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Nyheder2018januar27

Live Science1K
Killer Color: Dog's Life Endangered by Human Hair DyeA dog suffered life-threatening injuries after its fur was colored with human hair dye.
11h
Ingeniøren100+
Lille Læsø-firma borer sig ind til containerbrandeEt lille udviklingsfirma fra Læsø har fundet en metode, der kan slukke containerbrande i betryggende afstand – også når det gælder containerne i højden.
13h
Science | The Guardian
The Observer view on cloning | Observer editorialPictures of the first two cloned primates have caused deep unease. But the idea of making exact copies of deceased humans remains a delusion With their huge eyes and spindly limbs, the two cloned macaque monkeys, whose births in China were announced last week, made irresistible front page fodder. Created by scientists at the Institute of Neuroscience in Shanghai, the animals, Hua Hua and Zhong Zho
22min

LATEST

Big Think49
What Western people stand to gain from squatting more oftenWhat is the what about the squat? And have we reached some sort of squatting vogue moment? Read More
1h
Big Think4
How does the brain process curiosity?Have you ever been curious about how curiosity works? Read More
1h
The Atlantic100+
The Fire That Fueled the Iran ProtestsA new kind of anger has engulfed the Islamic Republic. On December 28, 2017, a small street protest over high prices in the city of Mashhad rapidly spilled over into some 85 cities and provincial towns. The crowds decried joblessness, uncertain livelihood and oppressive rule, with a few invoking Reza Shah, the Persian king who is credited for modernizing Iran in the 1930s. Meanwhile, President Do
3h
Scientific American Content: Global26
A Stunning Ultraviolet and Infrared VenusProcessed images from the Akatsuki spacecraft reveal beautiful details of this strange world — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
4h
Big Think100+
Corporate buybacks: Have you heard about this trillion dollar Ponzi scheme?Few know about the trillion dollar crime that stole pay raises while weakening our economy. The “lootocrats” and their courtiers are taking us for a ride. Read More
4h
The Atlantic500+
Trump's State of the Union Will Be an Economic Victory LapAs readers of his Twitter feed are well aware, President Trump firmly believes his first year in office has unleashed an economic boom fueled by the deregulation of business and the promise of tax cuts that Republicans in Congress delivered on last month. On Tuesday night, Trump plans to use his State of the Union address to make sure he gets the credit for it. A highlight reel of accomplishments
5h
Viden4
Menneskeskabte forhindringer gør vilde dyr dovneByer, veje og landbrugsjord får vilde dyr til at bevæge sig markant mindre end ellers, viser GPS-overvågning.
6h
NYT > Science93
Trilobites: A Suitcase-Size Satellite’s Big Image of Frozen Earth BelowA new image of Alaska from the recently launched Iceye satellite shows how much you can accomplish with a tiny satellite.
6h
Scientific American Content: Global200+
Is Science Infinite?Science will never tell us who we really are, and that is why it will last forever — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
7h
cognitive science1
Open-sourcing Psychlab | DeepMindsubmitted by /u/inquilinekea [link] [comments]
8h
Feed: All Latest84
Space Photos of the Week: Martian Dust Is Perfect for Smoothing Out Those WrinklesA dust storm predicted for 2018 could change the face of the Red Planet.
8h
Viden
10 gamle mænd har et trænings-trick, du ikke kan købe for pengeBootcamps lover at kickstarte din sundhed, men der skal sammenhold til, hvis du vil have et sundt liv.
8h
The Atlantic200+
Can the Taliban Be Stopped?Authorities in Afghanistan said at least 95 people were killed and about 158 others wounded on Saturday after Taliban militants drove an ambulance filled with explosives past a police checkpoint in Kabul and detonated the vehicle on a crowded street open mainly to government workers. Authorities expected the death toll to increase as more victims were being brought to hospitals in the Afghan capi
8h
Ingeniøren3
Virksomheds-ledere tror på bedre tiderDer er udsigt til øget salg, større udviklingsbudgetter og flere nyansættelser, når IDAs Toplederpanel kigger ind i 2018.
9h
Ingeniøren9
Inwatec fortsætter sidste års vilde vækstVirksomheden fik hul på væksten for tre år siden, og et øget behov for ingeniører skræmmer ikke.
9h
Popular Science36
Set up a second screen for your computerDIY Two views are better than one. Want to add an extra computer monitor? The process doesn't have to be time-consuming or expensive if you follow our advice. Here's how to double your display.
9h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories21
Deadly mudflows threaten residents near erupting Philippine volcanoMillions of tonnes of ash and rock from an erupting Philippine volcano could bury nearby communities due to heavy rain, authorities said Saturday, as tens of thousands flee over fears of a deadly explosion.
9h
Feed: All Latest48
Ski Gear for Bad Weather: Columbia, Line, POC, DakineSome days are crushingly cold and sloppy. Bring the right equipment and you won’t suffer.
10h
Feed: All Latest88
'Electric Dreams' Adapts Philip K. Dick But With Actual WomenThe new Amazon Prime series doesn't have the same problems with female characters that the author's short stories did.
10h
Scientific American Content: Global17
Lighthearted Thinking about Thinking Out LoudCan a card game make interdisciplinary synthesis and critical thinking fun? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
10h
Live Science9
Tiny Volcano Crystals Could Help Predict EruptionsPredicting when a volcano is going to explode is a very difficult task.
11h
Science : NPR5K
Honeybees Help Farmers, But They Don't Help The EnvironmentMaybe honeybees get too much attention. They are agricultural animals, like sheep or cattle, and they sometimes make life harder for wild bees. In fact, the bees in true peril are the wild ones. (Image credit: Dan Charles/NPR)
11h
Live Science9
Alien Life Hunt: Oxygen Isn't the Only Possible Sign of LifeAlien-life hunters shouldn't focus too narrowly on oxygen when scanning the atmospheres of exoplanets, a new study stresses.
11h
Live Science87
Video Peering at a Crow's Ear Is … EerieA viral video on Reddit reveals the "hole" truth about birds' ears.
11h
Feed: All Latest82
Dutch Spies Snooped on Russia's Elite Hackers, and More Security News This WeekThe Doomsday Clock, #ReleaseTheMemo, and more of the week's top security news.
11h
Ingeniøren13
Ny professor i exoplaneter: På jagt efter liv i rummetLars A. Buchhave er nyudnævnt professor på DTU Space med speciale i exo­planeter. Inden for det næste årti håber han at kunne ane de første spæde tegn på liv andre steder i universet.
11h
The Atlantic300+
My Pacemaker Is Tracking Me From Inside My BodyA month before turning 34, I received an unexpected birthday gift: a cloud-connected pacemaker. It sits in a tiny pocket in the left side of my chest, just above my heart. Silently and diligently, the device emits electrical pulses to make sure my heart rate never again plummets below 25 beats per minute. The idea of a battery-equipped, internet-connected device living forever inside my chest bot
11h
The Atlantic100+
The Devastating Paradox of PakistanT wo months after the 2008 U.S. presidential election, Vice President–elect Joe Biden sat with Afghanistan’s president, Hamid Karzai, in the Arg Palace, an 83-acre compound in Kabul that had become a gilded cage for the mercurial and isolated leader. The discussion was already tense as Karzai urged Washington to help root out Taliban sanctuaries in Pakistan, implying that more pressure needed to
11h
Big Think41
Karl Ove Knausgaard – The Way I Should Be in The World – Think Again – a Big Think Podcast #132If your vision is clear, everything is revelatory. The author of "My Struggle" on writing his way into life. Read More
11h
Scientific American Content: Global100+
Animals Worldwide Stick Close to Home When Humans Move InBaboons, grizzly bears and other species are giving up their wild ways as cities, farms and roads fracture habitat — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
11h
Scientific American Content: Global100+
How to Tell If Someone Is LyingSavvy Psychologist Dr. Ellen Hendriksen reveals seven ways to tell if someone is lying — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
11h
Feed: All Latest76
At Davos, Uber, Google, and Salesforce Are Just Waiting for the BacklashSilicon Valley's elite have the public's trust for now, but they know it won't last. At the World Economic Forum at Davos they chart a path forward.
12h
Feed: All Latest51
The Tricky Science of Producing Planet-Friendly PavementTurns out it's not so easy to improve the way we produce the stuff beneath our feet.
12h
Feed: All Latest300+
3.5 Billion-Year-Old Fossils Challenge Ideas About Earth’s StartA series of fossil finds suggests that life on Earth started earlier than anyone thought, calling into question a widely held theory of the solar system’s beginnings.
12h
The Atlantic500+
Facebook Only Cares About FacebookFacebook’s crushing blow to independent media arrived last fall in Slovakia, Cambodia, Guatemala, and three other nations. The social giant removed stories by these publishers from users’ news feeds, hiding them in a new, hard-to-find stream. These independent publishers reported that they lost as much as 80 percent of their audience during this experiment. Facebook doesn’t care. At least, it usu
12h
The Atlantic34
What Was Steven Soderbergh Doing With Mosaic?This article contains spoilers through all six episodes of Mosaic. A promotional poster for Mosaic , the six-part HBO miniseries/interactive app created by Steven Soderbergh, depicts the face of its star, Sharon Stone, like a painting in chiaroscuro. Stone’s features are shaded in tones of green and red, half in light, half in dark. The tagline for the image: “Look again.” The poster offers clues
12h
The Atlantic300+
The GOP's Best Candidates Aren't the Loudest OnesWith Joe Arpaio’s announcement that he is running for Senate, Arizona is poised to have its Alabama Moment. The national media will descend, and the spotlight will focus on the state. The rest of the country will line up to pass judgment on every word, cough, and bit of froth to escape Sheriff Joe’s lips. Countless chat-show segments will be devoted to Arizonans’ thoughts on race, immigration, an
13h
The Atlantic100+
The People Who Want to be AmericansOn a brisk evening at the New York Historical Society in Manhattan on Tuesday, a handful of green card holders were gathered to learn about the Louisiana Purchase of 1803. The group ranged in age and origin: a young man and a young woman in their twenties and a mother in her late forties were all from the Dominican Republic; an older couple was from the Netherlands; a middle aged woman was from P
13h
The Atlantic100+
The Battle of Khe Sanh and Its RetellingsEditor’s Note: Editor’s Note: This is part of The Atlantic’s ongoing series looking back at 1968. All past articles and reader correspondence are collected here . New material will be added to that page through the end of 2018. I had a brother at Khe Sanh Fighting off the Viet Cong They're still there, he's all gone ––Bruce Springsteen, Born in the USA, 1984 The Battle of Khe Sanh began 50 years
13h
New on MIT Technology Review3
The Best of the Physics arXiv (week ending January 27, 2018)This week’s most thought-provoking papers from the Physics arXiv.
14h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories16
One of world's oldest gorillas dies at San Diego Safari ParkOne of the world's oldest gorillas has died at San Diego Zoo Safari Park.
14h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories100+
Method to determine when cell has 'cashed' RNA 'checks' written by active genesDNA has often been called "the book of life," but this popular phrase makes some biologists squirm a bit. True, DNA bears our genes, which spell out the instructions our cells use to make proteins—those workhorse molecules that comprise our physical being and make just about everything in life possible.
14h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories7
Earthquake engineers conduct research on steel collectorsAn award-winning team of researchers at the University of Arizona and partnering universities is working to develop buildings that will not collapse under the force of major earthquakes, such as last year's 7.1-magnitude quake in central Mexico and 7.3-magnitude quake near the Iran-Iraq border. The two earthquakes were the deadliest of 2017, killing approximately 900 people combined, flattening hu
14h
Ingeniøren4
Ugens debat: Går fosfor op i røg, når gyllen bliver brændt?En ny aftale, der skal redde vandmiljøet, tillader landmænd at afbrænde den tørre fiberfraktion fra gylle. Hvad der så helt præcis sker med gyllens fosforindhold skabte debat i ugen, der gik.
15h
Viden31
120.000 hjertekarpatienter skal have undersøgt deres generUndersøgelsen skal give mere viden om de sygdomme, der er skyld i hver fjerde dødsfald herhjemme.
18h
New Scientist – News200+
Neutrinos may have more kinds of cosmic sources than we thoughtTrillions of neutrinos hit Earth each day, but we don’t know where they come from. A new model shows how many may be made in our atmosphere, our galaxy and beyond
21h
BBC News – Science & Environment100+
Global register lists alien speciesA fifth of more than 6,000 catalogued invasive animals and plants worldwide are causing harm.
23h
Big Think500+
When genomics lets us design our children, how can we keep it fair for all?Granted, genetic manipulation has been a dream for decades. Here’s what is different now. Read More
23h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily29
New marking technique could halt counterfeit goodsResearchers have developed the world's most secure marking system for combating pirated goods including pirated pharmaceuticals, foodstuffs, designer merchandise and artwork. The system could be on the market in a year and because the markings are random, it cannot be hacked.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily21
The magic of movies not tied to using latest technology according to new researchIn the nearly 60 years between the 1939 release of Hollywood's first animated movie, Snow White and the Seven Dwarves and modern hits like Toy Story, Shrek and more, advances in animation technology have revolutionized not only animation techniques, but moviemaking as a whole. However, a new study found that employing the latest technology doesn't always ensure creative success for a film.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily21
Superconducting synapse may be missing piece for 'artificial brains'Researchers have built a superconducting switch that 'learns' like a biological system and could connect processors and store memories in future computers operating like the human brain.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily19
Entomologist discovers millipede that comes in more color combinations than any otherThe thumb-sized millipede that crawls around the forest floor of Southwest Virginia's Cumberland Mountains has more color combinations than any other millipede discovered.
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The Atlantic12
The Atlantic Daily: When Trump Tried to Fire MuellerWhat We’re Following Trump vs. Mueller: President Trump reportedly tried to fire Special Counsel Robert Mueller in June 2017, but backed down when White House Counsel Don McGahn threatened to resign rather than help him do it. The showdown carries strong echoes of the 1973 Saturday Night Massacre, when two Justice Department officials stepped down rather than carry out President Richard Nixon’s o
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Feed: All Latest100+
Ford Paves a Path From Big Automaker to Big Operating SystemWith a reorganization and two acquisitions, a hazy vision of Ford's future starts to take shape.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily59
What are memories made of?Researchers have identified the distinct roles and locations in the brain of a protein called AKT believed to be instrumental in memory formation and synaptic plasticity.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily16
Swallowed button batteries add to safety concerns about 'fidget spinners'A report of two young children with burns of the esophagus caused by swallowed button batteries from 'fidget spinners' highlights a risk of severe injuries involving these popular toys, according to a series of reports.
1d
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily10
Scientists get better numbers on what happens when electrons get wetA particular set of chemical reactions governs everything from bridges corroding in water to your breakfast breaking down in your gut. One crucial part involves electrons striking water, and scientists still have to use ballpark numbers for certain parts of the equation when they use computers to model them. An new study offers a new set of numbers that may help scientists create better ways to sp
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily44
Botulinum-type toxins jump to a new kind of bacteriaA toxin much like the one that causes botulism has unexpectedly turned up in a completely different type of bacteria – Enterococcus. Where it came from is unclear, but the finding is concerning because enterococci have lately become a leading cause of multi-drug-resistant infections, especially in health care settings.
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NYT > Science13
Q&A: Seed Size Often MattersSmall seeds can develop more quickly and spread more widely than large-seeded plant species, although bigger seeds can thrive in richer, wetter soils.
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NYT > Science400+
Citing Deaths of Lab Monkeys, F.D.A. Ends an Addiction StudyThe agency said on Friday it was evaluating other animal studies and would retire the remaining monkeys to a sanctuary.
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Popular Science10
Right before the Super Bowl is a good time to buy a fancy new TVGadgets The holidays are over and the new models are coming, so score a cheap new set before the big game. This is a great time to find deals on nice TVs.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily9
Site of 1st chlamydia exposure makes big differenceExposing the gut to chlamydia protects against subsequent infection in the genital tract and other tissues, researchers have discovered. Chlamydia is the nation's most common sexually transmitted disease and causes infertility, ectopic pregnancy and pelvic inflammatory disease if left untreated.
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube4
Tony Beets Wants One More Look At Parker's Cut | Gold Rush#GoldRush | Friday 9p As Parker’s claim owner, Tony can pan one last time to make sure no gold is left behind before the land is reclaimed. Will Parker’s work pass the Tony test? Full Episodes Streaming FREE: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/gold-rush/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://t
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Scientific American Content: Global6
Lion Conservation Challenges Giraffe ProtectionHaving lions and giraffes together in protected areas means far lower survival rates for juvenile giraffes. Jason Goldman reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Feed: All Latest45
The Cars We'll Be Driving (and Not Driving) in 2018We discuss the latest in autonomous car tech, electric driving, and why China is the future of the auto industry.
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The Atlantic12
The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: The Titan of DavosToday in 5 Lines During his address at the World Economic Forum in Davos, President Trump said “America is open for business.” Trump dismissed a New York Times report that revealed he tried to fire Special Counsel Robert Mueller in June 2017 as “fake news.” Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer rejected a White House plan that would provide citizenship for Dreamers in exchange for tighter restrict
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The Atlantic300+
Defending All Blameless Undocumented ImmigrantsAs Congress debates immigration policy, one matter of particular concern and controversy is the fate of young people who were brought to the United States as children, avoided criminal records, and earned a high school diploma or joined the military. In 2012, President Obama sought to protect people like that from deportation, correctly reasoning that they give more to the country than they take,
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The Atlantic200+
Donald Disappoints DavosDAVOS, SWITZERLAND—In the internal psycholeadership struggle between Donald Trump’s good side, or what Senator Lindsey Graham has called “Tuesday Trump,” and his dark side, which Graham calls “Thursday Trump,” it was the first that prevailed at the World Economic Forum in Davos—much to the disappointment of many attendees. Trump gave a friendly speech, one that was respectful of the billionaires,
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News2
Method to precisely determine when cell has 'cashed' RNA 'checks' written by active genesScientists have designed software that enables biologists to determine with unprecedented accuracy how much protein a given cell is making. It's important because gene activity does not always result in the generation of a working protein.
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Popular Science2
Five rad and random products I found this weekGadgets The end-of-week dispatch from PopSci's commerce editor. Vol. 34. Throughout the week I spend hours scouring the web for things that are ingenious or clever or ridiculously cheap. Below, gadgets that are awesome, rad, and random.
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The Atlantic300+
Hillary Clinton, Burns Strider, and the Fault Lines of #MeTooHere is the top line, from The New York Times : A senior adviser to Hillary Clinton’s 2008 presidential campaign who was accused of repeatedly sexually harassing a young subordinate was kept on the campaign at Mrs. Clinton’s request, according to four people familiar with what took place. Mrs. Clinton’s campaign manager at the time recommended that she fire the adviser, Burns Strider. But Mrs. Cl
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
Tiny particles have outsized impact on storm clouds and precipitationTiny airborne particles from urban and industrial air pollution, wildfires and other sources can have a stronger influence on powerful storms than scientists previously predicted, according to a new study co-authored by University of Maryland researchers. The findings suggest that ultrafine aerosols, which are smaller than one-thousandth the width of a human hair, can intensify storms, increase th
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The Scientist RSS3
Parts of U.S. Saw an Increase in Zika-Linked Birth Defects in 2016The rise occurred in areas with confirmed local transmission, according to a new CDC report.
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New on MIT Technology Review400+
Your license plate is probably in the massive database ICE just got access to
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NYT > Science100+
Mind: More Than 150 Women Described Sexual Abuse by Lawrence Nassar. Will Their Testimony Help Them Heal?The psychological effects of disclosing a traumatic secret — of telling your story — depend on the audience, the nature of the trauma and other factors.
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Live Science62
These Bears Got Fishy Bandages After a Wildfire Burned Their PawsA fishy treatment has helped heal two black bears and a mountain lion whose paws were badly scorched in the deadly Thomas Fire, according to the California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW).
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New on MIT Technology Review73
Algorithms are making American inequality worseIn a new book, political scientist Virginia Eubanks says using computers to decide who gets social services hurts the poor.
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Popular Science200+
A motorcyclist is suing GM after crashing into its self-driving carTechnology Accidents involving autonomous cars can trigger a complex blame game. It was morning in San Francisco on December 7 of last year, and a self-driving car and a motorcyclist were both motoring down Oak Street. Read on.
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Popular Science300+
Teens who experience racism are way more likely to smokeHealth The correlation is strong, but the causation is more complex. A new study links experiences of racism to teen smoking, but the tobacco industry has targeted racial minorities for a very long time.
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Live Science200+
A 'Millimeter' from Death: 6-Inch Screw Lodged in Teen's SkullIn a life-threatening accident, a Maryland teenager fell while building a tree house and wound up with a 6-inch screw lodged in his skull.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News13
Scientists get better numbers on what happens when electrons get wetA particular set of chemical reactions governs everything from bridges corroding in water to your breakfast breaking down in your gut. One crucial part involves electrons striking water, and scientists still have to use ballpark numbers for certain parts of the equation when they use computers to model them. An new study offers a new set of numbers that may help scientists create better ways to sp
1d
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
Swallowed button batteries add to safety concerns about 'fidget spinners'A report of two young children with burns of the esophagus caused by swallowed button batteries from 'fidget spinners' highlights a risk of severe injuries involving these popular toys, according to a series of reports in the January/February Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition (JPGN). Official journal of the North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nut
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News1
Entomologist discovers millipede that comes in more color combinations than any otherThe thumb-sized millipede that crawls around the forest floor of Southwest Virginia's Cumberland Mountains has more color combinations than any other millipede discovered.
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NYT > Science8K
Yale’s Most Popular Class Ever: HappinessWith nearly 1,200 students signed up, a course that tells students how to lead more satisfying lives may be the largest in university history.
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Live Science100+
A Computer with Just 2 'Neurons' Can Learn to Ride a BikeIt takes a lot less than half a brain to learn how to ride a bike, according to neural network research.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
Trauma support for welfare recipients helps them earn moreResearch shows that addressing Welfare recipients' past and current trauma help them earn more at their jobs — providing hope for an exit from the program.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News1
What are memories made of?CU Boulder researchers have identified the distinct roles and locations in the brain of a protein called AKT believed to be instrumental in memory formation and synaptic plasticity.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily48
MIND diet may slow cognitive decline in stroke survivorsA diet created by researchers may help substantially slow cognitive decline in stroke survivors, according to preliminary research. The finding are significant because stroke survivors are twice as likely to develop dementia compared to the general population.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily16
Kisspeptin: Mouse study shows how the brain controls sexKisspeptin has already been identified as the key molecule within the brain responsible for triggering puberty and controlling fertility. A new study in mice reveals that a subset of neurons in an evolutionarily ancient part of brain, the hypothalamus, drive both attraction to the opposite sex and sexual behavior by two independent mechanisms.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily32
Nearly one out of five NSAID users exceed daily limitChances are you or someone you know has used nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) within the last month. NSAIDs, such as Advil (ibuprofen), Aleve (naproxen) and Celebrex, are among the most commonly used medicines in the US. Now, for the first time, researchers have found that 15 percent of adult ibuprofen users exceed the maximum recommended dose of ibuprofen or other NSAIDs in a one-wee
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New on MIT Technology Review500+
Storing data in DNA is a lot easier than getting it back outBut a method bacteria use to swap genetic information could offer a way.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories7
Mark your calendars: Samsung preps for Galaxy S9 launchSamsung has sent out the invitations to its Galaxy S9 event, which will take place on Feb. 25, the day before the start of the Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, Spain.
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Live Science100+
Is Marijuana Bad for Your Heart? Science Can't Say YetAs marijuana legalization spreads across the U.S., questions about the drug's effects on public health become more relevant. But in at least one area — heart health — there's just not enough scientific evidence to reach firm conclusions about the effects.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories32
Earthquake fault runs through Rodeo Drive and Beverly Hills' shopping district, California geologists sayNew data from state geologists show that an earthquake fault runs below Rodeo Drive and Beverly Hills' shopping district, heightening the known seismic risk in an area famous for Cartier, Gucci, Prada and other luxury brands.
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cognitive science1
Do Subliminal Messages Work?submitted by /u/Smart_by_Design [link] [comments]
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NYT > Science4K
Trilobites: Elephants Are Very Scared of Bees. That Could Save Their Lives.Researchers have compared the reactions of elephants in Africa and Asia to bee swarms, in efforts at protecting the endangered animals from angered farmers or poachers.
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NYT > Science11K
Curators at Museum of Natural History Object to a TrusteeSeveral members of the museum’s staff have sent a letter protesting Rebekah Mercer’s position on the board.
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The Atlantic200+
Photos of the Week: Aerobatic Performers, Snow Monsters, a MurmurationAlpine sports in Austria and the U.S., the Doomsday Clock advances, a beautiful landscape in Angola, extreme cold in Siberia, competition at the Australian Open, big surf in Hawaii, and much more.
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The Atlantic500+
Why Students Are Still Spending So Much for College TextbooksAfter settling into his dorm this past fall, John McGrath, a freshman at Rutgers University, took the campus shuttle to the school bookstore. He waited in line for 40 minutes clutching a list of four classes—including Microeconomics, Introduction to Calculus, and Expository Writing—and walked out later with an armful of books, some bundled with digital codes that he would use to access assignment
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories3
A spider that hunts other spiders: 18 new species of this bizarre Madagascar arachnid are unveiledAn unusual spider lurks in Madagascar's rainforests.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories7
Landslide watch: Can experts predict collapse at Washington's Rattlesnake Ridge?While Las Vegas bookies aren't laying odds—yet—on when the landslide at Rattlesnake Ridge will let loose, engineers and geologists tracking the treacherous slope near Yakima are placing their bets on mid-March to early April.
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Popular Science100+
Your modern kitchen appliances probably won't catch fire—yes, even Crock-PotsTechnology It's probably time to toss out some of your old kitchen hand-me-downs. Old kitchen appliances are a lot more dangerous than new ones thanks to heat management.
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New Scientist – News76
Your next job interview could be playing a weird smartphone gameBig firms like Siemens and Walmart are using video games to filter candidates, with tasks including blowing up balloons and tapping logos on a screen
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New Scientist – News200+
Young ‘dinosauromorphs’ may have begged for food like baby birdsTens of millions of years before dinosaurs evolved into birds, a proto-dinosaur had surprising features that suggest its young needed parental care after hatching
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News1
New marking technique could halt counterfeit goodsResearchers at the University of Copenhagen have developed the world's most secure marking system for combatting pirated goods including pirated pharmaceuticals, foodstuffs, designer merchandise and artwork. The system could be on the market in a year and because the markings are random, it cannot be hacked. The results have just been published in Science Advances, a scientific journal.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
NIST's superconducting synapse may be missing piece for 'artificial brains'Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have built a superconducting switch that 'learns' like a biological system and could connect processors and store memories in future computers operating like the human brain.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories2
Think you've got the flu? At-home doctor consultation app might helpAlarmed about the country's deadly flu epidemic, Lisa Maciel knew she needed to get her 2-year-old daughter to a doctor when the toddler's eyes began to water and she started to run a fever.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories3
Company aims to digitize paper-recycling industryA Minnesota company hopes a new partnership will help make the movement of recycled paper goods more efficient.
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Big Think400+
Bill Gates is convinced that artificial intelligence will make our lives better and easier. Ummm …Artificial Intelligence will change the nature of some jobs, and eliminate others. But will that be good for humanity? Bill Gates thinks so. Read More
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Feed: All Latest1K
Robert Mueller's Russia Investigation Includes at Least One Facebook Employee InterviewAs special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation grows, at least one Facebook employee who worked alongside the 2016 Trump campaign has been pulled into the probe.
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The Atlantic57
A Futile and Stupid Gesture Is a Basic Comedy BiopicThe story of Doug Kenney, the co-founder of National Lampoon magazine and the writer of seminal films like Animal House and Caddyshack , is one that might be unfamiliar to a casual comedy fan. Here was someone who laid the groundwork for so many of America’s legendary satirists, particularly the early stars of Saturday Night Live , but who has been somewhat forgotten in the intervening decades. D
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Science | The Guardian11
Lab notes: Bones and clones made this week's science headlinesThere were lots of exciting scientific tidbits this week, but two stories really stood out. The news of the first primates born using the same cloning method used to create Dolly the sheep opens many possibilities – although scientists are adamant that human clones are not among them. Also potentially rewriting the Homo sapiens story is the discovery of a 200,000-year-old jawbone in Israel – the
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Blog » Languages » English2
Asteroids triumph!Zoom! That must have been the sound of Team Asteroid hurtling past the finish line. Congratulations to both teams, enjoy your bonuses, and stay tuned in two weeks for another regularly scheduled VS battle! Artwork by Minjeong Kim
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Big Think200+
What Trump meant at Davos: “America first does not mean America alone.”President Donald Trump veered away from his typical protectionist rhetoric at the World Economic Forum in his remarks on the benefits of global cooperation. Read More
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories3
ESPN, to broadcast Madden eSport matchesESPN and Disney on Friday announced a deal to broadcast an NFL-inspired eSports championship series in which players face off on computers instead of turf.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories300+
NIST's superconducting synapse may be missing piece for 'artificial brains'Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have built a superconducting switch that "learns" like a biological system and could connect processors and store memories in future computers operating like the human brain.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories25
New marking technique could halt counterfeit goodsResearchers at the University of Copenhagen have developed the world's most secure marking system for combating pirated goods, including pirated pharmaceuticals, food, designer merchandise and artwork. The system could be on the market within a year, and because the markings are random, it cannot be hacked. The results have just been published in Science Advances.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily10
X-ray experiments suggest high tunability of 2-D materialResearchers used MAESTRO, an X-ray platform, to zero in on signatures of exotic electronic behavior in a 2-D material. They found that the material may be highly tunable, with potential applications in spintronics and other emerging fields.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily16
Tiny scales could serve as safe material in implants to reinforce bones and jointsResearchers have published a concept to use a naturally occurring mineral called calcite to “grow” scales that can attach to soft materials. The setup could one day serve as waterproof implants to reinforce bones or joints.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily13
Novel solution to better secure voice over internet communicationSecurity researchers develop automated verification model to better secure voice over internet communication from eavesdropping and man-in-the-middle attacks.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily14
Retinal injury caused by laser pointersIn recent years, a substantial increase in the number of eye injuries caused by laser pointers has been observed, especially in children and adolescents. Researchers report sometimes severe retinal injuries and irreversible impairments to vision/visual acuity.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily12
Pyridostigmine treatment reverses pediatric complications of botulinum toxin therapyPhysicians report that complications from botox therapy for nerve disorders can be reversed with pyridostigmine, a common treatment for myasthenia gravis.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily100+
Choose Omega-3s from fish over flax for cancer prevention, study findsOmega-3s from fish pack a stronger punch than flaxseed and other oils when it comes to cancer prevention, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily33
Aerobic exercise may mildly delay, slightly improve Alzheimer's symptomsGeriatrics experts have suggested that exercising can improve brain health in older adults. However, not all studies of exercise and older adults have proven the benefits of exercise. A team of researchers designed a study to learn whether exercise could delay or improve AD symptoms. They reviewed 19 studies that examined the effect of an exercise training program on cognitive function in older ad
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NYT > Science15K
This Flu Season Is the Worst in Nearly a DecadeAll states except Hawaii report widespread flu, federal officials said Friday. Infection and hospitalization rates are likely to equal or surpass those in 2009.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories4
The magic of movies not tied to using latest technology according to new researchIn the nearly 60 years between the 1939 release of Hollywood's first animated movie, Snow White and the Seven Dwarves and modern hits like Toy Story, Shrek and more, advances in animation technology have revolutionized not only animation techniques, but moviemaking as a whole. However, a new study in the INFORMS journal Organization Science found that employing the latest technology doesn't always
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Scientific American Content: Global300+
Controversial Fossil Hints Homo sapiens Blazed a Trail Out of Africa Earlier Than ThoughtThe jaw fragment suggests our species began traveling abroad 50,000 years earlier than previously thought — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Big Think1K
Scientist announces a laser so powerful it can tear empty spaceShanghai scientist Ruxin Li has already built the world’s most powerful lasers, and he plans a new one that can rip matter from empty space. Read More
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News1
The magic of movies not tied to using latest technology according to new researchIn the nearly 60 years between the 1939 release of Hollywood's first animated movie, Snow White and the Seven Dwarves and modern hits like Toy Story, Shrek and more, advances in animation technology have revolutionized not only animation techniques, but moviemaking as a whole. However, a new study in the INFORMS journal Organization Science found that employing the latest technology doesn't always
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Inside Science
Scanning for Signs of Domestic AbuseScanning for Signs of Domestic Abuse Study from Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston suggests new way to help identify victims of intimate partner violence. Radiologyimage.jpg Image credits: visivastudio via Shutterstock Human Friday, January 26, 2018 – 11:45 Jason Socrates Bardi, Editor (Inside Science) — A new study reviewing the medical images and other records of more than 100 victims of i
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily72
Colonoscopy may be linked to appendicitisAlthough the incidence of appendicitis in the United States has been in decline for many years, the condition still affects approximately seven percent of Americans annually.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily12
Using imaging to identify women at risk of giving birth prematurelyUltrasound is traditionally used on pregnant women to study the anatomy, movement and blood flow of the developing fetus, but nurse researchers are now using the imaging technique to identify women who are at risk of giving birth prematurely.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories13
Warmer weather is turning turtles on this South Florida beach femaleThanks to warmer temperatures, nearly all of the baby sea turtles hatching on a South Florida beach are turning out female.
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The Atlantic100+
The Naked Mole Rat Is One of the Weirdest Creatures Out ThereNaked mole rats feel no pain. They’re exceptionally long-lived. They frequently enter reversible comas, and a single queen mole rat rules over her colony with totalitarian authority. They can also survive without oxygen for extended periods of time—a feat that almost no other animal can accomplish. In this episode of “Animalism,” Ed Yong, a science writer for The Atlantic , explains why the naked
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The Atlantic4K
Why We Forget Most of the Books We ReadPamela Paul’s memories of reading are less about words and more about the experience. “I almost always remember where I was and I remember the book itself. I remember the physical object,” says Paul, the editor of The New York Times Book Review , who reads, it is fair to say, a lot of books. “I remember the edition; I remember the cover; I usually remember where I bought it, or who gave it to me.
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Big Think100+
Experts at Davos: "It is in men’s interest to embrace gender equality"Here are five points from the World Economic Forum at Davos that can help men and women work together for gender equality. Read More
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News3
Choose Omega-3s from fish over flax for cancer prevention, study findsOmega-3s from fish pack a stronger punch than flaxseed and other oils when it comes to cancer prevention, according to a first-ever University of Guelph study.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories3
AT&T ad campaign calls for 'net neutrality' lawAT&T, a beneficiary of the FCC's repeal of net neutrality rules, is urging Congress to write a federal net neutrality law.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories4
Why the imported washing machine you want is getting more expensiveAt $1,899, one of the priciest washing machines for sale at Abt Electronics in Glenview, Ill., is Samsung's two-washers-in-one-machine Steel FlexWash. As a result of new tariffs approved by President Donald Trump on Tuesday, that price tag is about to get steeper.
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