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Nyheder2018december27

Japan whale hunting: Commercial whaling to restart in July

One conservation group warns that the move shows "a troubling disregard for international rule".

17h

Lightning's electromagnetic fields may have protective properties

Lightning was the main electromagnetic presence in the Earth's atmosphere long before the invention of electricity. There are some 2,000 thunderstorms active at any given time, so humans and other organisms have been bathed in extremely low frequency (ELF) electromagnetic fields for billions of years.

2h

Danmark kræver bakterie-dræbende program til opvaskemaskiner

Alle opvaskemaskiner skal kunne varmes op til 70 grader i minimum ti minutter for at sikre, at alle resistente bakterier bliver slået ihjel, mener både Statens Serum Institut og regeringen.

3h

Phys.org
Gray wolf arrives at New Mexico zoo for recovery program

Albuquerque's zoo has received another Mexican gray wolf as part of an international recovery effort that includes breeding the endangered animals in captivity to ensure their genetic viability.

5min

Nations count cost of 2018 climate disasters

Climate change-induced disasters cost nations at least $100 billion in 2018, a watchdog said Thursday, warning the spate of deadly wildfires, floods and superstorms was "a shadow" of things to come if greenhouse gas emissions aren't slashed.

5min

The Year in #MeToo

2018 brought new revelations of sexual misconduct by high-profile scientists, as well as policy changes from funders and professional societies aimed at curbing bad behavior.

18min

Virtual Reality Helps Hospice Workers See Life And Death Through A Patient's Eyes

A Maine medical school and nearby hospice center are trying out a VR program aimed at fostering more empathy for dying patients among health workers-in-training. Not everyone is sold on the idea. (Image credit: Embodied Labs)

19min

Immigrant kids in ‘tender age’ shelters face myriad risks

Separating immigrant children from their parents will very likely lead to negative effects on emotional and mental health, research shows. Young children placed in “tender age” shelters are the most vulnerable, experts say. “Recent changes in the US immigration system have resulted in a large number of children removed from their parents, drawing increased scrutiny to this abhorrent practice,” sa

22min

Pluto explorer ushering in new year at more distant world

The spacecraft team that brought us close-ups of Pluto will ring in the new year by exploring an even more distant and mysterious world.

35min

Through 'bridge symptoms' social anxiety can develop into depression, and vice versa

The study examined the relationships between symptoms of major depressive disorder and social anxiety disorder. Traditionally, shared symptoms haven't been viewed as interacting elements that can cause someone suffering from one disorder to develop the other. The researchers argue that symptoms of one disorder can act as "bridges" that lead to the other. The findings suggest that treatments for d

41min

Universal basic income had a rough 2018

Some of the biggest and most promising experiments were plagued by delays and shutdowns.

44min

The Surgical Singularity Is Approaching

AI-powered robots may soon be doing some procedures faster, more accurately and with fewer complications than humans — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

45min

The Military Must Remain Apolitical

The surprise visit by President Trump to military personnel in Iraq and Germany the day after Christmas was a particularly welcome development, given his previous departure from this time-honored tradition of his predecessors around the holiday season. The visits were marred, however, by the president’s overtly political rhetoric, and by his encouragement of the small number of uniformed personne

45min

The Year the Gun Conversation Changed

The year was not a month old when a 16-year-old allegedly opened fire in a cafeteria in Italy, Texas, injuring one of his classmates on January 22nd. It was the first shooting on a K–12 campus this year. One day later, in Benton, Kentucky, a 15-year-old student allegedly killed two of his classmates and injured 17 others. Over the next three weeks, there were shootings at or near Lincoln High Sch

45min

Artificial intelligence is mastering a wider variety of jobs than ever before

In 2018, AI bested humans at following fauna, diagnosing disease, mapping the moon and more.

57min

Bacteria found in ancient Irish soil halts growth of superbugs—new hope for tackling antibiotic resistance

Researchers analysing soil from Ireland long thought to have medicinal properties have discovered that it contains a previously unknown strain of bacteria which is effective against four of the top six superbugs that are resistant to antibiotics, including MRSA.

59min

Indonesiens tsunami-varsling hænger i laser

Pengeproblemer i Indonesien har flere gange bremset de teknologier, der skulle forhindre katastrofer udløst af tsunamier.

1h

Researchers develop novel 3-D printing method for transparent glass

A novel additive manufacturing platform was used for the digital fabrication of transparent glass at industrial scale. The G3DP2 platform, developed by MIT scientists and used to turn molten glass into 3-meter tall columns, is described in an article published in 3-D Printing and Additive Manufacturing.

1h

Pine needles from old Christmas trees could be turned into paint and food sweeteners in the future

Abandoned Christmas trees could be saved from landfill and turned into paint and food sweeteners according to new research by the University of Sheffield.

1h

Magnitude 4.9 aftershock strikes near site of Alaska quake

A magnitude 4.9 aftershock has shaken an area of south central Alaska near where a powerful temblor jolted the region last month.

1h

Lighter load: Laundry detergents shrink for Amazon

Amazon's rise is forcing laundry detergents to shrink.

1h

The enduring legacy of Sigmund Freud, radical | Letters

Psychiatry professor Brendan Kelly , Peter Wilson , Richard Wilkinson and Kate Pickett , and Dr Ian Flintoff debate Suzanne Moore’s enthusiasm for the ideas of the father of psychoanalysis Suzanne Moore describes Sigmund Freud as “revolutionary” and says that he is now more relevant than Marx ( Forget Marx. Freud is the radical we need , 26 December). Moore is right: Freud was right and so, for th

1h

Proportion of cancers associated with excess body weight varies considerably by state

A new study finds an at least 1.5-fold difference in the share of cancers related to obesity between states with the highest and lowest proportions.

1h

FSU researchers unravel mystery of how, when DNA replicates

A team of Florida State University researchers has unlocked a decades old mystery about how a critical cellular process called DNA replication is regulated.

1h

Your brain rewards you twice per meal: When you eat and when food reaches your stomach

We know a good meal can stimulate the release of the feel-good hormone dopamine, and now a study in humans from the Max Planck Institute for Metabolism Research in Germany suggests that dopamine release in the brain occurs at two different times: at the time the food is first ingested and another once the food reaches the stomach. The work appears December 27 in the journal Cell Metabolism.

1h

How exercise reduces belly fat in humans

Some of you may have made a New Year's resolution to hit the gym to tackle that annoying belly fat. But have you ever wondered how physical activity produces this desired effect? A signaling molecule called interleukin-6 plays a critical role in this process, researchers report December 27 in the journal Cell Metabolism.

1h

Historical genomes reveal recent changes in genetic health of eastern gorillas

The critically endangered Grauer's gorilla has recently lost genetic diversity and has experienced an increase in harmful mutations. These conclusions were reached by an international team of researchers who sequenced eleven genomes from eastern gorilla specimens collected up to 100 years ago, and compared these with genomes from present-day individuals. The results are now published in Current Bi

1h

Better mouse model built to enable precision-medicine research for Alzheimer's

Incorporating genetic diversity into a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease resulted in greater overlap with the genetic, molecular and clinical features of this pervasive human disease, according to a study funded by the National Institute on Aging (NIA), part of the National Institutes of Health.

1h

How scientists collect lava from an active volcano

Science It takes the right gear. Volcano researcher Jessica Johnson explains how she scoops up 1800°F lava—and what scientists can learn from it.

1h

2019 Preview: AI to best humans at one of world’s most complex games

A team of AI bots were beaten at the video game Dota 2 by human players in June, but in 2019 they will return with a vengeance to become the world's best

1h

10 quotes to motivate you in 2019

Quotes can be good reminders that we're not alone in our struggles. The most powerful quotes remind us that while failure is not optional, how we treat it is. Fail well and learn from it, the most successful figures remind us again and again. None Good quotes are adrenaline shots, catalysts for perspective, reminders that as locked into our own thoughts as we sometimes become, others are walking

1h

Researchers unravel mystery of how, when DNA replicates

A team of Florida State University researchers has unlocked a decades-old mystery about how a critical cellular process is regulated and what that could mean for the future study of genetics.

1h

Historical genomes reveal recent changes in genetic health of eastern gorillas

The critically endangered Grauer's gorilla has recently lost genetic diversity and has experienced an increase in harmful mutations. These conclusions were reached by an international team of researchers who sequenced eleven genomes from eastern gorilla specimens collected up to 100 years ago, and compared these with genomes from present-day individuals. The results are now published in Current Bi

1h

Simple Sugars Wipe Out Beneficial Gut Bugs

Fructose and sucrose can make it all the way to the colon, where they spell a sugary death sentence for beneficial bacteria. Karen Hopkin reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

Bacteria found in ancient Irish soil halts growth of superbugs — new hope for tackling antibiotic resistance

Researchers analyzing soil from Ireland long thought to have medicinal properties have discovered that it contains a previously unknown strain of bacteria which is effective against four of the top six superbugs that are resistant to antibiotics, including MRSA.Antibiotic-resistant superbugs could kill up to 1.3 million people in Europe by 2050, according to recent research. The World Health Organ

1h

Five Times the Internet Was Actually Fun in 2018

There were lots of bad things online this year. Let’s celebrate some of the exceptions.

1h

Multicenter trial supports use of topical antibiotics in NICU babies

A team of doctors led by Karen L. Kotloff, M.D., University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM), Center for Vaccine Development and Global Health (CVD), has performed a clinical trial involving multiple hospitals that tested the effectiveness of applying a topical antibiotic known as mupirocin for prevention of Staphylococcus aureus (SA) infection in babies in the neonatal intensive care unit (

2h

Distinguishing between students who guess and those who know

Measuring the knowledge of students in online courses poses a number of challenges. Researchers from the Higher School of Economics and the University of Leuven made improvements to the model for assessing academic achievements and published their results in the journal Heliyon.

2h

New estimate of global human migration is much higher

Researchers have unveiled a new statistical method for estimating migration flows between countries, using the so-called pseudo-Bayes approach. They show that rates of migration—defined as an international move followed by a stay of at least one year—are higher than previously thought, but also relatively stable, fluctuating between 1.1 and 1.3 percent of global population from 1990 to 2015. In a

2h

Toyota Wants to Put a Robot in Every Home and Make It Your Pal

submitted by /u/trot-trot [link] [comments]

2h

The Biggest Science News of 2018

From disastrous scientific setbacks to the upending of scientific dogma and the end of a 40-year search for a protein

2h

UK army tests eagle-inspired paragliding drone for delivering supplies

An autonomous paraglider inspired by nature could be help military supplies, such as food or trucks, and airlift people to safety

2h

MIT researchers develop novel 3D printing method for transparent glass

A novel additive manufacturing platform was used for the digital fabrication of transparent glass at industrial scale.

2h

Genetic polymorphisms and zinc status

Zinc is an essential component for all living organisms, representing the second most abundant trace element, after iron. This element is widely distributed in the tissues of a human body where it is involved in normal growth, reproduction and several biological functions including immunity, energy metabolism and antioxidant processes.

2h

Phytochemistry, traditional uses and pharmacological profile of rose hip

The fruit of genus Rosa, known as 'rose hip,' is frequently used in different traditional medicines. Rose hips have long been used to treat kidney stones, gastroenteric ailments, hypertension and respiratory problems such as bronchitis, cough and cold. This review is focused on the ethnopharmacological uses of rose hip as well as phytochemical and pharmacological aspects.

2h

The Most-Read Security Stories of 2018

This year saw the most devastating cyberattack in history, a gang of teen hackers, and so much Mueller news.

2h

Expert tips: Stick to your New Year’s workout goals

Setting workout goals for the New Year? Increasing physical activity and aiming to improve your health are worthy goals, but can be challenging. To help you out, Brandon Alderman, an associate professor and vice chair of education and administration in the kinesiology and health department at Rutgers University, has some tips for setting realistic exercise goals that could also have a positive im

2h

Weird winds to blame for Greenland’s huge water patch

A new analysis shows that odd winds, rather than simple global warming, were to blame for a vast expanse of open water that appeared in the sea ice above Greenland in February 2018. Although last winter did see unusually warm temperature spikes in the Arctic, researchers say the cause for the big pool of open water in the middle of the ice—known as a polynya—was strong surface winds triggered by

2h

Does Weight-Loss Surgery Rewire Gut–Brain Connections?

Bariatric procedures are revealing new insights into the dialogue between bowel and brain — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

Your Christmas tree could help save the planet

Recycling your Christmas tree could help provide the materials needed to make food sweeteners and paint, as well as help cut greenhouse gas emissions.

2h

Understanding metabolic processes through machine learning

Bioinformatics researchers at Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf (HHU) and the University of California at San Diego (UCSD) are using machine learning techniques to better understand enzyme kinetics and thus also complex metabolic processes. The team led by first author Dr. David Heckmann has described its results in the current issue of the journal Nature Communications.

2h

European wheat lacks climate resilience

The climate is not only warming, it is also becoming more variable and extreme. Such unpredictable weather can weaken global food security if major crops such as wheat are not sufficiently resilient—and if we are not properly prepared.

2h

Give it the plasma treatment: Strong adhesion without adhesives

Polymers containing plastics are essential in modern life. Being lightweight, strong and unreactive, a vast range of technologies depend on them. However, most polymers do not adhere naturally to other materials, so they need adhesives or corrosive chemical treatments to enable attachment. This is a problem in areas like food and medicine, where contamination must be avoided at all costs.

2h

The landscape of protein tyrosine phosphatase (Shp2) and cancer

The current study was designed to focus on the allosteric regulation (autoinhibition) of the of Shp2 protein. Subsequently, it will cover the last 10-year recap of Shp2 protein, their role in cancer, and regulation in numerous ways (allosteric regulation).

3h

Computational advances in the label-free quantification of cancer proteomics data

In this paper, the recent advances and development in the computational perspective of LFQ in cancer proteomics were systematically reviewed and analyzed.

3h

Pine needles from Christmas trees could be turned into paint and food sweeteners

Abandoned Christmas trees could be saved from landfill and turned into paint and food sweeteners according to new research by the University of Sheffield.

3h

Electronics of the future: A new energy-efficient mechanism using the Rashba effect

Scientists at Tokyo Tech proposed new quasi-1D materials for potential spintronic applications, an upcoming technology that exploits the spin of electrons. They performed simulations to demonstrate the spin properties of these materials and explained the mechanisms behind their behavior.

3h

Silver nanowires promise more comfortable smart textiles

In a paper to be published in the forthcoming issue in NANO, researchers from the Nanjing University of Posts and Telecommunications have developed a simple, scalable and low-cost capillary-driven self-assembly method to prepare flexible and stretchable conductive fibers that have applications in wearable electronics and smart fabrics.

3h

What President Trump Will Face in the New Year

The critical last layer of Donald Trump’s support in 2016 came from voters uncertain that he belonged in the White House. Now he appears determined to test how much chaos they will absorb before concluding they made the wrong decision. For all the talk about the solidity of Trump’s base, it’s easy to forget how many voters expressed ambivalence even as they selected him over Hillary Clinton. Full

3h

The Disturbing Truth About Kevin Spacey’s ‘Let Me Be Frank’ Video

The video Kevin Spacey posted on Christmas Eve has been repeatedly described as “bizarre,” with good reason: No one knows what it means. Wearing a Santa apron and occasionally sipping from a mug, Spacey seems to inhabit his House of Cards character, Frank Underwood, drawling things such as, “We’re not done, no matter what anyone says.” The monologue hints at a desire to return to Cards , despite

3h

Nucleus-specific X-ray stain for 3-D virtual histology

Histology is used to identify structural details of tissue at the microscale in the pathology lab, but analyses remain two-dimensional (2D) as they are limited to the same plane. Nondestructive 3D technologies including X-ray micro and nano-computed tomography (nanoCT) have proven validity to understand anatomical structures, since they allow arbitrary viewing angles and 3D structural detail. Howe

3h

Our best photographs of 2018

Transport yourself around the world and see people creating and dealing with technological change in MIT Technology Review’s top photos of the year.

3h

Alien Hunters, Stop Using the Drake Equation

For the precocious hunter of off-Earth life, the Drake equation is the ever-ready, go-to toolkit for estimating just how (not) lonely humans are in the Milky Way galaxy. But it's not useful.

3h

This Ship Sank Decades Ago. Now, a 3D Model Has Resurrected It.

A digital 3D reconstruction has recreated a ship that sank in 1995.

3h

Researchers monitor electron behavior during chemical reactions for the first time

In a recent publication in Science, researchers at the University of Paderborn and the Fritz Haber Institute Berlin demonstrated their ability to observe electrons' movements during a chemical reaction. Researchers have long studied the atomic-scale processes that govern chemical reactions, but were never before able to observe electron motions as they happened.

3h

Coenzyme Q10 supplementation on metabolic profiles of patients with chronic kidney disease

This systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were conducted to determine the effects of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) supplementation on metabolic profiles of patients diagnosed with chronic kidney disease (CKD).

3h

Impact of a psycho-educational team in early breast cancer patients' coping strategies

The main purpose of the psycho-educational groups was to help women with breast cancer, learn how to cope with the physical, emotional, and lifestyle changes associated with cancer as well as with medical treatments that can be painful and traumatic. With this study, the researchers wanted to detect the effects that group action had on the women who participated in it.

3h

Long-term memory encoding engram neurons are established by the transcriptional cycling

Long-term memory (LTM) is formed by repetitive training trials with rest intervals and LTM formation requires transcription factors, including CREB and c-Fos. Miyashita et al. found that ERK activity is increased during rest intervals to induce transcriptional cycling between c-Fos and CREB in a subset of mushroom body neurons. Significantly, LTM is encoded in these mushroom body neurons, and bloc

3h

Vitamin D intake and obesity in occupational asthma patients and need for supplementation

The research was conducted to assess the vitamin D intake in occupational asthma patients and the relation with body mass index, comorbidities related to vitamin D deficit, lung function and quality of life.

3h

Endothelial regenerative capacity and aging: Influence of diet, exercise and obesity

This review will discuss the effects of advancing age on endothelial health and vascular regenerative capacity, as well as the influence of diet, exercise, and obesity on these cells, the mechanistic links and the subsequent impact on cardiovascular health.

3h

Synodos does it again: Breaking barriers to solve the 'impossible' problems

Treatment for low-grade gliomas in patients living with neurofibromatosis type 1 are now one step closer thanks to recent research discoveries initiated and funded by the Children's Tumor Foundation. The Foundation's SYNODOS consortium has just recently been published in Nature Medicine, showing that immunotherapy has the potential to impact gliomas.

3h

Treatment of Parkinson's disease: Separating hope from hype

This review emphasized the development of various non-pharmaceutical therapeutic approaches and mainly highlighted the cutting-edge treatments for PD including gene- and stem cell-based therapies, targeted delivery of neurotrophic factors, and brain stimulation techniques such as Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS), transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS), and Deep Brain Stimulation (DB

3h

New study shows link between secondhand smoke and cardiac arrhythmia

Continuous indoor exposure to secondhand tobacco smoke triggers changes in the heart's electrical activity, known as cardiac alternans, that can predict cardiac arrhythmia and sudden cardiac death, a new study from UC Davis Health researchers shows. The authors believe the study, conducted in mice, suggests that secondhand smoke exposure alters cells that regulate how the heart beats.

3h

How the brain enables us to rapidly focus attention

University of Queensland researchers have discovered a key mechanism in the brain that may underlie our ability to rapidly focus attention.Our brains are continuously bombarded with information from the senses, yet our level of vigilance to such input varies, allowing us to selectively focus on one conversation and not another.

3h

The Meme-ification of Asianness

Early every Sunday growing up in Australia, Anne Gu attended Chinese school, the weekend classes where many children of Chinese immigrants learn Mandarin. There, she bonded with her classmates over their shared sense of obligation. “We understood we had to be there because of our culture, our parents,” Gu said, “while our other friends were sleeping in.” They kept in touch via group chat, exchang

3h

Man Gets Black Widow Spider Bite. Then He Can't Pee.

There's a whole range of reasons you don't want to be bitten by a black widow spider, but you probably wouldn't think that losing the ability to pee is one of them.

3h

What really happens at femtosecond junctions?

When beams of ultra-short laser pulses running in the same direction intersect with each other at a noticeable angle, various interactions occur between the pulses. These physical phenomena are complicated, and their mathematical description becomes computationally complex. To carry out the appropriate simulations, entire computer clusters have to be engaged. The latest version of Hussar software

3h

New source of very high energy gamma-ray emission detected in the neighborhood of the supernova remnant G24.7+0.6

Using MAGIC telescopes and NASA's Fermi spacecraft, an international team of astronomers has discovered a new source of very high energy gamma-ray emission around the supernova remnant (SNR) G24.7+0.6. The detection of the new source, designated MAGIC J1835–069, is detailed in a paper published December 12 on the arXiv pre-print server.

3h

Quiz of the year: Test your knowledge of 2018’s science stories

What is the punk turtle’s secret power? Or the US Navy’s newest secret weapon? Find out how well you’ve been paying attention with our fun festive quiz

3h

The 10 Biggest Archaeology Stories of 2018

Here's a look back at the fascinating things archaeologists uncovered this year.

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18 Times Quantum Particles Blew Our Minds in 2018

These are all the biggest, most shocking quantum discoveries we covered in 2018.

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10 Strangest Medical Cases of 2018

Here are the most intriguing medical cases made headlines in 2018

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For 2019, smartwatches are sleeker, slicker and getting more affordable

A friend recently looked at the smartwatch on my wrist and said, "Why are you wearing that?" He held up his cellphone. "This can do everything that can do."

3h

The Streaming Wars Began in 2018—and They'll Only Get Worse

From Marvel cancellations to 'Friends' scares, this year was just the beginning of a long, grueling siege.

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Your Voice Assistant May Be Getting Smarter, But It's Still Awkward

The more smart devices that sell, the more compelling the AI technology becomes. But the virtual assistants inside still stumble.

3h

What Can Baboon Relationships Tell Us about Human Health?

Strong relationships seem to help baboons overcome early life adversity, and that could have big implications for human health — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

To spot anemia, app uses fingernail pics

Biomedical engineers have developed a smartphone app for the noninvasive detection of anemia. Instead of a blood test, the app uses photos of someone’s fingernails taken on a smartphone to determine whether the level of hemoglobin in their blood seems low. “All other ‘point-of-care’ anemia detection tools require external equipment, and represent trade-offs between invasiveness, cost, and accurac

4h

Huawei expects 21% revenue rise despite 'unfair' treatment

Chinese telecoms giant Huawei expects to see a 21 percent rise in revenue for 2018, its chairman said Thursday despite a year of "unfair treatment" which saw its products banned in several countries over security concerns.

4h

Amazon, Walmart face hit from new India e-commerce rules

Traditional traders and local players rejoiced Thursday at new e-commerce rules imposed by the Indian government on global giants such as Amazon and Walmart which analysts said could force them to rethink their Indian operations.

4h

Wake-up timer saves power for I.o.T. sensors

Researchers have created a low-cost, “battery-less” wake-up timer—in the form of an on-chip circuit—that significantly reduces the power consumption of silicon chips for Internet of Things (IoT) sensor nodes. The wake-up timer can cut power consumption down to true picoWatt range (one billion times lower than a smartwatch). “We have developed a novel wake-up timer that operates in the picoWatt ra

4h

When School Choice Means School’s Choice

Children should have equal access to a high-quality education. It’s a popular talking point among both the left and the right because it’s non-objectionable—yet it’s far from the reality of American primary and secondary education. As the landmark Reagan-administration report, A Nation at Risk, put it 35 years ago , “If an unfriendly foreign power had attempted to impose on America the mediocre e

4h

Leave No Trace Shows How to Critique Society—Without Demonizing an Entire System

Over the next month, The Atlantic ’s “And, Scene” series will delve into some of the most interesting films of the year by examining a single, noteworthy moment. Next up is Debra Granik’s Leave No Trace . (Read our previous entries here .) The most impressive thing about Leave No Trace is that the enemy of the film is not the government. Yes, Debra Granik’s story is about a father, Will (Ben Fost

4h

Looking for Solar Panels on Distant Planets

What are the aliens thinking? That’s always been a problem for the search for extraterrestrial intelligence ( SETI ). Until recently, SETI ’s focus has been on alien “beacons,” signals that somebody somewhere intentionally beamed into space. But this traditional method involves making informed guesses about what the aliens were thinking when they built their beacons, and those guesses may turn ou

4h

Sønderjyder går sammen for at forhindre datacentre i at fyre for fuglene

Fire sønderjyske kommuner opretter fælles energisekretariat, der skal rådgive om, hvordan de bedst udnytter spildvarmen fra datacentre og etablerer store varmepumper.

4h

Dream on: My year pursuing the third state of being

Dreaming can bring extraordinary ideas – if you can remember them. The 3rd article of our 12 Days of Culture explores the weird world of hypnagogic dreaming

4h

Don't Fear the Robot Overlords—Embrace Them as Coworkers

In factories across the world, machines are beginning to work more intimately with humans without sending them to the unemployment line—or the grave.

4h

Naturopaths cannot call themselves “Medically Trained” in New Brunswick

A judge in the Canadian province of New Brunswick has ruled that alternative-to-medicine practitioners knows as naturopaths cannot claim that they are "medically trained" or that they offer "family practice".

4h

Surprising Changes Will Affect Biodiversity in 2019

Experts reveal 15 emerging trends that will significantly influence plants, animals and ecosystems—for better and worse — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

Instagram’s Christmas Crackdown

Gabe Kenworthy, a 22-year-old freelance content manager for some of Instagram’s most notorious meme pages, was up at 2 o’clock on Christmas morning. He was sitting on his parents’ couch searching for heartwarming holiday content to post when he realized something was wrong. Just after he sent his boss some memes for approval, Kenworthy’s phone exploded with texts. The owner of a network of meme p

5h

Googles pakkedroner på vej til Helsinki

Google-ejeren Alphabet lancerer en pakkedrone-tjeneste i Finland under navnet Wing.

5h

Quiz: What were these six bamboozling inventions designed to do?

Can you tell a guillotine calibrator from a combustion-powered clock? A Victorian roller skate from a laser roulette wheel? Take our antiques quiz to find out

5h

The biggest technology failures of 2018

From gene-edited babies to guaranteed-fatal brain uploads, it was a bumper year for technology misfires and misuses.

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Is Smart Technology Making Us Dumb?

Yes and no: there are reasonable arguments on both sides of the question — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

The Terrible Joy of Yelling at an Amazon Echo

Life is stressful. And Amazon's voice assistant Alexa is a very convenient scapegoat.

5h

Pan Am Flight 103: Robert Mueller’s 30-Year Search for Justice

In December 1988 a bomb downed a Pan Am jet, leaving 270 dead. It was the first mass killing of Americans by terrorists. As the head of the Justice Department’s criminal division, Robert Mueller oversaw the case. And for him, it was personal.

5h

Privacy Law Showdown Between Congress and Tech Looms in 2019

Lawmakers spend the better part of 2018 talking tough to tech companies. Now the pressure is on for Congress to act.

5h

In 1993 my agency warned of climate change. In 1995 it was abolished | William Westermeyer

The US Office of Technology Assessment should be revived – in 2019 the world will need its expertise more than ever Many agree that one of the most pressing problems the world faces today is climate change. The question of what to do about it, however, has become highly politicised. Scepticism about climate change is typically a conservative position and trust in the conclusions of the scientific

5h

The Next Climate Frontier: Predicting a Complex Domino Effect

Motivated by events like Hurricane Harvey, researchers are trying to determine how climate change interacts with agriculture, energy, transportation and other human systems — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

Indviklet problem: Videnskaben kan hjælpe dig med drilske lyskæder

Det kommer altid bag på dig, når du åbner kassen med lyskæder. Et stort rod. Men der er en videnskabelig forklaring på, hvorfor det sker, og på hvordan du skal pakke den sammen.

6h

After Pluto, New Horizons mission nears an object 'beyond the known world'

Three and a half years after giving humanity its first close-up view of Pluto, and almost 13 years after launching from Earth, the New Horizons spacecraft will explore another new frontier: a reddish hunk of rock and ice known as Ultima Thule.

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How to set up your new phone for iOS and Android—and get used to Apple's X series iPhones

Perhaps you have been using one of the older iPhone models, like a 6, 7 or 8, and just found yourself with a shiny new iPhone XR or XS model, minus the home button and plus new security system and features.

6h

Why Fans of Elena Ferrante Should Watch The Best of Youth

When fans of My Brilliant Friend have finished the first season of HBO’s acclaimed television adaptation, they may find themselves looking to fill a void . The eight-episode series, which aired its finale earlier this month, followed the lives of Lenù and Lila, two girls growing up in a poor neighborhood in Naples in the mid-20th century. Their thorny, intense friendship—which Elena Ferrante’s wi

6h

Affirmative Action Shouldn’t Be About Diversity

I was a 16-year-old student at the Bronx High School of Science, scribbling Concrete Blonde lyrics at my desk, when my English teacher abruptly called on me, without a heads-up or any preparation, to explain my thoughts on the word nigger in Mark Twain’s Adventures of Huckleberry Finn . Truth be told, I didn’t have an opinion, at least not a sophisticated, nuanced one, because I was a teenager re

6h

Om igen: Klagenævn bremser havmøllepark tæt på den jyske vestkyst

Miljøgodkendelsen omtalte et 'letopfatteligt, geometrisk mønster', men Vattenfall vil sætte vindmøller ved Holmsland Klit på en 15 km lang række. Den går ikke, men kræver et tillæg til miljøgodkendelsen, har Energiklagenævnet bestemt.

6h

Gadgets: Mixcder E7 active noise-canceling headphones, great escape

When you look at the Mixcder E7 active noise-canceling headphones, they appear fancy and expensive.

6h

How religion turned American politics into a bizarre anti-science spectacle

In the last 30 years, religion has radicalized American politics and seriously harmed the perception of science, says journalist and author Kurt Andersen. This can be directly tied to the rise of the Christian Right in the 20th century. To see this, you only have to look at the response to the same question posed to Republican presidential candidates over three election cycles, from 2008 to 2016:

6h

Salk scientists find genetic signatures of biological aging

Some people appear to be considerably younger or older than their chronological age. Genetic signatures that may help explain this have been discovered by scientists at the Salk Institute.

6h

Hello, Alexa. Hey, Google: Getting your smart speaker up and running

If you just got a new smart speaker from Amazon or Google, you'll be barking commands out loud, and people around you may wonder what's going on.

6h

Drænrør banket ned i sandet ved Skagen: Orbicon bestyrer omstridt forsøg

Miljøministeriet har uden om Kystdirektoratet hyret et rådgiverfirma til på ny at teste opfinder Poul Jakobsens teknik til at sikre Vestkysten mod erosion.

7h

50 years ago, astronauts orbited the moon for the first time

Apollo 8 launched on December 21, 1968, with three astronauts on board, making 10 revolutions around the moon — the first manned lunar orbits.

7h

NEC to buy Danish IT firm KMD for $1.2 billion

Japan's NEC said Thursday that it would buy Denmark's largest IT firm KMD for $1.2 billion as part of its effort to expand its European and global businesses.

7h

Britain voices 'grave' concerns over China's Huawei

British Defence Secretary Gavin Williamson has warned of his "very deep concerns" about Chinese technology giant Huawei being involved in the use of 5G on Britain's mobile network, The Times reported Thursday.

7h

London's Gatwick airport sold to French Vinci conglomerate (Update)

French conglomerate Vinci said Thursday it had bought control of Gatwick airport, Britain's second-busiest, for nearly three billion pounds only months before Brexit.

7h

Indian firefighters battle air pollution in New Delhi

Indian authorities have ordered firefighters in the capital to sprinkle water from high-rise buildings to settle dust and stop garbage fires and have banned construction activity as hazardous air quality affects millions of people.

7h

Den danske it-sværvægter KMD solgt for otte milliarder kroner til japansk selskab

Den japanske teknologigigant NEC køber den danske softwarevirksomhed af kapitalfond.

8h

Et turbulent år, hvor Sundhedsplatformen bed sig fast

PLUS. To ting står klart efter endnu et år, hvor Sundhedsplatformen er blevet beskudt fra alle sider: Kritikken har været berettiget – og systemet er kommet for at blive

8h

Indonesia widens danger zone around island volcano

Indonesia raised the danger level for an island volcano that triggered a tsunami on the weekend, killing at least 430 people in Sumatra and Java, and widened its no-go zone.

8h

Fake moon landings and a flat Earth: why do athletes love conspiracy theories?

Sports stars as varied as Stephen Curry and Andrew Flintoff have flirted with conspiracy theories. But they are guided by very human emotions With Christmas Day just gone, it seems fitting that Steph Curry already has something he’d probably like to take back. Two weeks ago, the Golden State Warriors star gave the 24-hour news cycle an incredible gift during an appearance on The Ringer’s Winging

8h

Climate change: Huge costs of warming impacts in 2018

Ten weather events linked to climate change caused damage over $1bn in 2018, according to a study.

8h

Online mirrors: Video bloggers and viewers share emotions

An amusing commercial shows someone having a bad day, and how that person's mood affects each person down the line, with more bad moods. This emotional "contagion" may be a real-world phenomenon, and it appears that what we experience online can have a similar effect. Examining over 2000 video blogs, or vlogs on YouTube, researchers from Tilburg University, Netherlands, found we mirror the emotion

8h

Don’t miss January’s super moon blood moon lunar eclipse

submitted by /u/today89p [link] [comments]

9h

Her er årets læserhits på ing.dk

Et bilkarosseri med funktion som et batteri, liftoff for raketten Falcon Heavy, en kritisk ADAC-undersøgelse af elbilers miljøvenlighed og nye super-elcykler på de danske cykelstier er arets absolutte tophits på ing.dk.

9h

Forsvarets it-sikkerhedsrådgiver forsømmer mail-beskyttelse

Mens Center for Cybersikkerhed under FET anbefaler DMARC-teknologien til at forhindre mail-phishing, har organisationen ikke beskyttet alle sine egne domæner.

10h

Klimaguide i 10 trin: Katastrofen kom kun tættere på i 2018

Har du svært ved at hitte ud af, hvordan det faktisk går med klimaet? DR Viden leverer en hjælpende hånd til forståelsen af klimaudfordringerne lige nu.

11h

Online mirrors: Video bloggers and viewers share emotions

Examining over 2,000 video blogs, or vlogs on YouTube, researchers from Tilburg University found we mirror the emotions of those we see online and seek out people who share our emotions.

12h

Smarter Pricing Could Ease Parking Frustration

A new algorithm raises parking rates in busy neighborhoods and lowers them elsewhere, guaranteeing free parking spots regardless of location. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

13h

Biokemisk gennembrud kan føre til nye dufte, smagsstoffer og medicin

Forskere fra bl.a. Københavns Universitet har fundet ud af, hvordan man manipulerer med vigtige kulstofforbindelser. Det kan bringe nye smagsindtryk til såvel mad som tandpasta.

13h

The best science long reads of 2018 (part one)

A selection of the best science and environment published this year.

16h

Sugar hampers gut bacteria linked to leanness

Sugar can silence a key protein required for colonization by a gut bacterium associated with lean and healthy individuals, according to a new study with mice. The gut microbiota plays a key role in human health, and its composition is associated with diet. Until recently, scientists believed that sugar absorbed into the intestine and never reached the gut. However, recent studies have shown sugar

17h

3-week-old elephant dies at Ohio zoo after sudden illness

The Columbus Zoo and Aquarium says an elephant born three weeks ago has died.

17h

Hungry bacterial colonies swirl to suck up nutrients

Individual bacteria and biofilms can generate currents strong enough to draw distant nutrients, according to new research. Under threat of being scrubbed away with disinfectant, individual bacteria can improve their odds of survival by joining together to form colonies, called biofilms. What Arnold Mathijssen, postdoctoral fellow in bioengineering at Stanford University, wanted to understand was

17h

Bad moods might be a sign of health trouble

Negative mood—such as sadness and anger—is associated with higher levels of inflammation and may be a signal of poor health, report researchers. The investigators found that negative mood measured multiple times a day over time is associated with higher levels of inflammatory biomarkers. This extends prior research showing that clinical depression and hostility are associated with higher inflamma

17h

Plastic bag fee 'to double to 10p' and include every shop

The government wants to double the charge and extend it to all shops in England, to cut plastic use.

17h

The Atlantic Daily: The History of 2018

Dear Daily readers: This waning week of 2018 has been a maelstrom all its own. President Donald Trump landed in Iraq to visit U.S. troops stationed there. The avenues to asylum for migrant children arriving at the U.S. southern border continue to narrow. The U.S.-government shutdown continues, while markets swing down and up. An overnight tsunami has killed hundreds in Indonesia —the second major

17h

American adventurer completes solo trek across Antarctica (Update)

An American adventurer has become the first person to complete a solo trek across Antarctica without assistance of any kind.

18h

Sicily Is Shaken By Earthquake As Mount Etna Erupts Once Again

The volcano erupted two days ago, triggering 1,000 mostly small tremors. At least 10 people were injured and a number of buildings were damaged in Wednesday's quake. (Image credit: Marco Restivo/Barcroft Media via Getty Images)

19h

For patients with kidney disease, genetic testing may soon be routine

DNA sequencing can be used to identify the underlying genetic cause of many rare types of chronic kidney disease, leading to better treatment, finds a new study from Columbia University.

19h

Yale experts treat severe, disfiguring sarcoidosis with novel therapy

An all-Yale team of researchers successfully treated a patient with disfiguring sarcoidosis, a chronic disease that can affect multiple organs, with a drug approved for rheumatoid arthritis. Successful treatment of two other patients with similarly severe disease suggests an effective treatment for an incurable, sometimes life-threatening illness is within reach, the scientists said.

19h

Kicking, yelling during sleep? Study finds risk factors for violent sleep disorder

Taking antidepressants for depression, having post-traumatic stress disorder or anxiety diagnosed by a doctor are risk factors for a disruptive and sometimes violent sleep disorder called rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder, according to a study published in the Dec. 26, 2018, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The study also found me

20h

The President Is Visiting Troops in Iraq. To What End?

Since Franklin D. Roosevelt secretly flew to Morocco to finalize Allied war plans with Winston Churchill and surprise American soldiers stationed in the country, American presidents have engaged in the well-worn tradition of meeting with troops in combat zones. Bill Clinton met with troops in the Balkans; George W. Bush and Barack Obama both visited troops in Iraq and Afghanistan; Bush spent Than

20h

What's Next For Tiny Satellites?

Two briefcase-sized satellites gave the control room of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in November what scientists had never been able to get before: real-time information about a spacecraft's landing. (Image credit: FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP/Getty Images)

20h

Confronting the side effects of a common anti-cancer treatment

Results of a new study by neuroscientists at the University of Massachusetts Amherst suggest that a new treatment approach is needed — and how this may be possible — to address adverse effects of aromatase inhibitors, drugs commonly prescribed to both men and women to prevent recurrence of estrogen-positive breast cancer.

21h

'Tech addicts' seek solace in 12 steps and rehab

The young men sit in chairs in a circle in a small meeting room in suburban Seattle and introduce themselves before they speak. It is much like any other 12-step meeting—but with a twist.

21h

Tiny salamanders could complicate Shasta Dam project

A trio of salamander species in Northern California could complicate a controversial $1.4 billion public works project to heighten the Shasta Dam, the state's largest reservoir.

21h

Buzzed flies reveal important step to intoxication

As New Year's Eve approaches, many people will experience the familiar buzz that comes from imbibing a favorite cocktail or glass of wine.

21h

Fish bones yield new tool for tracking coal ash contamination

A Duke University study shows that trace elements in a fish's ear bones can be used to identify and track coal ash contamination in the waters where it lived.

21h

Collecting clean water from air, inspired by desert life

Humans can get by in the most basic of shelters, can scratch together a meal from the most humble of ingredients. But we can't survive without clean water. And in places where water is scarce—the world's deserts, for example—getting water to people requires feats of engineering and irrigation that can be cumbersome and expensive.

21h

Acknowledgment of Reviewers, 2018 [Reviewer Acknowledgment]

The PNAS editors would like to thank all the individuals who dedicated their considerable time and expertise to the journal by serving as reviewers in 2018. Their generous contribution is deeply appreciated. A Lars Aagaard Stuart A. Aaronson Pierre Abad Alejandro Aballay Snezhana I. Abarzhi Maria Abascal Adam R. Abate…

21h

Role of HHV-6 subtypes in accelerating EAE progression [Biological Sciences]

We enthusiastically read the article in PNAS by Leibovitch et al. (1), in which they show that intranasal inoculations with human herpesvirus (HHV)-6A and HHV-6B accelerate the onset and severity of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). They performed an outstanding job in utilizing marmosets to mimic the multiple sclerosis (MS)-like symptoms…

21h

Unraveling the blue paradox: Incomplete analysis yields incorrect conclusions about Phoenix Islands Protected Area closure [Social Sciences]

In PNAS, McDermott et al. (1) analyze a 2014–2016 central Pacific fishing surge, focusing on the Phoenix Islands Protected Area (PIPA) inside the Kiribati exclusive economic zone (EEZ). The authors incorrectly attribute the surge to the anticipated industrial fishing closure of PIPA and describe the phenomenon as a blue paradox…

21h

Reply to Hanich et al.: Alternate explanations for the blue paradox do not withstand statistical scrutiny [Social Sciences]

A primary goal of McDermott et al. (1) was to stimulate discussion of the “blue paradox” among proponents of marine reserves. We welcome the chance to engage with conservation experts and are grateful for the commentary provided by Hanich et al. (2). However, we are unconvinced by their arguments. Hanich…

21h

Reply to Zahednasab et al.: HHV-6 and marmoset EAE [Biological Sciences]

We thank Zahednasab et al. (1) for their enthusiastic support of our paper (2) and insightful comments. We wholeheartedly agree that additional studies are needed to more fully elucidate mechanisms underlying the association of HHV-6 and other viruses with neuroinflammatory pathologies like multiple sclerosis (MS). The authors correctly note that…

21h

Climate network percolation reveals the expansion and weakening of the tropical component under global warming [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

Global climate warming poses a significant challenge to humanity; it is associated with, e.g., rising sea level and declining Arctic sea ice. Increasing extreme events are also considered to be a result of climate warming, and they may have widespread and diverse effects on health, agriculture, economics, and political conflicts….

21h

Robust forecast aggregation [Economic Sciences]

Bayesian experts who are exposed to different evidence often make contradictory probabilistic forecasts. An aggregator, ignorant of the underlying model, uses this to calculate his or her own forecast. We use the notions of scoring rules and regret to propose a natural way to evaluate an aggregation scheme. We focus…

21h

Right temporal alpha oscillations as a neural mechanism for inhibiting obvious associations [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

Creative cognition requires mental exploration of remotely connected concepts while suppressing dominant ones. Across four experiments using different samples of participants, we provide evidence that right temporal alpha oscillations play a crucial role in inhibiting habitual thinking modes, thereby paving the way for accessing more remote ideas. In the first…

21h

High-capacity preconscious processing in concurrent groupings of colored dots [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

Grouping is a perceptual process in which a subset of stimulus components (a group) is selected for a subsequent—typically implicit—perceptual computation. Grouping is a critical precursor to segmenting objects from the background and ultimately to object recognition. Here, we study grouping by color. We present subjects with 300-ms exposures of…

21h

Dominance rank-associated gene expression is widespread, sex-specific, and a precursor to high social status in wild male baboons [Anthropology]

In humans and other hierarchical species, social status is tightly linked to variation in health and fitness-related traits. Experimental manipulations of social status in female rhesus macaques suggest that this relationship is partially explained by status effects on immune gene regulation. However, social hierarchies are established and maintained in different…

21h

Electrostatics, proton sensor, and networks governing the gating transition in GLIC, a proton-gated pentameric ion channel [Biochemistry]

The pentameric ligand-gated ion channel (pLGIC) from Gloeobacter violaceus (GLIC) has provided insightful structure–function views on the permeation process and the allosteric regulation of the pLGICs family. However, GLIC is activated by pH instead of a neurotransmitter and a clear picture for the gating transition driven by protons is still…

21h

Effective design principles for leakless strand displacement systems [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Artificially designed molecular systems with programmable behaviors have become a valuable tool in chemistry, biology, material science, and medicine. Although information processing in biological regulatory pathways is remarkably robust to error, it remains a challenge to design molecular systems that are similarly robust. With functionality determined entirely by secondary structure…

21h

Exploiting correlated molecular-dynamics networks to counteract enzyme activity-stability trade-off [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

The directed evolution of enzymes for improved activity or substrate specificity commonly leads to a trade-off in stability. We have identified an activity–stability trade-off and a loss in unfolding cooperativity for a variant (3M) of Escherichia coli transketolase (TK) engineered to accept aromatic substrates. Molecular dynamics simulations of 3M revealed…

21h

Eigenvector centrality for characterization of protein allosteric pathways [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Determining the principal energy-transfer pathways responsible for allosteric communication in biomolecules remains challenging, partially due to the intrinsic complexity of the systems and the lack of effective characterization methods. In this work, we introduce the eigenvector centrality metric based on mutual information to elucidate allosteric mechanisms that regulate enzymatic activity….

21h

Molecular basis for the acid-initiated uncoating of human enterovirus D68 [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Enterovirus D68 (EV-D68) belongs to a group of enteroviruses that contain a single positive-sense RNA genome surrounded by an icosahedral capsid. Like common cold viruses, EV-D68 mainly causes respiratory infections and is acid-labile. The molecular mechanism by which the acid-sensitive EV-D68 virions uncoat and deliver their genome into a host…

21h

Structural-functional interactions of NS1-BP protein with the splicing and mRNA export machineries for viral and host gene expression [Cell Biology]

The influenza virulence factor NS1 protein interacts with the cellular NS1-BP protein to promote splicing and nuclear export of the viral M mRNAs. The viral M1 mRNA encodes the M1 matrix protein and is alternatively spliced into the M2 mRNA, which is translated into the M2 ion channel. These proteins…

21h

SREBP-1a-stimulated lipid synthesis is required for macrophage phagocytosis downstream of TLR4-directed mTORC1 [Cell Biology]

There is a growing appreciation for a fundamental connection between lipid metabolism and the immune response. Macrophage phagocytosis is a signature innate immune response to pathogen exposure, and cytoplasmic membrane expansion is required to engulf the phagocytic target. The sterol regulatory element binding proteins (SREBPs) are key transcriptional regulatory proteins…

21h

Mitotic antipairing of homologous and sex chromosomes via spatial restriction of two haploid sets [Cell Biology]

Pairing homologous chromosomes is required for recombination. However, in nonmeiotic stages it can lead to detrimental consequences, such as allelic misregulation and genome instability, and is rare in human somatic cells. How mitotic recombination is prevented—and how genetic stability is maintained across daughter cells—is a fundamental, unanswered question. Here, we…

21h

Profiling proliferative cells and their progeny in damaged murine hearts [Cell Biology]

The significance of cardiac stem cell (CSC) populations for cardiac regeneration remains disputed. Here, we apply the most direct definition of stem cell function (the ability to replace lost tissue through cell division) to interrogate the existence of CSCs. By single-cell mRNA sequencing and genetic lineage tracing using two Ki67…

21h

TANGO1 and SEC12 are copackaged with procollagen I to facilitate the generation of large COPII carriers [Cell Biology]

Large coat protein complex II (COPII)-coated vesicles serve to convey the large cargo procollagen I (PC1) from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The link between large cargo in the lumen of the ER and modulation of the COPII machinery remains unresolved. TANGO1 is required for PC secretion and interacts with PC…

21h

Steroidogenic differentiation and PKA signaling are programmed by histone methyltransferase EZH2 in the adrenal cortex [Developmental Biology]

Adrenal cortex steroids are essential for body homeostasis, and adrenal insufficiency is a life-threatening condition. Adrenal endocrine activity is maintained through recruitment of subcapsular progenitor cells that follow a unidirectional differentiation path from zona glomerulosa to zona fasciculata (zF). Here, we show that this unidirectionality is ensured by the histone…

21h

Different iron storage strategies among bloom-forming diatoms [Environmental Sciences]

Diatoms are prominent eukaryotic phytoplankton despite being limited by the micronutrient iron in vast expanses of the ocean. As iron inputs are often sporadic, diatoms have evolved mechanisms such as the ability to store iron that enable them to bloom when iron is resupplied and then persist when low iron…

21h

Apurinic endonuclease-1 preserves neural genome integrity to maintain homeostasis and thermoregulation and prevent brain tumors [Genetics]

Frequent oxidative modification of the neural genome is a by-product of the high oxygen consumption of the nervous system. Rapid correction of oxidative DNA lesions is essential, as genome stability is a paramount determinant of neural homeostasis. Apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1; also known as “APEX1” or “REF1”) is a key…

21h

RNA-mediated gene fusion in mammalian cells [Genetics]

One of the hallmarks of cancer is the formation of oncogenic fusion genes as a result of chromosomal translocations. Fusion genes are presumed to form before fusion RNA expression. However, studies have reported the presence of fusion RNAs in individuals who were negative for chromosomal translocations. These observations give rise…

21h

Nuclear receptor HNF4A transrepresses CLOCK:BMAL1 and modulates tissue-specific circadian networks [Genetics]

Either expression level or transcriptional activity of various nuclear receptors (NRs) have been demonstrated to be under circadian control. With a few exceptions, little is known about the roles of NRs as direct regulators of the circadian circuitry. Here we show that the nuclear receptor HNF4A strongly transrepresses the transcriptional…

21h

Protein kinase p38{alpha} signaling in dendritic cells regulates colon inflammation and tumorigenesis [Immunology and Inflammation]

Dendritic cells (DCs) play pivotal roles in maintaining intestinal homeostasis, but how the DCs regulate diverse immune networks on homeostasis breakdown remains largely unknown. Here, we report that, in response to epithelial barrier disruption, colonic DCs regulate the differentiation of type 1 regulatory T (Tr1) cells through p38α-dependent IL-27 production…

21h

Autoimmunity to hypocretin and molecular mimicry to flu in type 1 narcolepsy [Immunology and Inflammation]

Type 1 narcolepsy (T1N) is caused by hypocretin/orexin (HCRT) neuronal loss. Association with the HLA DQB1*06:02/DQA1*01:02 (98% vs. 25%) heterodimer (DQ0602), T cell receptors (TCR) and other immune loci suggest autoimmunity but autoantigens are unknown. Onset is seasonal and associated with influenza A, notably pandemic 2009 H1N1 (pH1N1) infection and…

21h

Nanotechnology-mediated crossing of two impermeable membranes to modulate the stars of the neurovascular unit for neuroprotection [Medical Sciences]

The success of nanoparticle-mediated delivery of antioxidant and antiinflammatory-based neuroprotectants to the brain to improve neuronal functions in neurodegenerative diseases has demonstrated lesser impact instead of achieving its full potential. We hypothesized that these failures were due to a combination of parameters, such as: (i) unavailability of a delivery vehicle,…

21h

DeltaNp63-dependent super enhancers define molecular identity in pancreatic cancer by an interconnected transcription factor network [Medical Sciences]

Molecular subtyping of cancer offers tremendous promise for the optimization of a precision oncology approach to anticancer therapy. Recent advances in pancreatic cancer research uncovered various molecular subtypes with tumors expressing a squamous/basal-like gene expression signature displaying a worse prognosis. Through unbiased epigenome mapping, we identified deltaNp63 as a major…

21h

Integrating host response and unbiased microbe detection for lower respiratory tract infection diagnosis in critically ill adults [Medical Sciences]

Lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs) lead to more deaths each year than any other infectious disease category. Despite this, etiologic LRTI pathogens are infrequently identified due to limitations of existing microbiologic tests. In critically ill patients, noninfectious inflammatory syndromes resembling LRTIs further complicate diagnosis. To address the need for improved…

21h

Virus-inclusive single-cell RNA sequencing reveals the molecular signature of progression to severe dengue [Medical Sciences]

Dengue virus (DENV) infection can result in severe complications. However, the understanding of the molecular correlates of severity is limited, partly due to difficulties in defining the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) that contain DENV RNA in vivo. Accordingly, there are currently no biomarkers predictive of progression to severe dengue…

21h

Human cytomegalovirus US21 protein is a viroporin that modulates calcium homeostasis and protects cells against apoptosis [Microbiology]

The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) US12 gene family comprises a set of 10 contiguous genes (US12 to US21) with emerging roles in the regulation of virus cell tropism, virion composition, and immunoevasion. Of all of the US12 gene products, pUS21 shows the highest level of identity with two cellular transmembrane BAX…

21h

Phototaxis in a wild isolate of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus [Microbiology]

Many cyanobacteria, which use light as an energy source via photosynthesis, have evolved the ability to guide their movement toward or away from a light source. This process, termed “phototaxis,” enables organisms to localize in optimal light environments for improved growth and fitness. Mechanisms of phototaxis have been studied in…

21h

Translational switching of Cry1 protein expression confers reversible control of circadian behavior in arrhythmic Cry-deficient mice [Neuroscience]

The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is the principal circadian clock of mammals, coordinating daily rhythms of physiology and behavior. Circadian timing pivots around self-sustaining transcriptional–translational negative feedback loops (TTFLs), whereby CLOCK and BMAL1 drive the expression of the negative regulators Period and Cryptochrome (Cry). Global deletion of Cry1 and Cry2 disables…

21h

Ventral striatum’s role in learning from gains and losses [Neuroscience]

Adaptive behavior requires animals to learn from experience. Ideally, learning should both promote choices that lead to rewards and reduce choices that lead to losses. Because the ventral striatum (VS) contains neurons that respond to aversive stimuli and aversive stimuli can drive dopamine release in the VS, it is possible…

21h

MTSS1/Src family kinase dysregulation underlies multiple inherited ataxias [Neuroscience]

The genetically heterogeneous spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) are caused by Purkinje neuron dysfunction and degeneration, but their underlying pathological mechanisms remain elusive. The Src family of nonreceptor tyrosine kinases (SFK) are essential for nervous system homeostasis and are increasingly implicated in degenerative disease. Here we reveal that the SFK suppressor Missing-in-metastasis…

21h

Epigenetic regulator UHRF1 inactivates REST and growth suppressor gene expression via DNA methylation to promote axon regeneration [Neuroscience]

Injured peripheral sensory neurons switch to a regenerative state after axon injury, which requires transcriptional and epigenetic changes. However, the roles and mechanisms of gene inactivation after injury are poorly understood. Here, we show that DNA methylation, which generally leads to gene silencing, is required for robust axon regeneration after…

21h

Spatiotemporal activation of the C/EBP{beta}/{delta}-secretase axis regulates the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease [Neuroscience]

Alzheimer’s disease (AD) neuropathological hallmarks include senile plaques with aggregated amyloid beta as a major component, neurofibrillary tangles (NFT) containing truncated and hyperphosphorylated Tau, extensive neuronal loss, and chronic neuroinflammation. However, the key molecular mechanism that dominates the pathogenesis of AD remains elusive for AD. Here we show that the…

21h

Transgenerational hypocortisolism and behavioral disruption are induced by the antidepressant fluoxetine in male zebrafish Danio rerio [Physiology]

The global prevalence of depression is high during childbearing. Due to the associated risks to the mother and baby, the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine (FLX) is often the first line of treatment. Given that FLX readily crosses the placenta, a fetus may be susceptible to the disruptive effects of…

21h

Fluctuating selection on migrant adaptive sodium transporter alleles in coastal Arabidopsis thaliana [Plant Biology]

Stressors such as soil salinity and dehydration are major constraints on plant growth, causing worldwide crop losses. Compounding these insults, increasing climate volatility requires adaptation to fluctuating conditions. Salinity stress responses are relatively well understood in Arabidopsis thaliana, making this system suited for the rapid molecular dissection of evolutionary mechanisms….

21h

SOG1 activator and MYB3R repressors regulate a complex DNA damage network in Arabidopsis [Plant Biology]

To combat DNA damage, organisms mount a DNA damage response (DDR) that results in cell cycle regulation, DNA repair and, in severe cases, cell death. Underscoring the importance of gene regulation in this response, studies in Arabidopsis have demonstrated that all of the aforementioned processes rely on SUPPRESSOR OF GAMMA…

21h

Electrostatic effects, band distortions, and superconductivity in twisted graphene bilayers [Applied Physical Sciences]

Bilayer graphene twisted by a small angle shows a significant charge modulation away from neutrality, as the charge in the narrow bands near the Dirac point is mostly localized in a fraction of the Moiré unit cell. The resulting electrostatic potential leads to a filling-dependent change in the low-energy bands,…

21h

Yeast require redox switching in DNA primase [Biochemistry]

Eukaryotic DNA primases contain a [4Fe4S] cluster in the C-terminal domain of the p58 subunit (p58C) that affects substrate affinity but is not required for catalysis. We show that, in yeast primase, the cluster serves as a DNA-mediated redox switch governing DNA binding, just as in human primase. Despite a…

21h

Modulation of HIF-2{alpha} PAS-B domain contributes to physiological responses [Biochemistry]

Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) are transcription factors in the basic helix–loop–helix PER-ARNT-SIM (bHLH-PAS) protein family that contain internal hydrophobic cavities within their PAS-A and PAS-B domains. Among HIFs, the HIF-2α PAS-B domain contains a relatively large cavity exploited for the development of specific artificial ligands such as PT2399. Administration of PT2399…

21h

Ubiquitin-dependent switch during assembly of the proteasomal ATPases mediated by Not4 ubiquitin ligase [Biochemistry]

In the proteasome holoenzyme, the hexameric ATPases (Rpt1-Rpt6) enable degradation of ubiquitinated proteins by unfolding and translocating them into the proteolytic core particle. During early-stage proteasome assembly, individual Rpt proteins assemble into the hexameric “Rpt ring” through binding to their cognate chaperones: Nas2, Hsm3, Nas6, and Rpn14. Here, we show…

21h

Integral feedback control is at the core of task allocation and resilience of insect societies [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Homeostatic self-regulation is a fundamental aspect of open dissipative systems. Integral feedback has been found to be important for homeostatic control on both the cellular and molecular levels of biological organization and in engineered systems. Analyzing the task allocation mechanisms of three insect societies, we identified a model of integral…

21h

Quantifying single-cell secretion in real time using resonant hyperspectral imaging [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Cell communication is primarily regulated by secreted proteins, whose inhomogeneous secretion often indicates physiological disorder. Parallel monitoring of innate protein-secretion kinetics from individual cells is thus crucial to unravel systemic malfunctions. Here, we report a label-free, high-throughput method for parallel, in vitro, and real-time analysis of specific single-cell signaling usi

21h

Cofactors are essential constituents of stable and seeding-active tau fibrils [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Amyloid fibrils are cross-β–rich aggregates that are exceptionally stable forms of protein assembly. Accumulation of tau amyloid fibrils is involved in many neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Heparin-induced aggregates have been widely used and assumed to be a good tau amyloid fibril model for most biophysical studies. Here we…

21h

Combined molecular dynamics and neural network method for predicting protein antifreeze activity [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are a diverse class of proteins that depress the kinetically observable freezing point of water. AFPs have been of scientific interest for decades, but the lack of an accurate model for predicting AFP activity has hindered the logical design of novel antifreeze systems. To address this, we…

21h

MicroED structures of HIV-1 Gag CTD-SP1 reveal binding interactions with the maturation inhibitor bevirimat [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

HIV-1 protease (PR) cleavage of the Gag polyprotein triggers the assembly of mature, infectious particles. Final cleavage of Gag occurs at the junction helix between the capsid protein CA and the SP1 spacer peptide. Here we used MicroED to delineate the binding interactions of the maturation inhibitor bevirimat (BVM) using…

21h

Crystal structure of the human NK1 tachykinin receptor [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

The NK1 tachykinin G-protein–coupled receptor (GPCR) binds substance P, the first neuropeptide to be discovered in mammals. Through activation of NK1R, substance P modulates a wide variety of physiological and disease processes including nociception, inflammation, and depression. Human NK1R (hNK1R) modulators have shown promise in clinical trials for migraine, depression,…

21h

Cryo-EM structure of the native butyrylcholinesterase tetramer reveals a dimer of dimers stabilized by a superhelical assembly [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

The quaternary structures of the cholinesterases, acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE), are essential for their localization and function. Of practical importance, BChE is a promising therapeutic candidate for intoxication by organophosphate nerve agents and insecticides, and for detoxification of addictive substances. Efficacy of the recombinant enzyme hinges on its having

21h

Experimental accuracy in protein structure refinement via molecular dynamics simulations [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Refinement is the last step in protein structure prediction pipelines to convert approximate homology models to experimental accuracy. Protocols based on molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have shown promise, but current methods are limited to moderate levels of consistent refinement. To explore the energy landscape between homology models and native structures…

21h

PCNA-mediated stabilization of E3 ligase RFWD3 at the replication fork is essential for DNA replication [Cell Biology]

RING finger and WD repeat domain-containing protein 3 (RFWD3) is an E3 ligase known to facilitate homologous recombination by removing replication protein A (RPA) and RAD51 from DNA damage sites. Further, RPA-mediated recruitment of RFWD3 to stalled replication forks is essential for interstrand cross-link repair. Here, we report that in…

21h

Trends and patterns in the contributions to cumulative radiative forcing from different regions of the world [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

Different regions of the world have had different historical patterns of emissions of carbon dioxide, other greenhouse gases, and aerosols as well as different land-use changes. One can estimate the net cumulative contribution by each region to the global mean radiative forcing due to past greenhouse gas emissions, aerosol precursors,…

21h

Speleothem record of geomagnetic South Atlantic Anomaly recurrence [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

The diminishing strength of the Earth’s magnetic dipole over recent millennia is accompanied by the increasing prominence of the geomagnetic South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA), which spreads over the South Atlantic Ocean and South America. The longevity of this feature at millennial timescales is elusive because of the scarcity of continuous…

21h

Pliocene and Eocene provide best analogs for near-future climates [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

As the world warms due to rising greenhouse gas concentrations, the Earth system moves toward climate states without societal precedent, challenging adaptation. Past Earth system states offer possible model systems for the warming world of the coming decades. These include the climate states of the Early Eocene (ca. 50 Ma),…

21h

Pervasive iron limitation at subsurface chlorophyll maxima of the California Current [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

Subsurface chlorophyll maximum layers (SCMLs) are nearly ubiquitous in stratified water columns and exist at horizontal scales ranging from the submesoscale to the extent of oligotrophic gyres. These layers of heightened chlorophyll and/or phytoplankton concentrations are generally thought to be a consequence of a balance between light energy from above…

21h

Bioenergy cropland expansion may offset positive effects of climate change mitigation for global vertebrate diversity [Ecology]

Climate and land-use change interactively affect biodiversity. Large-scale expansions of bioenergy have been suggested as an important component for climate change mitigation. Here we use harmonized climate and land-use projections to investigate their potential combined impacts on global vertebrate diversity under a low- and a high-level emission scenario. We combine…

21h

Continuous-range tunable multilayer frequency-selective surfaces using origami and inkjet printing [Engineering]

The tremendous increase in the number of components in typical electrical and communication modules requires low-cost, flexible and multifunctional sensing, energy harvesting, and communication modules that can readily reconfigure, depending on changes in their environment. Current subtractive manufacturing-based reconfigurable systems offer limited flexibility (limited finite number of discrete r

21h

Termite mounds mitigate half of termite methane emissions [Environmental Sciences]

Termites are responsible for ∼1 to 3% of global methane (CH4) emissions. However, estimates of global termite CH4 emissions span two orders of magnitude, suggesting that fundamental knowledge of CH4 turnover processes in termite colonies is missing. In particular, there is little reliable information on the extent and location of…

21h

New insights into the evolution of wheat avenin-like proteins in wild emmer wheat (Triticum dicoccoides) [Evolution]

Fifteen full-length wheat grain avenin-like protein coding genes (TaALP) were identified on chromosome arms 7AS, 4AL, and 7DS of bread wheat with each containing five genes. Besides the a- and b-type ALPs, a c type was identified in the current paper. Both a and b types have two subunits, named…

21h

Inosine, but none of the 8-oxo-purines, is a plausible component of a primordial version of RNA [Evolution]

The emergence of primordial RNA-based life would have required the abiotic synthesis of nucleotides, and their participation in nonenzymatic RNA replication. Although considerable progress has been made toward potentially prebiotic syntheses of the pyrimidine nucleotides (C and U) and their 2-thio variants, efficient routes to the canonical purine nucleotides (A…

21h

Rapid evolution of a skin-lightening allele in southern African KhoeSan [Evolution]

Skin pigmentation is under strong directional selection in northern European and Asian populations. The indigenous KhoeSan populations of far southern Africa have lighter skin than other sub-Saharan African populations, potentially reflecting local adaptation to a region of Africa with reduced UV radiation. Here, we demonstrate that a canonical Eurasian skin…

21h

Dietary versatility of Early Pleistocene hominins [Evolution]

New geochemical data from the Malawi Rift (Chiwondo Beds, Karonga Basin) fill a major spatial gap in our knowledge of hominin adaptations on a continental scale. Oxygen (δ18O), carbon (δ13C), and clumped (Δ47) isotope data on paleosols, hominins, and selected fauna elucidate an unexpected diversity in the Pleistocene hominin diet…

21h

Sex-specific phenotypes of histone H4 point mutants establish dosage compensation as the critical function of H4K16 acetylation in Drosophila [Genetics]

Acetylation of histone H4 at lysine 16 (H4K16) modulates nucleosome–nucleosome interactions and directly affects nucleosome binding by certain proteins. In Drosophila, H4K16 acetylation by the dosage compensation complex subunit Mof is linked to increased transcription of genes on the single X chromosome in males. Here, we analyzed Drosophila containing different…

21h

Role of gene body methylation in acclimatization and adaptation in a basal metazoan [Genetics]

Gene body methylation (GBM) has been hypothesized to modulate responses to environmental change, including transgenerational plasticity, but the evidence thus far has been lacking. Here we show that coral fragments reciprocally transplanted between two distant reefs respond predominantly by increase or decrease in genome-wide GBM disparity: The range of methylation…

21h

Defective respiration and one-carbon metabolism contribute to impaired naive T cell activation in aged mice [Immunology and Inflammation]

T cell-mediated immune responses are compromised in aged individuals, leading to increased morbidity and reduced response to vaccination. While cellular metabolism tightly regulates T cell activation and function, metabolic reprogramming in aged T cells has not been thoroughly studied. Here, we report a systematic analysis of metabolism during young versus…

21h

Improving vaccines against Streptococcus pneumoniae using synthetic glycans [Medical Sciences]

Streptococcus pneumoniae remains a deadly disease in small children and the elderly even though conjugate and polysaccharide vaccines based on isolated capsular polysaccharides (CPS) are successful. The most common serotypes that cause infection are used in vaccines around the world, but differences in geographic and demographic serotype distribution compromises protection…

21h

HflXr, a homolog of a ribosome-splitting factor, mediates antibiotic resistance [Microbiology]

To overcome the action of antibiotics, bacteria have evolved a variety of different strategies, such as drug modification, target mutation, and efflux pumps. Recently, we performed a genome-wide analysis of Listeria monocytogenes gene expression after growth in the presence of antibiotics, identifying genes that are up-regulated upon antibiotic treatment. One…

21h

Baseplate variability of Vibrio cholerae chemoreceptor arrays [Microbiology]

The chemoreceptor array, a remarkably ordered supramolecular complex, is composed of hexagonally packed trimers of receptor dimers networked by a histidine kinase and one or more coupling proteins. Even though the receptor packing is universal among chemotactic bacteria and archaea, the array architecture has been extensively studied only in selected…

21h

Symbiotic unicellular cyanobacteria fix nitrogen in the Arctic Ocean [Microbiology]

Biological dinitrogen (N2) fixation is an important source of nitrogen (N) in low-latitude open oceans. The unusual N2-fixing unicellular cyanobacteria (UCYN-A)/haptophyte symbiosis has been found in an increasing number of unexpected environments, including northern waters of the Danish Straight and Bering and Chukchi Seas. We used nanoscale secondary ion mass…

21h

Multilayer network switching rate predicts brain performance [Neuroscience]

Large-scale brain dynamics are characterized by repeating spatiotemporal connectivity patterns that reflect a range of putative different brain states that underlie the dynamic repertoire of brain functions. The role of transition between brain networks is poorly understood, and whether switching between these states is important for behavior has been little…

21h

Approaching the adiabatic timescale with machine learning [Physics]

The control and manipulation of quantum systems without excitation are challenging, due to the complexities in fully modeling such systems accurately and the difficulties in controlling these inherently fragile systems experimentally. For example, while protocols to decompress Bose–Einstein condensates (BECs) faster than the adiabatic timescale (without excitation or loss) have…

21h

People use less information than they think to make up their minds [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

A world where information is abundant promises unprecedented opportunities for information exchange. Seven studies suggest these opportunities work better in theory than in practice: People fail to anticipate how quickly minds change, believing that they and others will evaluate more evidence before making up their minds than they and others…

21h

Persistence of false paradigms in low-power sciences [Social Sciences]

We develop a model describing how false paradigms may persist, hindering scientific progress. The model features two paradigms, one describing reality better than the other. Tenured scientists display homophily: They favor tenure candidates who adhere to their paradigm. As in statistics, power is the probability (absent any bias) of denying…

21h

Resource extraction and infrastructure threaten forest cover and community rights [Sustainability Science]

Mineral and hydrocarbon extraction and infrastructure are increasingly significant drivers of forest loss, greenhouse gas emissions, and threats to the rights of forest communities in forested areas of Amazonia, Indonesia, and Mesoamerica. Projected investments in these sectors suggest that future threats to forests and rights are substantial, particularly because resource…

21h

Correction for Kritee et al., Reply to Yan and Akiyama: Nitrous oxide emissions from rice and their mitigation potential depend on the nature of intermittent flooding [Correction]

LETTER Correction for “Reply to Yan and Akiyama: Nitrous oxide emissions from rice and their mitigation potential depend on the nature of intermittent flooding,” by Kritee Kritee, Joseph Rudek, Steven P. Hamburg, Tapan K. Adhya, Terrance Loecke, and Richie Ahuja, which was first published November 16, 2018; 10.1073/pnas.1816677115 (Proc Natl…

21h

Correction for Mann, Inner Workings: Hunting for microbial life throughout the solar system [Correction]

INNER WORKINGS Correction for “Inner Workings: Hunting for microbial life throughout the solar system,” by Adam Mann, which was first published November 6, 2018; 10.1073/pnas.1816535115 (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 115:11348–11350). The editors note that on page 11350, left column, last paragraph, line 6, “being developed by” should instead appear…

21h

Correction Rivas-Carrillo et al., Whole-genome comparison of endogenous retrovirus segregation across wild and domestic host species populations [Correction]

EVOLUTION Correction for “Whole-genome comparison of endogenous retrovirus segregation across wild and domestic host species populations,” by Salvador Daniel Rivas-Carrillo, Mats E. Pettersson, Carl-Johan Rubin, and Patric Jern, which was first published October 8, 2018; 10.1073/pnas.1815056115 (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 115:11012–11017). The authors wish to note: “It has come…

21h

In This Issue [This Week in PNAS]

Resource extraction, forest loss, and community rights Deforestation in Honduras. Amazonia, Indonesia, and Mesoamerica are home to much of the world’s remaining humid tropical forests. However, these regions also harbor mineral, oil, coal, and natural gas reserves, with planned projects for resource extraction and large-scale crop cultivation. In the Amazon…

21h

QnAs with David Baker [QnAs]

DNA is often dubbed life’s instruction manual, but life-sustaining functions in all living cells are largely carried out by proteins, which are composed of varying combinations of 20 basic building blocks, called amino acids. Whether they are Lilliputian snippets a few amino acids long or molecular leviathans made of multiple…

21h

Moving beyond forensic monitoring to understand and manage impacts of hydraulic fracturing for oil and gas development [Environmental Sciences]

In PNAS, Woda et al. (1) present the results of a multidimensional investigation of the impacts of several hydraulically fractured shale gas wells on an aquifer and a hydrologically connected stream in a particular area in central Pennsylvania. The stream, Sugar Run, has been impacted by migration of methane into…

21h

Rethinking pneumonia: A paradigm shift with practical utility [Medical Sciences]

We associate the founders of germ theory, Louis Pasteur and Robert Koch, with a dusty, bygone age: gray beards, sepia tones, and antiquated techniques. However, in their own time, both Pasteur and Koch were what we would now call “early adopters,” embracing and advancing the leading edge of available technology…

21h

Regulating behavior with the flip of a translational switch [Neuroscience]

From the pioneering discovery of the first single-gene mutants that controlled circadian behavior by Konopka and Benzer (1), the quest to probe the fundamentally important relationship between gene expression and behavior has been ongoing. The ability to control cellular function and behavior with exquisite precision in vivo through genetic, optogenetic,…

21h

Subterranean clues to the future of our planetary magnetic shield [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

The geomagnetic field, generated in the liquid outer core, provides a shield from cosmic radiation that can cause damage to man-made satellites, electrical power grids, and the ozone layer (1). In the absence of this shield, the solar wind might gradually erode the atmosphere, eventually robbing the planet of its…

21h

Science and Culture: Journal entries, maps, and photos help ecologists reconstruct ecosystems of the past [Anthropology]

Ilka Feller has a penchant for mangrove hunting. Since the early 2000s, Feller, an ecologist at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center, has periodically gone road-tripping in search of the northernmost mangrove tree in Florida. The red mangrove, Rhizophora mangle, has draping roots that hold fast in the tide. But all…

21h

Your home could be lit by jellyfish in the future

Imagine a future lit by bioluminescent LEDs that not only use fewer of Earth's resources to manufacture, but also improve your mood by mimicking the sun throughout the day. It could be closer than you think, according to Dr Rubén Costa, a young scientist who believes we're on the brink of a bio and nanotechnology revolution that could close the gap between nature and the man-made environment. "Wh

21h

Study yields new insight on how memory works

Two Veterans Affairs researchers have explored how memory is tied to the hippocampus, with findings that will expand scientists' understanding of how memory works and ideally aid in detection, prevention, and treatment of memory disorders.

22h

Christmas Around the World 2018

One last photo look at this year’s Christmas and its many light shows, religious observances, charity events, and festivals that took place around the world. Gathered here are images from Australia, Japan, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Iraq, England, Bolivia, the U.S., India, Indonesia, Italy, Israel, France, and many more countries.

22h

More CO2 messes up salmons’ life-or-death sense of smell

New research shows that the powerful sense of smell salmon have might be in trouble as oceans continue to absorb carbon emissions. The ability to smell is critical for salmon. They depend on scent to avoid predators, sniff out prey, and find their way home at the end of their lives when they return to the streams where they hatched to spawn and die. But ocean acidification is changing the water’s

22h

Fish bones yield new tool for tracking coal ash contamination

A Duke University study shows that trace elements found in fish ear bones can be used as biogenic tracers to track coal ash contamination. Strontium isotope ratios in the otoliths of fish collected from two lakes that received coal ash effluents matched strontium isotope ratios in contaminated pore water samples from the lakes' bottoms. This marks the first time strontium isotope ratios have been

22h

'Reluctant Psychonaut' Michael Pollan Embraces 'New Science' Of Psychedelics

Author Michael Pollan experimented with mushrooms, LSD and other psychedelics while researching his latest book, How to Change Your Mind. Originally broadcast May 15, 2018.

22h

Reduced Snow Pack Could Alter Crystal-Clear Mountain Lakes

Changes in phytoplankton growth, and nutrients, could affect famous mirror-like clarity — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

23h

2018 is almost finished, so I'm celebrating all the gadgets I loved

Gadgets My favorite products of the year. I've been testing products for two years. Testing for the year has come to a close. Here are the items I loved.

23h

Fire Ants Know That in Unity There is Strength

Fire Ants Know That in Unity There is Strength Successful ants play like the Borg from Star Trek. FireAnts.jpg Image credits: D. Kucharski K. Kucharska/ Shutterstock Creature Wednesday, December 26, 2018 – 12:30 Joel Shurkin, Contributor (Inside Science) — When an invasive species — plant or animal — invades an area, there usually is competition for space and food with the residents, but after

1d

Opioid use and misuse following treatment for head and neck cancer

Six months after treatment ended, 7 percent of patients remained on opioid pain medications.

1d

Collecting clean water from air, inspired by desert life

A pair of new studies from researchers at The Ohio State University offers a possible solution to water scarcity, inspired by nature.

1d

1d

Major Funding Pledges Won't Close the Clean Energy Investment Gap

A crucial strategy for fighting climate change continues to come up short — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

Top Retractions of 2018

From a self-sampling scientist to the downfall of a leading stem cell scientist, here's our naughty list.

1d

Producers of white colonies on kimchi surface, mistaken as molds, have been identified

Analyses of microbial community structures and whole genome sequencing were performed to the white colony-forming yeasts on kimchi surface. WiKim provides information for the safety of the white colony-forming yeasts on kimchi surface.

1d

The Creepiest Movie Shot of the Year Came From Hereditary

Over the next week, The Atlantic ’s “And, Scene” series will delve into some of the most interesting films of the year by examining a single, noteworthy cinematic moment from 2018. Next up is Ari Aster’s Hereditary . (Read our previous entries here .) Ari Aster has made no secret of the fact that Hereditary , his debut film and one of the best-reviewed pieces of horror this year , was inspired by

1d

Jerry Brown’s Greatest Legacy Is Proving California Is Governable

LOS ANGELES—When Jerry Brown first took the oath as governor of California on January 6, 1975, he succeeded Ronald Reagan, who was still six years away from the White House. Gerald Ford was president, Paul VI was pope, the Watergate conspirators John Mitchell, H. R. Haldeman, and John Ehrlichman had just been convicted, the Khmer Rouge was beginning its bloody rise to power in Cambodia, the Dow J

1d

Post-natal depression in dads linked to depression in their teenage daughters

Fathers as well as mothers can experience post-natal depression — and it is linked to emotional problems for their teenage daughters, new research has found.

1d

UC San Diego researchers identify how skin ages, loses fat and immunity

Some dermal fibroblasts can convert into fat cells that reside under the dermis, giving skin a youthful look and producing peptides that fight infections. University of California San Diego School of Medicine researchers and colleagues show how this happens and what causes it to stop as people age.

1d

Breast cancer drugs could help treat resistant lung cancers

A class of drugs used to treat certain breast cancers could help to tackle lung cancers that have become resistant to targeted therapies, a new study suggests.The research, published in Cell Reports, found that lung tumors in mice caused by mutations in a gene called EGFR shrunk significantly when a protein called p110α was blocked.

1d

Cell size and cell-cycle states play key decision-making role in HIV

Thanks to the development of antiretroviral drugs, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is considered a manageable chronic disease today. However, if left undiagnosed or untreated, HIV can develop into AIDS (acquired immune deficiency syndrome), a disease which led to the deaths of nearly 1 million people worldwide in 2017.

1d

Losing neurons can sometimes not be that bad

Current thinking about Alzheimer's disease is that neuronal cell death in the brain is to blame for the cognitive havoc caused by the disease. But a new study suggests that neuronal death in Alzheimer's may actually be a protective reaction against the disease. This could lead to a complete rethinking of therapeutical approaches to Alzheimer's.

1d

Ancient Purebred Horse With Bronze-Plated Saddle Is Discovered in Pompeii

The horse is the latest treasure unearthed from the city buried by pumice and ash after the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in A.D. 79.

1d

Essay: One Giant Step for a Chess-Playing Machine

The stunning success of AlphaZero, a deep-learning algorithm, heralds a new age of insight — one that, for humans, may not last long.

1d

Buzzed flies reveal important step to intoxication

The alcohol in beverages acts much like an anesthetic. It creates a hyper 'buzzed' feeling first, and then sedation. But how? It turns out there is an important intermediate step that wasn't previously known.

1d

2019 Preview: Teeth will reveal our species’ deep evolutionary past

We will start to learn what a host of ancient animal and early human remains really are, thanks to new techniques for analysing tiny fragments of fossil remains

1d

What’s next in Syria after the US withdraws?

On December 19, 2018, President Trump announced he wants to pull troops out of Syria because the United States military had achieved its goal of defeating the Islamic State militant group there. In this Q&A, terrorism expert Martha Crenshaw, a senior fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies’ Center for International Security and Cooperation at Stanford University, addresse

1d

Farewell, Chevy Volt: An Oral History of the Plug-In Hybrid

The dealers didn’t get it, neither did most of the public. But people who loved them, really loved them.

1d

Simple Genetic Mutation Helped Humans Become Endurance Runners

Mice with the human version of a gene can run for longer without becoming fatigued — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

Deep learning turns mono recordings into immersive sound

We’ve had 3D images for decades, but effectively imitating 3D sound has always eluded researchers. Now a machine-learning algorithm can produce “2.5D” sound by watching a video.

1d

How much money would you charge to quit Facebook?

Facebook users would require an average of more than $1,000 to deactivate their account for one year, according to new research. How valuable is Facebook to its users and how can we measure its value when access is free? Researchers tried to answer these questions by assessing Facebook’s value to its users in contrast to its market value or its contribution to gross domestic product. Researchers

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