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Nyheder2018december29

Our universe: An expanding bubble in an extra dimension

Uppsala University researchers have devised a new model for the universe – one that may solve the enigma of dark energy. Their new article, published in Physical Review Letters, proposes a new structural concept, including dark energy, for a universe that rides on an expanding bubble in an additional dimension.

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E.P.A. Proposes Rule Change That Would Let Power Plants Release More Toxic PollutionBarack Obama M.

The change would make it easier for coal-fired power plants to emit mercury and other pollutants linked to developmental and respiratory disorders.

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Dit indsamlede plastaffald bliver snart til diesel på fabrik i Skive

Den norske virksomhed Quantafuel vil omdanne 60 ton plastaffald om dagen til brændstof og andre produkter på dansk fabrik. Der er rejsegilde i næste måned.

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High cholesterol levels after Christmas

Large quantities of rich Christmas food appear to boost Danes' cholesterol levels. Right after the Christmas break, levels are 20 percent higher than in the summer.

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An Ancient Tradition Unfolds in New York

With a flash, the sky over New York City turned a mystical blue . The spectacle, which appeared without warning on Thursday night, stunned observers. They sensed something was wrong—because, obviously, would you look at the freaking sky?—and quickly formulated some possible explanations. The theories leaned heavily on science fiction. Maybe the glow signaled the end of a massive battle between su

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We've wasted so much plastic, it's almost impossible to picture—these charts will help

Environment The most mind-boggling statistic of the year, visualized. Less than 10 percent of all the plastic we've made has been recycled, but the enormity of that quantity is hard to really grasp.

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The Family Weekly: Paying Kids to Do Chores Is a Very American Thing

This Week in Family Two writers took the time to remember loved ones who died this December. The Atlantic staff writer Franklin Foer wrote a tribute to his grandmother, Ethel, who as a teenager trekked 2,600 miles to flee Nazi persecution with nothing but a pair of scissors and a winter coat. He remembers her as a woman who loved life fiercely: “Survival, in the end, feels like an insufficient wo

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Galapagos bans fireworks to protect unique wildlife

Fireworks have been banned on the Galapagos Islands to protect the archipelago's unique fauna, the local government said on Friday.

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Zuckerberg sees 'progress' for Facebook after tumultuous yearMark Zuckerberg Facebook

Facebook chief Mark Zuckerberg said Friday the world's biggest social network has "fundamentally" changed to focus on securing its systems against manipulation and misinformation.

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Ryanair cabin crew in Spain to strike in January

Unions for Ryanair's 1,800 cabin crew in Spain threatened Friday to strike in January unless the Irish low-cost airline agrees to improve work and pay conditions.

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Marine debris study counts trash from Texas to Florida

Trash, particularly plastic, in the ocean and along the shoreline is an economic, environmental, human health, and aesthetic problem causing serious challenges to coastal communities around the world, including the Gulf of Mexico.

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Seabirds Abandon Eggs After Winter Without Ice

Seabirds Abandon Eggs After Winter Without Ice Record low levels of winter sea ice devastate seabirds already struggling with climate change. black-guillemot-closeup.jpg Image credits: óskar elías sigurðsson via Flickr Creature Friday, December 28, 2018 – 14:30 Nala Rogers, Staff Writer (Inside Science) — Each winter, sleek seabirds known as Mandt's black guillemots descend on the ice that forms

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The mystery of the ISS hole just got even weirder

Space The hole came from the inside. Earlier this week, a Russian cosmonaut who investigated the mysterious hole in the Soyuz capsule docked to the International Space Station revealed that the hole was…

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Marine debris study counts trash from Texas to Florida

Trash, particularly plastic, in the ocean and along the shoreline is an economic, environmental, human health, and aesthetic problem causing serious challenges to coastal communities around the world, including the Gulf of Mexico.

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How an Explosion (Not Aliens) Turned New York’s Night Sky an Electric BlueNew York Blue Queens

The Men in Black and the Ghostbusters did not respond to requests for comment.

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Photos of the Week: Vertical Dancers, Pagan Solstice, Panda Monitor

Strange blue lights in the night sky over New York, Christmas calls from the White House, a fox hunt in Ireland, icy weather in China, the Sahara Festival in Tunisia, Santa Claus on Copacabana Beach in Rio, recovery from a tsunami in Indonesia, an eruption of Mount Etna in Sicily, penguins in Italy and Antarctica, and much more.

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Trump EPA Says Mercury Limits On Coal Plants Too Costly, Not 'Necessary'

The EPA says it will keep limits on toxic mercury emissions from coal plants but now deems them not cost-effective. Environmental groups worry the move could hinder future regulations. (Image credit: Matt Brown/AP)

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How a Guy With a Camera Outsmarted the United States

On the morning of December 26, Alan Meloy stood on the front porch of his home in northern England and noticed that “murky” early clouds were clearing into a crisp and sunny winter’s day. Meloy, a retired IT professional and a plane spotter of 45 years, decided to grab his best camera to see whether he could catch any interesting flyovers. Before long, he saw a “jumbo”—a Boeing VC-25A—and, knowin

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NASA spaceship closes in on distant world

NASA's unmanned New Horizons spacecraft is closing in on its historic New Year's flyby target, the most distant world ever studied, a frozen relic of the solar system some four billion miles (6.4 billion kilometers) away.

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One-hour ER discharge rule is safe after naloxone

It’s safe for hospital emergency departments to discharge opioid overdose patients as early as one hour after receiving naloxone, a new study shows. According to the St. Paul’s Early Discharge Rule, that’s how long providers should observe patients after naloxone treatment, so long as their vital signs meet specific criteria and they are ambulatory. Researchers at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver

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Winter storms batter large swaths of US

Two deaths were attributed to severe weather in the US Midwest as heavy snow and high winds snarled air and ground transportation during a busy holiday travel period.

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ESA Tipsheet for January 2019

Get a sneak peek into these new scientific papers, publishing on January 3, 2019 in the Ecological Society of America's journal Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment.

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In 2018, Alaska's Bering Sea was all out of whack.

Environment It was an extreme year. In some regions, this was the first time in 37 years of water surveys that there was no cold pool.

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Trilobites: How to Recycle Your Christmas Tree

You don’t want your tree to end up in a landfill. Let it have a second life as compost, a barrier for erosion or food for goats.

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Super catalyst turns chemical ‘trash’ into treasure

Researchers have developed a catalyst that combines strength and finesse to make an inert carbon-hydrogen bond reactive—effectively turning chemical “trash” to “treasure.” For decades, chemists have aspired to do carefully controlled chemistry on carbon-hydrogen bonds. The challenge is staggering. It requires the power of a miniature wrecking ball to break these extremely strong bonds, combined w

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Team Tea wins the rematch again!

Looks like any way you serve it, tea is Eyewire’s morning drink for good! Congratulations to everyone on a well played rematch. We’ll catch you again in 2019! Artwork by Rabbit Giraud

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Government Shutdown Affects NSF, FDA, Other Science Agencies

The ongoing stalemate over the federal budget has forced one-quarter of the US government to begin a second week of closure.

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Finding a Way Through an Unspeakable Loss

I can’t write this story. I must write this story. My brain can’t process this story, though this story has been my brain’s main occupant since the morning of December 14th, when I heard the news. Where to begin? With the accident itself? With the sludge of hours and days that followed? With the snow, the patch of ice, the oncoming headlights, none of which I saw in real life but all of which I n

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To pursue the science of happiness, try these 14 tips

There’s a science to happiness, says Tim Bono, the author of a recent book on the subject. In When Likes Aren’t Enough: A Crash Course in the Science of Happiness (Grand Central Life & Style, 2018), Bono shows how the often-overlooked details of day-to-day life can have a sizable influence on our personal sense of well-being and happiness. Based on his own research and other scientific studies, B

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Spotlight on role of automated trading amid Wall Street swoon

The recent tumult in financial markets has shined a light on the rising role of automated trading on Wall Street and whether it is exacerbating volatility.

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Acne medication changes the skin’s microbiome

Isotretinoin, a form of vitamin A that has been prescribed to treat acne for decades, changes the microbiome of the skin to more closely resemble the skin of people without acne, according to a new study. The study sheds light on how isotretinoin works and provides information that could lead to developing microbiome-based acne treatments, researchers say. There is a need for such alternatives be

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These are the most-read Science News stories of 2018

From male birth control to wombat poop, Science News online readers had a wide variety of favorite stories on our website.

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The Girl Who Lived

There were the scissors that my grandmother somehow remembered to bring with her as she fled. She could hear the rumble of destruction in the distance. She could see the cloud of smoke that was the Nazi murder of her family and neighbors. Without forethought, she made the decision to run ahead, carrying with her the scissors and, despite the blossoms of spring, a winter coat. In the seasons that

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Director of NIAMS Stephen Katz Dies

The head of the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases was a leader in the study of skin-based immunology.

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Favorite Visual Stories Of 2018

NPR's list of memorable visual stories includes coverage of the 2018 midterm election, migrant caravans, Puerto Rico's hurricane recovery and, of course, a musical insect invasion. (Image credit: Claire Harbage, Skunk Bear, Mengwen Cao for NPR, Angela Hsieh, Sean McMinn and Jazz Night In America/NPR)

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Democrats Establish a New House ‘Climate Crisis’ Committee

It’s official. When Democrats take control of the House of Representatives next month, they will form a special new committee to examine climate change, Nancy Pelosi said in a statement on Friday . Pelosi, likely the next speaker of the House, also announced that the new committee will be named the Select Committee on the Climate Crisis. It will be led by Kathy Castor, a seven-term congresswoman

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Sexual/gender minority patients prefer written self-report for identity info collection

Researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital conducted a matched cohort trial to determine which of two different SOGI collection methods was associated with higher patient satisfaction with their emergency department (ED) visit.

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Adults with cerebral palsy at increased risk of depression, anxiety

While cerebral palsy is considered a pediatric condition because it develops and is diagnosed in early childhood, it is a lifelong condition with the majority of children living into adulthood. Little research exists on the mental health of adults with cerebral palsy. This study included 1,700 adults 18 years or older with cerebral palsy and 5,100 adults without cerebral palsy.

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Study examines development of physical aggression in children as they age

Children can exhibit physical aggression when they are very young but that behavior typically declines before and during elementary school. However, a small proportion of children have atypically high physical aggression problems into adolescence, which may put them at increased risk for violent crime, social maladjustment, and alcohol and drug abuse. This observational study of 2,223 boys and gir

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Could drinking alcohol be associated with better survival in patients after heart failure diagnosis?

Having seven or fewer alcoholic drinks a week was associated with increased survival in older adults with newly diagnosed heart failure compared with patients who abstained from alcohol after accounting for other potential mitigating factors. Conflicting data exist about an association between alcohol consumption and heart failure but not much is known about the safety of alcohol consumption in pa

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Patient preferences for collecting sexual, gender identity information

Emergency department patients who are sexual or gender minorities reported greater satisfaction when information on sexual and gender identity was collected on forms during registration instead of by nurses who asked about it during the visit.

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Wide variation in use of pain relievers during labor across US

Pain relief for pregnant women in labor is commonly given in the form of epidural, spinal or combined spinal-epidural blockade, which is collectively referred to as neuraxial analgesia. This study used birth certificate data and found wide variation in neuraxial analgesia use across the United States. Among 2.6 million pregnant women who underwent labor in 2015, neuraxial analgesia was used by 73

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Study details opioid poisoning deaths among children, teens over two decades

Nearly 9,000 children and adolescents died from opioid poisonings with prescription and illicit drugs between 1999 and 2016 based on an analysis of national data. The death rate almost tripled over that time to nearly 1 per 100,000 based on the data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Prescription opioids were implicated in 73 percent of the deaths (6,561) and most of the de

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Moderate drinking not harmful for older patients with heart failure

A new study suggests that people over age 65 who are newly diagnosed with heart failure can continue to drink moderate amounts of alcohol without worsening their condition. However, the findings do not suggest that nondrinkers should start imbibing after a heart failure diagnosis, the researchers emphasized.

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December's Sparkling Space Pictures

December's Sparkling Space Pictures An assortment of twinkling images of space, stars and spacecrafts. 4_crop_heic1820a.jpg The Abell S1063 galaxy cluster, located 4 billion light-years away. Image credits: NASA/ESA/M. Montes Space Friday, December 28, 2018 – 11:00 Abigail Malate, Staff Illustrator (Inside Science) — This December, we have selected a festive variety of astronomical delights. Thr

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2019 Preview: We will see the first ever picture of a black hole

We have never seen a picture of a black hole, but that will change when the Event Horizon Telescope reveals its first snap of the behemoth at the Milky Way's centre

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The Branching Horrors of Black Mirror’s ‘Bandersnatch’

This piece contains spoilers for the Black Mirror special “Bandersnatch.” For most of its existence, Netflix’s streaming television service has largely existed to pump out more and more content. Its never-ending feed is packed with new shows, revived classics, licensed hits from other countries, and big acquisitions such as Black Mirror , a cult hit from the U.K.’s Channel 4 that tells warped Twi

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A brief history of black holes

Late in 2018, the gravitational wave observatory, LIGO, announced that they had detected the most distant and massive source of ripples of spacetime ever monitored: waves triggered by pairs of black holes colliding in deep space. Only since 2015 have we been able to observe these invisible astronomical bodies, which can be detected only by their gravitational attraction. The history of our hunt fo

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Deep learning for electron microscopy

Finding defects in electron microscopy images takes months. Now, there's a faster way. It's called MENNDL, the Multinode Evolutionary Neural Networks for Deep Learning. It creates artificial neural networks—computational systems that loosely mimic the human brain—that tease defects out of dynamic data. It runs on all available nodes of the Summit supercomputer, performing 152 thousand million mill

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When you look up, how far back in time do you see?

Our senses are stuck in the past. There's a flash of lightning, and then seconds pass until we hear the rumble of distant thunder. We hear the past.

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Fail-safe, reconfigurable chips

Researchers at the Telecommunications and Multimedia Applications Institute (iTEAM) of Valencia's Polytechnic University (UPV) have taken a step toward creating an infallible chip. They have developed an advanced method for the analysis and à la cart configuration of photonic circuits, which makes it possible to pre-emptively deal with the possible faults that a chip may suffer and reduce their im

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The science behind why our brains make us cooperate (or disagree)

Neuroscientists identify the parts of the brain that affect our social decision-making. Guilt has a large affect on social interactions, find the researchers. To find ways to cooperate, people need to let go of fear and anxiety, suggest studies None Why do we decide to work on a project or pursue a goal with someone? Or why do we treat some people like there's no way we can find any common langua

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Scientists model Mercury's glaciers

The processes that led to glaciation at the cratered poles of Mercury, the planet closest to the sun, have been modeled by a University of Maine-led research team.

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Lidar accelerates hurricane recovery in the Carolinas

Hurricane Florence's slow trot over North and South Carolina in September led to inundating rain, record storm surges, and another major disaster for the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) to contend with. Facing damage over hundreds of square miles, FEMA again called upon MIT Lincoln Laboratory to use their state-of-the-art lidar system to image the destruction in the region.

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New epigenetic study: Guinea pig fathers pass on adaptive responses to environmental changes

Adaptations to environmental change are the most important asset for the persistence of any plant or animal species. This is usually achieved through genetic mutation and selection, a slow process driven by chance. Faster and more targeted are so called epigenetic modifications which do not alter the genetic code but promote specialisations during cell maturation. A new study carried out by scient

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Better mouse model built to enable precision-medicine research for Alzheimer's

Incorporating genetic diversity into a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease resulted in greater overlap with the genetic, molecular and clinical features of this pervasive human disease, according to a new study.

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Secondhand smoke and cardiac arrhythmia

Continuous indoor exposure to secondhand tobacco smoke triggers changes in the heart's electrical activity, known as cardiac alternans, that can predict cardiac arrhythmia and sudden cardiac death, a new study shows. The authors believe the study, conducted in mice, suggests that secondhand smoke exposure alters cells that regulate how the heart beats.

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Long-term memory encoding engram neurons are established by the transcriptional cycling

Long-term memory (LTM) is formed by repetitive training trials with rest intervals and LTM formation requires transcription factors, including CREB and c-Fos. Researchers found that ERK activity is increased during rest intervals to induce transcriptional cycling between c-Fos and CREB in a subset of mushroom body neurons. Significantly, LTM is encoded in these mushroom body neurons, and blocking

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Electronics of the future: A new energy-efficient mechanism using the Rashba effect

Scientists have proposed new quasi-1D materials for potential spintronic applications, an upcoming technology that exploits the spin of electrons. They performed simulations to demonstrate the spin properties of these materials and explained the mechanisms behind their behavior.

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Distinguishing between students who guess and those who know

Measuring the knowledge of students in online courses poses a number of challenges. Researchers from the Higher School of Economics and the University of Leuven made improvements to the model for assessing academic achievements and published their results in the journal Heliyon.

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Producers of white colonies on kimchi surface, mistaken as molds, have been identified

The World Institute of Kimch (WiKim) has reported that the white colonies on the surface of kimchi are not formed by molds but by yeasts. The researchers also acquired genomic data regarding the hygienic safety of the yeast strains.

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The Books Briefing: ’Tis the Season for Parties

What better way to celebrate the remaining days of 2018 than by revisiting our favorite literary parties? There’s Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s take on Mrs. Dalloway and the dinner soirée, reimagined under the Donald Trump presidency. And, of course, who can forget Jay Gatsby’s infamous West Egg parties, which have inspired numerous high-school proms and costumed New Year’s shindigs. That being said

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Self-sorting through molecular geometries

Researchers at Kanazawa University report in Communications Chemistry that certain pentagonal and hexagonal organic molecules exhibit self-sorting. The effect can be used to grow multilayered tubular structures that preserve the geometry of the initial cavities.

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New hydraulic actuator will make robots tougher

Researchers at the Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) have developed a hydraulic actuator that will allow tough robots to operate in disaster sites and other harsh environments. The Tokyo Tech Venture H-MUSCLE Corporation was established to pursue applications for the actuator, and shipping of product samples will begin in February 2019.

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Hybrid qubits solve key hurdle to quantum computing

Researchers have crafted a new architecture for quantum computing. By constructing a hybrid device made from two different types of qubit — the fundamental computing element of quantum computers — they have created a device that can be quickly initialized and read out, and that simultaneously maintains high control fidelity.

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Sound changes the way rodents sense touch

Researchers report how the somatosensory cortex interprets tactile and auditory stimulation in mice and rats. They show that the barrel cortex response to auditory and tactile stimuli is additive, but also with different electrophysiological properties. The study provides new insights on how multimodal senses are interpreted by the brain.

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Bacteria found in ancient Irish soil halts growth of superbugs: New hope for tackling antibiotic resistance

Researchers analyzing soil from Ireland long thought to have medicinal properties have discovered that it contains a previously unknown strain of bacteria which is effective against four of the top six superbugs that are resistant to antibiotics, including MRSA. Antibiotic-resistant superbugs could kill up to 1.3 million people in Europe by 2050, according to recent research. The World Health Orga

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Your brain rewards you twice per meal: When you eat and when food reaches your stomach

We know a good meal can stimulate the release of the feel-good hormone dopamine, and now a study in humans suggests that dopamine release in the brain occurs at two different times: at the time the food is first ingested and another once the food reaches the stomach.

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How exercise reduces belly fat in humans

Some of you may have made a New Year's resolution to hit the gym to tackle that annoying belly fat. But have you ever wondered how physical activity produces this desired effect? A signaling molecule called interleukin-6 plays a critical role in this process, researchers report.

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Droplets don’t have to be round – here’s one squished into a square

Drops of liquid are usually round, but now we’ve found out how to make square droplets by squashing liquid between two elastic films stretched in different directions

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Historic UK music retailer HMV collapses due to digital surge

British music retailer HMV, which was launched by English composer Edward Elgar in 1921 and helped propel the Beatles to fame, collapsed into administration on Friday as consumers switch to digital streaming in droves.

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These nine measures reveal how forests are controlled by climate

Instead of blood pressure, temperature, and heart rate, the vital signs for a forest are captured in key traits such as the amount of nitrogen in a tree's leaves, the leaf area, or the density of the wood. These "functional traits" can impact how trees grow—and therefore how forests respond to climate change. While researchers have begun trying to tease out these patterns in recent decades, incomp

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The development of a hybrid micro mixer for biological and chemical experiments

An international team of scientists including an employee of I.M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University (MSMU) has developed a device for mixing chemical and biological reaction feeds. The team managed to increase the mixing efficiency up to 90 percent. The new device will be used in biological and chemical experiments. The article was published in the RSC Advances journal.

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Don't waste your dog's poo – compost it

Australia has one of the highest rates of pet ownership in the world, with 38% of Australian households owning dogs. Dogs improve the quality of our lives, and studies show that exposure to dogs can even improve our immune system.

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Elon Musk Leads the Most-Read Transportation Stories of 2018

This year, our readers remained obsessed with self-driving and electric cars—and one of the most famous men making them.

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What's Changed Since My First Column for Scientific American

What’s changed since my first Scientific American column — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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AI, robotics, automation: The fourth industrial revolution is here

For Chinese guests at Marriott International hotels, the check-in process will soon get easier. The hotel giant announced last summer that it's developing facial recognition systems that will allow guests to check in at a kiosk in less than a minute via a quick scan of their facial features.

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2 diabetes drugs spike heart attack risk

Two drugs commonly prescribed to treat Type 2 diabetes carry a high risk of cardiovascular events, including heart attack, stroke, heart failure, or amputation, a new study warns. “People should know if the medications they’re taking to treat their diabetes could lead to serious cardiovascular harm,” says lead author Matthew O’Brien, assistant professor of general internal medicine and geriatrics

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Discovery of topological LC circuits transporting EM waves without backscattering

NIMS has succeeded in fabricating topological LC circuits arranged in a honeycomb pattern where electromagnetic (EM) waves can propagate without backscattering, even when pathways turn sharply. These circuits may be suitable for use as high-frequency electromagnetic waveguides, which would allow miniaturization and high integration in electronic devices such as mobile phones.

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Earliest records of three plant groups uncovered in the Permian of Jordan

A "hidden cradle of plant evolution" has been uncovered in Jordan. In Permian sedimentary rocks exposed along the east coast of the Dead Sea, a team led by palaeobotanists from the University of Münster discovered well-preserved fossils of plant groups bearing characteristics typical of younger periods of Earth history. The Permian began some 300 million years ago and ended around 250 million year

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Children's well-being not negatively affected by living in single-parent households, study shows

The experience of single parenthood is more common than typically reported – and children's well-being is not negatively affected by living in single-parent households – according to a study led by the University of Sheffield.

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Who is vulnerable to the impacts of tropical cyclones and why?

Tropical cyclones, and the torrential rains and strong winds these storms bring along with them, threaten coastal communities around the world and are expected to increase in intensity due to climate change. But not every tropical cyclone becomes a natural disaster and not every natural disaster results in human fatalities.

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Last Year in Tech 2018: Smartphone notches, data breaches, and sad CEOs

Technology A look back at 2018's big tech stories. Bring on 2019.

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How 'Dry January' is the secret to better sleep, saving money and losing weight

New research shows that taking part in Dry January sees people regaining control of their drinking, having more energy, better skin and losing weight. They also report drinking less months later.

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Researchers develop 128Mb STT-MRAM with world's fastest write speed for embedded memory

A research team, led by Professor Tetsuo Endoh at Tohoku University, has successfully developed 128Mb-density STT-MRAM (spin-transfer torque magnetoresistive random access memory) with a write speed of 14 ns for use in embedded memory applications, such as cache in IOT and AI. This is currently the world's fastest write speed for embedded memory application with a density over 100Mb and will pave

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Cell death mechanisms in stroke and novel molecular and cellular treatment options

As a result of ischemia or hemorrhage, blood supply to neurons is disrupted which subsequently promotes a cascade of pathophysiological responses resulting in cell loss. This review will explore the most updated cellular death mechanisms leading to neuronal loss in stroke.

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Systematic review of food addiction as measured with the Yale Food Addiction Scale

The aim of this paper was to review the clinical significance of food addiction diagnoses made with the Yale Food Addiction Scale (YFAS) and to discuss the results in light of the current debate on behavioral addictions.

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Study shows high cholesterol levels after Christmas

Large quantities of rich Christmas food appear to boost Danes' cholesterol levels. Right after the Christmas break, levels are 20 percent higher than in the summer. So says a new study carried out by researchers from the Department of Clinical Biochemistry at Copenhagen University Hospital and the Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Copenhagen.

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Record for decoding the longest DNA sequence is impressive – here's what to expect next

Like other professionals, scientists like to be the best at what they do, but they also like to have fun in their job. And in 2018, my colleagues managed just that in claiming a record for decoding the world's longest DNA sequence.

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Clouds with a chance of warming

Researchers from Argonne's Environmental Science division participated in one of the largest collaborative atmospheric measurement campaigns in Antarctica in recent decades.

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Researchers link realism to blockchain's promise

Depending on who you ask, blockchain technology is poised to revolutionize the world—from creating a universal currency to building a free and truly private internet. Or, the new technology, built with a combination of encryption and transparency, is a solution in search of a problem.

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Researchers develop 128Mb STT-MRAM with world's fastest write speed for embedded memory

A research team, led by Professor Tetsuo Endoh at Tohoku University, has successfully developed 128Mb-density spin-transfer torque magnetoresistive random access memory (STT-MRAM) with a write speed of 14 ns for use in embedded memory applications, such as cache in IoT and AI. This is currently the world's fastest write speed for embedded memory application with a density over 100Mb and will pave

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Scientists learn how to predict space radiation levels

Experts from the National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Russia), the University of Oulu (Finland), and the St. Petersburg-based Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences (Russia) have compared the effect of cosmic ray solar modulation as recorded by neutron monitors and the PAMELA (Payload for Antimatter Matter Exploration and Light-Nuclei Astrophysics) satellite e

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New research reveals how galaxies stay hot and bothered

It's relatively easy for galaxies to make stars. Start out with a bunch of random blobs of gas and dust. Typically those blobs will be pretty warm. To turn them into stars, you have to cool them off. By dumping all their heat in the form of radiation, they can compress. Dump more heat, compress more. Repeat for a million years or so.

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Russian researchers explore the prospects for creating photonic integrated circuits

The transition from electronic integrated circuits to faster, more energy-efficient and interference-free optical circuits is one of the most important goals in the development of photon technologies. Photonic integrated circuits (PICs) are already used today for transmitting and processing signals in optical networks and communication systems, including, for example, I/O multiplexers of optical s

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Our universe: An expanding bubble in an extra dimension

Uppsala University researchers have devised a new model for the universe — one that may solve the enigma of dark energy. Their new article, published in Physical Review Letters, proposes a new structural concept, including dark energy, for a universe that rides on an expanding bubble in an additional dimension.

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NUS study: Older adults care about strangers' welfare in financial decision-making

A study from the National University of Singapore found that older adults make the same financial decisions for themselves and others, while young adults take more risks when making financial decisions for others.

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Sound changes the way rodents sense touch

Researchers at the Nara Institute of Science and Technology (NAIST) report how the somatosensory cortex interprets tactile and auditory stimulation in mice and rats. They show that the barrel cortex response to auditory and tactile stimuli is additive, but also with different electrophysiological properties. The study provides new insights on how multimodal senses are interpreted by the brain.

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These nine measures reveal how forests are controlled by climate

One of the first studies to examine how climate is influencing functional traits in forest communities on a global scale found evidence of major changes.

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A boundary dance of amyloid-β stepping into dementia

Alzheimer's disease is caused by aggregates of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides. This aggregation is accelerated at a cell membrane surface. The research group at ExCELLS revealed the reason of this phenomenon by molecular dynamics simulations and NMR experiments. The findings were published in the Journal of Physical Chemistry B.

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Hybrid qubits solve key hurdle to quantum computing

Researchers have crafted a new architecture for quantum computing. By constructing a hybrid device made from two different types of qubit — the fundamental computing element of quantum computers — they have created a device that can be quickly initialized and read out, and that simultaneously maintains high control fidelity.

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Vietnam court orders ride-hailing app to compensate taxi firm

A Vietnam court Friday ordered ride-hailing app Grab to pay a cab company more than $200,000 for losses incurred due to competition—a judgement blasted by the firm as "a giant step backwards" for the country's tech community.

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Rings make Saturn shadier, bluer and less hazy in winter

On Saturn, changing seasons can mean changes in the haziness—and color—of the skies.

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How Do Wildfires Start?

More than 8.5 million acres of land in the U.S. burned this year. Here's how the raging flames get their start.

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This May Be Life's 'Missing Ingredient'

Billions of years ago, molecules on a lifeless and tumultuous Earth mixed, forming the first life-forms.

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Plants have a plan for all seasons

Many plants need to avoid flowering in the autumn – even if conditions are favourable – otherwise they would perish in winter.

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India to send three-person crew on landmark space mission

India will send a three-member team into orbit for up to a week when it launches its first manned space mission expected in 2022, the government announced Friday.

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Researchers investigate molecular gas emission from the galaxy NGC 3557

Using Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), researchers have conducted interferometric observations of the elliptical galaxy NGC 3557 to investigate molecular gas emission from this source. Results of these observations, available in a paper published December 13 on arXiv.org, could be helpful for understanding the process of star formation in this galaxy.

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Tesla names two directors as part of Musk US fraud settlementTesla Larry Ellison

Tesla named two more independent directors on Friday and said it completed the requirements of a US settlement of fraud charges involving Chief Executive Elon Musk.

8h

Indonesia tsunami raises fears for endangered Javan rhino

Indonesia's tsunami has raised fears that another deadly wave could wipe out the few dozen Javan rhinos still living in the wild, conservation authorities said Friday.

8h

Special magnets make spin-based memory more efficient

A new magnetic device can manipulate digital information 20 times more efficiently and with 10 times more stability than commercial spintronic digital memories, say researchers. The spintronic memory device, which employs ferrimagnets, has the potential to accelerate the commercial growth of spin-based memory. “Our discovery could provide a new device platform to the spintronic industry, which at

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The most eye-catching science and tech news stories of 2018

From advances in mind reading and medical procedures to AI law enforcement and CRISPR controversy, 2018 was a year of highs and lows. Here are our highlights

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Edward Gorey and the Power of the Ineffable

“Everyday life is very discomfiting,” the American writer and illustrator Edward Gorey told The National Observer in 1976. “I guess I’m trying to convey that discomfiting texture in my books.” But Gorey’s art did not merely aim to discompose audiences with its macabre Victorian-Edwardian overlays and casual depictions of darkly comic cruelty. It also sought to unsettle by resisting definitive exp

8h

Letters: ‘The Puzzle of the Wealthy’

The Reason Many Ultrarich People Aren’t Satisfied With Their Wealth Recently, Joe Pinsker talked to a handful of experts about why many ultrarich people are motivated to accumulate more and more wealth. There are two central questions people ask themselves when determining whether they’re satisfied, one researcher explained: Am I doing better than I was before? and Am I doing better than other pe

8h

Best PS4 Accessories (2019): Controllers, Headsets, and More

Own a PS4 or PS4 Pro? You're definitely going to want some of these lovely extras.

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A Blood Test for the Body's Clock

A new way to measure internal time could yield insight into sleep deprivation and disease — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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2018's Science Superlatives: The Biggest, Oldest, Smelliest and Cutest

As 2018 draws to a close, we look back at some of the record-breaking discoveries of the year.

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Why a Large Number of Americans Don’t Know All Their Grandparents’ First Names

One-third of Americans aren’t able to name all of their grandparents, according to the genealogy website Ancestry.com. That proportion seems very, very high—it represents more than 100 million people. Can that estimate really be right? Ancestry filled in some details when I inquired. The figure comes from a survey the company recently commissioned that polled 2,000 American adults who were “stati

8h

Pediatric leukemia ‘super drug’ may be within reach

When scientists stabilized a key protein responsible for leukemia, MLL, it slowed the progression of the disease in mice, according to a new study. The next step, researchers say, is to combine the treatments from the past two years of research into a pediatric leukemia “super drug” to test on humans in a clinical trial. “This is a monster cancer that we’ve been dealing with for many years in chi

8h

Whether the cold extends lifespan depends on genes

The extent to which temperature affects lifespan depends on an individual’s genes, according to new research. Temperature is a known factor in aging and many animal species live longer at lower temperature than they do at higher temperatures. As a result, “there are people out there who believe, strongly, that if you take a cold shower every day it will extend your lifespan,” says Kristin Gribble

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Madagascar pochard: World's rarest bird gets new home

A species of duck thought to have been wiped out a decade ago is re-released at a lake in Madagascar.

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World's rarest bird gets new home in Madagascar

Conservationists hope to save a species of duck called the Madagascar pochard from extinction.

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Anak Krakatau: How a tsunami could wipe out the last Javan rhinos

There are only 67 Javan rhinos left in the world and they all live in sight of Anak Krakatau volcano.

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A Mission: Impossible Fake-Out for the Ages

Over the next week, The Atlantic ’s “And, Scene” series will delve into some of the most interesting films of the year by examining a single, noteworthy cinematic moment from 2018. Next up is Christopher McQuarrie’s Mission: Impossible—Fallout . (Read our previous entries here .) The ludicrously dubbed “Impossible Mission Force,” the imaginary federal agency at the heart of the Mission: Impossibl

9h

Here's how people jumped out of planes decades ago—and eject from them today

Aviation Exiting a speeding jet is no small feat. From parachutes for the balloon corps to the latest generation of high-speed ejection seats, here’s how we learned to make a swift aerial exit. From parachutes for the balloon corps to the latest generation of high-speed ejector seats, here’s how we learned to make a swift aerial exit.

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The Republican Reversal shows how the US party is like Soviet Russia

The Republicans used to be all for science. A new book analyses how the US conservative party turned against conservation for the fourth of our 12 Days of Culture

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What a Newfound Kingdom Means for the Tree of Life

Neither animal, plant, fungus nor familiar protozoan, a strange microbe foretells incredible biodiversity yet to be discovered — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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How President Woodrow Wilson tried to end all wars once and for all

President Wilson proposed "Fourteen Points" at the end of World War I. He wanted an organization created – the League of Nations – to settle international disputes. The League was a precursor to the United Nations, but the U.S. never actually joined it. None Coming out of the horrendous calamity of World War I, Woodrow Wilson , the 28th President of the United States, developed a vision for an in

9h

A virtual reality experience of being inside an exploded star

Cassiopeia A, the youngest known supernova remnant in the Milky Way, is the remains of a star that exploded almost 400 years ago. The star was approximately 15 to 20 times the mass of our sun and sat in the Cassiopeia constellation, almost 11,000 light-years from earth.

9h

An Elephant’s Personhood on Trial

Forty-seven years ago, the Asian elephant now known as Happy was one of seven calves captured—probably in Thailand, but details are hazy—and sent to the United States. She spent five years at a safari park in Florida, time that in the wild would have been spent by her mother’s side. Then she was moved to the Bronx Zoo in New York City. There Happy remains today, and since the death of an elephant

10h

Der er lang vej, til robotten overtager de kedelige opgaver i hjemmet

Selvom der i stor stil udvikles software og hardware til servicerobotter, der skal hjælpe mennesker med serviceopgaver i hjemmet, på restauranten eller i lufthavnen, så er der er lang vej, til de for alvor kan gøre hverdagen nemmere. Ny teknologi til selvkørende biler kan være med til at rykke u…

10h

Hybrid qubits solve key hurdle to quantum computing

Spin-based quantum computers have the potential to tackle difficult mathematical problems that cannot be solved using ordinary computers, but many problems remain in making these machines scalable. Now, an international group of researchers led by the RIKEN Center for Emergent Matter Science have crafted a new architecture for quantum computing. By constructing a hybrid device made from two differ

10h

Reactive optical matter: Light-induced motion

Newton's third law dictates that forces between interacting particles are equal and opposite for closed systems. In a non-equilibrium environment, the third law can be defied, giving rise to "nonreciprocal" forces. Theoretically, this was shown when dissimilar, optically trapped particles were mediated by an external field. In a recent study, Yuval Yifat and colleagues measured the net nonreciproc

10h

Electronics of the future: A new energy-efficient mechanism using the Rashba effect

Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology proposed new quasi-1-D materials for potential spintronic applications, an upcoming technology that exploits the spin of electrons. They performed simulations to demonstrate the spin properties of these materials and explained the mechanisms behind their behavior.

10h

The mysterious demise of Europe’s massive cave bears

Once more common than brown bears, cave bears didn't survive the last ice age. Could their sad end be down to their diet, or just to being bears of very little brain?

10h

Laser diode detects counterfeit olive oil

Researchers at the Complutense University of Madrid (UCM) and the Scintillon Institute in the U.S. have designed a sensor that can detect counterfeit olive oil labeled as extra virgin or protected designation of origin.

10h

ESA sets clock by distant spinning stars

ESA's technical centre in the Netherlands has begun running a pulsar-based clock. The "PulChron' system measures the passing of time using millisecond-frequency radio pulses from multiple fast-spinning neutron stars.

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Mission accomplished for ESA's butane-propelled CubeSat

The cereal-box sized GomX-4B – ESA's biggest small CubeSat yet flown – has completed its mission for the Agency, testing out new miniaturised technologies including: intersatellite link communication with its GomX-4A twin, a hyperspectral imager, star tracker and butane-based propulsion system.

10h

We’re all Just Starting to Realize the Power of Personal Data

This year revealed consumers have a lot more to learn about what happens to their information online.

10h

Is This Photo Real? AI Gets Better at Faking Images

Progress on AI-generated visuals offers clues on how images, video, and art could power new forms of entertainment and disinformation.

10h

NASA's New Horizons Probe Prepares To Make History—Again

The intrepid spacecraft has traveled 13 years and 4 billion miles to glimpse Ultima Thule, a cold, dark world at the fringes of our solar system.

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The 10 most intriguing inventions of 2018

From programmable pills to power-generating boots, here are some of the most unusual technological innovations we covered this year.

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These are the five hottest gadget trends for 2019

From folding phones to 8K TVs, the cutting-edge advances you need to know about for next year.

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Tiny Computers Could Transform Our Lives

And they’re getting closer to the marketplace all the time — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

10h

Lotus Birth: No Benefit, Plenty of Risk

The practice of refusing to cut the umbilical cord after delivery of a newborn has no benefit and risks serious infection. A recent case series illustrates the risks of so-called Lotus birth.

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Huge reserves of iron in Western Siberia might originate from under an ancient sea

The world's largest Bakchar iron ore deposit is located in an ancient sea in West Siberia, Russia. Its proven reserves are over 28 billion tons. Scientists seek to explain the accumulation of such a huge amount of iron. Now, they have proposed the upward migration of a mixture of Fe-rich brine and hydrothermal fluid through marine sediments as the origin of the Bakchar ironstone deposit.

10h

Description of rotating molecules made easy

Feynman diagrams are applied in condensed matter physics. By turning highly complex equations into sets of simple diagrams, the method has established itself as one of the sharpest tools in a theoretical physicist's toolbox. Giacomo Bighin, a postdoc in the group of Mikhail Lemeshko at the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (IST Austria), has now extended the Feynman diagram technique. Or

10h

Looking at molecules from two sides with table-top femtosecond soft-X-rays

X-ray spectroscopy provides direct access into the nature of chemical bonds, from which the outcome of chemical reactions can be understood. Thus, researchers are exploring both X-ray source development and the implementation of new measurement methods. Researchers at the Max Born Institute for Nonlinear Optics and Short Pulse Spectroscopy (MBI) have now successfully combined a table-top laser-bas

10h

Drones Used to Find Toy-Like "Butterfly" Land Mines

Quadcopters with thermal imagery cameras can help detect vicious mini-mines that often kill or maim children — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

10h

Chilling discovery: ice house found under London street

Cavernous 18th-century store reveals link to lost trade in ice blocks from Norwegian fjord For the well to-do residents of Georgian London, serving chilled drinks at a festive party was a more complicated process than today. In the absence of electricity to make ice cubes and keep them frozen, they had to source their ice from elsewhere. For the most discerning hosts, that meant using blocks of p

10h

Trump Leaves Israel in the Lurch

Ask Israelis what they appreciate about President Donald Trump, and they can tick off a substantial list: the long-sought move of the U.S. embassy to Jerusalem; the abandonment of the much-maligned Iran nuclear deal; the lack of pressure (so far) on Israel to curtail settlement expansion or make concessions to the Palestinians; and the absence of tensions with Israel’s leaders, which plagued the

11h

Jamal Khashoggi's Murder Remains a Mystery

The murder of Jamal Khashoggi is not a game of Clue, but it often resembles one. Maher Abdulaziz Mutreb, in the annex, with a syringe . Or was it Salah al-Tubaigy, in the consul’s office, with a bone saw ? About three months have passed since Khashoggi walked into the consulate in Istanbul, and nearly as much time has passed since Saudi Arabia confirmed—after a period of flailing attempts at deni

11h

The 18 Best Breakouts of 2018

Editor’s Note : Find all of The Atlantic ’s “Best of 2018” coverage here . Among the watershed cultural moments of 2018, Americans can count plenty of tearjerkers: the addictively heartwarming makeover magic of Queer Eye , say, or the squeal-worthy teen romance that gave the actor Lana Condor her first lead role. Some artists, such as the comedian Hannah Gadsby and the performer Mj Rodriguez, mad

11h

A New Book Describes Hunter S. Thompson’s Prescience

If Hunter S. Thompson were still alive—if the so-called Gonzo journalist hadn’t killed himself in 2005, his ashes subsequently propelled from a cannon in a ceremony financed by Johnny Depp—the odds are high that he’d be linking Donald Trump to “that dark, venal and incurably violent side of the American character,” and contending that Trump “speaks for the Werewolf in us.” That’s how Thompson rep

11h

What will be the big science stories of 2019? Here are our predictions

From black hole insights to the future of self-driving cars to figuring out what it means to be human, 2019 will be a big year in science.

11h

How to spot high-conflict people before it's too late

Here's a fast fact about high-conflict people: life is better when you avoid them. Bill Eddy, mediation expert and president of the High Conflict Institute, describes them not only as difficult but also potentially dangerous. So how can we avoid becoming a target in their path of destruction? First, you have to be able to recognize them, says Eddy. They tend to share these four key characteristic

11h

Kæmpe Mars-krater er fyldt med to kilometer tyk is

ESA-sonden Mars Express har sendt unikke billeder hjem af det 82 kilometer brede Korolev-krater, der gemmer på et massivt islag, der fastholdes af kold luft.

11h

Første Boeing-737 færdiggjort på kinesisk fabrik

Nu har den amerikanske flyproducent Boeing ligesom sin europæiske konkurrent Airbus et produktionsanlæg i Kina.

11h

Ballade på Instagram: Kontroversiel opdatering var en fejl

Opdateringen, der ramte flere danskere, ændrede hele feedet på Instagram. Chefen for Instagram siger i tweet, at det var en fejl.

12h

Ny terrænmodel skal lette vedligeholdelsen af danske veje

Geodata over det danske motorvejsnet skal give Vejdirektoratet et praj om, hvor der er behov for rabatsanering.

12h

Weather hampers efforts to inspect Indonesia tsunami volcano

Bad weather and a massive ash column hampered efforts to assess whether Indonesia's Anak Krakatau volcano island could trigger another deadly tsunami as authorities said Friday the search for victims in the worst-affected province will continue into January.

13h

Reliable tropical weather pattern to change in a warming climate

Every month or two, a massive pulse of clouds, rainfall and wind moves eastward around the Earth near the equator, providing the tropics their famous thunderstorms.

13h

A high-carb diet may lead to brain inflammation, says Dr. David Perlmutter

The re-release of David Perlmutter's Grain Brain continues the doctor's plight against high-carbohydrate diets. Perlmutter believes excess carbohydrates and gluten can lead to anxiety, depression, and Alzheimer's disease. A half-decade of research on brain health and the microbiome backs up Perlmutter's argument. None Sustainability and prevention are counterintuitive to human biology, which like

13h

Top 5 Real UFO sightings 2018-Alien Disclosure?

submitted by /u/wow890 [link] [comments]

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Australia swelters in record-breaking heatwave

Australia's vast continent is sizzling through extreme heatwave conditions this week, with temperatures reaching record highs and emergency services on high alert for bushfires.

13h

Army looks for a few good robots, sparks industry battle

The Army is looking for a few good robots. Not to fight—not yet, at least—but to help the men and women who do.

13h

'All lives matter': Indonesia saves tsunami-stranded turtles

Searching a debris-strewn beach for victims of Indonesia's deadly tsunami, a rescue team happened upon a giant sea turtle trapped in a pile of marine trash.

13h

Nancy Grace Roman, involved with Hubble telescope, dies

Nancy Grace Roman, the first woman to hold an executive position at NASA and who helped with development of the Hubble Space Telescope, has died.

13h

After naloxone, when can opioid overdose patients be safely discharged?

Naloxone has saved thousands of lives. But can patients be safely discharged from the Emergency Department (ED) just an hour after they receive the medication that curtails drug overdoses? A UB study is the first to clinically assess the one-hour rule.

13h

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