitation room. Tish narrates the story, so the reflection that follows is in her voice. “I looked at him. I know I smiled,” she says. “His face looked as

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How Set Up New Devices: iPhone, Amazon Echo, Google Home, TV

You got a cool gadget for the holidays! You lucky duck. Now you’ve gotta set it up. You poor sap.

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11 Fantastic Science Books to Binge Over the Holidays

Snuggle up with your favorite display technology and ignite your neurons with these recommended science books from 2018.

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The quantum trick that can help you live a better life – probably

Quantum theory suggests everything that can happen, does. Now a phone app gives us a way to exploit this weirdness – and enjoy the best of all possible worlds

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How Did Rifles With an American Stamp End Up in the Hands of African Poachers?

The question is at the heart of investigations by Congress and federal agencies into whether an American gun manufacturer is entangled in the shadowy world of arms smuggling and wildlife poaching.

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Vanity Fair Is a Misanthropic Holiday Treat

If Becky Sharp were alive in contemporary America, she would almost certainly be working in Donald Trump’s White House. It’s too easy to imagine William Makepeace Thackeray’s grifter antiheroine slapping on an Ann Taylor shift dress and pearls to lavishly praise the president on CNN, only to spin her way to a seven-figure tell-all and a prominent perch on the speaking circuit. As Thackeray wrote

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I Used to Write for Sports Illustrated. Now I Deliver Packages for Amazon.

Holiday parties were right around the corner, and I needed a cover story. I didn’t feel like admitting to casual acquaintances, or even to some good friends, that I drive a van for Amazon. I decided to tell them, if asked, that I consult for Amazon, which is loosely true: I spend my days consulting a Rabbit, the handheld Android device loaded with the app that tells me where my next stop is, how

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From the Archives: ‘Christmas Poem’ by e. e. cummings

Over the past 160 years, The Atlantic has published the work of some of the world’s most notable poets, from Walt Whitman to Emily Dickinson to Pablo Neruda. In the last years of his prolific career, e. e. cummings joined their ranks, contributing three poems to the magazine in the 1950s. His “Christmas Poem,” printed in December 1956, was the last to appear. The poem presents a modernist take on

5h

Sådan gik det i 2018 – hvor mange quizspørgsmål kunne du svare på?

Én læser med gode spådomsevner fik alle 13 spørgsmål rigtige i sidste års tipskupon om begivenheder i 2018. Læs her, hvad du skulle have svaret.

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From 300lbs to a Navy SEAL: How to gain control of your mind and life

David Goggins is scary tough. He is the only person to have completed Navy SEAL training (including two Hell Weeks), Air Force tactical air controller training, and U.S. Army Ranger School. Not that he was always a super soldier: Goggins once weighed 300lbs and was by his own admission lazy and undisciplined. Here, Goggins explains how he transformed himself and won the war in his mind—from posit

5h

50-året for Apollo 11 nærmer sig: Kommer vi nogensinde tilbage til Månen?

PLUS. Svaret er ja. Og det bliver også med bemandede missioner engang i 2020’erne. Spørgsmålet er blot, hvem der kommer først – USA eller Kina.

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Sicilian airport reopens amid Mount Etna's latest eruption

Italy's Catania airport resumed full operations Tuesday, a day after an ash cloud from Mount Etna's latest eruption in eastern Sicily forced it to shut down.

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Did 2018 usher in a creeping tech dystopia?

We may remember 2018 as the year when technology's dystopian potential became clear, from Facebook's role enabling the harvesting of our personal data for election interference to a seemingly unending series of revelations about the dark side of Silicon Valley's connect-everything ethos.

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Court orders bail for Nissan executive linked to Ghosn case

A Tokyo court on Tuesday granted bail for a Nissan executive accused of a key role in the financial misconduct case involving auto tycoon Carlos Ghosn, who remains in detention.

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Huawei Shipped 200 Million Phones In 2018

submitted by /u/sci54 [link] [comments]

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Charlatans for Christmas

A novel by Robin Cook is a great read with a medical theme. It brings up some serious questions about quality control and medical education.

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Gluten, kokosolie og alkohol: Tre store sundhedsnyheder i 2018 – som ikke holdt

Kokosolie er 'ren gift', stod der på dr.dk. Men det var en overdrivelse som både forskere og journalister bærer en del af ansvaret for, vurderer ekspert.

9h

Gay Life in Berlin Is Starting to Echo a Darker Era

BERLIN—The fetish cruising bar Bull is a place of pilgrimage in Berlin for more than one reason. To patrons, it is a 24-hour safe space that caters to every palate. To the British historian Brendan Nash, it is a symbol of “Babylon Berlin,” a golden decade of LGBT freedom in the city in the 1920s, when the bisexual Hollywood star Marlene Dietrich mixed with prostitutes and transgender dance-hall g

10h

Chestnut-killing wasp threatens major harvest

A small, invasive wasp is threatening the cultivation of chestnuts in Spain.

14h

Will the Christmas Goat Meet a Fiery Death Like it Usually Does?

Every year since 1966, the small town of Gävle in Sweden erects a 40-foot straw goat on the first day of Advent. For 37 of those years, the Gävle goat has been destroyed; more often than not, it has been set ablaze and burned to the ground. So ensues the annual conflict for the spirit of Christmas, fought between the Christians who run Gävle ’s businesses—who believe that the effigy brings local

16h

Death toll climbs past 370 in Indonesian tsunami disaster

Body bags were laid out along the shattered coastline as Indonesian authorities stepped up efforts to collect the dead and save the injured Monday in the aftermath of a tsunami that was apparently triggered by a volcanic eruption. The death toll climbed to 373 and was certain to rise.

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Annals of Internal Medicine embargoed news; Catheter ablation superior to standard drug

A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials found that catheter ablation was superior to conventional drug therapy alone for patients with atrial fibrillation and heart failure. Findings are published in Annals of Internal Medicine.

17h

Idaho lab protects US infrastructure from cyber attacks

It's called the "Dark Side" because the 50 workers there prefer to keep the lights low so they can dim the brightness on their computer screens.

18h

Mount Etna eruption causes airspace closure

The Mount Etna volcano erupted on Monday, spewing ash as several minor earthquakes hit the region, and prompting a partial closure of the Sicilian airspace around the mountain.

18h

Sustainable 'plastics' are on the horizon

A new Tel Aviv University study describes a process to make bioplastic polymers that don't require land or fresh water—resources that are scarce in much of the world. The polymer is derived from microorganisms that feed on seaweed. It is biodegradable, produces zero toxic waste and recycles into organic waste.

18h

Pitt-led research describes how neurons could disconnect from each other in Huntington's disease

Newly described mechanism called 'neuritosis' could play an important role in normal brain development, aging and neurodegenerative disease.

20h

Trees' enemies help tropical forests maintain their biodiversity

Scientists have long struggled to explain how tropical forests can maintain their staggering diversity of trees without having a handful of species take over — or having many other species die out. The answer, researchers say, lies in the soil found near individual trees, where natural 'enemies' of tree species reside.

20h

Hotter days will boost Chinese residential electric use

A new study from Duke University and Fudan University in China is the first to estimate how much Chinese residential electricity consumption would increase due to climate change. It's a lot. By the end of the 21st century, each degree Celsius increase in global mean surface temperature (GMST) would raise average Chinese residential electricity use by about 9 percent. Peak electricity use will rise

20h

Researchers use 'blacklist' computing concept as novel way to streamline genetic analysis

Researchers at Mount Sinai have discovered a new use for a long-standing computational concept known as 'blacklisting.' Using blacklisting as a filter to single out genetic variations in patient genomes and exomes that do not cause illness, researchers have successfully streamlined the identification of genetic drivers of disease.

20h

New global migration estimates show rates steady since 1990, high return migration

Two University of Washington scientists have unveiled a new statistical method for estimating migration flows between countries. Using the so-called pseudo-Bayes approach, they show that rates of migration are higher than previously thought, but also relatively stable, fluctuating between 1.1 and 1.3 percent of global population from 1990 to 2015. In addition, since 1990 approximately 45 percent o

20h

New global migration estimates show rates steady since 1990, high return migration

On today's increasingly crowded globe, human migration can strain infrastructure and resources. Accurate data on migration flows could help governments plan for and respond to immigrants. Yet these figures, when available, tend to be spotty and error-ridden, even in the developed world. Researchers have developed approaches to estimate migration rates, but even the best of these rely on unrealisti

20h

Hotter days will boost Chinese residential electric use

A new study from Duke University and Fudan University in China is the first to estimate how much Chinese residential electricity consumption would increase due to climate change. It's a lot.

20h

Trees' enemies help tropical forests maintain their biodiversity

Scientists have long struggled to explain how tropical forests can maintain their staggering diversity of trees without having a handful of species take over—or having many other species die out.

20h

Can relationship anarchy create a world without heartbreak?

Can you imagine a world without heartbreak? Not without sadness, disappointment or regret – but a world without the sinking, searing, all-consuming ache of lost love. A world without heartbreak is also a world where simple acts cannot be transformed, as if by sorcery, into moments of sublime significance. Because a world without heartbreak is a world without love – isn't it? More precisely, it mi

21h

Verdens hidtil største primtal er fundet: 'Det er helt vanvittigt stort'

Tallet har så mange cifre, at det ville tage mere end halvandet år at tælle dem, siger lektor i matematik.

21h

Brain activity predicts fear of pain

Researchers applied a machine learning technique that could potentially translate patterns of activity in fear-processing brain regions into scores on questionnaires used to assess a patient's fear of pain. This neuroscientific approach, reported in eNeuro, may help reconcile self-reported emotions and their neural underpinnings.

22h

Breast cancer drug impairs brain function

A comprehensive study of monkeys given the breast cancer drug letrozole reveals side effects that impact the brain. Published in JNeurosci, the research establishes the common marmoset as an important nonhuman primate model for studying the effects of estrogen-reducing treatments on the nervous system.

22h

How socioeconomic status shapes developing brains

The relationship between socioeconomic status (SES) and brain anatomy is mostly stable from childhood to early adulthood, according to a longitudinal neuroimaging study of more than 600 healthy young people published in JNeurosci. This finding suggests interventions designed to mitigate the influence of low SES on brain and mental health may be most beneficial for children younger than age five.

22h

Bizarre ‘dark fluid’ with negative mass could dominate the universe – what my research suggests

It's embarrassing, but astrophysicists are the first to admit it. Our best theoretical model can only explain 5% of the universe. The remaining 95% is famously made up almost entirely of invisible, unknown material dubbed dark energy and dark matter . So even though there are a billion trillion stars in the observable universe, they are actually extremely rare. The two mysterious dark substances

22h

Global Health: Marburg Virus, Related to Ebola, Is Found in Bats in West Africa

The discovery was part of a U.S.-led effort to spot dangerous pathogens in animals before humans are endangered.

23h

The Major Flaw of You’ve Got Mail

You’ve Got Mail premiered, as a not-very-holiday-focused holiday movie, in late December 1998. It was a film that could only have emerged from its particular historical moment: a rom-com about two people, Kathleen Kelly (Meg Ryan) and Joe Fox (Tom Hanks), enemies in life, who find soulmate-level connection via the magic of the dial-up modem. “In life, they’re at odds,” the film’s trailer intones.

23h

Colorful Peacocks Impress Females with Good Vibes

Peafowls' head crests are specifically tuned to the vibrations produced by feather-rattling male peacocks, thus acting as a sort of antenna. Jason G. Goldman reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

23h

Kilcher Christmas Piñata | Alaska: The Last Frontier

Atz Lee built a piñata for the Kilcher children. See who manages to open it with their homemade wooden sword. Stream Full Episodes of Alaska: The Last Frontier: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/alaska-the-last-frontier/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AlaskaTLF/ https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow on Twitter: https://t

23h

These past convictions predict odds of future offenses

New research shows offenders convicted of a violent crime or other serious felonies will likely commit the same crime again. A life sentence in many states rarely means offenders will spend a lifetime behind bars. In fact, offenders sentenced for murder served 15 years on average before initial release from state prison, according to a recent Bureau of Justice Statistics report using national-lev

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These Magnified Frost Crystal Images Are Totally Enchanting

Elizabeth Root Blackmer specializes in macro photography of natural phenomena too small for us to usually notice.

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How Miami's Amazon reseller army serves shoppers worldwide—and makes millions

If you bought your Christmas presents on Amazon this year, there is a decent chance someone in South Florida was taking your money.

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2019 Preview: People will receive transfusions of artificial blood

Volunteers will be injected with red blood cells grown from stem cells in the lab. If it works it could mean blood donors are no longer required

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‘Striking number’ of Danish households are food insecure

When people can’t afford enough good quality food, both their physical and mental health suffer, research in Denmark suggests. People living in approximately 200,000 households in Denmark can’t afford enough food, according to the new study. The work uses measurement methods used in the United States, where public authorities regularly monitor the prevalence of food insecurity. Because the study

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Scientists have created a new quasicrystal

The strange class of materials known as quasicrystals has a new member. In a paper in Science , researchers describe a quasicrystalline superlattice that self-assembles from a single type of nanoparticle building blocks. This is the first definitive observation of a quasicrystalline superlattice formed from a single component, the researchers say. The discovery provides new insight into how these

1d

Sustainable 'plastics' are on the horizon

A new Tel Aviv University study describes a process to make bioplastic polymers that don't require land or fresh water — resources that are scarce in much of the world. The resulting material is biodegradable, produces zero toxic waste and recycles into organic waste.

1d

Ski exoskeleton boosts leg power and reduces tiredness on the slopes

When hurtling down a mountain an exoskeleton could absorb some of the impact for skiers and snowboarders and give them extra power in their turns

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Here's how California can use fire to solve its wildfire problem

If California wants to get out in front of its wildfire problem, scientists have some clear but counterintuitive advice: Start more forest fires.

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Apple tweaks app rules to allow users to gift in-app purchases

Just in time for the holidays, Apple added a new gifting option that will allow you to give the gift of in-app purchases to your friends and family.

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The Most-Read WIRED Gear Stories of 2018

A review of the Air Fryer, a three-month sojourn in Bing, and a user's guide to how to disable throttling on an iPhone all topped this year's list.

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Muscle atrophy among critically ill kids occurs within one week of mechanical ventilation

Children with life-threatening respiratory failure who require mechanical ventilation in a pediatric intensive care unit commonly experience rapid muscle atrophy, according to a study published online Dec. 19, 2018, in PLOS ONE.

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Worry about Christmas commercialism goes way back

For as long as people have been shopping for Christmas, there’s been concern about turning a religious celebration into a commercial bonanza. This sentiment reaches back to when America was a backwater and the celebration of Christmas went from drinking and carousing to shopping and gift-giving. “People have complained about the excessive commercialization of Christmas ever since its incarnation

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Hunt for survivors as Indonesian tsunami death toll climbs to 373

Dozens of filled body bags were hauled away from buildings flattened by Indonesia's volcano-triggered tsunami Monday, as the death toll climbed to 373 and search teams pushed on with the grim hunt for corpses.

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You just unwrapped a new device. Here's what to do first.

DIY Seven steps to protect your new tech and load it with apps you actually want. When you get a new phone or computer, you want to ensure it will have a long and secure life. Here are seven steps you need to take when you first unwrap your device.

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At botanical garden in Mexico, natural species blossom again

Imagine a botanical garden, and acres of carefully designed, highly manicured, delicately pruned "zoos for plants" may come to mind. But at El Charco del Ingenio, a botanical garden and natural protected area in central Mexico, the sprawling scrubland has been allowed to return to its unencumbered, wilder roots.

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Hundredårsjagten på det perfekte dæksel – kapitel 2

PLUS. En fortælling i tre dele om en matematisk udfordring.

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What Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice Teaches Readers

Before she was a writer, Jane Austen was a reader. A reader, moreover, within a family of readers, who would gather in her father’s rectory to read aloud from the work of authors such as Samuel Johnson, Frances Burney, and William Cowper—as well as, eventually, Jane’s own works-in-progress. Not surprisingly, then, in Austen’s novels, the act of reading is a key indication of how a character shoul

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Letters: ‘Biscuits in the American South Are Serious Business Y’all’

Why Most of America Is Terrible at Making Biscuits There’s a scientific reason no one outside of the South can make light and fluffy biscuits, Amanda Mull wrote in November . The secret to success, she showed, is White Lily flour—which is difficult to find north of Richmond, Virginia. I’m not buying hard-to-get White Lily flour as the magic bullet for good biscuits. My mother in Kentucky made bis

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The world’s great nations are revisiting the moon. But where’s Europe?

The half-century since the first lunar landing has seen more stories than ever being spun about the moon, and why we should go there

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12 Best Xbox One Games (2019): Sidescrollers, Shooters, and More

Relive Halo classics, play co-op with friends, or enjoy the mayhem of a battle royale with our favorite Xbox One games.

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Past and present of imaging modalities used for prostate cancer diagnosis

This review illustrates a perspective on prostate cancer imaging summarizing current imaging approaches with a special focus on Prostate Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA), Bombesin (BN) and Androgen Receptor (AR) targeted imaging using Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and Single Positron Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) based on 99mTc and other radiotracers.

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Regulation of feeding behavior and energy metabolism by galanin-like peptide (GALP)

Galanin-like peptide (GALP) is composed of 60 amino acid residues and its sequence is highly homologous across species. GALP is produced in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus and has diverse physiological effects such as the regulation of feeding, energy metabolism, and reproductive behavior. In this review article, the researchers summarize their recent research focusing on the mechanism whereby GA

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Communication interception can be traced through meteor trails

Meteor burst communication is based on using meteors as cryptography assistants. Meteor trails reflect radio waves, which makes them suitable for radio transmissions at distances of up to 2,000 kilometers. Unpredictable nature of meteors makes pose a significant hindrance for signal interception.

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What Was Steve Mnuchin Thinking? Three Possibilities

Imagine having a runny nose, itchy eyes, congestion, and a sore throat, and your doctor telling you that you shouldn’t worry about cancer—she consulted her colleagues and they’re certain it is not cancer, and if it were, they could fight it. This is roughly what happened on Sunday evening, when Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin put out a press release on calls he held with executives from the cou

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The development of a hybrid micro mixer for biological and chemical experiments

An international team of scientists including an employee of I.M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University (MSMU) developed a device for mixing chemical and biological reaction feeds. The team managed to increase the mixing efficiency up to 90 percent. The new device will be used in biological and chemical experiments. The article of the scientists was published in the RSC Advances journal.

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New study shows how guinea pig fathers pass on adaptive responses to environmental changes

Adaptations to environmental change are the most important asset for the persistence of any plant or animal species. This is usually achieved through genetic mutation and selection, a slow process driven by chance. Faster and more targeted are epigenetic modifications. A new study carried out by scientists from the Leibniz-IZW in Germany shows for wild guinea pigs that epigenetic modifications spe

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New insights into pion condensation and the formation of neutron stars

Performing studies on a doubly magic isotope of tin, researchers have shown that the pion condensation should occur at around two times normal nuclear density, which can be realized in a neutron star with a mass of 1.4 times that of the Sun.

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Paramedics can safely evaluate psychiatric patients' medical condition in the field

Patients with psychiatric emergencies on involuntary holds are often taken to traditional hospital emergency departments, where they can spend hours to days in an emergency department bed waiting for access to specialized psychiatric personnel. New research finds that paramedics can use a screening process to determine whether to medically clear patients experiencing psychiatric emergencies before

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The 10 Weirdest Science Stories of 2018

Things sure got strange in 2018: from a space-bound Tesla to crows having sex with their dead.

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A French Teenager Turned the Bible and Quran into DNA and Injected Them into His Body

The injection probably won’t bring enlightenment, but it's also unlikely to kill him.

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‘Ghosts’ of fishing past can upend conservation

Conservation of a renewable resource like fish or other wildlife often hinges on habits or past decisions, research finds. The study challenges conventional expectations that the collapse of fast-growing natural resources is unlikely. Conservation is much easier to continue once it starts, says lead author Edward W. Tekwa, a postdoctoral associate in the ecology, evolution, and natural resources

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President Trump’s Nightmare Before Christmas

On his second Christmas Eve in office, the president of the United States stands virtually alone in Washington, D.C. Nine federal departments are shut down , with no resolution in sight. Democrats are furious at President Donald Trump’s attempt to hold the government hostage until he gets funding for a border wall. Many Republicans are livid about his sudden decision to pull military forces from

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7 Odd Things That Raise Your Risk of Cancer (and 1 That Doesn't)

Some things that may raise people's risk of cancer don't get a lot of attention.

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10 Ways Earth Changed Forever in 2018

Earth is always changing, and 2018 — a year filled with hurricanes, volcanic eruptions and earthquakes — was no exception.

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Megapixels: This incredible photo changed the way we look at Earth

Science The famous "Earthrise" turns 50 today. "Earthrise" is arguably the most famous family portrait on the planet—a snapshot of all of us together, captured by Apollo 8 astronauts on Christmas Eve, 1968.

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Why Coal Symbolizes Naughtiness

In 2014, The Killers released a Christmas single, “ Joel, the Lump of Coal .” Rather than featuring a traditional Christmas character, the song tells the bittersweet story of Joel, an animated chunk of coal who wants to be given as a Christmas present. Coal, everyone knows, is not a gift anyone desires; it is a punishment and a rebuke. But there was a time when Joel—and coal—would have been happi

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Families’ Weird Holiday Traditions, Illustrated

Part of the allure of the holidays is all the traditions: A turkey-and-mashed-potatoes feast on Thanksgiving, wrapped presents nestled under the bedazzled tree for Christmas, the lighting of the menorah during Hanukkah. It’s these iconic moments that Norman Rockwell captured in his popular illustrations of families’ snowy holiday revelry. But, then again, how Americans actually celebrate the holi

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Grande Arrival: The Year Digital Native Pop Stars Took Over

2018 saw the emergence of female artists whose online presence managed to be savvy without being sentimental, sensitive but still cynical.

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50 Years Ago, *Earthrise* Gave Us the View of a Lifetime

Astronauts on NASA's Apollo 8 mission snapped the first photos of Earth from space, forever changing how we see our place in the universe.

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Cryptojacking Took Over the Internet in 2018

Move over, ransomware. Cryptojacking is officially the scourge of the internet.

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Team gets closer to precise treatment for arrhythmia

New research makes a significant step toward precision medicine for patients with a life-threatening form of irregular heartbeat by determining in which patients a common drug treatment would be most beneficial. In 2015, then-President Barack Obama launched a precision medicine initiative, saying that its promise was “delivering the right treatments, at the right time, every time to the right per

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2018 in Quotes

From the effects of political upheaval on research to claims of gene-edited babies, the year has been a tumultuous one for the scientific community.

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The Tragic Fight Scene That Defined Black Panther

Over the next week, The Atlantic ’s “And, Scene” series will delve into some of the most interesting films of the year by examining a single, noteworthy cinematic moment from 2018. First up is Ryan Coogler’s Black Panther . (Read our previous entries here .) By the time we revisit the waterfall in Black Panther , about 75 minutes into the film, every viewer understands the stakes of the place. Wa

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Dear Therapist: My Boyfriend’s Wealthy Family Isn’t Fair with Their Money

Editor’s Note: Every Monday, Lori Gottlieb answers questions from readers about their problems, big and small. Have a question? Email her at dear.therapist@theatlantic.com . Dear Therapist, I am in a loving, five-year, long-distance relationship with my boyfriend, who happens to have a twin brother. My boyfriend is the successful one, with a doctorate from a top university, while his brother has

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Toys are us: How childhood objects may have shaped human history

Tantalising evidence hints that key human innovations including the wheel and weaving were the outcome of, quite literally, child's play

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Forget Elon Musk's Troubles—Tesla Had a Blockbuster 2018

Look past the CEO's antics, and it's clear the automaker spent the year clearing major, long-standing hurdles.

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The Year Tech Workers Realized They Were Workers

Low-paid workers at Marriott hotels, in part, protested encroaching automation—finding unexpected common cause with some well-paid engineers across tech.

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6 of the most amazing things that were 3D-printed in 2018

From bridges to cars, 3D printing proved this year that it’s still relevant and exciting.

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A Half Century Later, the Journey of Apollo 8 Still Inspires

On Christmas Eve 1968 people worldwide stepped back from the throes of crises and recognized themselves as citizens of a tiny, fragile planet — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Western Drought Ranks among the Worst of the Last Millennium

As temperatures warm, it becomes more likely the drought will match past “megadroughts” for length as well — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Techtopia #84: Bæredygtig business er fremtiden

FN har de startet projektet SDG Accelerator, hvor virksomheder kan få hjælp til at tilpasse forretningen til et eller flere af de 17 bæredygtighedsmål.

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Pablo Escobar’s hippos: Why drug lords shouldn’t play God

Lucy Cooke—an acclaimed zoologist, author, and TV presenter—tells the story of Colombian drug lord Pablo Escobar's exotic animal menagerie, which included four hippos illegally imported from Africa. Four hippos became eight, and eight became sixteen, and now this non-native creature is running wild in South America. Cooke explains why this is a moment in evolution — these hippos will evolve into

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Trump Delivers a Victory to Iran

During the presidential campaign, the outlier in Donald Trump’s foreign-policy orations was his treatment of Iran. On Europe, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, Russia (remember President Barack Obama’s “off-mic” tête-à-tête with President Dmitry Medvedev?), and the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, Trump largely followed his predecessor. Differences existed, certainly in style and manner, but t

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Netflix Captures the Doom and Dread of Watership Down

“In the beginning,” says a dream-reverberant voice in the first seconds of Netflix’s Watership Down , “Frith made the world. And he made the stars by scattering his droppings across the sky.” And in the beginning, Richard Adams, who was working at the time for the Ministry of Housing and Local Government, told his children a story about some rabbits. Some of the rabbits were nice; some of the rab

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Trilobites: Perhaps Santa Had to Shout to His Eight Reindeer Because They Fell Asleep

A small study suggests the body clocks of the reindeer said to pull Mr. Claus’s sleigh swing wildly through the seasons, bringing near-hibernation in winter.

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Brrr blop! Derfor rumler din mave ekstra højt til jul

Gemmer du plads i mavesækken til julemiddagen i aften, har du sikkert oplevet, at maven rumler. Men faktisk rumler din mave en lille smule hele tiden.

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Baby, Christmas Songs Have Always Been Controversial

This year’s battle in the War on Christmas is being fought over “Baby, It’s Cold Outside.” According to some, the song’s lyrics promote date rape. According to others, including a radio station in Kentucky playing the tune on continuous loop , it’s a harmless ditty and a Christmas classic. Commentators on Fox News, who look forward to the War on Christmas more eagerly than children await actual C

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Bad Vibes: How Hits To The Head Are Transferred To The Brain

A question about heading soccer balls inspired a series of experiments to understand how the brain changes shape when someone's head takes a hit. (Image credit: Photo illustration by David Madison/Getty Images)

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If You Feel Thankful, Write It Down. It's Good For Your Health

A growing body of research shows keeping a log of what you are thankful for can lower stress, help you sleep better, and may even reduce the risk of heart disease. But it's not for everyone. (Image credit: Kristen Uroda for NPR)

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Archaeologists find remains of horses in ancient Pompeii stable

Military officer’s stable preserved under ash from eruption of Mount Vesuvius Archaeologists have unearthed the petrified remains of a harnessed horse and saddle in the stable of an ancient villa in a Pompeii suburb. The Pompeii archaeological park’s head, Massimo Osanna, told the Italian news agency Ansa that the villa belonged to a high-ranking military officer, perhaps a general, in ancient Ro

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Tell us: how are you defying expectations about ageing?

If you’re still living life to the full at a time when many people expect you to be slowing down, we’d like to hear from you Are you in your 50s, 60s, 70s, 80s or older? Perhaps you’ve taken up a new sport (or got better at one you already enjoyed), discovered a new hobby, started a new career, met a new love… Tell us how you’ve defied expectations about ageing. Related: 'Life keeps evolving': si

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Sending astronauts to Mars would be stupid, astronaut says

One of the first astronauts to orbit the Moon thinks there's no public support to send people to Mars.

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Danmark ignorerede alle røde lamper for at være først med ERTMS

PLUS. Danmarkshistoriens største jernbaneprojekt har de seneste to år udviklet sig til en skandale, der får IC4 til at blegne. Nu venter 11 år uden råd til nye problemer. Nye læsere kan stå på her.

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Earthrise, A Photo That Changed The World Forever

submitted by /u/sci54 [link] [comments]

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SpaceX launches military satellite after four attempts

The Falcon 9 rocket blasted off from Cape Canaveral on Sunday after four previous launches were cancelled.

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