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Nyheder2018juli01

Designer enzyme uses unnatural amino acid for catalysis

University of Groningen chemists have created a new enzyme with an unnatural amino acid as its active center. They made the enzyme by modifying an antibiotic binding protein which normally acts as a bacterial transcription factor. Further modifications of the reactive site can create different enzymes for use in chemical synthesis. A description of the new enzyme was published in Nature Chemistry

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Eat 'em up: Next-generation therapeutic helps immune cells detect, destroy cancer

Researchers have found that cancer cells evade destruction by macrophages in two ways — by converting cells to become docile, M2 macrophages, and by sending out an 'eat me not' signal that tricks M1 macrophages into letting them be. Investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital have developed a therapeutic that delivers a double whammy to knock out both mechanisms.

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Teamwork between cells fuels aggressive childhood brain tumor

Scientists have discovered that cancerous cells in an aggressive type of childhood brain tumour work together to infiltrate the brain, and this finding could ultimately lead to much needed new treatments.

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Australian scientists crack the genetic code of koalas

The koala genome has been sequenced in a world first, by an international consortium led by Australian conservation scientists and geneticists. Considered to be the most complete marsupial genome sequenced in terms of quality — on par with the human genome — the highly accurate genomic data will provide information to inform habitat conservation, tackle diseases and help ensure this iconic anima

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Did public education campaign improve patient response to TIA, minor stroke?

A study of more than 2,200 patients in the United Kingdom examined the association of a public education campaign with delays and failure to seek medical attention after a minor stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA). The risk of major stroke is high after a TIA or minor stroke. Quick medical attention can substantially reduce that risk but patients often fail to recognize or act on their sympt

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Are hopes, plans for future associated with lower odds of perpetrating weapon-related violence?

Hopes and plans for the future were associated with lower odds of perpetrating weapon-related violence in a new study based on survey data from predominantly black/African-American male youths in low-resource neighborhoods in Pittsburgh who were enrolled in a violence prevention trial.

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Fern-tastic! Crowdfunded fern genomes published in Nature Plants

With crowdfunded support, researchers have sequenced the first two fern genomes ever. Their results, including the discovery of an ancient gene transfer and novel symbiosis mechanisms, appear this month in Nature Plants.

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Is drinking more coffee associated with lower risk of death?

Coffee is popular around the globe and studies have generally reported inverse associations (moving in opposite directions) between its consumption and the risk of chronic diseases and death. But what about heavy coffee drinking and people with genetic variations that can affect how they metabolize caffeine?

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Zika virus infection may multiply risk of miscarriage, stillbirth

Researchers at six National Primate Research Centers (NPRCs) combined results from individual studies to find that 26 percent of pregnancies in 50 monkeys infected with Zika virus during the first trimester of pregnancy ended in miscarriage or stillbirth, dwarfing the nearly 8 percent rate found earlier this year by a study of women infected with Zika early in pregnancy.

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Scientists propose solution to 'Gaia puzzle'

Scientists may have solved a long-standing puzzle over why conditions on Earth have remained stable enough for life to evolve over billions of years.

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Greenhouse gases were the main driver of climate change in the deep past

Greenhouse gases were the main driver of climate throughout the warmest period of the past 66 million years, providing insight into the drivers behind long-term climate change.

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Compounds found in green tea and red wine may block formation of toxic metabolites

A new study suggests there is hope of treating certain inborn congenital metabolic diseases — a hope found in green tea and in red wine.

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First confirmed image of newborn planet caught with ESO's VLTVLT ESO Planet Newborn

SPHERE, a planet-hunting instrument on ESO's Very Large Telescope, has captured the first confirmed image of a planet caught in the act of forming in the dusty disc surrounding a young star. The young planet is carving a path through the primordial disc of gas and dust around the very young star PDS 70. The data suggest that the planet's atmosphere is cloudy.

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New financial apps demystify stocks and bonds for Latinos

Carlos Garcia was three years into his first job in technology at Merrill Lynch when he first learned what a 401K retirement savings account was. He was floored when he learned that a colleague had already saved $30,000 in three years, and the company had matched it.

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Beauty vitamins promise shinier hair, stronger nails, and suppler skin, but do they work?

Health Cosmetic supplements have a lot of claims, but not enough science. Today, an increasing number of people are popping a pill—taking so called beauty vitamins, ingestible capsules, or gummies that all promise to improve their hair, skin,…

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In Search of New Rules to Protect Other Worlds From Earth's Cooties

NASA's Office of Planetary Protection has tried to protect other worlds from us and us from other worlds since the Cold War. But the future wants a better way.

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Can the Koala Genome Save the Species From Deforestation and Chlamydia?

Understanding the animal's genes could help combat shrinking habitats and an epidemic of chlamydia.

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The UK has been looking for alien weapons – but there’s far cooler stuff out there | Stuart Heritage

For 50 years the Ministry of Defence had a desk dedicated to stealing and weaponising alien tech. But what about cryosleep, or intergalactic wifi? The universe is vast and unexplored. For as long as humanity has existed we have gazed out awestruck into the stars, hoping against hope that we are not alone in the void. Might there be other life forms out there? Might we simply be an undiscovered ten

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Illinois' crop-counting robot earns top recognition at leading robotics conference

Today's crop breeders are trying to boost yields while also preparing crops to withstand severe weather and changing climates. To succeed, they must locate genes for high-yielding, hardy traits in crop plants' DNA. A robot developed by the University of Illinois to find these proverbial needles in the haystack was recognized by the best systems paper award at Robotics: Science and Systems, the pre

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Greenhouse gases were the main driver of climate change in the deep past

Greenhouse gases were the main driver of climate throughout the warmest period of the past 66 million years, providing insight into the drivers behind long-term climate change.

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Australian scientists crack the genetic code of koalas

A team of Australian and international scientists, led by Professor Rebecca Johnson, Director of the Australian Museum Research Institute and Professor Katherine Belov, University of Sydney, have made a significant break-through successfully sequencing the full koala genome, with the findings published today in Nature Genetics.

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Scientists propose solution to 'Gaia puzzle'

Scientists may have solved a long-standing puzzle over why conditions on Earth have remained stable enough for life to evolve over billions of years. The 'Gaia' hypothesis proposed that living things interacting with inorganic processes somehow keep the planet in a state where life can persist—despite threats such as a brightening sun, volcanoes and meteorite strikes.

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Study reveals secret origins of asteroids and meteorites

Most asteroids and meteorites originate from the splintering of a handful of minor planets formed during the infancy of our solar system, a new study shows.

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China's emissions reversal cause for 'cautious optimism,' says study

The decline in China's carbon emissions is likely to be sustained if changes to the country's industrial structure and energy efficiency continue, according to new research led by the University of East Anglia (UEA).

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Fern-tastic! Crowdfunded fern genomes published

On July 17, 2014, the world decided it wanted to learn the genomic secrets hidden in the beautiful little, floating water fern, Azolla filiculoides. Not only did they want to know, but they paid for it too—a whopping $22,160 from 123 backers—through a crowdfunding site called Experiment.com.

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Designer enzyme uses unnatural amino acid for catalysis

University of Groningen chemists have created a new enzyme with an unnatural amino acid as its active centre. They made the enzyme by modifying an antibiotic binding protein which normally acts as a bacterial transcription factor. Further modifications of the reactive site can create different enzymes for use in chemical synthesis. A description of the new enzyme was published in Nature Chemistry

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3 things you can do to keep kids from dying in hot cars

Babies and young children can sleep so peacefully that it may be tempting to leave them alone in a car while you run a quick errand. You should never do this, however, because it can lead to heatstroke, serious injury, and death. Heatstroke is the leading cause of non-crash, vehicle-related deaths for children. “Young children are particularly vulnerable, as their bodies’ heat up three to five ti

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Illinois' crop-counting robot earns top recognition at leading robotics conference

A robot developed by the University of Illinois to locate genes for high-yielding, hardy traits in crop plants' DNA was recognized by the best systems paper award at Robotics: Science and Systems, the preeminent robotics conference held last week in Pittsburgh.

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Story tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, July 2018

ORNL story tips: Oak Ridge National Laboratory assists FEMA with structural damage data from Hawaii lava flows; self-healing super-stretchy material could lead to longer-lasting consumer products; ORNL 3D prints plant-based plastic polymers; mini-grid safely tests components to the max; neutrons uncover pathway to new algae strains for sustainable biofuels.

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What Classical Music Can Learn From Kanye West

The conversation around Kanye West lately has focused on politics, stunts, and the phrase scoopity-poop . It can be easy to forget that it was his musicianship, not provocations, that built up enough goodwill for him to go on a five-week spree of releasing one album a week (at least one of which, apparently, was put out in unfinished, soon-to-be-revised form ). Some of those albums—Nas’s Nasir an

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Koala genome may contain clues for helping the species survive

The complete genetic instruction book of a koala may explain why the cuddly-looking cuties are such picky eaters, among other secrets.

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The tiny creature that secretly powers the planet | Penny Chisholm

Oceanographer Penny Chisholm introduces us to an amazing little being: Prochlorococcus, the most abundant photosynthetic species on the planet. A marine microbe that has existed for billions of years, Prochlorococcus wasn't discovered until the mid-1980s — but its ancient genetic code may hold clues to how we can reduce our dependence on fossil fuels.

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Lava hurls from Bali volcano in new eruption

The Mount Agung volcano on the Indonesian tourist island of Bali erupted Monday evening, ejecting a 2,000-meter-high (6,560-foot-high) column of thick ash and hurling lava down its slopes.

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Prospective teachers more likely to view black faces than white faces as angry

A preliminary study of prospective teachers finds that they are more likely to view the face of Black adults as angry compared to the faces of White adults. Similarly, the study participants viewed the behavior of Black children as more hostile than the behavior of White children.

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Climate change is making night-shining clouds more visible

Increased water vapor in Earth's atmosphere due to human activities is making shimmering high-altitude clouds more visible, a new study finds. The results suggest these strange but increasingly common clouds seen only on summer nights are an indicator of human-caused climate change, according to the study's authors.

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Study reveals how polymers relax after stressful processing

The polymers that make up synthetic materials need time to de-stress after processing, researchers said. A new study has found that entangled, long-chain polymers in solutions relax at two different rates, marking an advancement in fundamental polymer physics. The findings will provide a better understanding of the physical properties of polymeric materials and critical new insight to how individu

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Joslin researchers report excessive fetal growth despite well-controlled type 1 diabetes

A new study has shown that despite excellent glycemic control and low glycemic variability throughout their pregnancies, women with type 1 diabetes tended to give birth to infants who were large for gestational age.

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The spliceosome: The tailor that coordinates the 'snip and stitch' of genetic information

For the first time, research by SISSA and CNR sheds light on the functioning of a complex cellular system, composed by proteins and RNA, whose defects are involved in more than 200 diseases. A major step towards the development of possible drugs.

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New sensor technology enables super-sensitive live monitoring of human biomolecules

The human body is an extremely complex molecular machine, the details of which can be followed through certain substances; so-called biomarkers. Unfortunately, it is not yet possible to monitor biomarkers live in patients when these are present in minuscule concentrations. Researchers at Eindhoven University of Technology have now developed a new technique that can become the plain and simple solu

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Climate change is making night-shining clouds more visible

Increased water vapor in Earth's atmosphere due to human activities is making shimmering high-altitude clouds more visible, a new study finds. The results suggest these strange but increasingly common clouds seen only on summer nights are an indicator of human-caused climate change, according to the study's authors.

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What actually took place on July 4, 1776?

What happened on July 4, 1776? Not what you might think. On that historic day more than 200 years ago, the Continental Congress adopted the Declaration of Independence. But it would be weeks before the Founding Fathers actually signed the handwritten document that now rests in the National Archives in Washington. In the meantime, official broadsides—the public service announcements of the day—wer

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More young people active in public affairs despite negative perceptions

FEARS that democratic society could be undermined because young people are not participating enough in public affairs have been dispelled by researchers at the University of Huddersfield.

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Giant panda population research shows new challenges

Conservationists often work to save species without having long-term population data. That can present major challenges for the science of saving species, as this kind of information is critical for making informed conservation policy and management decisions. In a recently published study in the journal Conservation Letters, a team of scientists reports results of a large-scale study examining gi

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GPS-lænke skal lokalisere løbske robotter

Med 5G-nettets indtog vil flere og flere IoT-enheder i form af mobile robotter og AGV’er flytte sig rundt på produktionsgulvet, hvilket gør dem svære at tracke med traditionel GPS-teknologi. Derfor foreslår forskere, at man implementerer en GPS-lænke, der kan hjælpe med at holde styr på de mange …

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No Aliens, But Scientists Find More Evidence for Life on a Saturn Moon

Large molecules coming out of Enceladus, one of Saturn's moons, might be produced by a biological source beneath the surface.

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Partnership problems and not career planning mainly explain why women are freezing their eggs

Contrary to common suggestion, women are opting to freeze their eggs not to pursue education or careers but for reasons 'mostly revolving around women's lack of stable partnerships with men committed to marriage and parenting'. This is the conclusion of the largest qualitative study so far in elective egg freezing; 150 subjects from four IVF clinics in the USA and three in Israel were interviewed,

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Simulation breaks quantum computing world record

Researchers have set a new world record in simulating quantum computing power on a classical computer. If a quantum computer were a racing car it wouldn’t so much speed past a Formula One, it would simply take a private shortcut to appear at the finishing line just after the starting gun fires. And if you walked over to look under the hood to see how it worked, the engine would promptly collapse

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New drug and material discoveries to be untangled in VR

Scientists at the University of Bristol have developed new virtual reality (VR) cloud-based tools to help academics and industry progress new drugs, materials and boost the teaching of chemistry.

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Blood test enables reading out the internal clock

With a new blood test, researchers at the Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin can determine the state of the internal clock of a person. Once the internal rhythm of patient is known, drugs could be administered at particular times of day making them more effective and with fewer side effects than standard therapy. The study was published in The Journal of Clinical Investigation.

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Neandertals practiced close-range hunting 120,000 years ago

An international team of scientists reports the oldest unambiguous hunting lesions documented in the history of humankind. The lesions were found on skeletons of two large-sized extinct fallow deer killed by Neandertals about 120,000 years ago around the shores of a small lake (Neumark-Nord 1) near present-day Halle in the eastern part of Germany.

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Prospective teachers more likely to view black faces than white faces as angry

A preliminary study of prospective teachers finds that they are more likely to view the face of black adults as angry compared to the faces of white adults. Similarly, the study participants viewed the behavior of black children as more hostile than the behavior of white children.

6h

 

Study reveals how polymers relax after stressful processing

The polymers that make up synthetic materials need time to de-stress after processing, researchers said. A new study has found that entangled, long-chain polymers in solutions relax at two different rates, marking an advancement in fundamental polymer physics. The findings will provide a better understanding of the physical properties of polymeric materials and critical new insight to how individu

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Direct conversion of non-neuronal cells into nerve cells

Researchers of the Mainz University Medical Center discovered that on the way to becoming neurons pericytes need to go through a neural stem cell-like state. They succeeded in manipulating the signaling pathways in this intermediate state, which enabled them to either activate or inhibit neuronal reprogramming.

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Better social support and access to exercise classes could help people with lung conditions

Research has found that contact with healthcare professionals, support from peers and access to regular organized exercise sessions help people with chronic lung conditions to be physically active.

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Antioxidant supplements fail to improve sperm quality in infertile men

Despite many study results suggesting that antioxidants have a positive effect on abnormal sperm parameters associated with male infertility, a large US clinical trial of 174 couples has found that an antioxidant formulation taken daily by the male partner for a minimum of three months made no difference to sperm concentration, motility or morphology, nor to the rate of DNA fragmentation.

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Discovery of new biomarker could provide personalized treatment options for bladder cancer

A research team at Mount Sinai has identified two microRNA activity-based biomarkers that can provide insights regarding which patients with p53-like bladder cancer may have a better versus worse prognosis.

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Sicario: Day of the Soldado Is Dead Behind the Eyes

Sicario: Day of the Soldado is a nightmare. There’s bloody violence, growled dialogue, inky visuals—and in this world Mexican drug cartels, Somali pirate kings, and ISIS have essentially combined forces to smuggle suicide bombers into the U.S. The film, a sequel to Denis Villeneuve’s 2015 border thriller Sicario , uses this ugly scenario as a flimsy excuse for a bunch of grim set-pieces, where CI

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Teachers lacking educational background in science use inquiry-oriented instruction least

New study shows that eighth-grade science teachers without an educational background in science are less likely to practice inquiry-oriented science instruction, possibly contributing to the US lack of qualified STEM workers.

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Gene discovery unlocks mysteries to our immunity

Researchers have identified a new gene that plays a critical role in regulating the body's immune response to infection and disease.

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Mindfulness is key to tinnitus relief research reveals

New studies suggest mindfulness-based CBT could significantly help tinnitus sufferers.

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Does a full hospital mean higher infection risk?

While it might seem obvious that a fuller hospital would mean higher risk of hospital-acquired infections among its patients, a new study finds the opposite to be true. It uses a new approach to calculate the actual occupancy level at the time an infection occurs, and could be used for more uniform tracking of this important factor in patient safety, and evaluating what factors protect patients fr

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Screening a tiny section of DNA to avoid severe reactions to some meds

Researchers have found that a simple DNA test can predict if East Asian patients are likely to have bad reactions to thiopurine medications.

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Look Closely: These Aren't Flowers—They're Fireworks

Photographer Charlie Sin turns flares into flora.

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Algorithm matches human cardiologists in detecting heart attacks

Medical data tends to be messy and hard to annotate, which makes it hard for neural networks to learn from. But machine learning is beginning to make progress.

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More young people active in public affairs despite negative perceptions

Fears that democratic society could be undermined because young people are not participating enough in public affairs have been dispelled by researchers at the University of Huddersfield.

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A new twist on how parasites invade host cells

Researchers from CNRS, INSERM and the Université Grenoble Alpes have decoded the mechanisms used by the parasite Toxoplasma gondii to enter the cells of a host. Using high-resolution, high-speed imaging, they identified a unique process by which the parasite closes the 'entry door' it creates in order to enter and inhabit a host cell.

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Can doctors identify older patients at risk of medication harm?

Medication-related harm (MRH) is common in older adults following hospital discharge. A new British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology study has examined whether doctors can predict which older patients will experience MRH requiring care following hospital discharge, and whether clinical experience and confidence in prediction influence the accuracy of predictions.

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Mechanism leading to cortical malformation from brain-only mutations identified

A Korean research team led by Professor Jeong Ho Lee at the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology has recently investigated the molecular mechanism of defective neuronal migration in FMCDs.

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A ruthenium-based catalyst with highly active, flat surfaces outperforms metal-based competitors

Scientists in Japan and India have developed a reusable, high-performance catalyst based on flat-shaped ruthenium nanoparticles (Ru-NP) for the production of valuable chemicals. Due to its demonstrated durability, the catalyst could be widely used in the large-scale production of many types of dyes, detergents, agrochemicals and pharmaceuticals.

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Reward and unease are closely linked in the brain

Mice that lack a certain receptor in the brain are attracted to situations associated with discomfort, such as inflammation and nausea, according to a new study from Linköping University, Sweden. The finding has been published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation.

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Hope for new catalysts with high activity

Osaka University scientists elucidated the activation mechanism of NPG catalysts that made poisonous CO gas harmless.

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Scientists identify novel function of self-renewal factor of spermatogonial stem cells

A research team reports a novel function of fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2), a self-renewal factor for spermatogonial stem cell (SSC) which is the origin of sperm production. Although it has demonstrated that both FGF2 and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) is indispensable for SSC self-renewal and survival in vitro, the present study reveals that FGF2 has different properties fr

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Artificial ovary could help women conceive after chemotherapy

Scientists have taken further steps in creating an artificial ovary that could one day be used to help women who have lost their fertility because of cancer treatment

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Fish rescued as River Teme dries up in heatwave

More than 130 trout and salmon are saved after river levels plummet.

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Image: Saturn's inside-out rings

In this curious view, Saturn looms in the foreground on the left, adorned by shadows cast by the giant planet's rings. To the right, the rings emerge from behind the planet's hazy limb, stretching outwards from Cassini's perspective.

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We inflate the importance of our state’s role in history

People in the United States have hugely exaggerated ideas about how much their home states helped to write the nation’s narrative, research on “collective narcissism” finds. “Our study shows a massive narcissistic bias in the way that people from the United States remember the contributions of their home states to US history,” says Henry L. “Roddy” Roediger, professor of psychological and brain s

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ESHG welcomes the Council of Europe's new protocol on genetic testing

The European Society of Human Genetics welcomesthe Council of Europe's protocol on genetic testing for health purposes, which came into force yesterday.

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Loss of cilia leads to melanoma

Most cells in the human body have a cilium, a slender cell protuberance that picks up signals from the cell's external environment. Researchers at the University of Zurich have now shown that these fine sensory antennae play a key role in the formation of melanoma. When cilia are prevented from developing in benign pigment cells, the cells degenerate and develop an aggressive form of melanoma.

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UGR makes a step towards earlier diagnosis of pancreatic cancer

A multidisciplinary team from the University of Granada has developed software that can make it easier to identify potential pancreatic cancer biomarkers and thereby achieve earlier diagnosis. Pancreatic cancer can be diagnosed using biomarkers which are differentially expressed genes indicative of this illness.

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Artificial intelligence accurately predicts distribution of radioactive fallout

Researchers at the University of Tokyo Institute of Industrial Science created a machine-learning-based tool that can predict where radioactive emissions from nuclear power plants will disperse. After training using extensive data on previous weather patterns, the tool consistently achieved over 85 percent predictive accuracy, and up to 95 percent in winter when large and predictable weather syste

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Predicting bad side effects

Researchers from Japan's Tohoku University and colleagues have found that a simple DNA test can predict if East Asian patients are likely to have bad reactions to thiopurine medications.

7h

 

Does a full hospital mean higher infection risk?

While it might seem obvious that a fuller hospital would mean higher risk of hospital-acquired infections among its patients, a new study finds the opposite to be true. It uses a new approach to calculate the actual occupancy level at the time an infection occurs, and could be used for more uniform tracking of this important factor in patient safety, and evaluating what factors protect patients fr

7h

 

Mindfulness is key to tinnitus relief research reveals

New studies suggest mindfulness-based CBT could significantly help tinnitus sufferers.

7h

 

Tesla just hit a major milestone—five hours lateTesla Elon Musk Model

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The complete guide to Bluetooth headphone terms

DIY Shop for the features that really matter. Wireless headphones are the future, but they’re so complicated that it’s hard to know what to look for as you shop for the right pair. Here’s your guide to the Bluetooth…

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Transforming space exploration

The University of Leicester is spearheading the development of new power generation technologies for space exploration as part of a European Space Agency funded programme.

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Scientists discover autophagy inhibitory peptides from giant ankyrins

Autophagy, meaning "self-eating" in Greek, is a general metabolic mechanism characteristic of nearly all eukaryotic species, from the single cell yeast to humans. It is a process by which cells degrade unnecessary components for materials recycling and energy generation to survive against stress or maintain homeostasis.

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Method makes DNA ‘barcodes’ way more reliable

Researchers have developed a new method for correcting the errors that creep into ‘DNA barcodes,’ yielding far more accurate results and paving the way for more ambitious medical research in the future. In the same way that barcodes on your groceries help stores know what’s in your cart, DNA barcodes help biologists attach genetic labels to biological molecules to do their own tracking during res

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Computer algorithm maps cancer resistance to drugs, therapy

New methods of studying the evolution of treatment resistance in head and neck cancer are being developed by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center.

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Compounds found in green tea and wine may block formation of toxic metabolites

A new Tel Aviv University study suggests there is hope of treating certain inborn congenital metabolic diseases — a hope found in green tea and in red wine.

7h

 

Anemones take the heat with a little help from their friends

Research reveals the genetic response to heat stress and highlights symbiotic algae's role.

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Teachers lacking educational background in science use inquiry-oriented instruction least

New study shows that eighth-grade science teachers without an educational background in science are less likely to practice inquiry-oriented science instruction, possibly contributing to the US lack of qualified STEM workers.

7h

 

Giant panda population research shows new challenges

In a recently published study in the journal Conservation Letters, a team of scientists reports results of a large-scale study examining giant panda habitat use trends and changing threats to their survival. This benchmark study is based on nearly 70,000 person-hours of survey work by China's State Forestry Administration throughout the panda's range in Sichuan, covering three-quarters of the enti

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Astronomers study the merging galaxy cluster Abell 3376 and its radio relics

Using the Suzaku space telescope, astronomers have conducted an X-ray spectral study of the nearby merging galaxy cluster Abell 3376 and its two arc-shaped radio relics. The new research reveals more insights into the properties of the radio sources in this cluster. The findings are presented in a paper published June 20 on arXiv.org.

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Observing the universe with a camera traveling near the speed of light

Astronomers strive to observe the universe via ever more advanced techniques. Whenever researchers invent a new method, unprecedented information is collected and people's understanding of the cosmos deepens.

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Discovery leads to new ageing cream and chicken feed

What do a novel anti-ageing ingredient for cosmetics and a new type of chicken feed have in common? They were both produced using a new solvent developed by Leiden biologists in 2011. The medium is neither solid nor liquid, and the industry is now starting to see it's many possibilities.

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UA forecast: Below-average hurricane activity

Hurricane season didn't officially start until June 1, but Subtropical Storm Alberto made an appearance early, causing more than $50 million in damage as it made its way inland and up the coast in late May. Twelve people—seven in Cuba and five in the U.S.—died as Alberto's fallout included flooding, landslides, tornados and mudslides.

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Exclusive first look: Nerf’s AR-Powered Laser Ops Pro blasters

Gadgets Pew pew pew, the home game. Nerf's new laser tag blasters have a single-player, augmented reality mode.

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Star Wars News: Is the End Nigh for 'Star Wars Story' Movies?

Unsurprisingly, the answer is complicated.

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10 Best Android Phones of 2018 (New, Unlocked, and Cheap)

Wonder what the absolute best Android phone is right now? Look no further.

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Enzyme may get key role in drug design for breast cancer and brain condition

In recent years, researchers have focused on the enzyme TLK2, suspecting it of playing a main role in several diseases. A new study conducted at the University of Copenhagen now reveals that the enzyme exhibits lower levels of activity in intellectual disability and that it is possible to inhibit it in breast cancer, where it is overactive. The study thus suggests that the enzyme may be a target f

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Researchers describe unique molecular activity in water-ethanol mixtures

Researchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University have observed the formation of holes that move by themselves in droplets of ionic liquids (IL) sitting inside water-ethanol mixtures. This complex phenomenon is driven by an interplay between how ionic liquids dissolve, and how the boundary around the droplet fluctuates. Self-driven motion is a key feature of active matter, materials that use ambient

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Boldly going where no plant has gone before

Joe Chappell's latest venture in plant-based drug development could be described, quite literally, as "out of this world."

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Airbus sticking to delivery targets despite engine delays

Airbus said Monday it is sticking to its target of 800 aircraft deliveries this year, despite problems with getting timely delivery of new fuel-efficient engines for its A320neo jets.

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UA forecast: Below-average hurricane activity

The UA hurricane forecasting model, which has proved to be extremely accurate over the years, is calling for fewer hurricanes in the Atlantic this year on the heels of a devastating 2017.

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Chronic pain remains the same or gets better after stopping opioid treatment

Stopping long-term opioid treatment does not make chronic, non-cancer-related pain worse and, in some cases, makes it better, Washington State University researchers have found.

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Childhood Should Be Sacred

When desecrated in our name, it defiles all humanity — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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BP launches $28bn Azerbaijan gas pipeline

British oil giant BP has opened a new $28-billion gas pipeline in Azerbaijan, the company said Monday, in a project expected to reduce European dependence on Russian supplies.

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China aims to outstrip NASA with super-powerful rocket

China is working on a super-powerful rocket that would be capable of delivering heavier payloads into low orbit than NASA, a leading Chinese space expert was quoted as saying Monday.

7h

 

What odors do female blackbuck antelope find enticing in a male?

At Tal Chhapar, a wildlife sanctuary in the heart of the Thar desert, a strange drama is staged twice every year. In the blistering heat of summer from March to April and the post-monsoon months of September and October, up to 100 blackbuck antelope males stake out territories on the flatland to entice females to mate with them in a unique assemblage called a lek.

7h

 

SpaceX delivers AI robot, ice cream, mice to space station

The International Space Station got its first robot with artificial intelligence Monday, along with some berries, ice cream and identical brown mice.

7h

 

Dude, Dell is going public again

Dell is going public again after a five-year sojourn as a privately held company.

8h

 

New kinematics for customized, high-precision milling

Manufacturers generally must offer high-quality products at low prices in order to remain competitive. Three Fraunhofer Institutes are therefore working on the next generation of industrial robots which will facilitate cost-effective production processes. The researchers are focusing on developing a new kinematics for milling lightweight materials, metals, and steels. The aim: achieving a producti

8h

 

Using virtual reality systems to teach chemistry in 3-D

A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions across the U.K. has developed a framework for using virtual reality (VR) systems to teach chemistry. In their paper published on the open access site Science Advances, the team describes the system they developed and the advantages it has over standard teaching methods.

8h

 

New data for understanding how heavier elements are made in the cosmos

Nuclear binding energies of several rare-earth isotopes have been measured for the first time. The experiment carried out in the Accelerator Laboratory of the University of Jyväskylä, Finland, provides essential data for understanding how elements heavier than iron are produced in the Cosmos.

8h

 

Galaxy in the early universe contains carbon after all

In 2015, Jorryt Matthee thought he discovered an extremely distant galaxy called CR7, which lacked elements heavier than helium. Three years later, he shows with measurements using the ALMA telescope that the galaxy does have carbon after all, and even in normal concentrations. The American Astronomical Society recently paid attention to Matthee's research.

8h

 

The US natural gas industry is leaking way more methane than previously thought. Here's why that matters

Natural gas is displacing coal, which could help fight climate change because burning it produces fewer carbon emissions. But producing and transporting natural gas releases methane, a greenhouse gas that also contributes to climate change. How big is the methane problem?

8h

 

Rural Americans' struggles against factory farm pollution find traction in court

As U.S. livestock farming becomes more industrial, it is changing rural life. Many people now live near Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations (CAFOs) – large facilities that can house thousands of animals in close quarters. Neighbors have to contend with noxious odors, toxic emissions and swarms of insects, and have had little success in obtaining relief – but this could be changing.

8h

 

Autonomous trucks for logistics centers

Spatially demarcated areas such as company premises are ideal test areas for autonomous driving: the vehicles do not require road registration, traffic is manageable, other people who use the road are informed and unauthorized individuals are not allowed access. In the collaborative project AutoTruck, Fraunhofer is cooperating with industry to develop technologies for autonomous trucks in logistic

8h

 

From stone dildos to sexbots—how technology is changing sex

As the TV series Westworld wraps up its second season, the show continues to spark discussion about a potential future that involves lifelike sex robots.

8h

 

Teslas billige bil er på vej ud af produktionshelvede

Producenten har efter et halvt års forsinkelser nået målet for den nye Model 3. De sprøjter nu 5.000 elbiler ud om ugen.

8h

 

A factory to go

In the future, companies will be able to offer flexible production close to their customers. A fully automated production line can be housed inside a 20-foot ISO container, which a heavy truck can transport quickly to wherever it is needed. Medical products can be manufactured in close proximity to a hospital, for instance. Fraunhofer researchers teamed up with partners to develop this mobile fact

8h

 

Data scientists in hot demand thanks to Big Data

Data scientist is one of the most attractive jobs of the 21st century. This impression is confirmed when you take a look at relevant online job portals. According to a study by the McKinsey Global Institute, in the USA demand exceeds supply by far – and this does not appear to be any different in Germany. But what is it that makes this job so interesting in the first place? Someone who knows this

8h

 

A sentinel to watch over ocular pressure

Fast, easy and uncomplicated – that sums up the EYEMATE sensor system developed jointly by Duisburg's Fraunhofer Institute for Microelectronic Circuits and Systems IMS and Hanover's Implandata Ophthalmic Products GmbH (Implandata). It is a real innovation in intraocular pressure measurement. EYEMATE is sure to make life easier for glaucoma patients and their eye doctors. This implant provides acti

8h

 

Electron spectrometer deciphers quantum mechanical effects

Electronic circuits are miniaturized to such an extent that quantum mechanical effects become noticeable. Using photoelectron spectrometers, solid-state physicists and material developers can discover more about such electron-based processes. Fraunhofer researchers have helped revolutionize this technology with a new spectrometer that works in the megahertz range.

8h

 

The best protection against my unforeseeable small-scale disasters is to take immediate action

Climate change will have consequences—but when these will occur and how severe they will be cannot be precisely determined. Perhaps it is this uncertainty that will encourage people to act more quickly to prevent climate change. This is what the results of computer simulations by scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology in Plön, the University of Toronto and Geomar in Kiel s

8h

 

The not-school movement that's helping young people re-engage with learning

Alternative schooling programs could deliver greater learning outcomes for young people who are struggling at school, according to University of South Australia researcher, Dr. Thomas Stehlik.

8h

 

Dogs with jobs join cat fight

Who let the dogs out? And why? Wildlife warriors have enlisted dogs in the fight to save our threatened animals from feral cat predation.

8h

 

Trump Has Done More Than Pull Out of Paris

There’s new evidence that President Donald Trump has already made the planet hotter. Since taking office, Trump has done something substantively worse for the climate than pull the United States out of the Paris Agreement on climate change: He has slashed at a large body of climate-focused rules issued by President Obama. With the rules no longer in force and unlikely to be replaced, companies ar

8h

 

His Brother’s Keeper

I t was an early Sunday evening, July 2, 2017, and T. J. Smith, the chief spokesman for the Baltimore Police Department, wanted a plate of Maryland crabs. He plunked half a bushel onto the kitchen counter of his suburban home and began pulling ingredients from his cabinets and refrigerator. He let the crabs steam until their shells turned the color of fire. But before he could eat, Smith had to r

8h

 

Is an artificial tan safer than the real thing?

Health Sunless tanners work for the same reason a steak turns brown. With summer in full swing, lots of people are looking to get tan. Most of us are even willing to risk skin cancer for a brief glow.

8h

 

CO2 supply issues may trigger meat shortage, processing industry warns

Carbon dioxide supplies could take up to three weeks to return to normal with key gas producers on shutdown Supplies of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) may not return to normal levels for another two to three weeks – triggering likely shortages of meat for UK shoppers – the processing industry has warned. The production of crumpets , beer , fizzy drinks, fresh chicken and pork have been affected by shorta

8h

 

Botanical life in close-up – in pictures

Colin Salter’s new book is a selection of extraordinary electron microscopic images of the plant world around us, including seeds, pollen, fruiting bodies, trees and leaves, flowers, vegetables and fruit Continue reading…

8h

 

8h

 

Sikkerhedsforskere afslører nye sårbarheder i LTE-netværk

Blandt andet DNS Spoofing-angreb døbt 'aLTEr' udnytter mangler i LTE-netværk, der benyttes af milliarder verden over.

8h

 

The Pentagon Is Building a Dream Team of Tech-Savvy Soldiers

For years the Army has tried to recruit talent from Silicon Valley. A new initiative aims to nurture the rising technologists within its own ranks, too.

8h

 

Image of the Day: Beating Heart

Scientists at the Allen Institute for Cell Science have developed an open-source stem cell line with fluorescent tags for cardiac cells.

8h

 

Cold Cases Heat Up as Law Enforcement Uses Genetics to Solve Past Crimes

Since the Golden State killer was caught, the same family ancestry database has led to more arrests — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

 

Beer Shortage Looms in Europe As CO2 Supply Dwindles

The U.K. is running out of gas — for their beer.

8h

 

Are These Dots Purple, Blue or Proof That Humans Will Never Be Happy?

Are these dots blue or purple? According to a new study, the answer is pretty depressing.

9h

 

ECOSTRESS launches to space station on SpaceX mission

An Earth science instrument built by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, and experiments investigating cellular biology and artificial intelligence, are among the research heading to the International Space Station following Friday's launch of a NASA-contracted SpaceX Dragon spacecraft at 5:42 a.m. EDT.

9h

 

Why Henry Kissinger–or Anyone Else–Shouldn't Fear AI

Facts take a back seat when well-known people make misinformed pronouncements about "existential threats" — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9h

 

Sexual abuse, harassment and discrimination 'rife' among Australian academics

Sexual abuse, harassment and discrimination pervade parts of Australian universities, according to survey results released today by the Australian Women's History Network.

9h

 

Who's Afraid of Mexican Populism?

In many ways, Andrés Manuel López Obrador’s victory Sunday in the Mexican presidential elections seemed preordained. The socialist former Mexico City mayor is a two-time presidential candidate. He has been labeled a populist, an outsider , Mexico’s Donald Trump , and a “ tropical messiah .” His ascent to the pinnacle of Mexican politics, after failed runs in 2006 and 2012, is as much a testament

9h

 

What Does the Future of Abortion Rights Look Like?

In the summer of 1988, abortion-rights attorneys debated whether to appeal a major abortion case involving minors, Hodgson v. Minnesota , to the Supreme Court. Anti-abortion lawyers working with Americans United for Life knew exactly why the opposition hesitated: Anthony Kennedy, a 52-year-old Catholic appointed by Ronald Reagan, had recently taken his place on the Supreme Court . But instead of

9h

 

Smart city planning can preserve old trees and the wildlife that needs them

Australia's landscapes are dotted with mature eucalypts that were standing well before Captain Cook sailed into Botany Bay. These old trees were once revered as an icon of the unique Australian landscape, but they're rapidly becoming collateral damage from population growth. Mature eucalypts are routinely removed to make way for new suburbs.

9h

 

Can Sunscreen Really Repair Your DNA?

Several products claim to repair DNA damage inflicted by UVB rays. What's the science behind them?

9h

 

The Airbnb Challenger You've Never Heard of (by Name)

Booking Holdings, the company formerly known as Priceline, is spending liberally on advertising ahead of Airbnb's expected IPO next year.

9h

 

Why (and How) California Is Destroying Mountains of Weed

How exactly do you obliterate potentially tens of thousands of pounds of cannabis across the state? Not unlike how you get rid of yard trimmings.

9h

 

Fake Meat, Served Six Ways

Cellular agriculture has the potential to protect animal welfare and curb global warming; Joi Ito, a former vegan, grapples with the future of meat.

9h

 

Hope for new catalysts with high activity

Gold is a metal that is chemically inactive and does not corrode, but nanoporous gold (NPG), with its sponge-like structures, acts as a catalyst to promote chemical reactions such as carbon monoxide (CO) oxidation. Its mechanisms, however, remained unclear.

9h

 

New IR instrument searches for habitable planets

A new instrument to search for potentially habitable/inhabited planets has started operation at the Subaru Telescope. This instrument, IRD (InfraRed Doppler), will look for habitable planets around red dwarf stars. Astronomers are hoping that investigating these small but numerous stars will uncover a plethora of new planets.

9h

 

Bacteria proven to be worth their salt

Bacteria isolated from desert plants could provide the key to maintaining productive agriculture in arid regions.

9h

 

Anemones take the heat with a little help from their friends

A core set of heat-stress-response genes has been identified in anemones in a study that also highlights the role of symbiotic algae in coping with temperature, an important revelation for planning conservation efforts.

9h

 

Fuel chemistry distilled

A new conceptual model for describing a fuel's composition can accelerate and simplify combustion simulations. The gasoline and diesel we pump into our vehicles is a complex cocktail that can contain thousands of different chemicals. But look closer at the fuel, and the overwhelming complexity starts to resolve itself, KAUST researchers have shown.

9h

 

Game changing invention to revolutionise cybersecurity

Cyberattacks may become impossible with the creation of the first practical quantum random number generator.

9h

 

Scanning in the fourth dimension

Three-dimensional (3-D) computed tomography is a widely used technology that visualizes an object's external and internal structure by assembling a series of two-dimensional images taken sequentially across or around it. However, as anyone who has had a medical magnetic resonance imaging scan will recall, this type of 3-D reconstruction requires the subject to be motionless throughout the capture

9h

 

All the forests in the world from a single layer of cells

From ancient European beech trees to gigantic Californian redwoods and Australian mountain ashes, new research has found the enormous trunks of these trees are all formed from a single layer of cells no wider than the tip of a needle.

9h

 

Finally, there’s a way to keep syphilis growing in the lab

Scientists have figured out how to keep a sample of the bacteria Treponema pallidum alive and infectious for over eight months.

9h

 

Nye statsstøttede skove bliver pesticid-fri

Skovrejsning skal ikke foregå med pesticider fremover, fastslår miljøministeren. En teknikalitet betyder, at loven først træder i kraft om et år, men allerede i år prioriterer man pesticidløse skovrejsningsprojekter øverst.

9h

 

New results show that matter and antimatter interact with light in precisely the same way

It is one of the greatest mysteries in the universe: Why is there so much more matter than antimatter?

10h

 

Some monkeys in Panama may have just stumbled into the Stone Age

One group of capuchins uses stone tools, but neighbouring groups do not – suggesting primates – including us – might enter the Stone Age simply by chance

10h

 

VTT develops piglet vaccination to reduce antibiotics use

VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland has developed a vaccine, diluted into drinking water, to treat diarrhoea on piglets being weaned. The vaccine reduces the global resistance problem caused by excessive antibiotic use.

10h

 

Healthy red blood cells flow in an ordered pattern unlike their diseased counterparts

An interdisciplinary, international team of researchers including Northwestern Engineering professor Petia Vlahovska has discovered that healthy red blood cells assemble into a two-dimensional crystal pattern whereas pathological red blood cells succumb to disorder.

10h

 

New research explains why some molecules have irregular forms

There's always a reason for the way molecules form and how they are shaped. Once researchers understand the bonds in molecules, they figure out ways to use the materials they form to the best advantage, unlocking new innovations for science and technology.

10h

 

A new twist on how parasites invade host cells

Toxoplasmosis is a widespread infection caused by the parasite Toxoplasma gondii, which multiplies within a host and irreversible tissue damage. Humans primarily become infected by eating undercooked meat and poorly washed fruits and vegetables. After infecting the digestive system, the parasite enters deep tissue in the nervous system, among other places, and remains there to develop, nearly unde

10h

 

Invasive Giant Hogweed's Solar-Activated Sap Causes Blistering Skin Burns

The plant, which has spread to 11 states and was recently found in Virginia, attacks the DNA in human cells — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

10h

 

'The ocean is my home – and it's being trashed'

Turning the 4,000 live-aboard yachts around the world into a research fleet.

10h

 

Scavengers "protect" HDL

High-density lipoprotein (HDL) is widely thought to protect against the development of atherosclerosis, yet drugs that raise levels of HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) have failed to reduce the risk of heart disease.

10h

 

Researchers find vitamin D receptor is target for disruption by environmental chemicals

New research from North Carolina State University sheds light on the ways in which environmental chemicals can affect vitamin D receptors (VDR). The work shows that compounds identified as possible VDR disruptors in the Tox21 database interact with VDR in vitro and supports the efficacy of high throughput screening programs to identify compounds of interest.

10h

 

Developing countries face rising payments due to climate change, says report

Developing countries face debt payments of up to $168 billion over the next ten years as a result of their vulnerability to man-made climate change.

10h

 

Solar purifier creates its own disinfectant from water and sunlight

A hiker gets disoriented while on a desert trek when she comes upon a drying puddle left by a recent rain.

10h

 

Dispersion of seagrasses via vegetative fragments

NUS marine biologists have developed a model describing the dispersal of seagrass via vegetative fragments for the ecological engineering of coastlines.

10h

 

Simple swap for a greener toolkit

A metal catalyst that gives distinct carbon-based molecular skeletons upon ligand change may unlock cost-effective, green synthetic route

10h

 

Techtopia #59: Big data og AI svigtede Tyskland i VM

Podcast: Tyskland kæmpede hårdt i VM i fodbold. Holdet fik hjælp af det tyske softwarefirma SAP, der har lavet løsningen Sports One.

10h

 

First confirmed image of newborn planet caught with ESO's VLT

SPHERE, a planet-hunting instrument on ESO's Very Large Telescope, has captured the first confirmed image of a planet caught in the act of forming in the dusty disc surrounding a young star. The young planet is carving a path through the primordial disc of gas and dust around the very young star PDS 70. The data suggest that the planet's atmosphere is cloudy.

10h

 

Big Business Keeps Winning at the Supreme Court

The Supreme Court headlines last week were dominated—and rightly so—by Justice Anthony Kennedy’s retirement and the endorsement of President Donald Trump’s xenophobic travel ban. The former shifts the Court to the right for the next generation while the latter will be remembered as among the worst decisions since Korematsu upheld the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II. While the

10h

 

First confirmed image of a newborn planet revealed

Nascent planet seen carving a path through the disc of gas and dust surrounding the very young star PDS70 It is a moment of birth that has previously proved elusive, but astronomers say they now have the first confirmed image of the formation of a planet. The startling snapshot shows a bright blob – the nascent planet – travelling through the dust and gas surrounding a young star, known as PDS70,

10h

 

We must try harder to avoid biological bias in clinical trials

Entry requirements for trials are stacked against certain groups, so the results don't apply to everyone. We need to make things more inclusive

10h

 

Footsteps: The Balancing Act of Arches

Decades ago, the pioneering writer Edward Abbey immortalized then-empty Arches National Park. Can it survive the modern influx of visitors?

11h

 

Mind: Endless Gaming May Be a Bad Habit. That Doesn’t Make It a Mental Illness.

The World Health Organization has made “internet gaming” a diagnosable disorder. But many experts aren’t even sure it exists.

11h

 

World's first animals caused global warming

The evolution of Earth's first animals more than 500 million years ago caused global warming, new research shows.

11h

 

A Funeral for a Vision of Europe

PARIS—On Friday morning, news was just trickling in from a heated European Union summit on immigration whose pre-dawn result seemed to be a tightening of borders and the creation of centers to “process” would-be arrivals before they dared inch toward Europe. Headlines from America were of children separated from their parents at the Mexican border and how Justice Anthony Kennedy’s retirement migh

11h

 

Many Common Sunscreens May Harm Coral. Here's What To Use Instead

Hawaii is about to ban the sale of sunscreens containing certain chemicals that have been shown to harm coral reefs. Environmentalists urge a switch to mineral-based products. (Image credit: Photo illustration by Eslah Attar/NPR)

11h

 

Styrkelse af folkeskolelæreres teknologiforståelse får pris fra Stanford

Teknologiundervisningen i folkeskolen er i de fleste lande præget af indkøb af teknologier uden en nærmere kobling til læringsmål. Men sådan er det ikke i dansk innovativt projekt.

11h

 

World's first animals caused global warming

The evolution of Earth's first animals more than 500 million years ago caused global warming, new research shows.

11h

 

Partnership problems and not career planning mainly explain why women are freezing their eggs

Contrary to common suggestion, women are opting to freeze their eggs not to pursue education or careers but for reasons 'mostly revolving around women's lack of stable partnerships with men committed to marriage and parenting'. This is the conclusion of the largest qualitative study so far in elective egg freezing; 150 subjects from four IVF clinics in the USA and three in Israel were interviewed,

12h

 

Self-replicator that is simultaneously created and destroyed may lead to better understanding of life

As living organisms eat, grow, and self-regenerate, all the while they are slowly dying. Chemically speaking, this is because life is thermodynamically unstable, while its ultimate waste products are in a state of thermal equilibrium. It's somewhat of a morbid thought, but it's also one of the characteristics that is common to all forms of life.

12h

 

2/7-18: I dag er det e-dag

Eulers tal e er et af de vigtigste tal inden for matematik, naturvidenskab og ingeniørvidenskab. Så lad os fejre det i dag.

12h

 

UNESCO marks Colombian national park for conservation

Colombia's massive Chiribiquete National Park has made UNESCO's World Heritage List, the United Nations body announced Sunday.

12h

 

Wildfires spark evacuations in northern California

Californian authorities have issued red flag weather warnings and mandatory evacuation orders after a series of wildfires fanned by high winds and hot temperatures ripped through thousands of acres.

13h

 

13h

 

Mixed halide chemistry can be used to control magnetism in ultrathin magnetic devices

Physicists, chemists, and materials scientists have been probing the nature of layered magnetic materials for several decades, searching for clues to the properties of these materials that are more complex than they appear.

13h

 

CEO Musk: Tesla hits weekly goal of making 5,000 Models 3sTesla Elon Musk Model

Electric car maker Tesla Inc. has delivered on its CEO's promise to build a lower-priced car at a rate of 5,000 per week by the end of June.

13h

 

I never said that! High-tech deception of 'deepfake' videos

Hey, did my congressman really say that? Is that really President Donald Trump on that video, or am I being duped?

13h

 

Clínica 0-19: False hope in Monterrey for brain cancer patients (part 2 of 3)

Last week, I discussed Clínica 0-19, a clinic in Monterrey, Mexico whose doctors claim to be able to treat the deadly brainstem cancer DIPG using intra-arterial chemotherapy and immunotherapy. This week, I discuss what I've learned since last week, specifically a lot more about just what it is that these doctors do, why it is scientifically dubious and unproven, and why I am becoming even more har

13h

 

Can you solve it? Bigger! Faster! Heavier! – quiz

10 problems about big numbers Hi guzzlers We use numbers every day to describe the world – distances, weights, speeds, debts, populations, and so on. Yet most of us struggle to have an intuitive sense of what these numbers mean. How big is big? How fast is fast? Continue reading…

14h

 

Ung dansker lænset for 130.000 kroners kryptovaluta af ukendte hackere

En ung trader fra Randers mærkede konsekvensen af at ligge inde med en større mængde kryptovaluta på egen krop.

15h

 

Mixed halide chemistry can be used to control magnetism in ultrathin magnetic devices

Magnetization in an ultrathin magnetic device can be re-directed beyond the previously known confines of in-plane or out-of-plane spaces, researchers from Boston College report in Advanced Materials.

16h

 

Supplemental antioxidants may reduce exacerbations in cystic fibrosis

An antioxidant-enriched vitamin may decrease respiratory exacerbations in people with cystic fibrosis (CF), according to new research published online in April in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

16h

 

When mentors do this one thing, it can help reduce teen delinquency

When educators and coaches make kids feel like they matter, it reduces delinquency and destructive behavior, according to a study led by a University of Kansas professor.

16h

 

Music and the Brain

When you hear a favorite song do you smile involuntarily? Tap your feet? Start humming? Music’s strange power over our emotions and memories has a deep history dating more than 30,000 years ago… — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

16h

 

VIDEO: SDU-professor advarer mod synergieffekter ved nanopartikler

Brugen af metalnanopartikler som f.eks. sølvnano kan vise sig at være både sundheds- og miljøskadelig, advarer professor Frank Kjeldsen fra Institut for Biokemi og Molekylær Biologi ved Syddansk Universitet i Odense. Især fordi menneskeceller reagerer ekstra kraftigt på påvirkningen, når nanopartiklerne optræder sammen med andre metalnanopartikler.

17h

 

Bulwark Against an Abortion Ban? Medical Advances

Improved contraception and abortion pills mean the back-alley days are largely gone. But more restrictive abortion laws would especially affect poor and minority women.

20h

 

Did heavy rain give Mars its deep valleys?

Heavy rainfall may have formed the valley networks on Mars that bear a strong resemblance to those in arid landscapes here on Earth, according to a new study. Scientists have thought there must once have been enough water to feed streams that cut channels into the subsoil, but the origins of the water have been a matter of debate for years. Was it rainwater that caused streams and rivers to swell

21h

 

$20 blood test could help diagnose hepatitis B patients across Africa

A simple $20 blood test could help diagnose thousands of patients with hepatitis B in need of treatment in some of Africa's poorest regions.

21h

 

Blame these cells for the diarrhea chemo causes

Specialized immune cells called macrophages can trigger intestinal contractions, independent of the nervous system, that lead to the diarrhea so many cancer patients develop as a result of chemotherapy, according to new research in mice. Some 50 to 80 percent of cancer patients taking powerful chemotherapy drugs develop diarrhea, which can be severe and in some cases life-threatening. Their probl

21h

 

Focus on climate-related disasters may do more harm than good

Short-term management responses to natural disasters mediated by climate change “may be inefficient and even maladaptive in the long term,” according to a new paper. As hurricane season begins on the East Coast and the West Coast heads into fire season, there’s no time like the present to consider the short- and long-term effects of responses to disasters being shaped by the climate of a warming

21h

 

Why teens around the world face ‘double burden’ of malnutrition

A new study blames macro-level factors for the double burden of malnutrition among adolescents in developing countries. The double burden of malnutrition refers to the coexistence of undernutrition along with overweight and obesity, or diet-related noncommunicable diseases such as type 2 diabetes. “…the global health community has largely neglected the health needs of this population…” The study

21h

 

Rivers cover a lot more of the Earth than we thought

Rivers and streams cover more of the Earth than previously thought and therefore play a greater role in controlling concentrations of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, according to a new study. Using satellite images from NASA, the team developed the Global River Widths from Landsat (GRWL) Database, the most comprehensive global map of river length and width. “We added up all the rivers and str

22h

 

An artificial ovary for fertility preservation without the risk of reintroducing malignancy

Important steps in the development of an artificial ovary have been successfully completed by one of the world's leading groups in fertility preservation. Researchers from the Rigshospitalet in Copenhagen, Denmark, report today that they have for the first time isolated and grown human follicles to a point of 'biofunctionality' on a bioengineered ovarian scaffold made of 'decellularized' ovarian t

22h

 

'Artificial ovary' could help women conceive after chemotherapy

Development could allow women to have children after fertility-damaging treatments Doctors have made an “artificial ovary” from human tissue and eggs in a bid to help women have children after cancer treatment and other therapies that can damage female fertility. The team in Copenhagen showed that a lab-made ovary could keep human eggs alive for weeks at a time, raising hopes that the approach co

22h

 

Conflicting Ideas On Modern Feminism

Michel Martin talks about feminism with Mona Charen, author of Sex Matters: How Modern Feminism Lost Touch With Science, Love and Common Sense and Hanna Rosin, author of The End of Men: And The Rise of Women .

22h

 

Gene discovery unlocks mysteries to our immunity

Australia's national science agency CSIRO has identified a new gene that plays a critical role in regulating the body's immune response to infection and disease.

23h

 

People are racist towards their own ancestors

A study finds that when checking genetic ancestry, people cherry-pick which ancestors they identify with and which ignore. Read More

23h

 

People with “Maladaptive Daydreaming” spend an average of four hours a day lost in their imagination

"Daydreaming can evolve into an extreme and maladaptive behaviour, up to the point where it turns into a clinically significant condition," scientists say. Read More

23h

 

Starwatch: Hercules visible in summer trip through south-west

Find orange Arcturus and blue-white Vega in the night sky and they will point the way Track the constellation Hercules as it wheels highs across the summer sky. Although not bright, it has a distinctive shape and can be easily picked out with a little effort. Continue reading…

1d

 

Four dead, hundreds evacuated as torrential rains hit Romania

Days of torrential rains in Romania have claimed four lives and forced more than 250 people to flee their homes, local authorities said Sunday.

1d

 

War on plastic leaves manufacturers clutching at straws

For decades, plastic straws have been essential props for cocktail makers, smoothie lovers and fast food addicts.

1d

 

Firefighters tackle second wildfire in northern England

Firefighters in northern England launched a "large-scale attack" on a new moorland blaze Sunday, as emergency responders continued to battle another nearby wildfire that has been burning all week.

1d

 

Chasing dinosaurs in Myanmar's conflict-ridden north

"Amber hunters" on a quest for a Jurassic Park-style discovery of dinosaur remains sift through mounds of the precious resin in Myanmar—a lucrative trade that captivates palaeontologists but also fuels a decades-long conflict in the far north.

1d

 

Slovakia to feel most pain from Trump car tariffs: experts

As the world's largest per capita car producer, Slovakia stands to be hit hardest if US President Donald Trump makes good on his threat to impose a 20 percent tariff on cars imported from the EU, analysts say.

1d

 

UK forecaster issues 1st ever thunderstorm alert

Britain's Met Office weather forecasting service has issued its first thunderstorm alert in the agency's 164-year history.

1d

 

How Physics Lost Its Way

Physicist Sabine Hossenfelder claims desire for beauty and other subjective biases have led physicists astray — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

 

Multitasking is killing your productivity

Multitasking has been shown to diminish our ability to learn, stress us out, and kill our productivity. Here are some techniques to limit multitasking and help us regain our lost time. Read More

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When a smart home becomes a trap

Smart connected devices finding their way into million of’ homes are being taken over by domestic abusers, allowing them to invade and disrupt victims’ lives in a new, terrifying way Read More

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Off the scale: Can forensics save the world's most-trafficked mammal?

Forensic fingerprinting techniques will now be used in the battle against illegal wildlife trade as new methods of lifting fingermarks from trafficked animals.

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Did Satoshi Nakamoto Write This Book Excerpt? A WIRED Investigation

A mysteriously dropped manuscript and the never-ending hunt for bitcoin's inventor.

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