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Nyheder2018december26

Virkelighedstjek: Hvordan får vi 1 million elbiler på vejene i 2030?

Hvad snakker politikerne om, når de gerne vil have 1 mio. elbiler på vejene i 2030? Er det realistisk, og hvad skal der til? Læs, hvad eksperterne mener.

3h

Tree-ring analysis explains physiology behind drought intolerance

Tree rings tell the story of what's happening physiologically as fire suppression makes forests more dense and less tolerant of drought, pests and wildfires, new research shows.

41min

Why fitness instructors shouldn’t talk about looks

Fitness instructors should make motivational comments about strength and health, not weight loss and appearance, research suggests. Some types of exercise seem to improve body esteem in women, whereas others have the potential to lower it. In other words, from a psychological perspective, not all fitness approaches are created equal. “Our goal was to determine whether the psychological outcomes o

54min

When a Sponsored Facebook Post Doesn’t Pay Off

After rising to MySpace fame in the mid-aughts, singer-songwriter Kaila Yu amassed a following of nearly half a million fans on Facebook and 70,000 on Twitter and Instagram. Like all “influencers”—people who leverage a social-media following to influence others—Yu now makes her living monetizing her audience with branded content, promoting products and events through sponsored posts. In July, she

3min

Migrating birds may face tougher winds going south

Depending on potential climate change scenarios, altered winds may make it harder for North American birds to migrate south in the autumn but easier for them to come north in the spring. Researchers came to this conclusion using data from 143 weather radar stations to estimate the altitude, density, and direction birds took during spring and autumn migrations over several years. They also extract

5min

There's A Lot At Stake In The Weekly U.S. Drought Map

As drought has deepened across the West, much attention is paid to a colorful map that shows the hardest hit areas. The scientists who update the map each week face enormous pressure to get it right. (Image credit: Kami Engstrom/Courtesy of Matt Isgar)

30min

The Most-Read WIRED Science Stories of 2018

Feast your mind on stories about brain-eating amoebas, the science of wildfires, and a criminal twist to the genetics revolution.

32min

2018 Proved Game Streaming Can Still Get Bigger—and Messier

What will happen on with sites like Twitch in 2019? Hard to say—but we have some ideas.

32min

Illuminating nanoparticle growth with X-rays

Hydrogen fuel cells are a promising technology for producing clean and renewable energy, but the cost and activity of their cathode materials is a major challenge for commercialization. Many fuel cells require expensive platinum-based catalysts—substances that initiate and speed up chemical reactions—to help convert renewable fuels into electrical energy. To make hydrogen fuel cells commercially v

35min

Rich people give more to charity when you make them feel powerful

Wealthy people donated 60 per cent more money when they received messages appealing to their personal power rather than their community-mindedness

35min

Loopy Particle Math

Scientists are creating mathematical tools to identify novel particles and phenomena at the world's largest particle accelerator — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

36min

How Exercise Affects Your Brain

Scientists are continuing to showing that everything from the “runner’s high” to the “yogi’s tranquility” can have profound effects on your brain — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

36min

Wired that way: genes do shape behaviors but it’s complicated

Many of our psychological traits are innate in origin. There is overwhelming evidence from twin, family and general population studies that all manner of personality traits, as well as things such as intelligence, sexuality and risk of psychiatric disorders, are highly heritable. Put concretely, this means that a sizeable fraction of the population spread of values such as IQ scores or personalit

46min

Novel biomarkers & therapeutic targets for atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases

In this review, the researchers describe the analytical techniques and workflow used in untargeted metabolomics. They also identify several case studies that highlight the use of untargeted metabolomics in cardiovascular research.

52min

Give it the plasma treatment: strong adhesion without adhesives

A Japanese research team at Osaka University used plasma treatment to make fluoropolymers and silicone resin adhere without any adhesives. Heat-assisted helium-plasma treatment created oxygen-containing functional groups on PTFE or PFA, while open-air plasma-jetting installed silanol groups on vulcanized PDMS. Under pressure, the treated PDMS strongly adhered to the treated polymers, copper, and g

52min

What influences a person's psychological boundaries?

Professor Sofya Nartova-Bochaver of the Higher School of economics and colleagues from universities in Armenia and China conducted a comparative analysis of the psychological boundaries of individuals living in different countries. The results indicate that age and sex play a greater role in the formation of those boundaries than culture does.

52min

More bears needed to sustain Pyrenees population: activists

The release of additional bears into the Pyrenees mountains straddling France and Spain is needed to ensure the fledgling population's survival, the activist group charged with the bears' protection said Wednesday.

1h

Quake from Mount Etna volcano jolts Sicily, sparks panic

A quake triggered by Mount Etna's eruption jolted eastern Sicily before dawn Wednesday, injuring at least 10 people, damaging churches and houses on the volcano's slopes and prompting panicked villagers to flee their homes.

1h

Digitally enhanced: Estonia plots the end of bureaucracy

In the Estonian capital of Tallinn, three-day-old Oskar Lunde sleeps soundly in his hospital cot, snuggled into a lime green blanket decorated with red butterflies. Across the room, his father turns on a laptop.

1h

Cryptocurrencies crashed in 2018. Now they’re right where they should be.

A year ago, Bitcoin and its brethren were headed to the moon. These days they’re much more grounded.

1h

Illuminating nanoparticle growth with X-rays

Ultrabright X-rays at NSLS-II reveal key details of catalyst growth for more efficient hydrogen fuel cells.

1h

European wheat lacks climate resilience

A group of European researchers, including Professor Jørgen E. Olesen from the Department of Agroecology at Aarhus University, has found that current breeding programmes and cultivar selection practices do not provide the needed resilience to climate change.

1h

Autophagy and mitochondria: Targets in neurodegenerative disorders

Cellular homeostasis depends on the timely clearance of damaged cellular organelles and proteins via pathways including autophagy. Mitochondria and mitochondrial autophagy play a vital role in cellular health and failure of these pathways can have a devastating effect on cellular homeostasis. Here, the researchers review the involvement of mitochondrial and autophagy dysfunction in neurodegenerati

1h

Targeting kinetoplastid and apicomplexan thymidylate biosynthesis as antiprotozoal strategy

Kinetoplastid and apicomplexan parasites comprise a group of protozoans responsible for human diseases, with a serious impact on human health and the socioeconomic growth of developing countries. Researchers review the available literature in relation to drug discovery studies targeting thymidylate biosynthesis in kinetoplastid (genera Trypanosoma and Leishmania) and apicomplexan (Plasmodium spp a

1h

Flavonoids as P-gp inhibitors: A systematic review of SARs

This review concerned the recent updates on the structure-activity relationships of flavonoids as P-gp inhibitors, the molecular mechanisms of their action and their ability to overcome P-gp-mediated MDR in preclinical studies.

1h

Antifungal activity and detoxification of aflatoxins

Aflatoxins are secondary metabolites produced by fungi of the genus Aspergillus, which occur naturally in cereals like corn, beans and rice. Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) is the main aflatoxin produced by the fungi and has the highest toxicity, mainly targeting the liver, while also exhibits teratogenic, mutagenic and carcinogenic effects in humans and several animal models.

1h

Artificial activation of cancer cells to destroy them

This risky method of anti-cancer therapy was suggested by scientists of Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU). Their review of mechanisms for molecular activation of stem cells of gliomas (most widely-spread brain tumors) was approved for publishing in the Frontiers in Cellular Neuroscience journal.

1h

Anesthetic-induced myocardial conditioning: Molecular fundamentals and scope

The objective of this study was to investigate the role that miRNAs play in the cardioprotective effect of halogenated anesthetics. A review was conducted of more than 100 studies to identify miRNAs involved in anesthetic-induced myocardial conditioning. Halogenated anesthetics regulate the expression of miRNAs involved in heart conditions.

1h

Discovery of topological LC circuits transporting EM waves without backscattering

NIMS succeeded in fabricating topological LC circuits arranged in a honeycomb pattern where electromagnetic (EM) waves can propagate without backscattering even when pathways turn sharply. These circuits may be suitable for use as high-frequency electromagnetic waveguides, which would allow miniaturization and high integration in various electronics devices, such as mobile phones.

1h

Setting speed limits too low ups fatal crashes

Setting speed limits just five miles per hour below engineering recommendations produces a statistically significant decrease in total, fatal, and injury crashes, and property-damage-only crashes, according to researchers. “If (however) you lower the speed limit by 10, 15, 25 miles per hour, or more, drivers stop paying attention,” says Vikash Gayah, assistant professor of civil engineering at Pe

1h

60% of US children’s deaths in 2016 were preventable

The United States lost 20,360 children and teens in 2016—60 percent of them to preventable injuries, a new study shows. More than 4,100 of them died in motor vehicle crashes, though prevention efforts and better trauma care have cut the death rate of young people from such crashes in half in less than two decades. Meanwhile, firearms—the second cause of death in youth—claimed the lives of more th

1h

Tree-ring analysis explains physiology behind drought intolerance

Tree rings tell the story of what's happening physiologically as fire suppression makes forests more dense and less tolerant of drought, pests and wildfires, new research shows.

1h

News releases about health, Earth science and social sciences make up EurekAlert!'s 2018 trending news list

Health news occupied six of the 10 most-viewed news releases on EurekAlert! in 2018. The most popular news release, 'Study: Lead and other toxic metals found in e-cigarette 'vapors," submitted by Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health received 337,013 views.

1h

10 Times Humans Were Total Morons Around Animals in 2018

Here are a few of humanity's most embarrassing and shameful moments involving animals this year.

1h

14 Most Bizarre Scientific Discoveries of 2018

2018 was a weird one in science, from boiling bats to blueberry Earth.

1h

Memristor device acts like competing neurons

A new electronic device can directly model the behaviors of a synapse, which is a connection between two neurons. For the first time, the way that neurons share or compete for resources can be explored in hardware without the need for complicated circuits. “Neuroscientists have argued that competition and cooperation behaviors among synapses are very important. Our new memristive devices allow us

1h

Social Media Helped Make 2018 the Year of the Scammer

Hustlers have always tried to get over on the powerless—in 2018, though, the tables began to turn.

1h

The Finnish Swimmers Who Chill Out in Subzero Temperatures

Who needs a warm tropical beach when you can enjoy a hole in the ice? Definitely not the Finns.

1h

Glaciers "Sing" as They Crack at Night

Fracturing of Himalayan glaciers could make them melt faster, threatening the water supply for more than a billion people in Asia — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

Romaine to Honey Smacks Cereal: Why Were There So Many Foodborne Outbreaks in 2018?

From E. coli-tainted romaine lettuce to Salmonella in cereal, this year certainly had its fair share of foodborne illness outbreaks.

1h

Japan Embraces Commercial Whaling, Pulls Out Of Global Alliance That Banned Practice

Japan is leaving the International Whaling Commission, which put a moratorium on commercial whaling in the 1980s. The country will allow commercial hunts for the first time in 30 years next July. (Image credit: Kyodo/Reuters)

1h

Medical scientists describe optimal immune therapeutic strategies for liver cancer

KAIST medical scientists have presented a novel pathways involving T immune cell exhaustion, providing evidence and rationale for designing optimal strategies for immune checkpoint blockades in cancer patients. They succeeded in distinguishing the hepatocellular carcinoma group from the exhausted tumor infiltrating immune cell composition of liver cancer patients.

1h

What the Syria Hawks Refuse to Acknowledge

President Donald Trump’s decision to withdraw U.S. troops from Syria is controversial partly because of the possible consequences for the country’s Kurdish minority. “Among the biggest losers are likely to be the Kurdish troops that the United States has equipped and relied on to fight the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria,” The New York Times editorialized . “Turkey’s president, Recep Tayyip Erdog

2h

The Way American Parents Think About Chores Is Bizarre

The practice of paying children an allowance kicked off in earnest about 100 years ago. “The motivation was twofold,” says Steven Mintz, a historian of childhood at the University of Texas at Austin. “First, to provide kids with the money that they needed to participate in the emerging commercial culture—allowing them to buy candy, cheap toys, and other inexpensive products—and second, to teach t

2h

The 19 Best Books of 2018

Editor’s Note : Find all of The Atlantic ’s “Best of 2018” coverage here . 2018 was a year whose realities sometimes seemed to approach the dystopias and dramas of fiction, as stories of family trauma, environmental disaster, and sexual assault played out on the world stage. The books our writers and editors were drawn to this year include many that illuminate these struggles and inequities, whet

2h

The Moon exhibition in Denmark re-enchants the moon for our times

We lament the loss of our connection to the light of stars and moon, but in the second of our 12 Days of Culture, a science-art exhibition imbues the moon with new meaning

2h

2h

A New Type of DNA Testing Is Entering Crime Investigations

Geneology is about to send a lot more people to jail.

2h

How China Helped Make the Internet Less Free in 2018

Tech companies, democratic governments, and civil society need to work together to fight back against growing surveillance and censorship online.

2h

Those We Lost in 2018

The scientific community said goodbye to a number of leading researchers this year.

2h

China's Home-Grown Surge in Plant Biology

Studies to improve the productivity, resistance and taste of rice crops are central to China’s commanding position — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

How a Reclusive Lizard Became a Prize Find for Wildlife Smugglers

Scientists studying rare creatures face a tricky conundrum—how to publicize their research without launching their subjects into the exotic wildlife trade.

2h

Meltdown og Spectre nedsmeltede gamle ideer om it-sikkerhed i 2018

PLUS. Gode intentioner om at udføre programmer hurtigere ved at gemme værdier lokalt, omordne instruktioner og gætte på udfald af forgreninger ligger bag nuværende og fremtidige sikkerhedsproblemer i CPU'er.

3h

Palaeontologists behaving badly, and other bitter feuds in science

What killed the dinosaurs? Does string theory count as science? Is Pluto a planet? Get embroiled in five explosive debates that have put researchers at each others' throats

3h

Our best illustrations of 2018

Our artists’ thought-provoking, playful creations bring our stories to life, often saying more with an image than words ever could.

3h

2018 was a busy year in space

This year, some missions started exploring the cosmos, while others were winding down.

3h

How to Return and Exchange Your Unwanted Holiday Gifts

You can't always get what you want. Here's how to get some cash (or store credit) instead.

3h

2018 Was a Rough Year for Truth Online

The internet has been awash with misinformation for years, but researchers are finally realizing it's hard to quantify the scope of its impact.

3h

Josephine Klein obituary

Psychologist, psychotherapist, academic and community worker who founded the Refugee Therapy Centre in London The psychologist and psychotherapist Josephine Klein, who has died aged 92, had a passionate concern for social justice. It underpinned a variety of her initiatives as a researcher, writer and practitioner. Two books came out of a period in the research section of the National Association

3h

Humanizing Dick Cheney

This article contains mild spoilers for Vice. The central conundrum of Dick Cheney’s political and historical identity is the gulf between the malevolence of his public persona (snarling, dark, relentless) and the mildness of his private personality (wry, relaxed, understated). It’s a dichotomy that Adam McKay tackles head-on in Vice , his tragicomedy of a biopic about the 46th vice president of

4h

What Populists Do to Democracies

When Jair Bolsonaro won Brazil’s presidential election in October to the consternation of the country’s traditional political elite, commentators were sharply divided about the implications. Some warned that Bolsonaro, a far-right populist who has openly expressed admiration for the brutal military dictatorship that ruled Brazil from 1964 to 1985, presented a clear and present threat to democracy

4h

Amazon's Autodidact Streak

Candace Thille’s mother, who had an undergraduate degree in physics and a master’s degree in mathematics, always told her that all work is honorable work, as long as you set a high standard for yourself. Her father, an electrical engineer, was the one who emphasized the importance of education: “The most important thing you can learn,” he’d tell her, “is how to teach yourself new things.” When Th

4h

Trump’s not the problem. He’s a symbol of 4 bigger issues.

If the problem was just Trump, it wouldn't be happening in other places around the world, says political scientist Ian Bremmer. All sorts of advanced industrial democracies have people getting angrier and voting more and more against the establishment. Even when their economies are doing well, four factors exist that rip at the fabric of civic nationalism. What's surprising, however, there is one

4h

Best After-Christmas Sales (2018): Bose, Beats, Blu-ray, and More

If you’re looking for deals or unwrapped some gift cards this season, there are plenty of killer year-end sales happening.

4h

Husker du robotdrabet og den nemme app? Seks tech-historier vi vil huske fra 2018

Teknologien vil mest blive husket for sine skyggesider, i året der rinder ud. Men heldigvis var der også et par lyspunkter, fx var årets mest populære app både hjælpsom og dansk.

5h

If we want a different politics, we need another revolutionary: Freud | Suzanne Moore

Marx is all very well, but to effect real change Sigmund Freud’s modern tools of self-examination hold the answers “If anything is certain, it is that I myself am not a Marxist.” I love that Karl Marx said that. I love his self-knowledge. I love the poetry of The Communist Manifesto . I love that he was a seer, a prophet of what we now call globalisation. I love that he understood that there is n

5h

The Transformers Summit: solving the problem of urban living

The UN wants to make cities inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable by 2030. So innovators, entrepreneurs and policy makers are responding

5h

Nasa Spacecraft Hurtles Toward Historic New Year’S Flyby

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5h

As TikTok videos take hold with teens, parents scramble to keep up

Millions of teenagers seeking their 15 seconds of fame are flocking to TikTok, but many of their parents are only now learning about the express-yourself video app—often to their dismay.

6h

Israeli anti-drone company sees spike in interest

An Israeli technology company says its anti-drone system is drawing major interest after rogue unmanned aircraft sowed chaos at London's Gatwick Airport last week.

6h

Japan will resume commercial whaling, but not in Antarctic

Japan announced Wednesday it is leaving the International Whaling Commission to resume hunting the animals for commercial use but said it will no longer go to the Antarctic for its much-criticized annual killings of hundreds of whales.

6h

Indonesia says avoid coast near volcano, fearing new tsunami

Indonesian authorities asked people to avoid the coast in areas where a tsunami killed more than 420 people last weekend in a fresh warning issued on the anniversary of the catastrophic 2004 Asian earthquake and tsunami.

6h

Research shows biases against US immigrants with non-anglicized names

Immigrating to a new country brings many challenges, including figuring out how to be part of a new community. For some people, voluntarily adopting a name similar to where someone is living, rather than keeping an original name, is one part of trying to assimilate or fit in with the new community. According to a new study focused on the United States, where anglicized names are more typical, angl

6h

Hundredårsjagten på det perfekte dæksel – kapitel 3, 4 og efterskrift

PLUS. En fortælling i tre dele om en matematisk udfordring.

6h

Året hvor vi vinkede farvel til rent, urenset grundvand

PLUS. I årtier har det været en fast del af den danske selvforståelse, at vi kan pumpe vand op fra undergrunden og sende det direkte ud i vandhanerne. Men efter flere fund af gamle pesticidrester lakker denne praksis mod enden.

7h

‘Learning to relax can be life-changing’: how to find your comfort zone

Many of us have forgotten how to truly unwind. We ask the experts for ways to switch off in an always-on world How do you like to kick back, chill out and really relax? This sounds as if it should be a simple question. But I can’t be alone in having spent several evenings over the past couple of weeks slumped on the sofa, “watching TV” while my eyes flicker across Twitter and Facebook, as well as

8h

Skandaleår for Facebook: Men danskerne liker stadig på livet løs

Møgsagerne er kommet som perler på en snor igennem hele 2018, hvor Facebook på det nærmeste har siddet i gabestok. Men det får ikke danskerne til at droppe firmaets platforme.

9h

Expedition sets out to map Larsen C ice shelf

Scientists head to Weddell Sea to model changes to the shelf since the calving, in 2017, of the massive iceberg A68 In the comings days, a team of scientists, technicians and other specialists will gather onboard the SA Agulhas II, a 13,500-tonne ice-breaker moored off the coast of Antarctica, and make final preparations for one of the most ambitious polar expeditions in decades. Guided by satell

9h

Research shows biases against immigrants with non-anglicized names

Using variations of the 'trolley-dilemma' where people choose who to save or not save others in a hypothetical situation, social psychologists show that for certain groups, under certain conditions in a hypothetical scenario, having an anglicized name means you're more likely to be saved than if you kept your original Asian or Arab name.

10h

Ten big science stories of 2018

The year 2018 provided plenty to chew on if you're interested in science and the environment.

14h

'Absolute revolution': UK biotech firms thrive despite Brexit threat

Booming sector received nearly £1.6bn from investors in first eight months of 2018 Biotech is one of the most promising parts of the British drug industry, not least according to the investors who continue to pump vast sums into the sector despite the looming shadow of Brexit. In the first eight months of 2018 alone it received nearly £1.6bn, compared with £1.2bn for the entirety of 2017. An unas

15h

The Good News About These Short Days

Astrophysicist Adam Frank says to stop cursing the darkness of this time of year and enjoy its place in our cosmic concert.

18h

2018: A Big Year In Space

This past year was a weird and eventful one for news from outer space. We saw everything from a red sports car being shot off the planet to a detailed new map of our Milky Way to a mysterious hole drilled in the International Space Station.

18h

NASA: Holiday asteroid looks like a hippopotamus

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19h

Saturn’s Ring Are Disappearing Its Beauty Is Fleeting

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19h

Map zooms in on declining snow mass in Western US

Some parts of the Western United States have had a 41 percent reduction in the yearly maximum mass of snow since 1982. Researchers have mapped the changes in snow mass from 1982 to 2016 onto a grid of squares 2.5-miles on a side over the entire contiguous US. A person could practically find the trend for their neighborhood, says first author Xubin Zeng, professor of hydrology and atmospheric scie

20h

Watch: Morphing material goes from flat to face

Scientists have created a rubbery, shape-shifting material that morphs from one sophisticated form to another on demand. The shapes programmed into a polymer appear in ambient conditions and melt away when under heat. The process also works in reverse. The smooth operation belies a battle at the nanoscale, where liquid crystals and the elastomer in which they’re embedded fight for control. When c

21h

Why giving gifts brings you more happiness than receiving them

Giving gifts results in longer happiness from the act, says new research. We can sustain the pleasure of a new experience every time we give to others. Hedonic adaptation makes it hard to continuously enjoy spending money on ourselves. None Just in time for the holidays, comes new research that says you get more satisfaction from giving gifts than receiving. Usually, a phenomenon known as hedonic

21h

Saturn’S Ring Are Disappearing Its Beauty Is Fleeting

submitted by /u/sci54 [link] [comments]

22h

Pres på madbudgettet er koblet til usund kost og dårligt psykisk helbred i mindst 100.000 danske husstande

Et betydeligt antal danskere oplever, at de er så hårdt presset på budgettet,…

22h

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