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Nyheder2018juli02

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First confirmed image of newborn planet caught with ESO's VLTVLT ESO Planet Newborn

Astronomers led by a group at the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy in Heidelberg, Germany have captured a spectacular snapshot of planetary formation around the young dwarf star PDS 70. By using the SPHERE instrument on ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT)—one of the most powerful planet-hunting instruments in existence—the international team has made the first robust detection of a young planet, na

10h

 

Dansk studie: Nano-cocktail dræber leverceller på stribe

Mindre end hver tredje levercelle overlever 24 timer efter at være udsat for sølvnano og cadmium. SDU-forsker advarer derfor mod at kigge isoleret på nanopartiklers sundhedsskadelig effekt.

17h

 

Kæmpeteleskop tager første billede af nyfødt planet

Billedet er første bekræftede foto af en nyfødt planet. Den farer gennem en skive af støv og gas omkring en meget ung stjerne 370 lysår væk.

2h

 

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Athletic 'pull' increases campus diversity

The next time you see your favorite collegiate athlete on the field or court, think again about their road to getting there.That is something Clio Andris, assistant professor of geography at Penn State, has spent the past several years piecing together. Her findings were published in The Professional Geographer.

8min

 

Study shows machine learning can improve catalytic design

Chemical engineers at Rice University and Pennsylvania State University have shown that combining machine learning and quantum chemistry can save time and expense in designing new catalysts.

8min

 

Back to the future: Low-tech food-safety trainings still best for some audiences

While current training for food safety and sanitation usually incorporates high-technology presentations, such as videos and slide shows, there is still a need for low-tech approaches, according to Penn State researchers.

8min

 

Scientists visualize the connections between eye and brain

In a study published in the journal Cell, BIDMC researchers developed a means of tracking the activity of the far-reaching ends of retinal neurons (called boutons) as they deliver visual information to the thalamus, a brain region involved in image processing.

29min

 

No One Knows What Kim Jong Un Promised Trump

The optimism generated by President Trump’s meeting last month with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un is giving way to the reality of just how difficult it will be to persuade North Korea to surrender its nuclear weapons. In fact, it’s difficult even to understand what Kim and Trump actually agreed to. Recent reports said U.S. intelligence agencies suspect that North Korea has, according to NBC New

29min

 

Antioxidant supplements fail to improve sperm quality in infertile men

Despite many study results suggesting that antioxidants have a positive effect on abnormal sperm parameters associated with male infertility, a large US clinical trial of 174 couples has found that an antioxidant formulation taken daily by the male partner for a minimum of three months made no difference to sperm concentration, motility or morphology, nor to the rate of DNA fragmentation.

30min

 

Putting a quantum gas through its phases

Physicists at ETH Zurich have developed an experimental platform for studying the complex phases of a quantum gas characterized by two order parameters. With unprecedented control over the underlying microscopic interactions, the approach should lead to novel insight into the properties of a broad range of fundamentally and technologically important materials.

50min

 

Timely interventions help spot signs of teen dating violence

Therapist- and computer-led alcohol interventions held in the emergency department also can reduce teenage dating violence perpetration and depression symptoms, a new study finds.

50min

 

Brain stimulation decreases intent to commit physical, sexual assault

Research shows that using minimally invasive electrical currents on the brain's prefrontal cortex can reduce the intention to carry out physical and sexual assault. It's a new and promising approach to interventions around violence.

58min

 

A pretty plant of summer produces a promising anti-diabetes compound

Montbretin A (MbA), a natural compound with great potential for the treatment of type-2 diabetes, was discovered in the ornamental plant montbretia ten years ago, but it can't be produced on a large scale until its biosynthesis is understood. Scientists have now discovered genes and enzymes responsible for MbA biosynthesis and demonstrated the potential for metabolic engineering of wild tobacco to

58min

 

Assessing antidepressant exposure during pregnancy and Autism-like behavior in mouse pups

Maternal use of the antidepressant fluoxetine (Prozac) can alter the brain circuits in her offspring that control behaviors reminiscent of autism spectrum disorder, suggests a study in mice. These results have no immediate bearing on the treatment of depression in pregnant women.

58min

 

Unraveling genetic risk factors for Alzheimer's disease

The strongest genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's disease may impair the brain's ability to convert its primary fuel source into usable energy, finds a study of female mice. The research suggests therapeutic strategies that promote brain energy conversion in risk gene carriers could help to reduce risk or delay onset of the disease.

58min

 

Owls see as humans do

A study of barn owls suggests the visual systems of humans and birds may be more similar than previously thought.

58min

 

The increasingly efficient teenage brain

Some brain networks become more densely connected during adolescence while others become less so, according to a new analysis of neuroimaging data collected from more than 700 children and adolescents. These changes in network connectivity may underlie the refinement of cognitive abilities that develop during the teenage years.

58min

 

Marine mammals most at risk from increased Arctic ship traffic

The first comprehensive survey of Arctic marine mammal populations' vulnerability to shipping along two main routes finds which face the most risks from heavier traffic in the region.

58min

 

A new twist on how parasites invade host cells

Researchers have decoded the mechanisms used by the parasite Toxoplasma gondii to enter the cells of a host. Using high-resolution, high-speed imaging, they identified a unique process by which the parasite closes the 'entry door' it creates in order to enter and inhabit a host cell.

58min

 

PETA, Dow Chemical, Department of Defense, others co-author inhalation testing paper

In another heavy-hitting collaboration, PETA scientists co-authored an article with leading universities, corporations, and government agencies — including the Department of Defense, Dow Chemical, and Cardiff University — to show how to study the toxic effects of inhaled substances using animal-free approaches, instead of causing animals to suffer.

1h

 

Stem cells restore function in primate heart-failure study

Human stem cells have been successfully used to restore heart function in monkeys with heart failure. The findings suggest that the technique would be effective in heart-failure patients. The cells form new muscle that integrates into the heart so that it pumps vigorously again.

1h

 

200,000 asteroids trace their origins to just a handful of obliterated parents

Space And that’s only the inner asteroid belt. Families can be out there in so many ways, with foibles, feuds, and funny anecdotes about that time Aunt Suzy did that thing. You remember the one. But asteroid families…

1h

 

Who Milks America’s Cows?

Buy a pound of cheese or a carton of milk in the U.S., and it most likely hails from Wisconsin, the number-one cheese and number-two milk producer in the country. Often, that Wisconsin dairy product comes from a cow that was milked by an undocumented immigrant. Nationwide, 51% of dairy workers are immigrants. According to workers, farmers, and industry experts, more than three-fourths of these im

1h

 

Ty Dolla $ign Isn’t Just a Feature Artist, He’s a Star

Ty Dolla $ign sings in layers. On “After Dark,” the slinky Static Major–produced song from the second half of Drake’s bloated new album Scorpion , Ty peppers the chorus with his trademark ad libs. But it’s his verse that shows off Ty’s knack for musical citation. As Ty, born Tyrone William Griffin Jr., recounts the story of his dalliance with a woman, he addresses her directly: “You broke up with

1h

 

The gender bias of names: Surnames standing solo gives men advantage

In new research, Cornell University psychologists find that study participants, on average, were more than twice as likely to call male professionals — even fictional ones — by their last name only, compared to equivalent female professionals. This example of gender bias, say researchers, may be contributing to gender inequality.

1h

 

Utah soil's slippery grip on nutrients

Lawns in the Salt Lake Valley up to 100 years old are not yet saturated in the nutrient nitrogen, which is added by fertilizer, according to a new study. The result is surprising, since previous studies in the Eastern US suggested that fertilized soil would become saturated with nitrogen within a few decades.

1h

 

Astronomers snap the first baby pictures of a planet

New telescope images give the clearest view of an exoplanet embryo yet.

1h

 

China's New Laser Gun Can Zap You with a Silent, Carbonizing Beam

The guns fire 1,000 silent, invisible laser beams that last up to 2 seconds each.

1h

 

NASA finds Prapiroon strengthen into a typhoon

Tropical Cyclone Prapiroon strengthened into a Typhoon as NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the East China Sea in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean.

1h

 

This virus actually may boost — not weaken — our immune system

Lifelong cytomegalovirus infection may be beneficial, boosting the immune system in old age, when we need it most, according to a new study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

1h

 

Feinstein Institute researcher uncovers new understanding of certain psychiatric diseases

Research scientists from The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research and the Donald and Barbara Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra/Northwell in Hempstead, NY, in conjunction with their colleagues at Rockefeller University in New York City, have developed a new understanding of how certain psychiatric diseases manifest and potentially can be treated.

1h

 

Bacteria can 'divide and conquer' to vanquish their enemies

Some bacteria can release toxins that provoke their neighbours into attacking each other, a tactic that could be exploited to fight infections.

1h

 

The vanishing nuclear industry

Could nuclear power make a significant contribution to decarbonizing the US energy system over the next three or four decades? That is the question asked by four current and former researchers from Carnegie Mellon University. Their answer: probably not.

1h

 

Host plants tell insects when to grow longer wings and migrate

Scientists have discovered that the quality of the host rice plant determines whether the brown planthopper, a major pest on rice in Asia, grows short wings or long wings.

1h

 

Oldest evidence of horse veterinary care discovered in Mongolia

A team of scholars, led by William Taylor of the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, analyzed horse remains from an ancient Mongolian pastoral culture. Examination of skeletal remains from the impressive horse burials associated with the Deer Stone-Khirigsuur Culture showed that surgical procedures were used to remove baby teeth that would have caused young horses pain or diffic

1h

 

Human behavior in operating rooms parallels primate patterns of hierarchy and gender

A team led by a researcher who customarily studies nonhuman primate behavior has found that humans working in operating rooms follow the same general primate patterns of hierarchy and gender.

1h

 

A well-known animal health drug could stop outbreaks of malaria and Zika virus

Medicines given to household pets to kill fleas and ticks might be effective for preventing outbreaks of malaria, Zika fever and other dangerous insect-borne diseases.

1h

 

Off/on switch for DNA repair protein

Damage to DNA is a daily occurrence but one that human cells have evolved to manage. Now researchers have determined how one DNA repair protein gets to the site of DNA damage. The authors say they hope this discovery research will help identify new therapies for ovarian cancer.

1h

 

Alzheimer's in mini format: A novel tool to study disease mechanisms and possible remedies

Scientists have been successful in mimicking mechanisms of Alzheimer's disease in a novel, stem cell-based model system that reproduces features of human brain tissue. This experimental tool can be used to study mechanisms of pathology and help to find new therapeutic approaches, the researchers say. Their results indicate that modulating the immune system can trigger neuronal repair processes and

1h

 

Honeybees finding it harder to eat at America's bee hot spot

A new federal study finds bees are having a much harder time finding food in America's last honeybee refuge.

1h

 

Cardiac Cell Transplants Help Monkeys’ Hearts

The organ’s blood-pumping capacity improved with the infusion of cells, a study shows.

1h

 

Why suicide is on the rise in the US—even as it falls in Europe

Science Could inequality be to blame? In 2015, 44,193 Americans died by their own hand. That was more than the number killed in motor vehicle accidents and over twice the number who died through homicide.

1h

 

NASA finds Prapiroon strengthen into a typhoon

Tropical Cyclone Prapiroon strengthened into a Typhoon as NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the East China Sea in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean.

1h

 

Dolphin sanctuary gains steam thanks to 'The Cove' director push

Louie Psihoyos — the director of the Academy Award-winning documentary The Cove — is scouting out locations for his latest project, a real-life dolphin sanctuary. Read More

1h

 

Facebook co-founder: Give the 99% a $6,000 raise by taxing big tech and the 1%

Chris Hughes earned nearly half a billion dollars after co-founding Facebook. Now he's arguing for fairer wages in the form of a $500 monthly 'social dividend' for low- and middle-class Americans. Read More

1h

 

Yes, America still is an export superpower

America is the world's #2 exporter – and that makes trade wars everything but "good and easy to win" Read More

1h

 

Amazonian psychedelic may ease severe depression, new study shows

The medicinal properties of ayahuasca come from two plants: Banisteriopsis caapi, a psychedelic brew that Amazonian indigenous populations have long used for spiritual purposes, and Psychotria viridis. The first randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial of the beverage show that it can ease severe depression. Read More

1h

 

With 'Scorpion', #DrakeSZN Is Back—as Overwrought as Ever

Drake's fifth solo effort is a mega-production that siphons attention, even if it doesn’t say much of anything.

1h

 

California high court: Yelp can't be ordered to remove posts

Online review site Yelp.com cannot be ordered to remove posts against a San Francisco law firm that a judge determined were defamatory, a divided California Supreme Court ruled Monday in a closely watched case that internet companies warned could be used to silence online speech.

1h

 

Water compresses under a high gradient electric field

Modern civilization relies on water's incompressibility—it's something we take for granted. Hydraulic systems harness the virtual non-compressibility of fluids like water or oil to multiply mechanical force. Bulldozers, cranes, and other heavy machinery exploit the physics of hydraulics, as do automobile brakes, fire sprinkler systems, and municipal water and waste systems. It takes extraordinary

1h

 

Water compresses under a high gradient electric field

Scientists at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have predicted new physics governing compression of water under a high-gradient electric field. Physics Professor Aleksei Aksimentiev and his post doctoral researcher James Wilson found that a high electric field applied to a tiny hole in a graphene membrane would compress the water molecules travelling through the pore by 3 percent. The

1h

 

The gender bias of names: Surnames standing solo gives men advantage

In new research, Cornell University psychologists find that study participants, on average, were more than twice as likely to call male professionals — even fictional ones — by their last name only, compared to equivalent female professionals. This example of gender bias, say researchers, may be contributing to gender inequality.

1h

 

Scale is a key ingredient when tracking biodiversity, researchers say

To fully understand biodiversity and how it is changing, you need to look near, far, and in-between, according to a new study.

1h

 

Utah soil's slippery grip on nutrients

Lawns in the Salt Lake Valley up to 100 years old are not yet saturated in the nutrient nitrogen, which is added by fertilizer, according to a new study from University of Utah researchers. The result is surprising, since previous studies in the Eastern U.S. suggested that fertilized soil would become saturated with nitrogen within a few decades.

1h

 

Diesel doesn't float this boat—team designs zero-emissions marine research vessel

Marine research could soon be possible without the risk of polluting either the air or the ocean. It's thanks to a new ship design and feasibility study led by Sandia National Laboratories.

1h

 

Bacteria can 'divide and conquer' to vanquish their enemies

Some bacteria can release toxins that provoke their neighbours into attacking each other, a tactic that could be exploited to fight infections.

1h

 

Host plants tell insects when to grow longer wings and migrate

Scientists at Washington State University and China Jiliang University have discovered that the quality of the host rice plant determines whether the brown planthopper, a major pest on rice in Asia, grows short wings or long wings.

1h

 

The vanishing nuclear industry

Could nuclear power make a significant contribution to decarbonizing the U.S. energy system over the next three or four decades? That is the question asked by four current and former researchers from Carnegie Mellon University's Department of Engineering and Public Policy (EPP). Their answer: probably not.

1h

 

Human behavior in operating rooms parallels primate patterns of hierarchy and gender

A team led by a researcher who customarily studies nonhuman primate behavior has found that humans working in operating rooms (ORs) follow the same general primate patterns of hierarchy and gender.

1h

 

Oldest evidence of horse veterinary care discovered in Mongolia

A team of scholars led by William Taylor of the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History analyzed horse remains from an ancient Mongolian pastoral culture known as the Deer Stone-Khirigsuur Culture (ca. 1300-700 BC). Deer stones, with their beautiful deer carvings, and their accompanying stone mounds (khirigsuurs) are famous for the impressive horse burials that are found alongside th

1h

 

Infrared NASA imagery shows Post-Tropical Cyclone Emilia coming to an end

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the Eastern Pacific Ocean and looked at cloud top temperatures in Post-Tropical Cyclone Emilia as it continued weakening toward dissipation.

1h

 

Mongolians practiced horse dentistry as early as 3,200 years ago

Horse dentistry got an early start among Bronze Age Mongolian herders.

1h

 

A Baby Planet Is Born

In 2003, Donald Pettit, a NASA astronaut, sprinkled some salt into a ziplock bag for an experiment. Pettit was living on the International Space Station, about 200 miles above Earth. The station was just a few years old then, and astronauts were keen to see how stuff reacted in microgravity. Pettit gave the bag a good shake. When he stopped, the salt crystals were suspended like tiny flakes in a

1h

 

Versatile ultrasound system could transform how doctors use medical imaging

A new ultrasound system that uses optical, instead of electronic components, could improve performance while giving doctors significantly more flexibility in how they use ultrasound to diagnose and treat medical problems.

1h

 

The Atlantic Hires Todd S. Purdum as Staff Writer

Washington, D.C. (July 2, 2018)— Todd S. Purdum is joining The Atlantic as a staff writer and as a California correspondent, editor in chief Jeffrey Goldberg announced today. Purdum will cover politics and culture for The Atlantic . He will be based in Los Angeles, where The Atlantic is establishing a second California bureau after opening an office in San Francisco earlier this summer. “Todd is

2h

 

2h

 

Could Aspirin Help Prevent Alzheimer's Disease? Mouse Study Says Maybe.

Scientists have found how aspirin might help prevent Alzheimer's disease by helping cells clear the debris that leads to amyloid plaque formation.

2h

 

Last week in tech: Google's AI gets chatty and Nerf has new laser tag blasters

Technology Hello, yes, this is robot speaking. Download the latest episode of our podcast!

2h

 

2h

 

Eyewire Cup FAQ

The Eyewire Cup is the first of its kind on Eyewire, and because of that we’ve had a few questions about how various facets of the competition will work. Please refer to this FAQ for all your Eyewire Cup questions! What is the Starting Lineup? The Starting Lineup is made up of the top players on your team. Who is on the Starting Lineup will change during the competition, as some players earn more

2h

 

Utah soil's slippery grip on nutrients

Lawns in the Salt Lake Valley up to 100 years old are not yet saturated in the nutrient nitrogen, which is added by fertilizer, according to a new study from University of Utah researchers. The result is surprising, since previous studies in the Eastern US suggested that fertilized soil would become saturated with nitrogen within a few decades.

2h

 

Scale is a key ingredient when tracking biodiversity, researchers say

To fully understand biodiversity and how it is changing, you need to look near, far, and in-between, according to a new study. Researchers at Yale University studied 50 years of data about nesting birds in North America and tracked biodiversity changes on a local, regional, and continental scale. They found significant differences in how much change had occurred, based upon how wide a geographic n

2h

 

Stability of Earth: Scientists propose solution to 'Gaia puzzle'

Scientists may have solved a long-standing puzzle over why conditions on Earth have remained stable enough for life to evolve over billions of years.

2h

 

Earth's First Animals Sparked Global Warming, Too

Seafloor burrowing by the first animals on Earth had serious consequences for the planet.

2h

 

Tesla makes 5,000 Model 3s per week, but can it continue?Tesla Elon Musk Model

Tesla Inc. made 5,031 lower-priced Model 3 electric cars during the last week of June, surpassing its often-missed goal of 5,000 per week. But the company still only managed to crank out an average of 2,198 per week for the quarter.

2h

 

Infrared NASA imagery shows Post-Tropical Cyclone Emilia coming to an end

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the Eastern Pacific Ocean and looked at cloud top temperatures in Post-Tropical Cyclone Emilia as it continued weakening toward dissipation.

2h

 

Lyft pushes into bikes with new acquisitionLyft Uber Bikes US

US ridesharing giant Lyft said Monday it was acquiring bikesharing operator Motivate as it ramps up efforts against rival Uber in alternative forms of transportation.

2h

 

Seattle bans plastic straws, utensils at restaurants, bars

Looking for a plastic straw to sip your soda? It's no longer allowed in Seattle bars and restaurants.

2h

 

Facebook: 800K users may have had bug unblock blocked people

Facebook says more than 800,000 users may have been affected by a bug that unblocked people they previously had blocked.

2h

 

Research shows plants in Africa 'green up' ahead of rainy season

A study led by the University of Southampton has shown the greening up of vegetation prior to the rainy season in Africa is more widespread than previously understood.

2h

 

Fleet of aerial, surface, and underwater robots maps ocean front

Using multiple autonomous vehicles simultaneously, an interdisciplinary team of scientists and engineers returns to the United States after exploring the North Pacific Subtropical front—a sharp boundary where cold fresh waters from the north meet warm salty waters from the south. The fronts are the most conspicuous oceanographic phenomena and the goal of this project was to demonstrate the use of

3h

 

GPM satellite sees Fabio strengthening into a hurricane

NASA's Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core observatory satellite flew above Tropical Storm Fabio in the eastern Pacific Ocean as the storm was quickly strengthening into a hurricane. GPM provided a look at the heights of thunderstorms within, and estimated rainfall.

3h

 

Geneticist Francisco Ayala Quits After Sexual Harassment Accusations

The University of California, Irvine, which found him guilty of inappropriate behavior, will remove Ayala’s name from buildings and scholarships.

3h

 

Three research-based ways to maximize the fun of leisure activities

Everyone's so busy these days that it is easy to think you need to schedule time to have fun. But be careful about how you do that, said a time management expert. Research shows that scheduling can undermine enjoyment if it is not done right.

3h

 

Experimental drug stops Parkinson's disease progression in mice

Researchers say they have developed an experimental drug, similar to compounds used to treat diabetes, that slows the progression of Parkinson's disease itself — as well as its symptoms — in mice.

3h

 

Electrical disorder acts like a traffic light for a biological gate

Nature's way of allowing proteins across its gates, through porous biological membranes, depends, among others, on their electrical charge. Scientists have now uncovered how the mixed electrical charge at the ends of proteins can influence biological membrane crossing. This has potential implications for our understanding of how proteins travel across the body, and of disease mechanisms.

3h

 

Is the Bitcoin network an oligarchy?

Cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin can be analysed because every transaction is traceable. This means that they are an attractive system for physicists to study. Scientists have now examined the structure of the Bitcoin-owner community by looking at transactions of this cryptocurrency between 2009 and 2013.

3h

 

What articulation-relevant brain regions do when we listen

Brain regions that are involved in the articulation of language are also active in the perception of language. This finding makes a significant contribution to clarifying a research question that has been hotly debated for decades.

3h

 

How mangroves help keep the planet cool

In a new global framework, scientists have developed a more accurate assessment of how mangroves store carbon in their soil. The researchers found that previous studies have underestimated the blue carbon levels in mangroves by up to 50 percent in some regions and overestimated levels by up to 86 percent in others. This study will help countries develop and evaluate their carbon footprint and blue

3h

 

Quantum-enhanced sensing of magnetic fields

An international team of physicists has demonstrated that algorithms and hardware developed originally in the context of quantum computation can be harnessed for quantum-enhanced sensing of magnetic fields.

3h

 

NASA's GPM satellite sees Fabio strengthening into a hurricane

NASA's Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core observatory satellite flew above Tropical Storm Fabio in the eastern Pacific Ocean as the storm was quickly strengthening into a hurricane. GPM provided a look at the heights of thunderstorms within, and estimated rainfall.

3h

 

Research shows plants in Africa 'green up' ahead of rainy season

A study led by the University of Southampton has shown the greening up of vegetation prior to the rainy season in Africa is more widespread than previously understood.

3h

 

Study identifies which marine mammals are most at risk from increased Arctic ship traffic

The first comprehensive survey of Arctic marine mammal populations' vulnerability to shipping along two main routes finds which face the most risks from heavier traffic in the region.

3h

 

Can aspirin treat Alzheimer's?

regimen of low-dose aspirin potentially may reduce plaques in the brain, which will reduce Alzheimer's disease pathology and protect memory, according to neurological researchers at Rush University Medical Center, who published the results of their study today in the July issue of The Journal of Neuroscience.

3h

 

A pretty plant of summer produces a promising anti-diabetes compound

Montbretin A (MbA), a natural compound with great potential for the treatment of type-2 diabetes, was discovered in the ornamental plant montbretia ten years ago, but it can't be produced on a large scale until its biosynthesis is understood. Canadian scientists discovered genes and enzymes responsible for MbA biosynthesis and demonstrated the potential for metabolic engineering of wild tobacco to

3h

 

Brain stimulation decreases intent to commit physical, sexual assault

Research from the University of Pennsylvania shows that using minimally invasive electrical currents on the brain's prefrontal cortex can reduce the intention to carry out physical and sexual assault. It's a new and promising approach to interventions around violence.

3h

 

High prevalence of inappropriate antibiotic prescribing in a VA healthcare system

Inappropriate antibiotic prescribing is rampant at primary care clinics within the Veterans Administration (VA) healthcare system in Pittsburgh, despite the rise of antibiotic resistance. About half of all prescriptions reviewed were prescribed unnecessarily. In another quarter of cases, the incorrect antibiotic was prescribed, or the duration of the prescription wasn't consistent with guideline r

3h

 

Owls see as humans do

A study of barn owls published in JNeurosci suggests the visual systems of humans and birds may be more similar than previously thought.

3h

 

Assessing antidepressant exposure during pregnancy and Autism-like behavior in mouse pups

Maternal use of the antidepressant fluoxetine (Prozac) can alter the brain circuits in her offspring that control behaviors reminiscent of autism spectrum disorder, suggests a study in mice published in eNeuro. These results have no immediate bearing on the treatment of depression in pregnant women.

3h

 

Prefrontal cortex stimulation reduces aggressive intentions

Increasing prefrontal cortex activity with brain stimulation reduces aggressive intent in human adults, according to new research published in JNeurosci. This finding extends previous correlational aggression research by demonstrating the influence of the prefrontal cortex on the intent to commit an aggressive act in a 'gold standard' double-blind, placebo-controlled, stratified, parallel-group, r

3h

 

Unraveling genetic risk factors for Alzheimer's disease

The strongest genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's disease may impair the brain's ability to convert its primary fuel source into usable energy, finds a study of female mice published in JNeurosci. The research suggests therapeutic strategies that promote brain energy conversion in risk gene carriers could help to reduce risk or delay onset of the disease.

3h

 

Treating Alzheimer's with aspirin

A low-dose aspirin regimen may represent a new avenue for reducing Alzheimer's disease pathology, according to new research in a mouse model of the disease published in JNeurosci. The study identifies a new role for one of the most widely used medications in the world.

3h

 

The increasingly efficient teenage brain

Some brain networks become more densely connected during adolescence while others become less so, according to a new analysis published in eNeuro of neuroimaging data collected from more than 700 children and adolescents from the Philadelphia Neurodevelopmental Cohort. These changes in network connectivity may underlie the refinement of cognitive abilities that develop during the teenage years.

3h

 

Science calls bullshit on China's 'AK-47 laser gun'

China has allegedly developed a 'laser gun' that can burn you to death. It probably doesn't exist. Read More

3h

 

How diversity can launch startups even higher

Startups create the tech and products that set the tone for our collective future. It’s pivotal that founders lead by example to make diversity and inclusion a priority—and reap the rewards. Read More

3h

 

Can neuroscience-backed parent coaching break the cycle of poverty?

The cycle of poverty can be hard to break, will early childhood interventions based on new neuroscience be the silver bullet we need? Read More

3h

 

Amazonian psychedelic may ease severe depression, new study shows

The medicinal properties of ayahuasca come from two plants: Banisteriopsis caapi, a psychedelic brew that Amazonian indigenous populations have long used for spiritual purposes, and Psychotria viridis. The first randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial of the beverage show that it can ease severe depression. Read More

3h

 

3h

 

Loss of lemurs might endanger many of Madagascar's largest tree species

Widespread logging and hunting have endangered virtually all of Madagascar's 100-plus species of iconic lemurs, and a new study by ecologists illustrates how saving the animals may also be key to saving the island's largest trees.

3h

 

Giant panda population research shows new challenges

Scientists report results of a large-scale study examining giant panda habitat use trends and changing threats to their survival. This benchmark study is based on nearly 70,000 person-hours of survey work by China's State Forestry Administration throughout the panda's range in Sichuan, covering three-quarters of the entire species range.

3h

 

Will Michael Cohen Join the Ranks of Trump Turncoats?

Every president exhausts some aides’ loyalty eventually, but it usually doesn’t happen before his first midterm election. In his second summer in office, however, Donald Trump is facing a wave of defections—including tantalizing comments by Michael Cohen, a former Trump Organization lieutenant and attorney, that suggest he might cooperate with prosecutors. “My wife, my daughter, and my son have m

3h

 

I.Coast to invest 1 billion euros to replenish forest cover

The world's top cocoa producer Ivory Coast said Monday it would invest nearly one billion euros over 10 years to replace forests that were razed to grow the bean.

3h

 

I.Coast studies first cocoa-fired power station

Abidjan wants to build the world's first biomass power station fired by cocoa production waste, Ivory Coast and US officials said Monday.

3h

 

Study identifies which marine mammals are most at risk from increased Arctic ship traffic

In August 2016, the first large cruise ship traveled through the Northwest Passage, the northern waterway linking the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. The following year, the first ship without an icebreaker plied the Northern Sea Route, a path along Russia's Arctic coast that was, until recently, impassable by unescorted commercial vessels.

3h

 

The Online Gene Test Finds a Dangerous Mutation. It May Well Be Wrong.

Third-party analysis of raw DNA is not as rigorous as that done in a certified laboratory. But many consumers don’t understand that their results are not conclusive.

3h

 

A pretty plant of summer produces a promising anti-diabetes compound

Roughly half of the western medicines used today were derived from naturally occurring plant metabolites. Plants produce over 200,000 of these specialized metabolites, but identifying medicinally useful ones is challenging, and obtaining sufficient quantities for human use poses an even greater challenge. Type-2 diabetes, a disease characterized by elevated blood glucose levels due to the body's i

3h

 

Versatile ultrasound system could transform how doctors use medical imaging

While ultrasound is one of the most common medical imaging tools, conventional electronic ultrasound devices tend to be bulky and cannot be used at the same time as some other imaging technologies. A new ultrasound system that uses optical, instead of electronic components, could improve performance while giving doctors significantly more flexibility in how they use ultrasound to diagnose and trea

3h

 

Neanderthals practiced close-range hunting 120,000 years ago

Scientists reports the oldest unambiguous hunting lesions documented in the history of humankind. The lesions were found on skeletons of two large-sized extinct fallow deer killed by Neanderthals about 120,000 years ago around the shores of a small lake near present-day Halle in the eastern part of Germany.

3h

 

Sound-waves: Making opaque materials totally transparent

Researchers have found a way to make materials that are normally opaque to sound waves completely transparent. Their system involves placing acoustic relays at strategic locations so that sound waves can propagate at a constant amplitude — regardless of what may lie in their path. This method could eventually be used to make it possible to hide objects like submarines.

3h

 

Climate change is making night-shining clouds more visible

Increased water vapor in Earth's atmosphere due to human activities is making shimmering high-altitude clouds more visible, a new study finds. The results suggest these strange but increasingly common clouds seen only on summer nights are an indicator of human-caused climate change, according to new research.

3h

 

World's first animals likely caused global warming

The evolution of Earth's first animals more than 500 million years ago caused global warming, new research shows.

3h

 

When mentors do this one thing, it can help reduce teen delinquency

When educators and coaches make kids feel like they matter, it reduces delinquency and destructive behavior, according to a new study.

3h

 

Artificial intelligence accurately predicts distribution of radioactive fallout

Researchers have created a machine-learning-based tool that can predict where radioactive emissions from nuclear power plants will disperse. After training using extensive data on previous weather patterns, the tool consistently achieved over 85 percent predictive accuracy, and up to 95 percent in winter when large and predictable weather systems dominate. This tool can aid immediate evacuation in

3h

 

3h

 

Electrical brain stimulation may help reduce violent crime in future – study

Researchers found that applying an electric current to a part of the brain linked to violent acts reduced people’s intentions to commit assault It could be a shocking way to treat future criminals. Scientists have found that a session of electrical brain stimulation can reduce people’s intentions to commit assaults, and raise their moral awareness. Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania an

3h

 

Across the universe on a butter mountain | Letter

Dr John Ellis contemplates the size of the cosmos in relation to Wales and packs of butter Tony Robinson asks to what depth 40 trillion trillion trillion packs of butter would cover a country the size of Wales ( Letters , 29 June). In scientific notation this is 40×10 36 packs. Wales is about 2×10 10 square metres. A pack of butter measured 95x63x41mm, so 2×10 10 ÷6×10 –3 or 3.4×10 12 packs would

3h

 

Versatile ultrasound system could transform how doctors use medical imaging

A new ultrasound system that uses optical, instead of electronic components, could improve performance while giving doctors significantly more flexibility in how they use ultrasound to diagnose and treat medical problems.

3h

 

FDA Approves First Drug Derived from Marijuana

The approval of Epidiolex® is a major milestone in bringing safe, effective cannabinoid-based medications to patients — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

 

SQUID

SQUID The game-changing scientific device you've never heard of. SQUID Video of SQUID Physics Monday, July 2, 2018 – 12:15 Yuen Yiu, Staff Writer (Inside Science) — Meet the game-changing scientific device you've never heard of — SQUID. No, not the slimy animal with tentacles that wrestles sperm whales in Moby Dick . We're talking about an entirely different kind of squid. You can find them in

4h

 

From stone age tools to false teeth: the secrets of Amsterdam’s canals

A construction project in the Dutch capital has led to hundreds of thousands of artefacts being dug up – and they have now gone on display Canals have long offered a fine place to lose things – shopping trollies, love tokens, drowned kittens, all the unwanted objects and dark secrets many hoped would never be found, slipped into their still, dark depths. But in Amsterdam, some of those long-forgo

4h

 

Watch magnets organise themselves and then leap into the air

As magnets are compressed together, they organise into a grid – but once they get too close together, one leaps into the air and causes a chain reaction

4h

 

Facebook promises to better explain who is paying for ads

Facebook says it is making advertising on the social network more transparent by publishing more information about the adverts firms are running on the site

4h

 

Valley of Tehuacan-Cuicatlan listed as UNESCO heritage site

The Tehuacan-Cuicatlan Valley, home to the oldest water management system in North America, was added Monday as a "mixed site" to the UNESCO World Heritage list, reflecting its significance as both a natural and cultural area.

4h

 

Wind spreads California fire as other states battle blazes (Update)

A massive wildfire in rural Northern California has exploded in size and forced evacuations in hot, dry weather that is sweeping through several Western states where blazes are threatening thousands of homes.

4h

 

French director red-faced after pink flamingo disaster

A French director said Monday he would abandon filming at a Mediterranean wetlands after a pilot sparked a panic among a huge flock of pink flamingos, causing hundreds of them to abandon their eggs.

4h

 

Oldest US nuke plant, near Jersey shore, closing Sept. 17

America's oldest nuclear power plant will shut down on Sept. 17, but the Oyster Creek plant near the New Jersey shore will stay right where it is for the next 60 years.

4h

 

Bali's Mount Agung spews orange lava in fresh eruption

A volcano on the Indonesian island of Bali erupted Monday, belching a plume of ash 2,000 metres (6,500 feet) high as bright orange lava cascaded from its summit.

4h

 

Loss of lemurs might endanger many of Madagascar's largest tree species

Widespread logging and hunting have endangered virtually all of Madagascar's 100-plus species of iconic lemurs, and a new study by Rice University ecologists illustrates how saving the animals may also be key to saving the island's largest trees.

4h

 

Dawn's latest orbit reveals dramatic new views of Occator crater

NASA's Dawn spacecraft reached its lowest-ever and final orbit around dwarf planet Ceres on June 6 and has been returning thousands of stunning images and other data.

4h

 

3 Reasons Why the U.S. is Vulnerable to Big Disaster

Many of us live in areas at risk, particularly along the coasts — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

 

Loss of lemurs might endanger many of Madagascar's largest tree species

Widespread logging and hunting have endangered virtually all of Madagascar's 100-plus species of iconic lemurs, and a new study by Rice University ecologists illustrates how saving the animals may also be key to saving the island's largest trees.

4h

 

Algorithm identifies hypertensive patients who will benefit from intensive treatment

Using data from large clinical trials, UT Southwestern researchers developed a way to predict which patients will benefit most from aggressive high blood pressure treatment.

4h

 

Next-generation robotic cockroach can explore under water environments

In nature, cockroaches can survive underwater for up to 30 minutes. Now, a robotic cockroach can do even better. Harvard's Ambulatory Microrobot, known as HAMR, can walk on land, swim on the surface of water, and walk underwater for as long as necessary, opening up new environments for this little bot to explore.

4h

 

Zika virus may pose greater threat of miscarriages than previously thought

Research from several institutions suggests that more women could be losing their pregnancies to the Zika virus without knowing they are infected.

4h

 

Mayo researchers find off/on switch for DNA repair protein

Damage to DNA is a daily occurrence but one that human cells have evolved to manage. Now, in a new paper published in Nature Structural & Molecular Biology, Mayo researchers have determined how one DNA repair protein gets to the site of DNA damage. The authors say they hope this discovery research will help identify new therapies for ovarian cancer.

4h

 

Enter BIFROST—physicists get their own rainbow bridge

In Norse mythology, the Bifrost was the rainbow bridge linking the realm of the gods to Earth. At UC Santa Barbara, it is also the name of the Broadly-tunable Illumination Facility for Research, Outreach, Scholarship, and Training (BIFROST), a laser facility that will provide coherent light throughout the visible and infrared spectrum to 10 laboratories in the campus's Broida Hall, which houses th

4h

 

Salamander’s Genome Guards Secrets of Limb Regrowth

In a loudly bubbling laboratory at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, about 2,800 of the salamanders called axolotls drift in tanks and cups, filling floor-to-ceiling shelves. Up close, axolotls are just on the cute side of alien. They have fleshy pink bodies and guileless, wall-eyed faces. Unlike most salamanders, which metamorphose into land-dwellers as they grow up, axolotls usually keep

4h

 

Koala chlamydia vaccine possible with DNA study

The strain is different to that found in humans, but a genome study hopes to provide clues to fight the infection.

4h

 

Computer graphics research team to present new tool for sketching faces

Across popular social media platforms, users are posting countless images every day. On Instagram alone, there are more than 40 billion uploaded photos—a figure that's skyrocketing by 95 million daily. This presents a clear need for intuitive yet robust photo-editing tools that allow the average user to perform advanced editing functions.

4h

 

How mangroves help keep the planet cool

Coastal scientists have developed a new global framework to more accurately assess how mangroves along different types of coastlines from deltas to lagoons store carbon in their soil. They found that previous studies have underestimated the blue carbon levels in mangroves by up to 50 percent in some regions and overestimated levels by up to 86 percent in others. Their study published recently in N

4h

 

Coffee Drinkers Are More Likely To Live Longer. Decaf May Do The Trick, Too

The latest study to link coffee and longevity adds to a growing body of evidence that, far from a vice, the brew can be protective of good health. (Image credit: Sutthiwat Srikhrueadam / EyeEm/Getty Images/EyeEm)

4h

 

Cracking the genetic code of koalas

The koala genome has been sequenced in a world first, by an international consortium of conservation scientists and geneticists. Considered to be the most complete marsupial genome sequenced in terms of quality — on par with the human genome — the highly accurate genomic data will provide information to inform habitat conservation, tackle diseases and help ensure this iconic animal's long-term s

4h

 

Mayo researchers find off/on switch for DNA repair protein

Damage to DNA is a daily occurrence but one that human cells have evolved to manage. Now, in a new paper published in Nature Structural & Molecular Biology, Mayo researchers have determined how one DNA repair protein gets to the site of DNA damage. The authors say they hope this discovery research will help identify new therapies for ovarian cancer.

4h

 

Three research-based ways to maximize the fun of leisure activities

Everyone's so busy these days that it is easy to think you need to schedule time to have fun. But be careful about how you do that, said Selin Malkoc, a time management expert at The Ohio State University's Fisher College of Business. Research shows that scheduling can undermine enjoyment if it is not done right,

4h

 

Mid- to late-life increases in marker of chronic inflammation tied to dementia

Researchers at Johns Hopkins have added to evidence that rising and chronic inflammation as measured by a biomarker in the blood in middle and late age are linked to visible structural changes in the brains of people with poor cognition and dementia.

4h

 

Is the Bitcoin network an oligarchy?

Cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin can be analysed because every transaction is traceable. This means that they are an attractive system for physicists to study.

4h

 

Help NASA track and predict mosquito-borne disease outbreaks

Picnics, parades and fireworks are the attributes of a grand July Fourth celebration. So are the itch and scratch of mosquito bites. While the bites are annoying, they don't tend to stop the festivities. However, certain types of mosquitoes can cause serious harm. They are known to carry and spread diseases like Zika, West Nile Virus and malaria.

4h

 

The koala genome has been fully sequenced for the first time

The koala genome has been sequenced for the first time, providing new insights into its diet and sex life, and assisting with conservation efforts

4h

 

Injecting new heart cells improves recovery from heart attacks

Injecting brand new muscle cells directly into the heart helps it recover after a heart attack, a study in monkeys has found.

4h

 

Ethics Investigation into EPA Head Scott Pruitt Widens

Officials raise additional allegations about Pruitt using his public office for personal gain — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

 

Newborn planet pictured for first timeVLT ESO Planet Newborn

Astronomers have directly imaged a recently formed planet in a distant solar system.

4h

 

Making opaque materials totally transparent

Most naturally occurring materials have a disordered atomic structure that interferes with the propagation of both sound and electromagnetic waves. When the waves come into contact with these materials, they bounce around and disperse—and their energy dissipates according to a highly complex interference pattern, diminishing in intensity. That means it's virtually impossible to transmit data or en

4h

 

Researchers see beam of light from first confirmed neutron star merger emerge from behind sun

A research team led by astronomers at the University of Warwick had to wait over 100 days for the sight of the first of confirmed neutron star merger to remerge from behind the glare of the sun.

4h

 

Electrical disorder acts like a traffic light for a biological gate

Nature's way of allowing proteins across its gates, through porous biological membranes, depends, among others, on their electrical charge. For a protein to cross this type of membrane, it needs to be stimulated by an electrical field. A new study focuses on a particular kind of proteins that have multiple functions—dubbed Intrinsically Disordered Proteins—because the electric charge disorder on t

4h

 

Computer graphics research team to present new tool for sketching faces

A research team, led by computer scientists from the University of Bern-Switzerland and University of Maryland-College Park, have devised a sketch-based editing framework that enables a user to edit their photos by sketching a few strokes on top of them.

4h

 

What people want from a trip to the ER

Understanding and addressing what patients need from an emergency room encounter could help improve patient care.

4h

 

How mangroves help keep the planet cool

In a new global framework, scientists have developed a more accurate assessment of how mangroves store carbon in their soil. The researchers found that previous studies have underestimated the blue carbon levels in mangroves by up to 50 percent in some regions and overestimated levels by up to 86 percent in others. This study published recently in Nature Climate Change will help countries develop

4h

 

Koala genome cracked Down Under to help save species

Scientists at the Earlham Institute in Norwich, UK, have played a major role as part of a consortium led by the Australian Museum Research Institute and the University of Sydney to sequence the koala genome for the first time, with the findings published in Nature Genetics. The findings of the research could ensure the long-term survival of one of the world's most beloved animals, which is under t

4h

 

CRISPR genome editing technology can correct alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency

Groundbreaking research demonstrates proof-of-concept for using CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing technology to correct the gene mutation responsible for alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency, successfully making a targeted gene correction in the livers of affected mice that restored at least low levels of normal AAT.

4h

 

A refined magnetic sense

An international team of physicists at ETH Zurich, Aalto University, the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, and the Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics in Moscow has demonstrated that algorithms and hardware developed originally in the context of quantum computation can be harnessed for quantum-enhanced sensing of magnetic fields.

4h

 

Giant Hogweed: A Plant That Can Burn and Blind You. But Don’t Panic.

The invasive plant is widespread in New York and was recently spotted for the first time in Virginia, but conservationists believe they can fight it.

4h

 

Take a number: How Many Teenage Girls Deliberately Harm Themselves? Nearly 1 in 4, Survey Finds.

Rates of self-injury are even higher in parts of the United States, according to government data. Boys are half as likely to harm themselves.

4h

 

Undetected Zika infections may be triggering miscarriages and stillbirths

A collaborative study between six of the National Primate Research Centers shows pregnancy loss due to Zika A infections that don't cause women any symptoms may be a common but unrecognized cause of miscarriages and stillbirths.

5h

 

Researchers determine the rate of return to sport after shoulder surgery

Athletes with shoulder instability injuries often undergo shoulder stabilization surgery to return to sport (RTS) and perform at their preinjury activity level. Returning to sports in a timely fashion and being able to perform at a high level are priorities for these athletes undergoing surgery.

5h

 

What articulation-relevant brain regions do when we listen

With an exceptional research design, Freiburg scientists have solved a research question that has been debated for decades.

5h

 

Is the Bitcoin network an oligarchy?

Cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin can be analysed because every transaction is traceable. This means that they are an attractive system for physicists to study. In a paper published in EPJ B, Leonardo Ermann from the National Commission for Atomic Energy in Buenos Aires, Argentina, and colleagues from the University of Toulouse, France, have examined the structure of the Bitcoin-owner community by loo

5h

 

Saving koalas: Gene study promises solution to deadly sex disease

Scientists fail to find a koala cuteness gene but DNA may lead to a vaccine for chlamydia in the iconic marsupial.

5h

 

Electrical disorder acts like a traffic light for a biological gate

Nature's way of allowing proteins across its gates, through porous biological membranes, depends, among others, on their electrical charge. In a new study published in EPJ E, Albert Johner from the Charles Sadron Institute in Strasbourg, France and Jean-Francois Joanny from ESPCI Paris have uncovered how the mixed electrical charge at the ends of proteins can influence biological membrane crossing

5h

 

Experimental drug stops Parkinson's disease progression in mice

Johns Hopkins researchers say they have developed an experimental drug, similar to compounds used to treat diabetes, that slows the progression of Parkinson's disease itself — as well as its symptoms — in mice.

5h

 

Novel pretargeted radionuclide therapy for HER2-expressing cancers shows promise

In a mouse model, researchers have demonstrated that a novel, affibody-based pretargeted radionuclide therapy for HER2 (human epidermal growth factor receptor 2)-expressing cancers is non-toxic to the kidneys and improves survival. The study is reported in The Journal of Nuclear Medicine's July featured article of the month.

5h

 

Next-generation robotic cockroach can explore under water environments

In nature, cockroaches can survive underwater for up to 30 minutes. Now, a robotic cockroach can do even better. Harvard's Ambulatory Microrobot, known as HAMR, can walk on land, swim on the surface of water, and walk underwater for as long as necessary, opening up new environments for this little bot to explore.

5h

 

Making opaque materials totally transparent

EPFL researchers have found a way to make materials that are normally opaque to sound waves completely transparent. Their system involves placing acoustic relays at strategic locations so that sound waves can propagate at a constant amplitude — regardless of what may lie in their path. This method could eventually be used to make it possible to hide objects like submarines.

5h

 

Alzheimer's in mini format: A novel tool to study disease mechanisms and possible remedies

DZNE scientists have been successful in mimicking mechanisms of Alzheimer's disease in a novel, stem cell-based model system that reproduces features of human brain tissue. This experimental tool can be used to study mechanisms of pathology and help to find new therapeutic approaches, the researchers say. Their results, published in Developmental Cell, indicate that modulating the immune system ca

5h

 

Researchers see beam of light from first confirmed neutron star merger emerge from behind sun

A research team led by astronomers at the University of Warwick had to wait over 100 days for the sight of the first of confirmed neutron star merger to reemerge from behind the glare of the sun.

5h

 

Study: Zika could cause more miscarriages than we realize

More women could be losing their pregnancies to the Zika virus without knowing they're infected, suggests a collaborative study published in Nature Medicine.The study found 26 percent of nonhuman primates infected with Zika during early stages of pregnancy experienced miscarriage or stillbirth even though the animals showed few signs of infection.

5h

 

Foleys aren't fun: Patient study shows catheter risks

A new study puts large-scale evidence behind what many hospital patients already know: Having a urinary catheter may help empty the bladder, but it can hurt, lead to urinary tract infections, or cause other issues in the hospital and beyond. In fact, in-depth interviews and chart reviews from more than 2,000 patients shows that more than half of catheterized hospital patients experienced a complic

5h

 

Metformin reverses established lung fibrosis

Researchers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham have shown — for the first time — that established lung fibrosis can be reversed using a drug treatment that targets cell metabolism. This novel finding, reported in the journal Nature Medicine, is important because, despite significant advances to reveal the pathological mechanisms of persistent fibrosis, effective treatment interventions a

5h

 

Zika virus may pose greater threat of miscarriages than previously thought

Research from several institutions, including the California National Primate Research Center at UC Davis, suggests that more women could be losing their pregnancies to the Zika virus without knowing they are infected.

5h

 

Study reveals secret origins of asteroids and meteorites

A study appearing online Monday, July 2 in Nature Astronomy found at least 85 percent of 200,000 asteroids in the inner asteroid belt — the main source of Earth's meteorites — originate from five or six ancient minor planets.

5h

 

New cancer immunotherapy shows promise in early tests

Much cancer immunotherapy research has focused on harnessing the immune system's T cells to fight tumors, 'but we knew that other types of immune cells could be important in fighting cancer too,' says Ashish Kulkarni at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. Now he and colleagues at Brigham and Women's Hospital, with others, report that in preclinical models they can amplify macrophage immune re

5h

 

China's emissions reversal cause for 'cautious optimism' says study

The decline in China's carbon emissions is likely to be sustained if changes to the country's industrial structure and energy efficiency continue, according to new research led by the University of East Anglia.

5h

 

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