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Nyheder2018december30

In 1983, Isaac Asimov predicted the world of 2019. Here's what he got right (and wrong).

In 1983, the Toronto Star asked science fiction writer Isaac Asimov to predict what the world would be like in 2019. His predictions about computerization were mostly accurate, though some of his forecasts about education and space utilization were overly optimistic. Asimov's predictions highlight just how difficult it is to predict the future of technology. None Isaac Asimov was one the world's

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Galapagosøerne forbyder fyrværkeri for at beskytte dyrelivet

Det vil fremover ikke være lovligt at importere, sælge, distribuere eller bruge fyrværkeri på Galapagosøerne.

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Fynsk pilotanlæg skal producere fremtidens grønne råstof fra biogas og brint

Projektet, som netop har fået 16,6 mio. kr. i støtte fra EUDP, skal booste overskydende CO2 fra biogasproduktionen med brint fra vindmøllestrøm ved hjælp af en ny, biologisk metode.

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Tysk virksomhed vil erstatte bilmotorens tændrør med mikrobølger

Ved at bruge mikrobølgeantænding i stedet for tændrør kan både brændstofforbrug og udledninger fra forbrændingsmotoren reduceres, mener et tysk virksomhed. Muligheden for integration i eksisterende motorer har fanget bilindustriens interesse.

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UK invests millions in micro-robots able to work in dangerous sites

Devices could be deployed in underground pipe networks, reducing need for roadworks The UK government is investing millions in the development of micro-robots designed to work in underground pipe networks and dangerous sites such as decommissioned nuclear facilities. The ambition is for the robots, developed in British universities, to mark the end of disruptive and expensive roadworks by carryin

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Ebola-fighting human protein offers hope for new drugs

A human protein that helps fight the Ebola virus could one day lead to an effective therapy against the deadly disease, researchers say. The newly discovered ability of the human protein RBBP6 to interfere with Ebola virus replication suggests new ways to fight the infection. As viruses develop and evolve proteins to bypass the body’s immune defenses, human cells in turn develop defense mechanism

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Stardust’s origins are more complex than we thought

New research brings scientists closer to solving a long-standing mystery about the origins of stardust. Everything around you—your desk, your laptop, your coffee cup—in fact, even you—is made of stardust, the stuff forged in the fiery furnaces of stars that died before our sun was born. When stars die, they seed the cosmos around them with the elements that go on to coalesce into new stars, plane

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Physicists puzzled by strange numbers that could explain reality

Physicists discover complex numbers called octonions that work in 8 dimensions. The numbers have been found linked to fundamental forces of reality. Understanding octonions can lead to a new model of physics. None Is our reality, including its forces and particles, based on the strange properties of numbers with eight dimensions called " octonions "? A physicist thinks so, having found a way to e

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A Former General’s New Broadside Against President Trump

Stanley McChrystal has a history of speaking plainly about American presidents and their leadership. His military career ended in 2010 after a Rolling Stone profile quoted him and his aides as criticizing Obama-administration officials, mocking the civilian leaders and painting them as indecisive. McChrystal quickly offered his resignation, which President Barack Obama accepted. But while the ret

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How to Memorize the Largest Known Prime

It may seem daunting to memorize a 24-million digit number, but with these tips you'll be well on your way — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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New global migration estimates show rates steady since 1990, high return migration

Scientists have unveiled a new statistical method for estimating migration flows between countries. Using the so-called pseudo-Bayes approach, they show that rates of migration are higher than previously thought, but also relatively stable, fluctuating between 1.1 and 1.3 percent of global population from 1990 to 2015. In addition, since 1990 approximately 45 percent of migrants have returned to t

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How 'Dry January' is the secret to better sleep, saving money and losing weight

New research shows that taking part in Dry January sees people regaining control of their drinking, having more energy, better skin and losing weight. They also report drinking less months later.

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Proportion of cancers associated with excess body weight varies considerably by state

A new study finds an at least 1.5-fold difference in the share of cancers related to obesity between states with the highest and lowest proportions.

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A boundary dance of amyloid-beta stepping into dementia

Alzheimer's disease is caused by aggregates of amyloid-beta peptides. This aggregation is accelerated at a cell membrane surface. The research group at ExCELLS revealed the reason of this phenomenon by molecular dynamics simulations and NMR experiments. m

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Making Connections with the STEM Learning Ecosystems Initiative

Building a national community of practice — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Moderate drinking not harmful for older patients with heart failure, study suggests

A new study suggests that people over age 65 who are newly diagnosed with heart failure can continue to drink moderate amounts of alcohol without worsening their condition. However, the findings do not suggest that nondrinkers should start imbibing after a heart failure diagnosis, the researchers emphasized.

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2019 Preview: Experimental vaccine could let coeliacs eat gluten

A vaccine that teaches a person's immune system to see gluten as harmless could enable some people with coeliac disease to eat bread and pasta made from wheat

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The Best Tech Quotes of the Year

Fourteen memorable lines, from an ethicist ruing the use of CRISPR to edit a baby's genes, to Elon Musk's "plan" to take Tesla private.

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Fra kedeligt til cool: Kødbakker med genanvendt plast

Den danske plastindustri er inde i en rivende udvikling med ønsket om at blive førende inden for cirkulær plastemballage.

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Letter: How to Stop Brain Drain on Indian Reservations

The Blackfeet Brain Drain After leaving to pursue an education, Sterling HolyWhiteMountain wrote in November , some Native Americans find themselves stuck between a longing to help their community and the lack of viable employment back home. “A ll too often,” he observed, “success for reservation Indians means leaving your heart in your homeland.” I would like to add to Sterling HolyWhiteMountain

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Best Video Games (2018): *God of War*, *Spider-Man*, and More

Indies and blockbusters, exclusives and multiplatform delights, these are the 10 standouts of the year.

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Going Viral: 6 New Findings about Viruses

Viruses were discovered in 1892, and yet even in 2018, researchers are still uncovering new secrets about these infectious invaders.

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100 Best Science Photos of 2018

Science can be stunning, and it did not disappoint in 2018.

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In Case You Missed It

Top news from around the world — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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10 Times Animals Behaved Oddly in 2018

Animals can get really weird. Here are our favorite examples from 2018.

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83 Things That Blew Our Minds in 2018

Most “Himalayan” pink salt is from the Punjab area of Pakistan, not the actual Himalayas. Hippos poop so much that sometimes all the fish die . In addition to the supermassive black hole at its center, the Milky Way galaxy may be home to thousands of smaller black holes , invisible to even our finest scientific instruments. There’s a parasitic fungus that doses cicadas with the hallucinogen found

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Nancy Grace Roman, 'Mother Of Hubble' Space Telescope, Has Died, At Age 93

Roman was one of the first female executives at NASA, its first chief of astronomy and she played an instrumental role in making the Hubble Space Telescope a reality. She died on Dec. 25. (Image credit: Courtesy of NASA)

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The Best Music Moments of 2018

From Robyn to "This Is America," it was a good year for music. Thank u, next.

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The animal economists that can wheel and deal as well as any human

From monkey markets to fishy business, we’re finding that many animals make rational trades. Even brainless fungi have a thing or two to teach us

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The Mysterious Conversation That Creates an Obsession in Burning

The Atlantic ’s “And, Scene” series delves into some of the most interesting films of the year by examining a single, noteworthy cinematic moment from 2018. Next up is Lee Chang-dong’s Burning . (Read our previous entries here .) “My father has an anger disorder. He has rage bottled up inside of him. It goes off like a bomb. Once it goes off, everything is destroyed.” So begins a confession of so

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Civil Discourse Exists in This Small Corner of the Internet

Imagine a place on the internet where a post that begins with “I’m not a feminist” is met with comments quoting Virginia Woolf and asking serious, clarifying questions. A place where a conversation about gun-control legislation unfurls into a thread of analogies, statistics, and self-reflection; where a discussion on the benefits and drawbacks of immigration is carried out in a series of building

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The Most Dangerous People on the Internet in 2018: Trump, Zuck and More

From Donald Trump to Russian hackers, these are the most dangerous characters we've been watching online in 2018.

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2018 Was the Year of the Scooter. What Happens Now?

After the mania comes the grind.

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This Year SpaceX Made Us All Believe in Reusable Rockets

A few small glitches marred an otherwise stellar year as SpaceX honed its reusable rocket technology.

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Kender du disse nye ord fra 2018?

PLUS. Kan du definere ‘gig økonomi’, eller har du brug for en ‘digital detox’? Ellers kan du læse med her og få opdateret dit ordforråd med ni af årets buzzwords.

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Tarmen: 8 meter langt organ manipulerer dit helbred

Starter autisme i tarmen? Og kan man spise sig rask med donor-afføring? Nyere forskning viser, at tarmbakterier og helbred går hånd i hånd. Her får du fem eksempler.

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Michio Kaku: Let’s not advertise our existence to aliens

If advanced alien civilizations do exist, theoretical physicist Michio Kaku asks: Why would they want anything to do with us? It would be like an academic talking to a squirrel, he suggests, and he has a great point. Hollywood and science fiction novels have conditioned us for years to believe that aliens either want to hang out on our intellectual level and learn from us… or destroy us. If ali

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No Peace for Them and No Honor for Us

Nothing in the presidency of Donald Trump combines tragedy and farce so perfectly as his decision to withdraw the 2,000 American troops in Syria. “We have defeated ISIS in Syria, my only reason for being there during the Trump Presidency,” he tweeted on the morning of December 19. The claim was false on its face. The Islamic State has lost most of its territory, but it retains thousands of fighte

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Reflections on a Year of Outrage

As New Year’s Day approaches, I’ve been looking back and pondering the almost constant expressions of outrage that characterized another year. “The same cycle occurs regardless of the gravity of the offense, which can make each outrage feel forgettable, replaceable,” the former Slate editor Julia Turner declared . “The bottomlessness of our rage has a numbing effect … It’s fascinating to look at

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Get live updates on New Horizons’ flyby of a distant Kuiper Belt object

The New Horizons spacecraft is ready for the most distant close flyby of a rocky object in the solar system, a rocky body called MU69 or Ultima Thule.

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How to get fit without busting a gut

Modern high-intensity workouts are seductively short – but do they offer the same life-extending benefits as established exercise regimes? Is it boom time for the fitness business? One in seven people in the UK is believed to be a member of a gym, 2018 saw the number of gyms exceed 7,000 for the first time, and by 2022 the private health and fitness club market alone is predicted to be worth a who

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Nasa's New Horizons: Final commands given to distant probe

Nasa's New Horizons spacecraft is all set for its dramatic encounter with a far-off icy world.

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A Journey Into the Solar System’s Outer Reaches, Seeking New Worlds to Explore

NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft will visit a tiny and mysterious object in the Kuiper belt on Tuesday, seeking clues to the formation of our cosmic neighborhood.

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Elon Musk wants testers for Tesla’s long-awaited ‘full self-driving’ A.I. chip

Elon Musk is looking for a few hundred more people to test and provide feedback about Tesla's long-awaited Hardware 3 update, according to an internal company message. Hardware 3, first announced in August, will likely expand the autonomous abilities of Tesla cars. It's still unclear just what those expanded capabilities will be, however. None Tesla CEO Elon Musk wants "a few hundred" more people

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‘For 30 years I’ve been obsessed by why children get leukaemia. Now we have an answer’

Newly knighted cancer scientist Mel Greaves explains why a cocktail of microbes could give protection against disease Mel Greaves has a simple goal in life. He is trying to create a yoghurt-like drink that would stop children from developing leukaemia. The idea might seem eccentric; cancers are not usually defeated so simply. However, Professor Greaves is confident and, given his experience in th

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China's top court to handle intellectual property appeals

China's top court will rule on intellectual property cases for the first time from January 1, the government said, elevating the handling of an issue that has become a key complaint in the trade war with the US.

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Iran sees 'revival' of imperilled Lake Urmia

It is one of the worst ecological disasters of recent decades, but the shrinking of Iran's great Lake Urmia finally appears to be stabilising and officials see the start of a revival.

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French start-up offers 'dark web' compass, but not for everyone

For years criminal websites shrouded in secrecy have thrived beyond the reach of traditional search engines, but a group of French engineers has found a way to navigate this dark web—a tool they don't want to fall into the wrong hands.

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Computer virus hits Tribune Publishing, Los Angeles Times

A computer virus hit newspaper printing plants in Los Angeles and at Tribune Publishing newspapers across the country.

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Bali's Agung volcano spews ash in fresh eruption

A volcano on the Indonesian holiday island of Bali erupted Sunday, belching ash high into the air and over nearby villages as officials warned tourists to keep clear of the area.

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Social media has made Gen Z less engaged in the classroom, says math lecturer Clio Cresswell

Mathematics lecturer noticed the changes in her students after returning to teaching after a five-year break. She says her students are noticeably less engaged, increasingly on their smartphones or computers, and ask more "stupid questions." A batch of results from an ongoing National Institutes of Health study recently showed alarming results about the impacts that screen use has on developing b

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Capt Lou Rudd is first Briton to cross Antarctic unaided

A British Army officer has become the second person ever to trek unaided across Antarctica.

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Atjuiu! På med halstørklædet: Gør kulden dig syg?

Når det er koldt, skal du tage godt med tøj på, siger et gammelt råd. Men holder du influenzaen væk, når du pakker dig ind i varmt tøj? Videnskaben klær dig på til vinterens minusgrader.

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Intellectual activity and dementia: It's more of a help than a cure.

A remarkable seven-decade cognition studied 498 people from Scotland. People who test well as children retain that ranking through life. Study finds remaining engaged has no effect on the trajectory of dementia's "cognitive burden." All of them were born in Scotland in 1936. And according to the Scottish Council for Research in Education archives, all of them took the same intelligence test on Ju

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Turn Xmas Tree Into Food and Medicine

Pine needles can easily be broken down into sugars, as well as the building blocks of paint, adhesives and medicines. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Endangered Species Observers Have Spotted The First Right Whale Calf Of The Season

The sighting is a glimmer of hope for a species that has seen a hard few years: 19 right whales died in 2017 and 2018, and not a single North American right whale calf was seen last season. (Image credit: Michael Dwyer/AP)

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Fake news is everywhere. Even in places that were once legitimate.

The South China Morning Post is a respected paper with a long and noble history that has recently made more than a few missteps. Critics of the paper allege that it has fallen into the hands of Beijing and is now little more than a propaganda outlet. The use of a legitimate news source to peddle propaganda is nothing new, but it may be the shape of things to come. We are awash in fake news. It ju

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Through an encrypted digital ID, Estonians can access about 99% of public services online

A new report from The Associated Press outlines Estonia's most recent advancements in its digital government. Estonia allows its citizens to vote, obtains medical data and register business documents online. Given security concerns and other complications, it remains unclear whether nations like the U.S. could implement similar systems. None It's easier than ever to order goods and access informa

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The Treatment Gap: In Rehab, ‘Two Warring Factions’: Abstinence vs. Medication

A reluctant evolution is taking place in residential drug treatment for opioid addiction. Here’s a look at one center’s wary shift.

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Earthquake Off Philippine Coast Hits A Region Already On High Alert

U.S. Geological Survey says it was magnitude 7.0. No casualties have been reported. On Dec. 22, a tsunami, likely caused by the volcano Anak Krakatau, hit Indonesia and killed about 430 people. (Image credit: Fauzy Chaniago/AP)

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Astrobiology Highlights of 2018

A very incomplete list of contributions furthering our search for life elsewhere (and other stuff) — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Right whale calf, mother spotted in Atlantic off Florida

Florida conservationists are reporting a right whale calf sighting off the state's Atlantic coast.

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2019 Preview: Gravitational waves will be discovered every few weeks

The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) and other experiments will detect dozens more ripples in space time

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All about Ultima: New Horizons flyby target is unlike anything explored in space

NASA's New Horizons spacecraft is set to fly by a target nicknamed 'Ultima Thule,' 4 billion miles from the Sun, on New Year's Day 2019. No spacecraft has ever explored such a distant world.

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Scientists think they've found a super-Earth exoplanet dripping with sapphires and rubies

Space The right kind of chemistry can lead to some strange sorts of worlds. The right kind of chemistry can lead to some strange sorts of worlds.

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How to talk to your children about sex

It’s no easy task for parents, but there are ways to start this crucial conversation “If you had a question about sex, where would you go?” I ask my 12-year-old daughter, Orla. She doesn’t look up from her phone. “I’d ask online,” she deadpans. “then delete my browser history.” “You wouldn’t come to me?” I venture, worried, hurt, amused and (a tiny part) relieved. “Mum, if I asked you about sex,

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Best Space Photos of 2018, From Penguins to Selfies on Mars

We’re paying homage to the year’s highlights, especially the InSight Mars landing.

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What happens in the minds of free climbers

Science Studying the brains of daredevils like Alex Honnold. Neuroscientist Jane Joseph was using MRI scans to study thrill-seekers' brains. Then a journalist suggested she look at free-solo climber Alex Honnold.

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Jocelyn Bell Burnell and the Discovery of Pulsars

Jocelyn Bell Burnell discovered pulsars (a specific type of neutron star) and got zero credit for it until recently. Here's her story — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Video: Togene venter på Danmarks nye signalsystem

Den landsdækkende udrulning af det digitale signalsystem ERTMS bliver forsinket med ni år. Ingeniøren har taget turen mellem Aarhus og Viborg, hvor togene er ombygget til det nye system, men må køre efter de gamle signaler i flere år endnu.

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George R. R. Martin Didn't Work on 'Nightflyers.' It Shows

Syfy's new series doesn't reflect the influence of the man who wrote the novella on which it's based.

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The Timeless Bliss of Eating Hometown Food

A four-hour wait is nothing in the face of nostalgia. When Matt Fligiel learned in 2013 that the future of Blimpyburger was in jeopardy, he knew he had to savor one last meal at the local institution before it closed. “They said they were going to reopen, but nobody actually believed them,” said the 24-year-old native of Ann Arbor, Michigan, who now lives in Chicago. “I waited with two of my frie

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Readers Respond to the September 2018 Issue

Letters to the editor from the September 2018 issue of Scientific American — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Space Oddity: 10 Bizarre Things Earthlings Launched into Space in 2018

This past year, engineers launched many oddities into space, including a Tesla Roadster, a gold-plated canopic jar and a cosmic disco ball.

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9 Times Nature Was Totes Adorbs in 2018

2018 was rough. You've earned a little cuteness, don't you think?

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The Real Fake News: Top Scientific Retractions of 2018

From unintentional irony to flat-out fraud, it has been another banner year for scientific retractions. Here are five notable ones.

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How Environmental Policies Fared In Trump's Cross Hairs In 2018

NPR's Debbie Elliott asks Bloomberg energy reporter Jennifer Dlouhy about the Trump administration's moves to weaken environmental regulations this past year.

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DNA fra fortidens mennesker skal afsløre hemmelighederne bag psykiske lidelser

Nyt forskningsprojekt skal kortlægge DNA fra tusindvis af gamle skeletter for at skaffe ny viden om lidelser som Alzheimers og skizofreni.

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How President Woodrow Wilson tried to end all wars once and for all

President Wilson proposed "Fourteen Points" at the end of World War I. He wanted an organization created – the League of Nations – to settle international disputes. The League was a precursor to the United Nations, but the U.S. never actually joined it. None Coming out of the horrendous calamity of World War I, Woodrow Wilson , the 28th President of the United States, developed a vision for an in

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Nature’s Nation: Art benefits from getting its hands dirty

Forty-eight years on from the first Earth Day, the 5th article in our 12 Days of Culture series examines the long-term impact of environmental art

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The Best of the Physics arXiv (week ending December 29, 2018)

This week’s most thought-provoking papers from the Physics arXiv.

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Bell’s V-280 Valor Tiltrotor Flies Through a Year of Testing

The V-22 Osprey-inspired aircraft, bidding to replace the Army's Black Hawk helicopter, has spent the past 12 months bagging a series of milestones.

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Going Dumb: My Year With a Flip Phone

The upsides of a downgrade.

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Chinese firms offer subsidies on Huawei phones in show of support

Chinese firms are encouraging staff to buy Huawei smartphones following Canada's arrest of a top Huawei executive on a US extradition request, which has triggered an outpouring of nationalist support.

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Austria to press ahead with digital tax: chancellor

Austrian Chancellor Sebastian Kurz vowed Saturday to press ahead with a tax on large internet and technology companies, following France's example, as the European Union struggles to finalise a new EU-wide levy.

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Death rays: How the dream of an ultimate weapon became a dark farce

The quest for the ultimate destructive weapon is a convoluted story of egos, charlatanry and deception – with a starring role for mercurial genius Nikola Tesla

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How To Help Kids Overcome Their Fear Of Doctors And Shots

Half of the parents of young children in a recent survey said their kids fear going to the doctor. Some admit skipping vaccines and needed appointments. Here's how to nip medical anxiety in the bud. (Image credit: Ryan Johnson for NPR)

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A Star Is Born Finds Movie Magic in a Parking Lot

Over the next week, The Atlantic ’s “And, Scene” series will delve into some of the most interesting films of the year by examining a single, noteworthy cinematic moment from 2018. Next up is Bradley Cooper’s A Star Is Born . (Read our previous entries here .) By the time Ally (played by Lady Gaga) and Jackson Maine (Bradley Cooper) are sitting together in an empty parking lot in the middle of th

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The Making of a Trade Warrior

At his confirmation hearing s for the position of U.S. trade representative, Robert Lighthizer, the nation’s chief trade negotiator, promised to fight for all of America’s great industries. Yes, he acknowledged, he had built his three-decade career by lobbying for the steel industry. But he was ready, he said, to make the world safe again for good old-fashioned American capitalism, in all its for

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The Bipartisan Group That’s Not Afraid of Partisanship

C ARY, N.C. —One Saturday morning this past fall, a handful of progressive voters were seated in a neat circle, pondering why more people don’t agree with their preferred policy solutions for the country. This kind of hand-wringing has been common among Democratic voters since the 2016 election, especially in liberal enclaves (like urban Wake County, where Cary is located) in red states (like Nor

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2018 Tech in Memoriam: Goodbye to the iPhone SE, Google+, and More

Pour one out for this year's tech casualties.

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California Could Soon Have Its Own Version of the Internet

In 2018, the state reimposed net neutrality, established a privacy regime, and set bot rules. Will the moves splinter the net, or will others follow?

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The Year in Robots (2018): Boston Dynamics, Baxter, and More

Look back on the biggest moments in robotics in 2018, from the continued ascendance of SpotMini to the rapid rise and fall of the home robot.

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All the reasons 2018 was a breakout year for DNA data

Gene information on millions of people is revolutionizing how we predict disease, catch criminals, and find new drugs.

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Bored at work? Your brain is trying to tell you something.

We've all been bored on the job at least once in our lives, but that boredom is actually very old human wiring. We constantly seek out new information to keep our minds sharp, and when tasks get repetitive we get bored and move on. But what if you can't move on? What if the tasks are your job and you have to repeat them day after day to keep a roof over your head? That, says London Business Schoo

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A Troubling Pattern of Personal Diplomacy

President Donald Trump’s decision to quickly withdraw troops from Syria has sparked deep concern about an Islamic State revival, Iranian gains, and a Turkish attack on America’s Kurdish allies. For months, in both public and private, top aides—including Trump’s national-security adviser, his special envoy for the ISIS coalition, and his special representative for Syria—had all insisted that Ameri

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Fighting Nazis for a Living

In 1970, crosstown busing came to Richmond, Virginia. Richard Cohen, then only a teenager, persuaded his parents to let him attend an integrated public school instead of private school. He ended up leaving high school a year early to begin college at Columbia University, where he studied philosophy. Cohen, now the president of the Southern Poverty Law Center, worked in private law for seven years

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Police diver adopts dog rescued from icy lake

A puppy was saved from a frozen lake by a police diver in Turkey.

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Strong quake off Philippines prompts panic, tsunami warning (Update)

A powerful undersea earthquake struck off the southern Philippines on Saturday, prompting people to scramble out of shopping malls and buildings and authorities to warn villagers to stay away from beaches in case of a tsunami.

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US investigating CenturyLink internet outage, 911 failures

U.S. officials and at least one state said Friday that they have started investigations into a nationwide CenturyLink internet outage that has disrupted 911 service.

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Indonesian tsunami volcano lost two-thirds of its height

The Indonesian volcano which caused a tsunami that killed more than 400 people last week lost more than two-thirds of its height following the eruption which triggered the killer waves.

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Disse artikler fik debattørerne op i det røde felt

Elvarme-afgift, FM-sluk, fjernvarme og ph-værdien i verdenshavene. Det var emner, der fik fyret godt op under debatten på ing.dk. Her er en top-20 over de artikler, der fik flest debattører til tasterne i det forløbne år.

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10 vigtige opdagelser videnskaben stod bag i 2018

Hvert år bliver vi klogere. Og videnskaben har i år fundet svar på både skøre, mærkelige og virkelig vigtige dele af vores verden. DR Videnskab har samlet årets største bedrifter.

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Anak Krakatau: Indonesian volcano's dramatic collapse

Satellite images indicate Anak Krakatau lost over two-thirds of its height and volume when it erupted.

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The Atlantic Daily: Finding a Way to 2019

What We’re Following The partial U.S.-government shutdown continues, while the House Democrats push forward with the establishment of a Climate Crisis Committee—to the disappointment of some activists on the party’s left, who’d hoped for a more ambitious mandate. Still at loose ends is the fallout over the Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi’s murder , the geopolitical impact—or lack thereof—of the

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Fireworks banned on the Galapagos to protect wildlife

Authorities in Ecuador say animals suffered elevated heart rates and anxiety after pyrotechnic shows.

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Researchers develop 128Mb STT-MRAM with world's fastest write speed for embedded memory

A research team has successfully developed 128Mb-density STT-MRAM (spin-transfer torque magnetoresistive random access memory) with a write speed of 14 ns for use in embedded memory applications, such as cache in IOT and AI. This is currently the world's fastest write speed for embedded memory application with a density over 100Mb and will pave the way for the mass-production of large capacity STT

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Rerouting nerves during amputation reduces phantom limb pain before it starts

Doctors have found that a surgery to reroute amputated nerves, called targeted muscle reinnervation, or TMR, can reduce or prevent phantom or residual limb pain from ever occurring in amputee patients who receive the procedure at the time of amputation.

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Our universe: An expanding bubble in an extra dimension

Researchers have devised a new model for the universe — one that may solve the enigma of dark energy. Their new article proposes a new structural concept, including dark energy, for a universe that rides on an expanding bubble in an additional dimension.

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Marine debris study counts trash from Texas to Florida

Trash, particularly plastic, in the ocean and along the shoreline is an economic, environmental, human health, and aesthetic problem causing serious challenges to coastal communities around the world, including the Gulf of Mexico.

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Breaking down AGEs: Insight into how lifestyle drives ER-positive breast cancer

Consumption of processed foods high in sugar and fat increase levels of advanced glycation end products (AGEs). Researchers report that AGE levels are higher in patients with estrogen receptor (ER)-positive than ER-negative breast cancer. Addition of AGEs caused breast cancer cells, whose growth had previously been controlled by tamoxifen, to begin to grow again. This suggests that patients with h

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Reliable tropical weather pattern to change in a warming climate

As human activities cause the Earth's temperature to increase, reliable, well-studied weather patterns like the Madden-Julian Oscillation will change too, say researchers.

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Sugar-sweetened beverage pattern linked to higher kidney disease risk

In a study of African-American men and women with normal kidney function, a pattern of higher collective consumption of soda, sweetened fruit drinks, and water was associated with a higher risk of developing kidney disease.

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After naloxone, when can opioid overdose patients be safely discharged?

Naloxone has saved thousands of lives. But can patients be safely discharged from the Emergency Department (ED) just an hour after they receive the medication that curtails drug overdoses? A new study is the first to clinically assess the one-hour rule.

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These nine measures reveal how forests are controlled by climate

One of the first studies to examine how climate is influencing functional traits in forest communities on a global scale found evidence of major changes.

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Pine needles from Christmas trees could be turned into paint and food sweeteners

Abandoned Christmas trees could be saved from landfill and turned into paint and food sweeteners according to new research.

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How the brain enables us to rapidly focus attention

Researchers have discovered a key mechanism in the brain that may underlie our ability to rapidly focus attention. Our brains are continuously bombarded with information from the senses, yet our level of vigilance to such input varies, allowing us to selectively focus on one conversation and not another.

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Fish bones yield new tool for tracking coal ash contamination

A new study shows that trace elements found in fish ear bones can be used as biogenic tracers to track coal ash contamination. Strontium isotope ratios in the otoliths of fish collected from two lakes that received coal ash effluents matched strontium isotope ratios in contaminated pore water samples from the lakes' bottoms. This marks the first time strontium isotope ratios have been used as fing

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New insight on how memory works

Researchers have explored how memory is tied to the hippocampus, with findings that will expand scientists' understanding of how memory works and ideally aid in detection, prevention, and treatment of memory disorders.

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Kicking, yelling during sleep? Study finds risk factors for violent sleep disorder

Taking antidepressants for depression, having post-traumatic stress disorder or anxiety diagnosed by a doctor are risk factors for a disruptive and sometimes violent sleep disorder called rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder. The study also found men are more likely to have the disorder.

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Researchers use 'blacklist' computing concept as novel way to streamline genetic analysis

Researchers have discovered a new use for a long-standing computational concept known as 'blacklisting.' Using blacklisting as a filter to single out genetic variations in patient genomes and exomes that do not cause illness, researchers have successfully streamlined the identification of genetic drivers of disease.

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Trump EPA orders rollback of Obama mercury regulations (Update)

The Trump administration has targeted an Obama-era regulation credited with helping dramatically reduce toxic mercury pollution from coal-fired power plants, saying the benefits to human health and the environment may not be worth the cost of the regulation.

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