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Sharks Make a Splash in Brooklyn

Visitors can see and learn about sharks and their environment in the new "Ocean Wonders: Sharks!" facility at the Wildlife Conservation Society's New York Aquarium. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Fake chews? New Zealand MP fears 'existential threat' of synthetic burgers

The Impossible Burger, being served on Air New Zealand, has also drawn the ire of acting prime minister Winston Peters A veggie burger that “bleeds” fake blood has been accused of posing an “existential threat” to New Zealand’s beef industry, amid a growing row over synthetic meat. The Impossible Burger, which is being served on the national carrier Air New Zealand, has drawn the ire of the actin

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What you eat while pregnant may affect your baby's gut

A mother's diet during pregnancy may have an effect on the composition of her baby's gut microbiome — the community of bacteria living in the gut — and the effect may vary by delivery mode, according to study published in the open-access journal Microbiome.

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Mothers who follow five healthy habits may reduce risk of obesity in children

Children and adolescents whose mothers follow five healthy habits — eating a healthy diet, exercising regularly, keeping a healthy body weight, drinking alcohol in moderation, and not smoking — are 75 percent less likely to become obese when compared with children of mothers who did not follow any such habits, according to a new study.

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New anti-clotting drugs linked to lower risk of serious bleeding

New drugs known as direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) used to treat serious blood clots are associated with reduced risks of major bleeding compared with the older anti-clotting drug, warfarin, finds a new study.

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Sleep disorder linked with changes to brain structure typical of dementia

Obstructive sleep apnea is associated with changes to the structure of the brain that are also seen in the early stages of dementia, according to a study published in the European Respiratory Journal.

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New anti-clotting drugs linked to lower risk of serious bleeding

New drugs known as direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) used to treat serious blood clots are associated with reduced risks of major bleeding compared with the older anti-clotting drug, warfarin, finds a study in The BMJ today.

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Children are less likely to be obese if mothers stick to a healthy lifestyle

Children of mothers who follow a healthy lifestyle have a substantially lower risk of developing obesity than children of mothers who don't make healthy lifestyle choices, finds a study published in The BMJ.

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Mothers who follow five healthy habits may reduce risk of obesity in children

Children and adolescents whose mothers follow five healthy habits — eating a healthy diet, exercising regularly, keeping a healthy body weight, drinking alcohol in moderation, and not smoking — are 75 percent less likely to become obese when compared with children of mothers who did not follow any such habits, according to a new study led by Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

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Brazil police search Philips office in fraud probe

Police searched the offices of Philips in Brazil on Wednesday and detained two people linked to the Dutch company as part of an investigation into a scheme into fraud involving public health services, authorities said.

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GE's Latin American CEO, 21 others, arrested in Brazil for fraud

Brazilian police arrested General Electric's Latin America CEO Daurio Speranzini Junior on Wednesday as part of a probe into suspected fraud and corruption by multinational companies in the Rio de Janeiro state health system.

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Expanding primary care buprenorphine treatment could curb opioid overdose crisis

Physicians write that expanding the availability of medication treatment for opioid use disorder in primary care settings would be a major step toward reducing overdose deaths.

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Brain study paves way for therapy for common cause of dementia

Scientists have uncovered a potential approach to treat one of the commonest causes of dementia and stroke in older people. Studies with rats found the treatment can reverse changes in blood vessels in the brain associated with the condition, called cerebral small vessel disease. Treatment also prevents damage to brain cells caused by these blood vessel changes, raising hope that it could offer a

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In India, swapping crops could save water and improve nutrition

India will need to feed approximately 394 million more people by 2050. Meanwhile, many of its regions are chronically water-stressed, and nutrient deficiencies are widespread — 30 percent of Indians or more are anemic. But a new study shares a brighter outlook: replacing some rice with less thirsty crops could dramatically reduce water demand in India, while also improving nutrition.

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Frigid polar oceans, not balmy coral reefs, are species-formation hot spots

Tropical oceans teem with the dazzle and flash of colorful reef fishes and contain far more species than the cold ocean waters found at high latitudes. This well-known 'latitudinal diversity gradient' is one of the most famous patterns in biology, and scientists have puzzled over its causes for more than 200 years.

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Test tube artificial neural network recognizes 'molecular handwriting'

Scientists have developed an artificial neural network out of DNA that can recognize highly complex and noisy molecular information.

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Expanding primary care buprenorphine treatment could curb opioid overdose crisis

Two physicians from Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health write that expanding the availability of medication treatment for opioid use disorder in primary care settings would be a major step toward reducing overdose deaths.

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Viable Embryos Created With Northern White Rhino Sperm in the Lab

Researchers froze the fertilized eggs, taken from southern white rhinos, in hopes of preserving the near-extinct northern subspecies.

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Jim Rossman: We found your new favorite gadgets, including a nifty way to carry keys and tools

Every so often I accumulate a desk full of gadgets that might not warrant a full review, so I save up a few and run them together.

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Increase the meaningfulness of your work by considering how it helps others

Seeing our work as benefiting others really helps us to find it meaningful, and therefore more enjoyable. Read More

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LOOK: Hot, Young Stars Form 'Celestial Fireworks'

NASA posted the glittery image of stars that "live fast and die young" on the eve of Independence Day. It shows a cluster of "huge, hot" stars called NGC 3603, about 20,000 light years away. (Image credit: NASA, ESA, R. O'Connell (University of Virginia), F. Paresce (National Institute for Astrophysics, Bologna, Italy), E. Young (Universities Space Research Association/Ames Research Center), the

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Heat wave kills 19 in Canada (Update)

A heatwave in Quebec has killed at least 19 people in the past week as high summer temperatures scorched eastern Canada, health officials said Wednesday.

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Our human ancestors walked on two feet but their children still had a backup plan

More than 3 million years ago, our ancient human ancestors, including their toddler-aged children, were standing on two feet and walking upright, according to a new study.

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Anti-Bat-Signal: Moths with larger hindwings and longer tails are best at deflecting bats

Each night, dramatic aerial battles are waged above our heads, complete with barrel rolls, razor-sharp turns, sonar jamming, cloaking devices and life-or-death consequences.

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Combining antibiotics changes their effectiveness

The effectiveness of antibiotics can be altered by combining them with each other, non-antibiotic drugs or even with food additives. Depending on the bacterial species, some combinations stop antibiotics from working to their full potential whilst others begin to defeat antibiotic resistance, report researchers.

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New tools to systematically build cooperation: Theory of repeated games

Social dilemmas occur when individual desires clash with group needs. How can people be encouraged to cooperate when they have reason not to? Scientists show that if the social dilemma that individuals face are dependent on if they work together, cooperation can triumph. This finding resulted from a new framework that they introduced, which extends the entire theory of repeated games. Moreover, th

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5 fakta om Tycho Brahe: Fik ø af en konge, og røg i infight med en anden

Tycho Brahe ændrede vores syn på Universet. Her kan du læse mere om den stædige astronom, der blev jaget ud af Danmark.

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Munich officials want train station to have air taxi parking

A group of city counselors in Munich say they want the southern German city's main train station to have a landing pad for flying taxis.

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Even phenomenally dense neutron stars fall like a feather

Astronomers have given one of Einstein's predictions on gravity its most stringent test yet. By precisely tracking the meanderings of three stars in a single system — two white dwarf stars and one ultra-dense neutron star — the researchers determined that even phenomenally compact neutron stars 'fall' in the same manner as their less-dense counterparts, an aspect of nature called the 'Strong Equ

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Foot fossil pegs hominid kids as upright walkers 3.3 million years ago

A foot from an ancient hominid child suggests that Lucy’s species, Australopithecus afarensis, walked early in life.

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Researchers create hybrid embryos of endangered white rhinos

Scientists have created the first rhino embryos, providing a small glimmer of hope for the nearly extinct northern white rhinoceros.

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Under pressure, afraid to take bathroom breaks? Inside Amazon's fast-paced warehouse world

Working at an Amazon warehouse in the U.K., James Bloodworth came across a bottle of straw-colored liquid on a shelf. It looked like pee.

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Brain study paves way for therapy for common cause of dementia

Scientists at the University of Edinburgh have uncovered a potential approach to treat one of the commonest causes of dementia and stroke in older people. Studies with rats found the treatment can reverse changes in blood vessels in the brain associated with the condition, called cerebral small vessel disease. Treatment also prevents damage to brain cells caused by these blood vessel changes, rais

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Stabilizing endothelial cells could help tackle vascular dementia

Researchers have discovered that stabilizing dysfunctional endothelial cells with approved drugs reverses cellular dysfunction in a rat model of cerebral small vessel disease (SVD), hinting towards a new therapeutic.

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Foot fossil of juvenile hominin exhibits ape-like features

A rare juvenile foot fossil of our early hominin ancestor, Australopithecus afarensis, exhibits several ape-like foot characteristics that could have aided in foot grasping for climbing trees, a new study shows.

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In India, swapping crops could save water and improve nutrition

India will need to feed approximately 394 million more people by 2050. Meanwhile, many of its regions are chronically water-stressed, and nutrient deficiencies are widespread — 30 percent of Indians or more are anemic. But a study published today in Science Advances shares a brighter outlook: replacing some rice with less thirsty crops could dramatically reduce water demand in India, while also i

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Anti-Bat-Signal: Moths with larger hindwings and longer tails are best at deflecting bats

Each night, dramatic aerial battles are waged above our heads, complete with barrel rolls, razor-sharp turns, sonar jamming, cloaking devices and life-or-death consequences.

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Our human ancestors walked on two feet but their children still had a backup plan

More than 3 million years ago, our ancient human ancestors, including their toddler-aged children, were standing on two feet and walking upright, according to a new study published in Science Advances.

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How Scuba Divers Will Rescue Soccer Team Trapped in Thai Cave

The boys who survived for 9 days in a flooded cave in Thailand will now have to go through a risky crash course in cave diving in order to make their way out.

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The second great battle for the future of our food is underway

First it was GM food. Now battle lines are being drawn over whether crops and animals modified with CRISPR gene-editing can make it on to supermarket shelves

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It’s ok that the public rejected GM food – after all, we did ask

Many people see the public's rejection of genetically-modified food as a failure, but I would argue it was successful public engagement, says Lesley Paterson

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Trio of stars shows Einstein is still right about relativity

A fundamental rule of general relativity has passed it's most extreme test yet, courtesy of the movements of three distant stars

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Hybrid embryos made to save the doomed northern white rhino

Biologists have created hybrid rhino embryos as a first step towards creating pure northern rhino embryos and are confident they can save the species from the brink

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Rhino Embryos Made in Lab to Save Nearly Extinct Subspecies

The development is an early step toward the much more distant goal of resurrecting the northern white rhinoceros, whose last male died this year.

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Alfred Alberts, Unsung Father of a Cholesterol Drug, Dies at 87

His discovery led to lovastatin, but he shunned the limelight — until he was a patient himself and doctors, learning who he was, treated him “like a rock star.”

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Ancient Human Ancestors Had to Deal with Climbing Toddlers

A new discovery finds that our ancestors' toddlers had a special toe that made them better suited for climbing compared to the adults.

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Anti-Bat-Signal: Moths with larger hindwings and longer tails are best at deflecting bats

Each night, dramatic aerial battles are waged above our heads, complete with barrel rolls, razor-sharp turns, sonar jamming, cloaking devices and life-or-death consequences.

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Our human ancestors walked on two feet but their children still had a backup plan

More than 3 million years ago, our ancient human ancestors, including their toddler-aged children, were standing on two feet and walking upright, according to a new study published in Science Advances.

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In India, swapping crops could save water and improve nutrition

India will need to feed approximately 394 million more people by 2050, and that's going to be a significant challenge. Nutrient deficiencies are already widespread in India today—30 percent or more are anemic—and many regions are chronically water-stressed. Making matters worse, evidence suggests that monsoons are delivering less rainfall than they used to. But a study published today in Science A

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Countdown to Shark Week: The Daily Bite | 30 Years of Bites

As we get close to Shark Week, it’s time to look at some of the best bites that 30 years of Shark Week gifted us. Also, some fresh shark ink jumps onto human skin and we take a visit to the New York Aquarium. Shark Week 2018 starts Sunday July 22 9p! Stream The Daily Bite on Discovery GO: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/the-daily-bite/ Stream Classic Shark Week Episodes: https://www.discovery.

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Wikipedia down in several countries in EU law protest

Wikipedia went down in at least three countries Wednesday in a protest at an upcoming European Parliament vote on a highly disputed law that could make online platforms legally liable for copyrighted material put on the web by users.

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Renewable energy push in sunny Arizona draws political fight

Arizona's largest utility is fiercely opposing a push to mandate increased use of renewable energy in the sun-drenched state, setting up a political fight over a measure funded by a California billionaire.

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Scientists create embryos, hope to save near-extinct rhino

Months after the death of Sudan, the world's last male northern white rhino, scientists said Wednesday they have grown embryos containing DNA of his kind, hoping to save the subspecies from extinction.

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How Is the Declaration of Independence Preserved?

The National Archives and Records Administration uses science and technology to keep one of America's most important historic documents safe. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The best 70th birthday presents we could give to the NHS | Letters

On the 70th anniversary of the founding of the NHS, readers celebrate its achievements and worry for its future It was no surprise to read that the very first lesson you suggest could be learned from overseas ( Five things the NHS could do to improve service , 3 July) is the establishment of integrated health and social care, as has happened in New Zealand. The achievements of the Attlee governmen

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Even phenomenally dense neutron stars fall like a feather

Harnessing the exquisite sensitivity of the National Science Foundation's Green Bank Telescope (GBT), astronomers have given one of Einstein's predictions on gravity its most stringent test yet. By precisely tracking the meanderings of three stars in a single system — two white dwarf stars and one ultra-dense neutron star — the researchers determined that even phenomenally compact neutron stars

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Test tube artificial neural network recognizes 'molecular handwriting'

Caltech scientists have developed an artificial neural network out of DNA that can recognize highly complex and noisy molecular information.

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Engineering cooperation

Social dilemmas occur when individual desires clash with group needs. How can people be encouraged to cooperate when they have reason not to? In a new Nature paper, scientists show that if the social dilemma that individuals face are dependent on if they work together, cooperation can triumph. This finding resulted from a new framework that they introduced, which extends the entire theory of repea

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Combining antibiotics changes their effectiveness

The effectiveness of antibiotics can be altered by combining them with each other, non-antibiotic drugs or even with food additives. Depending on the bacterial species, some combinations stop antibiotics from working to their full potential whilst others begin to defeat antibiotic resistance, report EMBL researchers and collaborators in Nature on July 4.

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Frigid polar oceans, not balmy coral reefs, are species-formation hot spots

Tropical oceans teem with the dazzle and flash of colorful reef fishes and contain far more species than the cold ocean waters found at high latitudes. This well-known 'latitudinal diversity gradient' is one of the most famous patterns in biology, and scientists have puzzled over its causes for more than 200 years.

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Theory of general relativity proven yet again in new research

In a novel test of Einstein's theory of general relativity, an international group of astronomers has demonstrated that the theory holds up, even for a massive three-star system.

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The Guardian view on world heritage: in the beginning was the dream | Editorial

An astonishing neolithic ruin shows the incomprehensible variety and power of religion Unesco has just added to its list of world heritage sites one of the most remarkable archaeological locations in the world, one which raises huge questions about the development of civilisation and offers no answers at all. Göbekli Tepe appears to be no more than a hill of dirt in the bare, brown landscape of so

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Gadgets: Universal docking station works with all devices

While many universal gadgets claim to do it all, the udoq 400 universal docking station is true to its word and does it well.

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Scientists Hope Lab-Grown Embryos Can Save Rhino Species From Extinction

Only two northern white rhinos remain, and they're both female. But researchers said Wednesday that they successfully have created embryos using sperm collected from the males before they died out. (Image credit: Sunday Alamba/AP)

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Framework provides new tools to systematically build cooperation; scientists extend theory of repeated games

Social dilemmas occur when individual desires clash with group needs. How can people be encouraged to cooperate when they have reason not to? In a new Nature paper, Hilbe and Krishnendu Chatterjee of the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (IST Austria), together with Martin Nowak of Harvard and Stepan Simsa of Charles University, have shown that if the social dilemma that individuals face

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Combining antibiotics changes their effectiveness

The effectiveness of antibiotics can be altered by combining them with each other, non-antibiotic drugs or even with food additives. Depending on the bacterial species, some combinations stop antibiotics from working to their full potential whilst others begin to defeat antibiotic resistance, report EMBL researchers and collaborators in Nature on July 4.

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Einstein gets it right again—weak and strong gravity objects fall the same way

Einstein's understanding of gravity, as outlined in his general theory of relativity, predicts that all objects fall at the same rate, regardless of their mass or composition. This theory has passed test after test here on Earth, but does it still hold true for some of the most massive and dense objects in the known universe, an aspect of nature known as the Strong Equivalence Principle? An intern

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Frigid polar oceans, not balmy coral reefs, are species-formation hot spots

Tropical oceans teem with the dazzle and flash of colorful reef fishes and contain far more species than the cold ocean waters found at high latitudes. This well-known "latitudinal diversity gradient" is one of the most famous patterns in biology, and scientists have puzzled over its causes for more than 200 years.

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Embryo breakthrough 'can save northern white rhino'

The loss of the endangered northern white rhino could be reversed by IVF, say scientists.

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Whale strandings off Washington-Oregon coast highest in nearly two decades

Struck by a ship, entangled in crab pots, stillborn, emaciated: It's been a tough three months for whales.

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July Fourth brings some of the year's worst air pollution, thanks to fireworks

Americans' fervor for Fourth of July fireworks has some unfortunate side effects.

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Testosterone boost feeds US men's hunger for luxury products, study indicates

An extra shot of testosterone, it seems, makes a man act like an animal.

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Facebook and Apple disagree on how to curb fake news for midterms

Apple and Facebook have figured out how to keep us glued to their devices and platforms. But they haven't figured out how to curb the misinformation that plagued them during the 2016 election and have struggled to regain public trust. And now, as the midterm elections approach, they certainly don't agree on a solution.

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Amazon Prime Day: One million deals kick off July 16 with offers at Whole Foods, too

Amazon's fourth annual Prime Day will kick off at 3 p.m. on July 16 and run for 36 hours with more than 1 million offers.

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To help save northern spotted owls, we need to prevent kissing cousins

Biologists present a study on a Northern Spotted Owl pedigree, consisting of almost 14,200 individuals over 30 years, which determined inbreeding varies across the species' range. Selection against inbreeding based on decreased future reproduction, fewer offspring, and overall survival of individuals was also supported. These results indicate that Spotted Owl conservation efforts need to address o

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Crows are always the bullies when it comes to fighting with ravens

A new study presented citizen science data which supports that American Crows and Northwestern Crows almost exclusively (97 percent of the time) instigate any aggressive interactions with Common Ravens no matter where in North America. The data showed that aggression by crows was most frequent during the breeding season, most likely due to nest predation by ravens. This study not only gives insigh

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A diet rich in nuts improves sperm count and motility

The inclusion of nuts in a regular diet significantly improves the quality and function of human sperm, according to results of a randomized trial which measured conventional semen parameters and molecular changes over a 14-week study period. The findings, say the investigators, 'support a beneficial role for chronic nut consumption in sperm quality' and reflect a research need for further male-sp

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Piping plovers want people to get off their lawn

A new study presents negative associations between anthropogenic disturbance (human recreational use of beaches, coastal modifications) and piping plovers on their non-breeding grounds. Shorebirds are one of the most threatened bird families in the world. This research indicates that there are direct consequences of disturbance.

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'Fire Flowers' Dazzle in Gorgeous Photos of Japanese Fireworks

Makoto Igari pays tribute to the country's unique pyrotechnics.

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How to stop artificial intelligence being so racist and sexist

AI his frequently be biased, but a new technique may be able put fairness right at the heart of training algorithms

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Asian hornet nests found by radio-tracking

Electronic radio tags could be used to track invasive Asian hornets and stop them colonizing the UK and killing honeybees, new research shows.

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New study questions when the brown bear became extinct in Britain

New research provides insights into the extinction of Britain's largest native carnivore. The study is the first of its kind to collate and evaluate the evidence for the brown bear in post-Ice Age Britain.

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The Gaia Sausage: The major collision that changed the Milky Way galaxy

Astronomers have discovered an ancient and dramatic head-on collision between the Milky Way and a smaller object, dubbed the 'Sausage' galaxy. The cosmic crash was a defining event in the early history of the Milky Way and reshaped the structure of our galaxy, fashioning both its inner bulge and its outer halo, the astronomers report in a series of new papers.

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Rising sea levels could cost the world $14 trillion a year by 2100

Failure to meet the United Nations' 2ºC warming limits will lead to sea level rise and dire global economic consequences, new research has warned. A study found flooding from rising sea levels could cost $14 trillion worldwide annually by 2100, if the target of holding global temperatures below 2ºC above pre-industrial levels is missed.

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Woman Rescued a Baby Raccoon. Now, She and 20 Friends Need Rabies Treatment.

Baby raccoons are cute. But if you ever see one, you should probably resist the urge to scoop it up and bring it home with you.

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We love fireworks because they scare us

Science Our brains enjoy fear, but only in small, controlled doses. What about fireworks makes them so appealing? Why do these eruptions of light have such an euphoric effect on us? The answer might not be what you expect.

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Why July 4th is the wrong date to celebrate Independence Day

There is a more accurate date for when American independence from Great Britain was declared. Read More

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Watch a Baby Exoplanet Being Born

New observations reveal an infant alien world coalescing from gas and dust around a young star — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Will the UK’s plans to ban ‘gay conversion therapy’ succeed?

Similar bans in the US have saved thousands of teens from discredited “treatments”, even though they have loopholes that allow religious advice

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Facebook apologises after bug unblocks people who were blocked

Blocking is often used to help Facebook users avoid abuse or harassment, but a bug meant 800,000 people lost this safeguard for a week

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Bolivia to build museum at bottom of 'sacred lake'

Bolivia is to build an underwater museum in its sacred Lake Titicaca, the culture minister said.

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Russia makes new request to Greece for cybercrime suspect

Russian authorities have sent a new extradition request to Greece for a Russian cybercrime suspect also sought on criminal charges by the U.S. and France.

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UAE further delays launch of first nuclear reactor

The United Arab Emirates said Wednesday that its first nuclear reactor would come online in late 2019 or early 2020, further delaying the launch of the Arab World's first atomic power station.

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How to use the £20bn NHS birthday gift: an alternative wish list

An extra cash injection promised for the UK's National Health Service is earmarked to go on what it wants, not what it really needs, says Luke Allen

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Revolution in quake detection technology

A new method using existing communications cables could make earthquakes easier to detect.

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Klimaforskernes nye værktøj: Tv-billeder fra Flandern Rundt

Tv-optagelser gennem 36 år dokumenter, at foråret i Belgien kommer tidligere og tidligere.

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In Defense of the Vegan Hot Dog

One carnivore's advice: When a tofu dog snuggles up to your tube steak on the grill, don’t be a jerk about it.

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Small-Town America Through the Lens of an Immigrant

Since 2015, photographer Niko Kallianiotis has chronicled the beauty and flaws of his adoptive state of Pennsylvania.

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Saving California Condors with a Chisel and Hand Puppets

Conservationists have helped to save North America’s largest bird from extinction, but it’s still important to give every chick a chance to fly free. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Countdown to Shark Week: The Daily Bite | Close Calls with Sharks

30 years of Shark Week has produced some of the most amazing moments of close calls, especially the tests of tonic immobility you’ll see in this episode. Also, we’ve done it…puppies dressed as sharks! Shark Week 2018 starts Sunday July 22 9p! Stream The Daily Bite on Discovery GO: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/the-daily-bite/ Stream Classic Shark Week Episodes: https://www.discovery.com/tv

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'Heritage potential' map aims to help urban planners preserve history

A University of Alberta student created a model to determine areas of potential archeological and heritage significance to help policy makers, urban planners and developers make better-informed decisions about where to set urban developments.

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Google lader virksomheder læse dine e-mails

Ansatte hos hundreder af virksomheder har kunnet læse tusindvis af Gmail-brugeres e-mails.

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Abraham Lincoln’s Warning

An American can always benefit from rereading the Declaration of Independence. But I suspect that this Fourth of July is better spent with that document’s best interpreter, Abraham Lincoln, beginning with words he uttered after worrying that his countrymen were losing touch with the core ideals of their political inheritance. “Now, my countrymen, if you have been taught doctrines in conflict with

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Researchers attempt to understand how Mobile Bay deals with excess nutrients

Nutrients. Just the word sounds good. Wholesome. We want food packed with nutrients. Everything a growing child needs. Junk food doesn't have nutrients, we believe. Nutrient-rich food keeps us healthy.

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Edmunds rounds up latest full-size pickups

The 2019 model year marks the start of a new cycle for some of America's top trucks, led by redesigned pickups from Chevrolet and Ram. Ford's top-selling F-150 had updates in 2018, and more may be in the offing for 2019. Typically, Japanese truckmakers Nissan and Toyota aren't far behind with their own updates. Edmunds breaks down what you need to know about today's crop of full-size pickups.

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Research lab rides wave of growth in pulse crops

Like a farmer scanning the horizon for coming changes in weather, in 2014 Mary Burrows looked to the future of Montana agriculture, and what she saw prompted her to start the Regional Pulse Crop Diagnostic Laboratory at Montana State University.

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Why technology puts human rights at risk

Movies such as 2001: A Space Odyssey, Blade Runner and The Terminator brought rogue robots and computer systems to our cinema screens. But these days, such classic science fiction spectacles don't seem so far removed from reality.

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First polluted white dwarf found in Gaia DR2

Astronomers have identified the first metal-polluted white dwarf star from the Gaia Data Release 2 (DR2) provided by ESA's Gaia satellite. The newly found star received designation GaiaJ1738−0826. The finding is detailed in a paper published June 24 on the arXiv pre-print repository.

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Piping plovers want people to get off their lawn

A new study in The Condor: Ornithological Applications presents negative associations between anthropogenic disturbance (human recreational use of beaches, coastal modifications) and piping plovers on their non-breeding grounds. Shorebirds are one of the most threatened bird families in the world. This research indicates that there are direct consequences of disturbance.

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To help save northern spotted owls, we need to prevent kissing cousins

The Auk: Ornithological Advances presents a study on a Northern Spotted Owl pedigree, consisting of almost 14,200 individuals over 30 years, which determined inbreeding varies across the species' range. Selection against inbreeding based on decreased future reproduction, fewer offspring, and overall survival of individuals was also supported. These results indicate that Spotted Owl conservation ef

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Crows are always the bullies when it comes to fighting with ravens

A study from The Auk: Ornithological Advances presents citizen science data which supports that American Crows and Northwestern Crows almost exclusively (97 percent of the time) instigate any aggressive interactions with Common Ravens no matter where in North America. The data showed that aggression by crows was most frequent during the breeding season, most likely due to nest predation by ravens.

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Smoke from moorland wildfires may hold toxic blast from the past

The UK’s largest wildfire for decades is almost under control, but peat burning below the ground risks spewing historical pollution back into the sky

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'Meget høj' trussel om statslige angreb mod sundhedssektoren kan føre til dødsfald

Cyberkriminelle angriber sundhedssektoren for at tjene penge på afpresning og datatyveri, lyder det i ny trusselsvurdering fra Center for Cybersikkerhed. I værste fald kan cyberangreb koste liv. Leverandørernes fjernadgang til medikoudstyr er et angrebspunkt.

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The best time to water your plants during a heatwave

When the warmer weather strikes, our gardens and outdoor spaces become a perfect oasis for rest and relaxation. But as nice as the hot weather might be, extreme conditions and record-breaking temperatures can wreak havoc on your plants.

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New method discovered to view proteins inside human cells

Scientists at the University of Warwick have created a new way to view proteins that are inside human cells.

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Soil contains one of the keys to climate agreement

To drive back global warming to below 2°C, carbon storage in soils plays an important part, since soils can store a notable share of the human CO2 emissions.

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5 Comics You Should Read Before Seeing 'Ant-Man and the Wasp'

It's time to get familiar with Janet and Hope Van Dyne.

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HTC U12 Plus Review: No Buttons, Mo Problems

HTC reminds us why it's important to have actual buttons on your smartphone. Our full HTC U12 Plus review.

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Shining new light on the pineal gland

When zebrafish lack a specific protein, the two hemispheres of the brain develop symmetrically, and the sleep hormone melatonin is not produced. These results were recently published by Freiburg biologists Theresa Schredelseker and Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Driever in the journal Development. Their research on the pineal gland have revealed a genetic connection between left-right asymmetry and day-night

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Study suggests dogs have lost ability to reconcile after violent conflicts

A team of researchers with the University of Vienna's Messerli Research Institute has found that wolves tend to reconcile shortly after conflicts but dogs do not. In their paper published in the journal Royal Society Open Science, the group describes their study of captive wolf packs and dogs from a rescue shelter and what they learned.

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Crows are always the bullies when it comes to fighting with ravens

A study from The Auk: Ornithological Advances presents citizen science data which supports that American Crows and Northwestern Crows almost exclusively (97% of the time) instigate any aggressive interactions with Common Ravens no matter where in North America. The data showed that aggression by crows was most frequent during the breeding season, most likely due to nest predation by ravens. This s

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Piping plovers want people to get off their lawn

A new study in The Condor: Ornithological Applications presents negative associations between anthropogenic disturbance (human recreational use of beaches, coastal modifications) and Piping Plovers on their non-breeding grounds. Shorebirds are one of the most threatened bird families in the world. Numerous studies have shown the negative impacts of humans on these birds, whether it be large-scale

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To help save northern spotted owls, we need to prevent kissing cousins

The Auk: Ornithological Advances presents a study on a Northern Spotted Owl pedigree, consisting of almost 14,200 individuals over 30 years, which determined inbreeding varies across the species' range. Selection against inbreeding based on decreased future reproduction, fewer offspring, and overall survival of individuals was also supported. These results indicate that Spotted Owl conservation ef

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Raising the American Flag Made in China

As the world confronts President Donald Trump’s “America First” protectionism, one product stands at the symbolic center of today’s trade war: American flags made in China. A harbinger of economic globalization and a source of nationalist anxiety, these foreign-made flags have so far escaped the president’s tariff targets. Yet for the past two decades , and most recently on Flag Day , Congress ha

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A new study to improve seabird conservation in Patagonian ecosystems

Preserving a 300,000 square km area in Patagonian waters could improve the conservation of 20 percent of the population of sea birds in their natural habitat, according to a study published in the journal Conservation Biology and led by Francisco Ramírez, researcher from the Faculty of Biology and the Biodiversity Research Institute of the University of Barcelona (IRBio).

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How the land recovers from wildfires – an expert's view

The apocalyptic images of desolate, scorched landscapes following the wildfires in Greater Manchester and Lancashire are hard to reconcile with the lush, picturesque moorland scenery that had existed just days before. While the fight to extinguish these fires continues – and may do so for weeks – our thoughts turn to the recovery of the affected area that now exceeds 2,000 hectares in size.

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First commercial DNA data storage service set to launch in 2019

A start-up called Catalog claims it will be able to store a terabyte of data in a gram-sized DNA pellet, but questions remain over whether the technology is ready

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Why This 5.4-Million-Year-Old Planet Is Still a Baby

Astronomers just captured a first-of-its-kind image of a newborn alien world — which has been developing in a nursery of dust and gas for more than 5 million years.

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Helping a sea turtle that lost its dive

A juvenile green sea turtle discovered floating in an estuary in Broome has been brought to Murdoch University's Animal Hospital for a CT scan.

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Searching for alien life on other moons

We usually look for signs of life on planets like ours—but maybe we are looking in the wrong place

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How to clean up our universal plastic tragedy

Twenty five years ago, I spent a summer removing plastic packing bands and plastic nets from 135 entangled Antarctic fur seals on Bird Island, South Georgia in the sub-Antarctic. Plastic marine waste discarded by the fishing industry were the primary source of entanglements.

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Artificial light at night found to cause stunting and shorter metamorphic phase in toads

A pair of researchers with Case Western Reserve University in the U.S. has found that artificial light at night (ALAN) causes stunting and shortens metamorphic duration in toads. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, Kacey Dananay and Michael Benard describe their study of the American toad living under artificial lighting conditions and what they learned by doing so.

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Benjamin Rush, Founding Father and Father of Psychiatry

This blog post was originally published on July 2, 2012. Of the 56 founding fathers who signed the U.S. Declaration of Independence, there were four physicians: Josiah Bartlett and Matthew Thornton of New Hampshire, Lyman Hall of Georgia, and Benjamin Rush of Pennsylvania. by Ole Erekson, Engraver, c. 1876, Library of Congress Josiah Bartlett went on to inspire the main character of The West Wing

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How to Help a Loved One Suffering from Mental Illness

As a family member, encouraging a loved one to seek mental health treatment is one of the thinnest tightropes we can walk — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Social housing protects against homelessness – but other benefits are less clear

Social housing, managed by governments and the community sector, provides a safety net to vulnerable Australians. A person living in social housing is far less likely to experience homelessness than someone battling it out in the private rental market.

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How to photograph fireworks

DIY Quick tips to make your Instagram shots flawless. Capture all the color and excitement, but not the noise, when fireworks light up the sky.

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SATB1 vital for maintenance of hematopoietic stem cells

Blood plays the important role of transporting oxygen and hormones necessary for the human body. Blood contains blood cells, such as erythrocytes, neutrophils, and lymphocytes, which are generated from hematopoietic stem cells, or hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs).

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This brain ‘blackout’ starts a migraine

Researchers have identified the electrical activity specific to the start of migraines and demonstrated a way to stop it in animal experiments. “Seizures and migraines are two very different states of the brain,” says Steven J. Schiff, professor of engineering in the departments of neurosurgery, engineering science and mechanics, and physics at Penn State. “We found that the spreading depolarizat

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Without lemur poo, Madgascar’s trees may be doomed

Saving Madagascar’s 100-plus species of iconic lemurs, which widespread logging and hunting have endangered, may also be key to saving the island’s largest trees, according to new research. “Forest loss is a huge problem in Madagascar right now, but our study suggests that just saving the trees is not enough,” says study coauthor Amy Dunham, associate professor of biosciences at Rice University.

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Radical As Ever, Boots Riley Takes On the Tech Boom

With his feature directorial debut, 'Sorry to Bother You,' Riley has stormed Hollywood in a second act no one expected.

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We Have No Idea How Bad the US Tick Problem Is

And new tick-borne pathogens are emerging at a troubling clip.

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Porous materials shed light on environmental purification

During the last two decades, porous materials such as zeolites and metal-organic frameworks have drawn the attention of the scientific community due to the wide range of applications derived from their porosity. Recently, a new class of all organic materials has emerged – the hydrogen-bonded organic frameworks (HOFs). These crystalline materials rely on two types of non-covalent interactions – π-π

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CO2 shortage—why can't we just pull carbon dioxide out of the air?

More people than ever are acutely aware that rising levels of carbon dioxide (CO₂) in the atmosphere are accelerating climate change and global warming. And yet food manufacturers have been issuing stark warnings that they've nearly run out of the gas, which is used in many products from beer to crumpets. The obvious question is: why we can't just capture the excess CO₂ from the atmosphere and use

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What’s Different About LeBron’s Move to the Lakers

Since he left the Cleveland Cavaliers in 2010 by announcing his decision to join the Miami Heat on a national television broadcast, angering many of his loyal fans and even the team’s owner , LeBron James, the best player of his generation and perhaps the greatest player to ever grace a basketball court, has taken meticulous steps to manage public perception and craft his narrative. After his fir

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Anticipating stress messes up memory—and your day

Starting your morning by focusing on the stress to come may harm your mindset throughout the day, according to a new study. The researchers found that when participants woke up feeling like the day ahead would be stressful, their working memory—which helps people learn and retain information even when they’re distracted—was lower later in the day. Anticipating something stressful had a great effe

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How to Survive Hot Weather at Work–and Not Fall Out with Colleagues

The idea of a perfect office temperature is something of a red herring. Ultimately, people just want to have a level of control over their environments — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Looking at a future where aircraft de-icing is a thing of the past

Using nanotechnology, researchers create new aeroplane coatings that repel water and stop ice from forming.

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Upper and lower plate controls on the 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake

Researchers at Tohoku University's Department of Geophysics have been studying the great Tohoku-oki earthquake which occurred on March 11, 2011, to the east of Japan's Honshu Island (Fig. 1).

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Sunny day flooding along the US coast can be increased by Atlantic Rossby waves

A new link between processes in the open ocean and coastal sea-level has been revealed in a Nature Communications paper, published today by scientists at the National Oceanography Centre (NOC).

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Shark Week Presents: The Daily Bite!

We’re counting down the days to Shark Week and covering everything you need and want to know about America’s favorite week of the year. Hosted by Jordan Carlos. Shark Week 2018 starts Sunday July 22 9p! Stream The Daily Bite on Discovery GO: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/the-daily-bite/ Stream Classic Shark Week Episodes: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/shark-week/ Subscribe to Discovery:

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Independence Day!

Happy 4th to all our readers.

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Asian hornet scientists in 'breakthrough' to stop spread

Scientists used radio tags to track Asian hornets, allowing their nests to be detected quickly.

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Cash and competition make doctors prescribe fewer antibiotics

Doctors in Australia and the UK are now prescribing fewer antibiotics thanks to financial incentives and a bit of competition among peers

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How suppliers of everyday devices make you vulnerable to cyber attack – and what to do about it

If you run a business, you're probably concerned about IT security. Maybe you invest in antivirus software, firewalls and regular system updates.

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Radiokrypton dating plumbs mysteries of water aquifers

We tap it, pump it and draw it from below the surface of every imaginable landscape, from desert to well-manicured suburban yard. It is the one essential ingredient required to sustain life. Water.

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Loneliness found to be high in public senior housing communities

Older adults living in public senior housing communities experience a large degree of loneliness, finds a new study from the Brown School at Washington University in St. Louis.

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Celebrate researcher Henrietta Swan Leavitt's 150th birthday on July 4th

On this Independence Day a century and a half ago, Henrietta Swan Leavitt was born. While working at Harvard College Observatory in Cambridge, Mass. – now part of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA) – in the late 19th and early 20th century, Leavitt conducted research that led to two of the most surprising and important discoveries in the history of astrophysics.

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Ny type mobilmaster giver dækning til Roskildes festivalgæster

Lige syd for Roskilde ligger en mark, der uden sammenligning har den bedste mobildækning af alle marker i Danmark. Den huser netop nu Roskilde Festival, men er samtidig vært for en række nye antenner, teleselskabet 3 tester i det usædvanlige miljø.

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Research shows how to improve the bond between implants and bone

Research carried out recently at the Canadian Light Source (CLS) in Saskatoon has revealed promising information about how to build a better dental implant, one that integrates more readily with bone to reduce the risk of failure.

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How Chesapeake Bay bacteria snack on sunlight

The Chesapeake Bay is known for its blue crabs, but those crustaceans are far outnumbered by much tinier residents: bacteria. Every milliliter of bay water is home to thousands to millions of these marine microbes, critical building blocks of the bay's ecosystem. To protect these ecosystems, scientists want to understand how these bacteria feed themselves.

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The Nonsense-y Polaris Slingshot Is the Future of Driving

The three-wheeler is all about having fun on the road—and once the robots free us from the drudgery of daily driving, that's all we'll have left.

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The Physics of Launching Fireworks From a Drone

PSA: Let's keep drones and fireworks *far* away from each other.

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A Fourth of July Drone Show Helps Military Families With Special Needs

On Wednesday, Travis Air Force Base will host a light show by Intel's Shooting Star drones instead of traditional fireworks.

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Dear Therapist: How Do I Stop My Wife From Leaving Me?

Editor’s Note: Every Wednesday, Lori Gottlieb answers questions from readers about their problems, big and small. Have a question? Email her at dear.therapist@theatlantic.com . Dear Therapist , My wife has given up on me and is threatening to leave. She has given me six months to find treatment for the lack of emotion I am displaying toward her. I am 64 years old and love her very much. We have o

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My Parents Still Struggle to Know Me After I Transitioned Late

Editor’s Note: This article is part of a series of responses to Jesse Singal’s Atlantic article “ When Children Say They’re Trans .” When I was growing up, transgender women were no more than punchlines, and transgender men nearly unheard of. I was a happy enough androgynous little kid, but when I hit puberty everything changed. I became depressed, self-harmed, had poor hygiene, and wore careless

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Faster big-data analysis with world-class pattern mining technologies

A research team at Korea's Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology (DGIST) succeeded in analyzing big data up to 1,000 times faster than existing technology by using GPU-based 'GMiner' technology. The finding of big data pattern analysis is expected to be utilized in various industries including the finance and IT sectors.

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China's Baidu rolls out self-driving buses

China's internet giant Baidu announced Wednesday it had begun mass producing the country's first autonomous mini-bus, as the firm prepares to roll them out in tourist spots and airports.

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The robots helping NHS surgeons perform better, faster – and for longer

Surgical robots such as Versius cut training time down from 80 sessions to 30 minutes NHS at 70: all our anniversary coverage in one place It is the most exacting of surgical skills: tying a knot deep inside a patient’s abdomen, pivoting long graspers through keyhole incisions with no direct view of the thread. Trainee surgeons typically require 60 to 80 hours of practice, but in a mock-up operat

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China court 'bans sales' of chips from US firm Micron

A Chinese technology firm embroiled in a patent dispute with US chip giant Micron said Wednesday that a court had ruled in its favour and ordered an immediate halt of several Micron products in China.

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New study questions when the brown bear became extinct in Britain

New research provides insights into the extinction of Britain's largest native carnivore.

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The Gaia Sausage: The major collision that changed the Milky Way galaxy

An international team of astronomers has discovered an ancient and dramatic head-on collision between the Milky Way and a smaller object, dubbed the "Sausage" galaxy. The cosmic crash was a defining event in the early history of the Milky Way and reshaped the structure of our galaxy, fashioning both its inner bulge and its outer halo, the astronomers report in a series of new papers.

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Asian hornet nests found by radio-tracking

Electronic radio tags could be used to track invasive Asian hornets and stop them colonising the UK and killing honeybees, new research shows.

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Missing 1.5°C warming target will cost $14 trillion in floods

The cost of rising sea levels caused by global warming could be in the trillions by 2100, unless governments make efforts to adapt

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Poor will suffer more as rising CO2 makes food less nutritious

Falling levels of iron and zinc in food due to soaring carbon dioxide levels will increase the disease burden, hitting poorest countries the hardest

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Classics professor using 3-D printing to rebuild ancient history

As a University of Kansas professor has spent two years trying to recreate an ancient Roman structure in western Turkey, he has enlisted the help of a very modern technological tool—a 3-D printer.

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With changing demographics, more racial/ethnic socialization needed for white youth

While teaching and talking about race and ethnicity with children and adults is especially important in racially diverse societies, this process known as "racial/ethnic socialization" can lead to tensions for white youth as communities become more diverse, according to a research paper published in the Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology.

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A matter of gravity—understanding how plants grow in space

Last month a rocket thundered off a NASA launch pad in Virginia, destined for the International Space Station. Nestled among the 7,400 lbs. of supplies was a handful of seeds designed to open new windows into our knowledge of how plants grow in space – information that could lead to growing fresh food in space for people aboard the space station or producing biofuel on our own planet.

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Image: Tiny cameras snap pictures of Lake Superior

These two images of Lake Superior and surrounding area show the first data downlinked from the CubeSat Multispectral Observation System (CUMULOS) cameras. The image on the left, taken by a short-wavelength infrared camera, captures a larger area of the lake and shows strong contrast between land and water features. The narrower field of view image on the right taken by the payload's long-wavelengt

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Why our carbon emission policies don't work on air travel

The federal government's National Energy Guarantee aims to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in the electricity industry by 26% of 2005 levels. But for Australia to meet its Paris climate change commitments, this 26% reduction will need to be replicated economy-wide.

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Irrigation and development pose threat to international status of Narran Lakes

A long-term UNSW Sydney study shows the impact of irrigation and development on the breeding of colonial waterbirds in Narran Lakes.

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Next four Galileo satellites fuelled for launch

Europe's next four Galileo satellites have been fuelled at Europe's Spaceport in Kourou, French Guiana, in preparation for their launch on 25 July.

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Image: Testing MTG's FCI instrument

A test model of the main imager for Europe's forthcoming Meteosat Third Generation weather satellite being lifted towards Europe's largest vacuum chamber for simulated space testing.

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Image: Lunar agenda

This image of the Moon was taken by ESA astronaut Alexander Gerst from the International Space Station during his Horizons mission. But he's not the only one to be eyeing the Moon these days.

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How dingoes sculpt the shape of sand dunes in the Australian desert

A new study by UNSW scientists has shown how the presence – and absence – of dingoes affects the desert landscape.

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The Left and the Right Have Abandoned American Exceptionalism

Barack Obama and Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez have a lot in common. They’re both courteous, charismatic and wonky. They’re both people of color who rose from modest means in part because their mothers fought to get them a decent education. They were both community organizers. And at tender ages they both challenged older, entrenched House Democrats, though Obama—in his 2000 race against Chicago Congr

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Is #MeToo Too Big?

On October 15, 2017, shortly after The New York Times and the New Yorker published their initial investigations into the allegations of monstrous behavior by Harvey Weinstein, the actor Alyssa Milano sent out a tweet : “If you’ve been sexually harassed or assaulted,” she wrote, “write ‘me too’ as a reply to this tweet.” The suggestion, which currently has more than 67,000 replies and sparked many

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Study finds new genomic regions associated with weight gain in Nelore cattle

Brazilian research aims at enhancing quality of beef and raising Nelore's food efficiency. Because they are rooted in tropical lands, Nelore cattle do not gain weight as easily as the breeds forged in regions with harsh winters.

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A promising new tool to measure antibodies against malaria

Antibodies against multiple Plasmodium falciparum proteins (or antigens) can be measured using a simple, accurate and reproducible assay that requires very small amounts of blood. In a series of recently published articles, a team led by ISGlobal reports the development and optimisation of several quantitative suspension array assays (qSATs) to assess natural and vaccine-induced responses to malar

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Researchers find Mediterranean fish retreat if a diver carries a speargun

Fisheries scientists from the Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB) and international colleagues have studied the response of fish in the Mediterranean Sea to spearfishing. They found that the fish can exactly distinguish whether divers are carrying a speargun and adjust their escape behaviour, keeping a safe distance outside the shooting range. This is good for the fi

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High performance nitride semiconductor for environmentally friendly photovoltaics

A Tokyo Institute of Technology research team has shown copper nitride acts as an n-type semiconductor, with p-type conduction provided by fluorine doping, utilizing a unique nitriding technique applicable for mass production and a computational search for appropriate doping elements, as well as atomically resolved microscopy and electronic structure analysis using synchrotron radiation. These n-t

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Researchers sharpen predictions of where lost cargo will wash up

The UNSW team tracking cargo lost from a ship near Port Stephens are now predicting the path of the containers days in advance.

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Want stronger, healthier sperm? Eat your nuts

Snacking on nuts was shown to increase the number and quality of the sperm men produced Grazing on nuts may boost men’s fertility, according to doctors who found that a daily snack of almonds, hazelnuts and walnuts increased the number and quality of the sperm men produced. Fertility specialists in Spain examined the sperm of 119 healthy young men before and after a 14-week study during which hal

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USA afslutter test af lette angrebsfly før tid efter dødsulykke

Det amerikanske luftvåben har sat en stopper for testflyvninger af to fly, der kandiderer til at blive et billigt supplement til F-35. Det sker efter et styrt under evalueringen af kandidaterne, hvor piloten omkom.

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A diet rich in nuts improves sperm count and motility

The inclusion of nuts in a regular diet significantly improves the quality and function of human sperm, according to results of a randomised trial which measured conventional semen parameters and molecular changes over a 14-week study period. The findings, say the investigators, 'support a beneficial role for chronic nut consumption in sperm quality' and reflect a research need for further male-sp

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The Other Victims: First Responders To Violent Disasters Often Suffer Alone

Some firefighters, EMTS and police officers say recent mass shootings have brought to the surface their own trauma, buried over years on the job. Many find it hard to open up and seek help. (Image credit: Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News)

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Ipswich coffee shop uses takeaway mugs to ditch plastic

A cafe is trying to cut its plastic waste by using donated mugs and cups to serve takeaway hot drinks.

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New study questions when the brown bear became extinct in Britain

New research provides insights into the extinction of Britain's largest native carnivore. The study — 'The Presence of the brown bear in Holocene Britain: a review of the evidence' published in Mammal Review — is the first of its kind to collate and evaluate the evidence for the brown bear in post-Ice Age Britain.

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Asian hornet nests found by radio-tracking

Electronic radio tags could be used to track invasive Asian hornets and stop them colonizing the UK and killing honeybees, new research shows.

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Virksomheder verden over ramt af datalæk fra populært spansk firma

Ukrypteret data blev i mindst et tilfælde lækket, da angribere i starten af maj downloadede en delvis backup fra den spanske virksomhed Typeform's servere.

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Trump Keeps His Friends Distant and His Enemies Closer

Despite his justified reputation for unpredictability, Donald Trump’s foreign-policy pronouncements have tended to fit a pattern. He is equally prone to exaggerating his achievements as he is to bemoaning what he sees as slights to America. Which may help explain why he is equally prone to trusting Kim Jong Un as he is to mistrusting U.S. NATO allies. Kim made a vague promise to Trump to “work to

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Lost history of brown bears in Britain revealed

From fearsome predator to teddy bear: tracing the hidden history of brown bears in Britain.

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From apps to artificial wombs: the smart tech transforming NHS care

Smart pills can keep track of a patient’s correct dose – and could even monitor vital signs NHS at 70: all our anniversary coverage in one place Look beyond the huge technological shifts that are revolutionising how the NHS operates, and there are a multitude of less heralded breakthroughs and gadgets that could ease the workload on staff, and help prevent illnesses. Some are already being used i

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Spectacular Chinese mammal fossil exhibition opens | Elsa Panciroli

New public exhibition at Beijing’s Museum of Natural History features scores of previously unseen fossils We flew over Jurassic China, and the pristine forest stretched endlessly towards distant mountains. A river meandered below and we sank down to skim across its surface like a dragonfly. A pterosaur swooped in front. The tip of its wing caught the glistening waters’ surface and sent up a spray

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From cash-strapped roommates to Airbnb billionaires

A decade ago a pair of San Francisco roommates decided to make rent money by using air mattresses to turn their place into a bed-and-breakfast when a conference in the city made hotel rooms scarce.

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The Gaia Sausage: The major collision that changed the Milky Way galaxy

An international team of astronomers has discovered an ancient and dramatic head-on collision between the Milky Way and a smaller object, dubbed the 'Sausage' galaxy. The cosmic crash was a defining event in the early history of the Milky Way and reshaped the structure of our galaxy, fashioning both its inner bulge and its outer halo, the astronomers report in a series of new papers.

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How do I get a six-pack? You asked Google – here’s the answer | Emma Oko

Every day millions of people ask Google life’s most difficult questions. Our writers answer some of the commonest queries The six-pack is a shy, elusive thing that, although doesn’t serve any functional purpose, is used by some keep-fitters as a measure of personal progress – rather in the way that standing on those bathroom scales is. On the naked, athletic body, a six-pack can look as sharp as a

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US lets ZTE resume some activity

The United States has temporarily allowed Chinese telecoms company ZTE to resume some activities while it works to meet conditions set by Washington in a politically charged settlement reached last month.

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All of a flutter: Chinese bet big on World Cup

At Xia Lugen's run-down, smoky betting shop in downtown Shanghai, hordes of young men cluster around banks of computers, as betting slips and a huge World Cup chart adorn the walls and a projector beams matches onto a makeshift screen.

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India slams WhatsApp over deadly rumours

India has told WhatsApp to take "immediate action" after a spate of horrific lynchings sparked by false rumours being shared on the hugely popular smartphone messaging service.

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European tourist magnets hit back as Airbnb turns 10

Facing competition from Airbnb, which will celebrate a decade this summer, top European attractions such as Paris, Amsterdam, Berlin and Barcelona are out to revamp their own offerings.

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Reality Check: Fishing after Brexit – sink or swim?

BBC Reality Check looks at the government's promise of taking back control of UK fishing waters.

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App-udviklere kan læse e-mails fra millioner af Gmail-brugere

Også Googles egne medarbejdere kan 'i særlige tilfælde' – fx ved undersøgelse for softwarefejl – læse brugeres emails, herunder indholdet.

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Stress-ramte tilbage i job behandles helt forkert

Det er ikke antallet af timer, det drejer sig om, men mængden og sværhedsgraden af de opgaver,…

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The only way to protect our NHS? Set up a National Care Service | Sonia Sodha

The founding principles of the health service must be extended to social care. Otherwise the NHS will be run into the ground There’s so much of modern life we take for granted, but not the NHS. It has a special place in British hearts, outranking the armed forces and the royal family in what makes us proud to be British. But the NHS is facing two existential tests on its 70th birthday, both of wh

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Cykelløb afslører klimaforandringer

Tv-billeder fra cykelløbet Flandern Rundt viser, at træer får blade tidligere og tidligere på året.

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Mini-EFI skal fange uforsikrede bilister fra skyen

Det danske udviklingshus Commentor er i gang med at udvikle et nyt automatisk inddrivelsessystem efter lovændring, der straffer uforsikrede bilister med dagbøder.

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Møgbeskidte festivalgæster skal stressteste system til genbrug af badevand

På Roskilde Festival tester virksomheden Flow Loop et system, der lader dig genbruge dit eget badevand. Det kan spare vand og energi, men testen har mødt en uforudset forhindring i det danske drikkevandsdirektiv.

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Discovering King Tutankhamun's tomb: Harry Burton's photographs

A new exhibition reappraises the work of Harry Burton, who photographed the decade-long Tutankhamun excavation.

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Exposure to paint, varnish, other solvents linked to increased risk of MS

People who have been exposed to paint, varnish and other solvents and who also carry genes that make them more susceptible to developing multiple sclerosis (MS) may be at much greater risk of developing the disease than people who have only the exposure to solvents or the MS genes, according to a new study.

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New tools used to identify childhood cancer genes

Using a new computational strategy, researchers have identified 29 genetic changes that can contribute to rhabdomyosarcoma, an aggressive childhood cancer.

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Only 7 percent of social egg freezers have returned for fertility treatment at a large European center

Despite dramatic uptake in the numbers of women electing to freeze their eggs as insurance against an anticipated age-related fertility decline, there is still little that clinics can predict about outcome based on real-life experience. Indeed, at one of Europe's biggest fertility centers only 7.6 percent of women have returned to thaw their eggs and try for a pregnancy. And only one-third of thos

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City Life Favors Downsized Invertebrates

Most invertebrates get smaller on average in cities, although a few very mobile species respond to urbanization by growing. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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BRIEF: Wolves Have No Dog in the Fight

BRIEF: Wolves Have No Dog in the Fight Dogs avoid each other after aggressive encounters, whereas wolves rapidly reconcile. shutterstock_10086985.jpg Image credits: Cynthia Kidwell via Shutterstock Creature Tuesday, July 3, 2018 – 19:15 Nala Rogers, Staff Writer (Inside Science) — Wolves aren't the type to hold a grudge. When two pack members squabble, they often reconcile immediately afterward

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Only 7 percent of social egg freezers have returned for fertility treatment at a large European center

Despite dramatic uptake in the numbers of women electing to freeze their eggs as insurance against an anticipated age-related fertility decline, there is still little that clinics can predict about outcome based on real-life experience. Indeed, at one of Europe's biggest fertility centers — the Brussels Centre for Reproductive Medicine in Belgium — only 7.6 percent of women have returned to thaw

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Rising sea levels could cost the world $14 trillion a year by 2100

Failure to meet the United Nations' 2ºC warming limits will lead to sea level rise and dire global economic consequences, new research has warned.Published today in Environmental Research Letters, a study led by the UK National Oceanographic Centre found flooding from rising sea levels could cost $14 trillion worldwide annually by 2100, if the target of holding global temperatures below 2ºC above

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DNA reveals Romans helped spread TB across three continents

The Romans gave us roads, public toilets and the modern calendar, but we may also have them to thank for spreading a deadly disease: tuberculosis

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Rising sea levels could cost the world $14 trillion a year by 2100

Failure to meet the United Nations' 2ºC warming limits will lead to sea level rise and dire global economic consequences, new research has warned.

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The impact of the sugar tax in Chile: A bittersweet success?

A new sugar tax introduced on soft drinks in Chile has been effective in reducing consumption of sugary drinks, new research carried out in the country has revealed. However, the international research team say although consumption may have dropped, it may not be enough to reduce socioeconomic inequalities in diet-related health.

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Impact of urban sprawl on life expectancy, innovation hubs

Urban researchers found a correlation between urban sprawl and a decreased life expectancy in the United States.

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A first look at interstitial fluid flow in the brain

Past research has shown a link between interstitial fluid flow and an increased invasion rate of glioblastoma cells, and biomedical researchers and electrical engineers recently developed a new method to measure and reconstruct interstitial fluid flow velocities in the brain. This method gives a first look at interstitial fluid flow dynamics in glioma models, and the technique can readily translat

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New clues to sepsis may speed diagnosis

Researchers have found a clue in understanding how an infection can spiral into sepsis by blunting the body's immune response. This research may also help doctors identify the patients who may need immediate intensive treatment to save their lives.

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Why males are more at risk than females for neurodevelopmental disorders

Researchers have recently begun to realize that biological sex plays a key role in disease risk. Sex plays a role in hypertension, diabetes, arthritis — and in many neurological and psychiatric disorders. Depression and anxiety affect females more, while neurodevelopmental disorders, including autism spectrum disorders, early onset schizophrenia, and attention deficit hyperactivity, affect more m

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New experimental results from the largest and most sophisticated stellarator

An international team is running tests on the largest and most sophisticated stellarator, the Wendelstein 7-X fusion experiment. Researchers are analyzing data from the first experiment campaign that took place in 2016, hoping to understand the science of fusion reactors.

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A bright and vibrant future for seismology

Fiber-optic cables can be used to detect earthquakes and other ground movements. The data cables can also pick up seismic signals from hammer shots, passing cars or wave movements in the ocean.

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Spraying efficiently: Breaking up is hard to do

Using oscillating liquid streams, breakup and drop formation can be improved compared to common straight jets, but dynamic interactions make it difficult for scientists to understand the mechanisms behind this breakup. Now, researchers have simulated the breakup of an oscillating stream using numerical modelings. Their findings give a better understanding of how an oscillating jet achieves these r

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Can citizen science reverse the extinction of experience?

Opportunities for people to interact with nature have declined over the past century, as many now live in urban areas and spend much of their time indoors. Conservation attitudes and behaviors largely depend on experiences with nature, and this 'extinction of experience' (EOE) is a threat to biodiversity conservation. Researchers now propose that citizen science, an increasingly popular way to int

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Self-healing seed pods

An international team of researchers has discovered a self-sealing mechanism in the seed pods of Banksia plants: special waxes in the junction zone between the two pod valves melt at elevated environmental temperatures and thereby seal small fissures.

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New genomic regions associated to weight gain in Nelore cattle

A pioneering research project has identified genes potentially associated with functions such as growth and weight gain in the Nelore breed. These functions are key to beef production. The researchers pinpointed genomic regions that had changed owing to selection, referring to these as genomic signatures of selection.

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Fleet of aerial, surface, and underwater robots maps ocean front

The research vessel Falkor returns with unprecedented detail of a major open-ocean front mapped with multiple aerial and underwater vehicles in astounding resolution.

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Gulf stream eddies as a source of iron

Researchers have fortuitously discovered that Gulf Stream eddies are rich in iron, and these eddies transport this essential micronutrient to the iron-poor North Atlantic Gyre. Before this discovery, the typical assumption was that this part of the ocean received iron primarily from Saharan dust.

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Fungi and bacteria grow on body implants

A body implant provides a new habitat for bacteria and fungi, a new study reveals. The researchers have examined a number of implants such as screws implanted in the body in connection with surgery and discovered bacteria and fungi on them — despite the fact that the patients have shown no signs of infection.

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Don't sweat it: Scientists identify key step in production of BO

Researchers have unraveled a key part of the molecular process by which armpit bacteria produce the most pungent component of the noxious smell we recognize as BO. The findings could result in more effective deodorants with targeted active ingredients, the researchers suggest.

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Anticonvulsant drugs ineffective for low back pain and can cause harm, despite increased prescribing

Anticonvulsant drugs are increasingly being used to treat low back pain, but a new study finds they are ineffective and can have adverse effects.

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Patients don't mind if doctors sport tattoos or piercings

Patients don't mind if their emergency care doctors sport tattoos or piercings, or both, suggests an observational study.

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Clocking up 45+ working hours/week linked to heightened risk of diabetes in women

Clocking up 45 or more working hours in a week is linked to a heightened risk of diabetes in women, finds an observational study.

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More evidence supports link between orthostatic hypotension and CVD

Orthostatic hypotension (OH) — a rapid drop in blood pressure upon standing up from a sitting or lying down position — is a frequently encountered clinical sign among patients. Clinicians most often consider OH as indicative of dehydration. However, new research bolsters the notion that adults with OH may have undiagnosed cardiovascular disease.

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Earth's first animals probably triggered a change in climate

Environment Of course, they warmed things up over millions of years, not a couple hundred. Human beings are the most egregious example of how life can wreak havoc on a planet’s natural environment, but not the only example.

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A Cruise-on-Cruise Crash Reveals the Hardest Thing About Self-Driving Tech

Humans are wild beasts, and they're not getting off the road anytime soon.

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How Long Can Humans Survive in a Cave?

The youth soccer team and its coach in Thailand that had gone missing in the Tham Luang caves for more than a week have been found.

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The Atlantic Daily: Whose Country?

What We’re Following Immigration Debate: German Chancellor Angela Merkel struck a last-minute immigration deal with her interior minister, averting a crisis that could have brought down her coalition government. But the question of how to handle asylum-seekers isn’t fully resolved. Germany’s new agreement depends on Austria’s cooperation, and Sebastian Kurz, the latter country’s 31-year-old chanc

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The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: (Still) Fraught Pruitt

-Written by Elaine Godfrey ( @elainejgodfrey ) Programming note: We will not publish on July 4, but we’ll be back in your inboxes on Thursday. See you then! Today in 5 Lines The Trump administration is rescinding Obama-era guidance that encouraged schools to consider race in the admissions process to promote diversity. Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt reportedly urged Pr

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Natural selection could have influence on lizards' 'personalities'

In a recent study, scientists have demonstrated a link between individual variation in risk-taking behavior and survival of animals in changing environments.

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Breakthrough synthesis strategy could mean wave of new medicinal compounds

Scientists have devised a new strategy for synthesizing notoriously difficult carbocyclic 5-8-5 fused ring systems, a molecular structure with broad therapeutic potential.

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German Scientists Photograph Formation Of A Planet

A German team has managed to photograph a planet forming in a distant solar system.

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Meet China's growing fleet of automated delivery drones

Blog: Eastern Arsenal Meals being air freighted, plus armies of delivery robots. China's tech giants and start ups are building the AI and robots for China's future smart economy.

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How to explain the AKT phosphorylation of downstream targets in the wake of recent findings [Biological Sciences]

AKT (v-Akt oncogene), a Ser/Thr protein kinase, was also identified as protein kinase B (PKB) (reviewed in ref. 1). There are three known isoforms of AKT1-3. All these AKT isoforms are highly conserved and are recruited to the plasma membrane where they bind to PIP3,4,5 via the PH-domain and are…

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Reply to Agarwal: Activity against nuclear substrates is not necessarily mediated by nuclear Akt [Biological Sciences]

The phosphorylation of Akt substrates in subcellular compartments other than the plasma membrane has previously been proposed to be mediated by the diffusion of activated Akt (1, 2). While this neatly accounts for the observation that Akt is activated by growth factors primarily at the plasma membrane, it poses problems…

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The social code of speech prosody must be specific and generalizable [Biological Sciences]

Ponsot et al. (1) used speech transformation algorithms and reverse-correlation techniques to derive pitch contours for the word “bonjour,” constituting prosodic prototypes for trustworthy and dominant speech. The use of reverse correlation is a powerful method that allows the properties of complex expressions to be inferred from listeners’ perceptual responses…

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Reply to Knight et al.: The complexity of inferences from speech prosody should be addressed using data-driven approaches [Biological Sciences]

We are glad our proposed methodological approach (1) raises interest in the community. Knight et al. (2) make two important theoretical considerations that we would like to further develop here. The first point they raise concerns the specificity of the pitch prototype of dominance/trustworthiness: They argue one should demonstrate that…

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Lack of group-to-individual generalizability is a threat to human subjects research [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

Only for ergodic processes will inferences based on group-level data generalize to individual experience or behavior. Because human social and psychological processes typically have an individually variable and time-varying nature, they are unlikely to be ergodic. In this paper, six studies with a repeated-measure design were used for symmetric comparisons…

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Gravity of human impacts mediates coral reef conservation gains [Sustainability Science]

Coral reefs provide ecosystem goods and services for millions of people in the tropics, but reef conditions are declining worldwide. Effective solutions to the crisis facing coral reefs depend in part on understanding the context under which different types of conservation benefits can be maximized. Our global analysis of nearly…

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Reproduction in the Baka pygmies and drop in their fertility with the arrival of alcohol [Anthropology]

To understand the diversity of human growth and development from an evolutionary point of view, there is an urgent need to characterize the life-history variables of vanishing forager societies. The small body size of the Baka pygmies is the outcome of a low growth rate during infancy. While the ages…

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Hyperstimulation of CaSR in human MSCs by biomimetic apatite inhibits endochondral ossification via temporal down-regulation of PTH1R [Applied Biological Sciences]

In adult bone injuries, periosteum-derived mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) form bone via endochondral ossification (EO), whereas those from bone marrow (BM)/endosteum form bone primarily through intramembranous ossification (IMO). We hypothesized that this phenomenon is influenced by the proximity of MSCs residing in the BM to the trabecular bone microenvironment. Herein,…

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Antibody selection using clonal cocultivation of Escherichia coli and eukaryotic cells in miniecosystems [Applied Biological Sciences]

We describe a method for the rapid selection of functional antibodies. The method depends on the cocultivation of Escherichia coli that produce phage with target eukaryotic cells in very small volumes. The antibodies on phage induce selectable phenotypes in the target cells, and the nature of the antibody is determined…

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Aldehydes are the predominant forces inducing DNA damage and inhibiting DNA repair in tobacco smoke carcinogenesis [Biochemistry]

Tobacco smoke (TS) contains numerous cancer-causing agents, with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and nitrosamines being most frequently cited as the major TS human cancer agents. Many lines of evidence seriously question this conclusion. To resolve this issue, we determined DNA adducts induced by the three major TS carcinogens: benzo(a)pyrene (BP),…

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Asf1a resolves bivalent chromatin domains for the induction of lineage-specific genes during mouse embryonic stem cell differentiation [Biochemistry]

Bivalent chromatin domains containing repressive H3K27me3 and active H3K4me3 modifications are barriers for the expression of lineage-specific genes in ES cells and must be resolved for the transcription induction of these genes during differentiation, a process that remains largely unknown. Here, we show that Asf1a, a histone chaperone involved in…

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Broadly conserved Na+-binding site in the N-lobe of prokaryotic multidrug MATE transporters [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Multidrug and toxic-compound extrusion (MATE) proteins comprise an important but largely uncharacterized family of secondary-active transporters. In both eukaryotes and prokaryotes, these transporters protect the cell by catalyzing the efflux of a broad range of cytotoxic compounds, including human-made antibiotics and anticancer drugs. MATEs are thus potential pharmacological targets against…

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Sodium and proton coupling in the conformational cycle of a MATE antiporter from Vibrio cholerae [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Secondary active transporters belonging to the multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE) family harness the potential energy of electrochemical ion gradients to export a broad spectrum of cytotoxic compounds, thus contributing to multidrug resistance. The current mechanistic understanding of ion-coupled substrate transport has been informed by a limited set of…

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Separating the effects of nucleotide and EB binding on microtubule structure [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Microtubules (MTs) are polymers assembled from αβ-tubulin heterodimers that display the hallmark behavior of dynamic instability. MT dynamics are driven by GTP hydrolysis within the MT lattice, and are highly regulated by a number of MT-associated proteins (MAPs). How MAPs affect MTs is still not fully understood, partly due to…

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Kinetic analysis of the multistep aggregation pathway of human transthyretin [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Aggregation of transthyretin (TTR) is the causative agent for TTR cardiomyopathy and polyneuropathy amyloidoses. Aggregation is initiated by dissociation of the TTR tetramer into a monomeric intermediate, which self-assembles into amyloid. The coupled multiple-step equilibria and low-concentration, aggregation-prone intermediates are challenging to probe using conventional assays. We report a 19F-

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Inverse enzyme isotope effects in human purine nucleoside phosphorylase with heavy asparagine labels [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Transition path-sampling calculations with several enzymes have indicated that local catalytic site femtosecond motions are linked to transition state barrier crossing. Experimentally, femtosecond motions can be perturbed by labeling the protein with amino acids containing 13C, 15N, and nonexchangeable 2H. A slowed chemical step at the catalytic site with variable…

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Indel-correcting DNA barcodes for high-throughput sequencing [Cell Biology]

Many large-scale, high-throughput experiments use DNA barcodes, short DNA sequences prepended to DNA libraries, for identification of individuals in pooled biomolecule populations. However, DNA synthesis and sequencing errors confound the correct interpretation of observed barcodes and can lead to significant data loss or spurious results. Widely used error-correcting codes borrowed…

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A versatile nanobody-based toolkit to analyze retrograde transport from the cell surface [Cell Biology]

Retrograde transport of membranes and proteins from the cell surface to the Golgi and beyond is essential to maintain homeostasis, compartment identity, and physiological functions. To study retrograde traffic biochemically, by live-cell imaging or by electron microscopy, we engineered functionalized anti-GFP nanobodies (camelid VHH antibody domains) to be bacterially expressed…

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ER-phagy requires Lnp1, a protein that stabilizes rearrangements of the ER network [Cell Biology]

The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) forms a contiguous network of tubules and sheets that is predominantly associated with the cell cortex in yeast. Upon treatment with rapamycin, the ER undergoes degradation by selective autophagy. This process, termed ER-phagy, requires Atg40, a selective autophagy receptor that localizes to the cortical ER. Here…

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Error-prone protein synthesis in parasites with the smallest eukaryotic genome [Evolution]

Microsporidia are parasitic fungi-like organisms that invade the interior of living cells and cause chronic disorders in a broad range of animals, including humans. These pathogens have the tiniest known genomes among eukaryotic species, for which they serve as a model for exploring the phenomenon of genome reduction in obligate…

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Macrophage phenotype and bioenergetics are controlled by oxidized phospholipids identified in lean and obese adipose tissue [Immunology and Inflammation]

Adipose tissue macrophages (ATMs) adapt their metabolic phenotype either to maintain lean tissue homeostasis or drive inflammation and insulin resistance in obesity. However, the factors in the adipose tissue microenvironment that control ATM phenotypic polarization and bioenergetics remain unknown. We have recently shown that oxidized phospholipids (OxPL) uniquely regulate gene…

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Microglia inhibit photoreceptor cell death and regulate immune cell infiltration in response to retinal detachment [Immunology and Inflammation]

Retinal detachment (RD) is a sight-threatening complication common in many highly prevalent retinal disorders. RD rapidly leads to photoreceptor cell death beginning within 12 h following detachment. In patients with sustained RD, progressive visual decline due to photoreceptor cell death is common, leading to significant and permanent loss of vision….

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Impairment of gamma-glutamyl transferase 1 activity in the metabolic pathogenesis of chromophobe renal cell carcinoma [Medical Sciences]

Chromophobe renal cell carcinoma (ChRCC) accounts for 5% of all sporadic renal cancers and can also occur in genetic syndromes including Birt–Hogg–Dube (BHD) and tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC). ChRCC has a distinct accumulation of abnormal mitochondria, accompanied by characteristic chromosomal imbalances and relatively few “driver” mutations. Metabolomic profiling of ChRCC…

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Early loss of mitochondrial complex I and rewiring of glutathione metabolism in renal oncocytoma [Medical Sciences]

Renal oncocytomas are benign tumors characterized by a marked accumulation of mitochondria. We report a combined exome, transcriptome, and metabolome analysis of these tumors. Joint analysis of the nuclear and mitochondrial (mtDNA) genomes reveals loss-of-function mtDNA mutations occurring at high variant allele fractions, consistent with positive selection, in genes encoding…

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mRNA-binding protein tristetraprolin is essential for cardiac response to iron deficiency by regulating mitochondrial function [Medical Sciences]

Cells respond to iron deficiency by activating iron-regulatory proteins to increase cellular iron uptake and availability. However, it is not clear how cells adapt to conditions when cellular iron uptake does not fully match iron demand. Here, we show that the mRNA-binding protein tristetraprolin (TTP) is induced by iron deficiency…

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Timing of DNA damage responses impacts persistence to fluoroquinolones [Microbiology]

Bacterial persisters are subpopulations of phenotypic variants in isogenic cultures that can survive lethal doses of antibiotics. Their tolerances are often attributed to reduced activities of antibiotic targets, which limit corruption and damage in persisters compared with bacteria that die from treatment. However, that model does not hold for nongrowing…

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Species-specific disruption of STING-dependent antiviral cellular defenses by the Zika virus NS2B3 protease [Microbiology]

The limited host tropism of numerous viruses causing disease in humans remains incompletely understood. One example is Zika virus (ZIKV), an RNA virus that has reemerged in recent years. Here, we demonstrate that ZIKV efficiently infects fibroblasts from humans, great apes, New and Old World monkeys, but not rodents. ZIKV…

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A second RNA-binding protein is essential for ethanol tolerance provided by the bacterial OLE ribonucleoprotein complex [Microbiology]

OLE (ornate, large, extremophilic) RNAs comprise a class of structured noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) found in many extremophilic bacteria species. OLE RNAs constitute one of the longest and most widespread bacterial ncRNA classes whose major biochemical function remains unknown. In the Gram-positive alkaliphile Bacillus halodurans, OLE RNA is abundant, and localizes…

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Sparse bursts optimize information transmission in a multiplexed neural code [Neuroscience]

Many cortical neurons combine the information ascending and descending the cortical hierarchy. In the classical view, this information is combined nonlinearly to give rise to a single firing-rate output, which collapses all input streams into one. We analyze the extent to which neurons can simultaneously represent multiple input streams by…

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Changes in white matter in mice resulting from low-frequency brain stimulation [Neuroscience]

Recent reports have begun to elucidate mechanisms by which learning and experience produce white matter changes in the brain. We previously reported changes in white matter surrounding the anterior cingulate cortex in humans after 2–4 weeks of meditation training. We further found that low-frequency optogenetic stimulation of the anterior cingulate…

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Altering gain of the infralimbic-to-accumbens shell circuit alters economically dissociable decision-making algorithms [Neuroscience]

The nucleus accumbens shell (NAcSh) is involved in reward valuation. Excitatory projections from infralimbic cortex (IL) to NAcSh undergo synaptic remodeling in rodent models of addiction and enable the extinction of disadvantageous behaviors. However, how the strength of synaptic transmission of the IL–NAcSh circuit affects decision-making information processing and reward…

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The impact of traditional neuroimaging methods on the spatial localization of cortical areas [Neuroscience]

Localizing human brain functions is a long-standing goal in systems neuroscience. Toward this goal, neuroimaging studies have traditionally used volume-based smoothing, registered data to volume-based standard spaces, and reported results relative to volume-based parcellations. A novel 360-area surface-based cortical parcellation was recently generated using multimodal data from the Human Connecto

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Cellulose synthase complexes display distinct dynamic behaviors during xylem transdifferentiation [Plant Biology]

In plants, plasma membrane-embedded CELLULOSE SYNTHASE (CESA) enzyme complexes deposit cellulose polymers into the developing cell wall. Cellulose synthesis requires two different sets of CESA complexes that are active during cell expansion and secondary cell wall thickening, respectively. Hence, developing xylem cells, which first undergo cell expansion and subsequently deposit…

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Predicting perturbation patterns from the topology of biological networks [Systems Biology]

High-throughput technologies, offering an unprecedented wealth of quantitative data underlying the makeup of living systems, are changing biology. Notably, the systematic mapping of the relationships between biochemical entities has fueled the rapid development of network biology, offering a suitable framework to describe disease phenotypes and predict potential drug targets. However,…

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Nanoparticle decoration impacts airborne fungal pathobiology [Medical Sciences]

Airborne fungal pathogens, predominantly Aspergillus fumigatus, can cause severe respiratory tract diseases. Here we show that in environments, fungal spores can already be decorated with nanoparticles. Using representative controlled nanoparticle models, we demonstrate that various nanoparticles, but not microparticles, rapidly and stably associate with spores, without specific functionalization.

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HIV-1 gag recruits PACSIN2 to promote virus spreading [Microbiology]

The p2b domain of Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) Gag and the p6 domain of HIV-1 Gag contain late assembly (L) domains that engage the ESCRT membrane fission machinery and are essential for virus release. We now show that the PPXY-type RSV L domain specifically recruits the BAR domain protein PACSIN2…

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Commensal pathogen competition impacts host viability [Microbiology]

While the structure and regulatory networks that govern type-six secretion system (T6SS) activity of Vibrio cholerae are becoming increasingly clear, we know less about the role of T6SS in disease. Under laboratory conditions, V. cholerae uses T6SS to outcompete many Gram-negative species, including other V. cholerae strains and human commensal…

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Accelerating pathway evolution by increasing the gene dosage of chromosomal segments [Microbiology]

Experimental evolution is a critical tool in many disciplines, including metabolic engineering and synthetic biology. However, current methods rely on the chance occurrence of a key step that can dramatically accelerate evolution in natural systems, namely increased gene dosage. Our studies sought to induce the targeted amplification of chromosomal segments…

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LARGE, an intellectual disability-associated protein, regulates AMPA-type glutamate receptor trafficking and memory [Neuroscience]

Mutations in the human LARGE gene result in severe intellectual disability and muscular dystrophy. How LARGE mutation leads to intellectual disability, however, is unclear. In our proteomic study, LARGE was found to be a component of the AMPA-type glutamate receptor (AMPA-R) protein complex, a main player for learning and memory…

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Human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived glial cells and neural progenitors display divergent responses to Zika and dengue infections [Neuroscience]

Maternal Zika virus (ZIKV) infection during pregnancy is recognized as the cause of an epidemic of microcephaly and other neurological anomalies in human fetuses. It remains unclear how ZIKV accesses the highly vulnerable population of neural progenitors of the fetal central nervous system (CNS), and which cell types of the…

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Coordinated prefrontal-hippocampal activity and navigation strategy-related prefrontal firing during spatial memory formation [Neuroscience]

Learning the location of relevant places in the environment is crucial for survival. Such capacity is supported by a distributed network comprising the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus, yet it is not fully understood how these structures cooperate during spatial reference memory formation. Hence, we examined neural activity in the prefrontal–hippocampal…

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Serine metabolism in the brain regulates starvation-induced sleep suppression in Drosophila melanogaster [Physiology]

Sleep and metabolism are physiologically and behaviorally intertwined; however, the molecular basis for their interaction remains poorly understood. Here, we identified a serine metabolic pathway as a key mediator for starvation-induced sleep suppression. Transcriptome analyses revealed that enzymes involved in serine biosynthesis were induced upon starvation in Drosophila melanogaster brains….

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Mutations in EID1 and LNK2 caused light-conditional clock deceleration during tomato domestication [Plant Biology]

Circadian period and phase of cultivated tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) were changed during domestication, likely adapting the species to its new agricultural environments. Whereas the delayed circadian phase is mainly caused by allelic variation of EID1, the genetic basis of the long circadian period has remained elusive. Here we show that…

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Structural and functional insights into the unique CBS-CP12 fusion protein family in cyanobacteria [Plant Biology]

Cyanobacteria are important photosynthetic organisms inhabiting a range of dynamic environments. This phylum is distinctive among photosynthetic organisms in containing genes encoding uncharacterized cystathionine β-synthase (CBS)–chloroplast protein (CP12) fusion proteins. These consist of two domains, each recognized as stand-alone photosynthetic regulators with different functions described in

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Multiple feedback loops of the Arabidopsis circadian clock provide rhythmic robustness across environmental conditions [Plant Biology]

Although circadian oscillators in diverse eukaryotes all depend on interlinked transcriptional feedback loops, specific components are not conserved across higher taxa. Moreover, the circadian network in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana is notably more complex than those found in animals and fungi. Here, we combine mathematical modeling and experimental approaches…

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Modulation of transcriptional burst frequency by histone acetylation [Systems Biology]

Many mammalian genes are transcribed during short bursts of variable frequencies and sizes that substantially contribute to cell-to-cell variability. However, which molecular mechanisms determine bursting properties remains unclear. To probe putative mechanisms, we combined temporal analysis of transcription along the circadian cycle with multiple genomic reporter integrations, using both short-li

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Correction for Mandal et al., Mapping intracellular mechanics on micropatterned substrates [Correction]

BIOPHYSICS AND COMPUTATIONAL BIOLOGY Correction for “Mapping intracellular mechanics on micropatterned substrates,” by Kalpana Mandal, Atef Asnacios, Bruno Goud, and Jean-Baptiste Manneville, which was first published October 31, 2016; 10.1073/pnas.1605112113 (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 113:E7159–E7168). The authors wish to note the following: “Due to an oversight, a line in…

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Correction for Smith et al., Myosin IIA interacts with the spectrin-actin membrane skeleton to control red blood cell membrane curvature and deformability [Correction]

CELL BIOLOGY Correction for “Myosin IIA interacts with the spectrin-actin membrane skeleton to control red blood cell membrane curvature and deformability,” by Alyson S. Smith, Roberta B. Nowak, Sitong Zhou, Michael Giannetto, David S. Gokhin, Julien Papoin, Ionita C. Ghiran, Lionel Blanc, Jiandi Wan, and Velia M. Fowler, which was…

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Correction for Fustin et al., Two Ck1{delta} transcripts regulated by m6A methylation code for two antagonistic kinases in the control of the circadian clock [Correction]

CELL BIOLOGY Correction for “Two Ck1δ transcripts regulated by m6A methylation code for two antagonistic kinases in the control of the circadian clock,” by Jean-Michel Fustin, Rika Kojima, Kakeru Itoh, Hsin-Yi Chang, Ye Shiqi, Bowen Zhuang, Asami Oji, Shingo Gibo, Rajesh Narasimamurthy, David Virshup, Gen Kurosawa, Masao Doi, Ichiro Manabe,…

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Correction to Supporting Information for Rashidian et al., Noninvasive imaging of immune responses [SI Correction]

IMMUNOLOGY AND INFLAMMATION Correction to Supporting Information for “Noninvasive imaging of immune responses,” by Mohammad Rashidian, Edmund J. Keliher, Angelina M. Bilate, Joao N. Duarte, Gregory R. Wojtkiewicz, Johanne Tracey Jacobsen, Juanjo Cragnolini, Lee Kim Swee, Gabriel D. Victora, Ralph Weissleder, and Hidde L. Ploegh, which was first published April…

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In This Issue [This Week in PNAS]

Optimized tomography offers path to 3D virtual histology of brain tissue Cell segmentation in the granular layer (dark red), the molecular layer (light red), and the Purkinje cell layer (gray). When stained and examined under a light microscope, micrometer-thick slices of brain tissue can help uncover relationships between cellular architecture…

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QnAs with John E. Cronan [QnAs]

John E. Cronan has spent a long and distinguished research career studying the various pathways by which lipids and fatty acid-derived cofactors, such as biotin and lipoic acid, are synthesized. Cronan and his colleagues have uncovered several important biosynthetic pathways, including one for the cofactor lipoic acid. These biomolecules play…

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QnAs with Gary A. Glatzmaier [QnAs]

In the interiors of stars and most planets, global magnetic fields are generated by thermal convection of an electrically conducting fluid under the influence of rotation. Planetary scientist Gary A. Glatzmaier, Professor Emeritus of Earth and Planetary Sciences at the University of California, Santa Cruz and a member of the…

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Two types of cellulose synthesis complex knit the plant cell wall together [Plant Biology]

Plant secondary cell walls (SCWs) compose most of Earth’s renewable fibers and biomass (1), and they have irreplaceable roles in the plant lifestyle, ecosystem cycles, carbon sequestration, and human industry. Nonetheless, much remains unknown about how these strong, cellulose-rich polymer networks are synthesized and assembled. Watanabe et al. (2) generate…

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HIV-1 packs in PACSIN2 for cell-to-cell spread [Microbiology]

The assembly and release of retroviral particles is driven primarily by the Gag polyprotein precursor, which contains several functional domains: matrix, capsid, and nucleocapsid. The matrix domain directs Gag to the plasma membrane, capsid plays a key role in Gag multimerization during assembly, and nucleocapsid binds to the viral genomic…

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A large deletion within the clock gene LNK2 contributed to the spread of tomato cultivation from Central America to Europe [Plant Biology]

Plant domestication is regarded as one of the most pivotal events in human history, as it allowed the growth and development of human civilization by providing the surplus of food needed for its expansion. Occurring independently and almost simultaneously in several parts of the world, plant domestication involved only a…

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Reassessing the chronology of the archaeological site of Anzick [Anthropology]

Found in 1968, the archaeological site of Anzick, Montana, contains the only known Clovis burial. Here, the partial remains of a male infant, Anzick-1, were found in association with a Clovis assemblage of over 100 lithic and osseous artifacts—all red-stained with ochre. The incomplete, unstained cranium of an unassociated, geologically…

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Inflamed neutrophils sequestered at entrapped tumor cells via chemotactic confinement promote tumor cell extravasation [Applied Biological Sciences]

Systemic inflammation occurring around the course of tumor progression and treatment are often correlated with adverse oncological outcomes. As such, it is suspected that neutrophils, the first line of defense against infection, may play important roles in linking inflammation and metastatic seeding. To decipher the dynamic roles of inflamed neutrophils…

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Polyhedra and packings from hyperbolic honeycombs [Applied Mathematics]

We derive more than 80 embeddings of 2D hyperbolic honeycombs in Euclidean 3 space, forming 3-periodic infinite polyhedra with cubic symmetry. All embeddings are “minimally frustrated,” formed by removing just enough isometries of the (regular, but unphysical) 2D hyperbolic honeycombs {3,7}, {3,8}, {3,9}, {3,10}, and {3,12} to allow embeddings in…

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Resilience of networks with community structure behaves as if under an external field [Applied Physical Sciences]

Although detecting and characterizing community structure is key in the study of networked systems, we still do not understand how community structure affects systemic resilience and stability. We use percolation theory to develop a framework for studying the resilience of networks with a community structure. We find both analytically and…

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Origami mechanologic [Applied Physical Sciences]

Robots autonomously interact with their environment through a continual sense–decide–respond control loop. Most commonly, the decide step occurs in a central processing unit; however, the stiffness mismatch between rigid electronics and the compliant bodies of soft robots can impede integration of these systems. We develop a framework for programmable mechanical…

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Dislocation-controlled formation and kinetics of grain boundary loops in two-dimensional crystals [Applied Physical Sciences]

The formation and kinetics of grain boundaries are closely related to the topological constraints imposed on their complex dislocation structure. Loop-shaped grain boundaries are unique structures to establish such a link because their overall topological “charge” is zero due to their null net Burgers vector. Here, we observe that a…

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Quasicrystalline 30{degrees} twisted bilayer graphene as an incommensurate superlattice with strong interlayer coupling [Applied Physical Sciences]

The interlayer coupling can be used to engineer the electronic structure of van der Waals heterostructures (superlattices) to obtain properties that are not possible in a single material. So far research in heterostructures has been focused on commensurate superlattices with a long-ranged Moiré period. Incommensurate heterostructures with rotational symmetry but…

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A nonequilibrium force can stabilize 2D active nematics [Applied Physical Sciences]

Suspensions of actively driven anisotropic objects exhibit distinctively nonequilibrium behaviors, and current theories predict that they are incapable of sustaining orientational order at high activity. By contrast, here we show that nematic suspensions on a substrate can display order at arbitrarily high activity due to a previously unreported, potentially stabilizing…

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Structure of a lipid-bound viral membrane assembly protein reveals a modality for enclosing the lipid bilayer [Biochemistry]

Cellular membranes are maintained as closed compartments, broken up only transiently during membrane reorganization or lipid transportation. However, open-ended membranes, likely derived from scissions of the endoplasmic reticulum, persist in vaccinia virus-infected cells during the assembly of the viral envelope. A group of viral membrane assembly proteins (VMAPs) were identified…

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Mechanistic insights into GLUT1 activation and clustering revealed by super-resolution imaging [Biochemistry]

The glucose transporter GLUT1, a plasma membrane protein that mediates glucose homeostasis in mammalian cells, is responsible for constitutive uptake of glucose into many tissues and organs. Many studies have focused on its vital physiological functions and close relationship with diseases. However, the molecular mechanisms of its activation and transport…

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Cryo-EM structure of human mitochondrial trifunctional protein [Biochemistry]

The mitochondrial trifunctional protein (TFP) catalyzes three reactions in the fatty acid β-oxidation process. Mutations in the two TFP subunits cause mitochondrial trifunctional protein deficiency and acute fatty liver of pregnancy that can lead to death. Here we report a 4.2-Å cryo-electron microscopy α2β2 tetrameric structure of the human TFP….

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Crystal structures of a [NiFe] hydrogenase large subunit HyhL in an immature state in complex with a Ni chaperone HypA [Biochemistry]

Ni-Fe clusters are inserted into the large subunit of [NiFe] hydrogenases by maturation proteins such as the Ni chaperone HypA via an unknown mechanism. We determined crystal structures of an immature large subunit HyhL complexed with HypA from Thermococcus kodakarensis. Structure analysis revealed that the N-terminal region of HyhL extends…

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Three-dimensional virtual histology of human cerebellum by X-ray phase-contrast tomography [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

To quantitatively evaluate brain tissue and its corresponding function, knowledge of the 3D cellular distribution is essential. The gold standard to obtain this information is histology, a destructive and labor-intensive technique where the specimen is sliced and examined under a light microscope, providing 3D information at nonisotropic resolution. To overcome…

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Computational design of orthogonal membrane receptor-effector switches for rewiring signaling pathways [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Membrane receptors regulate numerous intracellular functions. However, the molecular underpinnings remain poorly understood because most receptors initiate multiple signaling pathways through distinct interaction interfaces that are structurally uncharacterized. We present an integrated computational and experimental approach to model and rationally engineer membrane receptor-intracellular protein

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Inhibition of epithelial cell migration and Src/FAK signaling by SIRT3 [Cell Biology]

Metastasis remains the leading cause of cancer mortality, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) signaling promotes the metastatic cascade. However, the molecular pathways that control ROS signaling relevant to metastasis are little studied. Here, we identify SIRT3, a mitochondrial deacetylase, as a regulator of cell migration via its control of ROS…

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Dye-sensitized photoelectrochemical water oxidation through a buried junction [Chemistry]

Water oxidation has long been a challenge in artificial photosynthetic devices that convert solar energy into fuels. Water-splitting dye-sensitized photoelectrochemical cells (WS-DSPECs) provide a modular approach for integrating light-harvesting molecules with water-oxidation catalysts on metal-oxide electrodes. Despite recent progress in improving the efficiency of these devices by introducing g

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Ab initio spectroscopy and ionic conductivity of water under Earth mantle conditions [Chemistry]

The phase diagram of water at extreme conditions plays a critical role in Earth and planetary science, yet remains poorly understood. Here we report a first-principles investigation of the liquid at high temperature, between 11 GPa and 20 GPa—a region where numerous controversial results have been reported over the past…

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News Feature: The carbon detectives [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

Even if countries agree to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, researchers face the monumental task of precisely monitoring the amounts of gases that are being emitted, and where. New tech will help, but the complications are many. To escape the worst ravages of climate change, humans have a steep path to…

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Computer simulations of Jupiter’s deep internal dynamics help interpret what Juno sees [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

We describe computer simulations of thermal convection and magnetic field generation in Jupiter’s deep interior: that is, its convective dynamo. Results from three different simulations highlight the importance of including the dynamics in the very deep interior, although much of the convection and field generation seems to be confined to…

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Atmospheric sulfur isotopic anomalies recorded at Mt. Everest across the Anthropocene [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

Increased anthropogenic-induced aerosol concentrations over the Himalayas and Tibetan Plateau have affected regional climate, accelerated snow/glacier melting, and influenced water supply and quality in Asia. Although sulfate is a predominant chemical component in aerosols and the hydrosphere, the contributions from different sources remain contentious. Here, we report multiple sulfur isotope…

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Policy distortions, farm size, and the overuse of agricultural chemicals in China [Environmental Sciences]

Understanding the reasons for overuse of agricultural chemicals is critical to the sustainable development of Chinese agriculture. Using a nationally representative rural household survey from China, we found that farm size is a strong factor that affects the use intensity of agricultural chemicals across farms in China. Statistically, a 1%…

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Methane in groundwater before, during, and after hydraulic fracturing of the Marcellus Shale [Environmental Sciences]

Concern persists over the potential for unconventional oil and gas development to contaminate groundwater with methane and other chemicals. These concerns motivated our 2-year prospective study of groundwater quality within the Marcellus Shale. We installed eight multilevel monitoring wells within bedrock aquifers of a 25-km2 area targeted for shale gas…

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Genetic and developmental origins of a unique foraging adaptation in a Lake Malawi cichlid genus [Evolution]

Phenotypic novelties are an important but poorly understood category of morphological diversity. They can provide insights into the origins of phenotypic variation, but we know relatively little about their genetic origins. Cichlid fishes display remarkable diversity in craniofacial anatomy, including several novelties. One aspect of this variation is a conspicuous,…

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Decimation by sea star wasting disease and rapid genetic change in a keystone species, Pisaster ochraceus [Evolution]

Standing genetic variation enables or restricts a population’s capacity to respond to changing conditions, including the extreme disturbances expected to increase in frequency and intensity with continuing anthropogenic climate change. However, we know little about how populations might respond to extreme events with rapid genetic shifts, or how population dynamics…

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Genomic organization underlying deletional robustness in bacterial metabolic systems [Evolution]

Large-scale DNA deletions and gene loss are pervasive in bacterial genomes. This observation raises the possibility that evolutionary adaptation has altered bacterial genome organization to increase its robustness to large-scale tandem gene deletions. To find out, we systematically analyzed 55 bacterial genome-scale metabolisms and showed that metabolic gene ordering renders…

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Maximum principles and Bocher type theorems [Mathematics]

We establish maximum principles and Bôcher-type theorems for superharmonic and fractional superharmonic nonnegative functions on a punctured ball. Connecting maximum principles with Bôcher-type theorems is a crucial observation.

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Identification of a common immune regulatory pathway induced by small heat shock proteins, amyloid fibrils, and nicotine [Medical Sciences]

Although certain dogma portrays amyloid fibrils as drivers of neurodegenerative disease and neuroinflammation, we have found, paradoxically, that amyloid fibrils and small heat shock proteins (sHsps) are therapeutic in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). They reduce clinical paralysis and induce immunosuppressive pathways, diminishing inflammation. A key question was the identificatio

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Ultrahigh-charge electron beams from laser-irradiated solid surface [Physics]

Compact acceleration of a tightly collimated relativistic electron beam with high charge from a laser–plasma interaction has many unique applications. However, currently the well-known schemes, including laser wakefield acceleration from gases and vacuum laser acceleration from solids, often produce electron beams either with low charge or with large divergence angles….

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Atomic-scale strain manipulation of a charge density wave [Physics]

A charge density wave (CDW) is one of the fundamental instabilities of the Fermi surface occurring in a wide range of quantum materials. In dimensions higher than one, where Fermi surface nesting can play only a limited role, the selection of the particular wavevector and geometry of an emerging CDW…

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Nonlocal supercurrent of quartets in a three-terminal Josephson junction [Physics]

A novel nonlocal supercurrent, carried by quartets, each consisting of four electrons, is expected to appear in a voltage-biased three-terminal Josephson junction. This supercurrent results from a nonlocal Andreev bound state (ABS), formed among three superconducting terminals. While in a two-terminal Josephson junction the usual ABS, and thus the dc…

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Local quantum phase transition in YFe2Al10 [Physics]

A phase transition occurs when correlated regions of a new phase grow to span the system and the fluctuations within the correlated regions become long lived. Here, we present neutron scattering measurements showing that this conventional picture must be replaced in YFe2Al10, a compound that forms naturally very close to…

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Analyzing gender inequality through large-scale Facebook advertising data [Social Sciences]

Online social media are information resources that can have a transformative power in society. While the Web was envisioned as an equalizing force that allows everyone to access information, the digital divide prevents large amounts of people from being present online. Online social media, in particular, are prone to gender…

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Quantifying coal power plant responses to tighter SO2 emissions standards in China [Sustainability Science]

We evaluate the impact of China’s new air pollution standards on sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions by comparing newly available data from Continuous Emissions Monitoring Systems (CEMS) at coal power plants with satellite measures. First, we show that following the July 2014 deadline for implementing tighter emissions standards, stack concentrations of…

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Payments for environmental services supported social capital while increasing land management [Sustainability Science]

Payments for environmental services (PES) programs incentivize landowners to protect or improve natural resources. Many conservationists fear that introducing compensation for actions previously offered voluntarily will reduce social capital (the institutions, relationships, attitudes, and values that govern human interactions), yet little rigorous research has investigated this concern. We examin

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Ancestral people of Chaco Canyon likely grew their own food

Experts have determined that the sandy soils of Chaco Canyon were not too salty to grow crops such as maize, beans and squash for the more than 1,200 people who occupied this beautiful but harsh landscape during its most prolific years. The study suggests people of Chaco Canyon largely were self-sufficient.

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How good bacteria can help keep a gut healthy

New research reveals a cellular mechanism by which good bacteria can help the gut stay healthy.

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Explainer: How computers "see" faces and other objects

Computers started to be able to recognize human faces in images decades ago, but now artificial intelligence systems are rivaling people's ability to classify objects in photos and videos.

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UTA patents headset that allows persons to point to objects of interest using their eyes

People with disabilities such as ALS, spinal injury or Lou Gehrig's disease, often lose use of their legs, arms or hands. Even at advanced stages of the disease, one may still retain movement in their eyes. Some technologies have incorporated eye-tracking to enable disabled persons to interact with a computer to communicate messages to a caregiver, but the devices are often difficult to calibrate

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Routine DNA tests will put NHS at the 'forefront of medicine'

From 1 October new cancer patients will have tumours screened for key mutations NHS at 70: all our anniversary coverage in one place People in England will have access to DNA tests on an unprecedented scale from the autumn when the NHS becomes the first health service in the world to routinely offer genomic medicine. From 1 October, hospitals across England will be connected to specialist centres

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Fresh Concerns Raised About UIC Researcher's Pediatric Drug Study

New documents reveal that Mani Pavuluri had enrolled her sons as controls in a prematurely halted drug trial, a ProPublica investigation finds.

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Trilobites: Owls See the World Much Like We Do

Barn owls have simpler brains than primates, but they can process information about things moving in their environment in a similarly complex way.

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Trilobites: Lots of Successful Women Are Freezing Their Eggs. But It May Not Be About Their Careers.

The decision to head to the fertility clinic for women in a study had more to do with an absence of suitable partners and little to do with getting ahead at work.

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Trilobites: It’s Time for a Chemistry Lesson. Put on Your Virtual Reality Goggles.

A new tool allows researchers to manipulate molecules in three dimensions, recalling physical models used to visualize forests of atoms in the past.

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Countdown to Shark Week: The Daily Bite | Sidewinder and Slash

Jordan Carlos hosts the countdown to Shark Week as we look back at some of the most famous sharks ever, take a trip down the waves with a few sharp toothed friends, and learn some new shark vocab. Shark Week 2018 starts Sunday July 22 9p! Stream The Daily Bite on Discovery GO: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/the-daily-bite/ Stream Classic Shark Week Episodes: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows

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Countdown to Shark Week: The Daily Bite | Dickie Done Did It!

As we countdown the days to Shark Week, host Jordan Carlos revisits what Shark Week legends say is the true hero of Shark Week. Also, we say hello to one of our most daring Shark Week personalities, Dickie Chivell, and peek forward to the anticipated show, Great White Abyss. Shark Week 2018 starts Sunday July 22 9p! Stream The Daily Bite on Discovery GO: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/the-dai

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Brain Stimulation Reduces Feelings of Aggression

Researchers propose that the method could be used to rein in violence.

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Electrical brain stimulation can reduce violent impulses by more than 50%

In a fascinating and somewhat unexpected result, mild electrical stimulation of the prefrontal cortex part of the brain can reduce violent urges and even raise moral awareness. Read More

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One fascinating reason things never seem to get better

Harvard psychologists identify “prevalence-induced concept change,” our tendency to raise our threshold for success as we make progress. Read More

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Terrawatch: Nasa hopes Juno will reveal the heart of Jupiter

Data from Juno may show whether there is a solid core at the centre of Jupiter Earth’s crust and oceans give our planet an obvious boundary. But jump to Jupiter and no such edge is visible. Instead, its gaseous atmosphere gradually compresses until it becomes a liquid. No one knows if there is a solid core at its centre. But with luck, data coming back from Nasa’s ambitious Juno mission will reve

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Boosting testosterone makes men prefer higher-status products

Status symbols, like a luxury car or brand-name denim, may not function any better than their lower-status counterparts, but they do convey a message about the owner's position on the social ladder. A new study found that a single dose of testosterone was enough to boost men's preference for higher-status goods, pointing to a biological basis for consumer behavior.

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Can parents of juvenile offenders still dream?

A new study reveals that mothers don't lose hope for their sons' futures and potential — even if they are arrested as a minor.

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New vulnerability in deadly form of lung cancer discovered

Researchers have discovered a new metabolic vulnerability in small cell lung cancer (SCLC) that can be targeted by existing drug therapies.

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Researcher uses HPV vaccine to treat patient with skin cancer

In 2017, a case report by Dr. Anna Nichols showed the HPV vaccine Gardasil reduced the number of new basal and squamous cell skin cancers in two patients. Tim Ioannides, M.D., a voluntary faculty member at UM, suggested using the vaccine as an off-label treatment by directly injecting it into the tumors.

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Southeast Asian forest loss greater than expected, with negative climate implications

Researchers using satellite imaging have found much greater than expected deforestation since 2000 in the highlands of Southeast Asia, a critically important world ecosystem. The findings are important because they raise questions about key assumptions made in projections of global climate change as well as concerns about environmental conditions in Southeast Asia in the future.

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Remember That Dark-Matter-Free Galaxy? It May Have Dark Matter After All

Remember That Dark-Matter-Free Galaxy? It May Have Dark Matter After All

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What the satellites in your body do

Scientists studying satellite RNAs discovered that a specific type called hSATa induces breast cancer by directly interfering with DNA copying and damage repair. The research suggests that targeting satellite RNAs could provide another approach for treating multiple types of cancer, including breast, ovarian, prostate and pancreatic.

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Novel property of a new anti-tuberculosis drug

Researchers have discovered a novel property of a new anti-tuberculosis drug which may help develop more drugs to treat the top infectious disease killer in the world.

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Mutation and 3D modeling reveal new structure to cell division process

The structure of cohesin, a cell division protein, could be much different than expected, a new study shows.

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Cardiac hybrid imaging an effective tool for predicting heart attacks

Cardiac hybrid imaging with CT and nuclear stress testing is an excellent long-term predictor of adverse cardiac events like heart attacks in patients being evaluated for coronary artery disease, according to a new study.

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Ultimate precision for sensor technology using qubits and machine learning

Extracting information quickly from quantum states is necessary for future quantum processors and super-sensitive detectors in existing technologies. Researchers demonstrate a new method that combines quantum phenomena and machine learning to realise a magnetometer with precision beyond the standard quantum limit.

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High performance nitride semiconductor for environmentally friendly photovoltaics

A research team has shown how n-type and p-type copper nitride semiconductors could potentially replace the conventional toxic or rare materials in photovoltaic cells.

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Exposure to paint, varnish, other solvents linked to increased risk of MS

People who have been exposed to paint, varnish and other solvents and who also carry genes that make them more susceptible to developing multiple sclerosis (MS) may be at much greater risk of developing the disease than people who have only the exposure to solvents or the MS genes, according to a study published in the July 3, 2018, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Ac

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How we're saving one of Earth's last wild places | Steve Boyes

Navigating territorial hippos and active minefields, TED Fellow Steve Boyes and a team of scientists have been traveling through the Okavango Delta, Africa's largest remaining wetland wilderness, to explore and protect this near-pristine habitat against the rising threat of development. In this awe-inspiring talk packed with images, he shares his work doing detailed scientific surveys in the hopes

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The Era of Affirmative Action May Not Last Much Longer

On Tuesday, the Trump administration made its official position clear: Schools should limit their use of race as a factor when determining admissions. The administration is moving to rescind seven guidance documents from the Education Department’s Office for Civil Rights and the Department of Justice, according to The New York Times . These Obama-era memos encouraged elementary, secondary schools

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Seattle bans plastic straws, but US still has a long way to go

Seattle has become the first major US city to ban plastic straws and utensils in its eateries, a victory for environmentalists that will be tough to replicate elsewhere in the United States.

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In a warming world, could air conditioning make things worse?

As climate change continues to push summer temperatures ever higher, the increased use of air conditioning in buildings could add to the problems of a warming world by further degrading air quality and compounding the toll of air pollution on human health, according to a new study.

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Scientists pump up chances for quantum computing

New research has moved the world one step closer to reliable, high-performance quantum computing. A ground-breaking single-electron "pump" device developed by researchers can produce one billion electrons per second and uses quantum mechanics to control them one by one.

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New insight into the maturation of miRNAs

A research team has used an integrated structural biological approach to elucidate the maturation of a cancer-causing microRNA in gene regulation.

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Economic burden of fatty liver disease in US is $32 billion annually, new study finds

Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, or NAFLD, which affects roughly 100 million Americans, costs the United States healthcare system $32 billion annually, according to a first-of-its-kind study.

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Promising new tool to measure antibodies against malaria

Antibodies against multiple Plasmodium falciparum proteins (or antigens) can be measured using a simple, accurate and reproducible assay that requires very small amounts of blood. Researchers report the development and optimization of several 'quantitative suspension array' assays (qSAT) that could help assess natural and vaccine-induced responses to malaria and other parasites.

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Drugs that block structural changes to collagen could prevent lung fibrosis

A new study provides the first evidence in humans that altered collagen structure affects tissue stiffness during progression of lung fibrosis, suggesting potential approaches for treating the condition.

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Researchers discover new enzyme paradigm for critical reaction in converting lignin into useful products

Researchers have discovered and characterized a new family of cytochrome P450 enzymes that is critical to improving the conversion of lignin — one of the main components of plants — into valuable products such as nylon, plastics, and chemicals.

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Diesel doesn't float this boat

Marine research could soon be possible without the risk of polluting either the air or the ocean, thanks to a new ship design and feasibility study.

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Dozens Fall Ill in Texas Outbreak: What Is Cyclospora?

So far, Texas health officials have identified 56 illnesses due to Cyclospora since May.

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Facebook responding to US regulators in data breach probe

Facebook acknowledged Tuesday it was facing multiple inquiries from US and British regulators about the major Cambridge Analytica user data scandal.

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Study suggests natural selection could have influence on lizards' 'personalities'

For more than a century, scientists have understood that natural selection have profound effects on how an animal looks—Anolis lizards that spend more time on the ground, for example, might need longer legs for running, while species that remain in the trees usually have shorter legs better suited for climbing.

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Wildfires are burning across the country—here's how to prepare

Science Only YOU can protect your home from a wildfire. If your community is touched by fire this year, will you know what to do? Or how to prepare? Here are some resources to get you started.

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Why they fight: US and China brawl over high technology

To understand why the United States and China stand on the brink of a trade war, consider the near-death experience of American Superconductor Corp.

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Ancestral people of Chaco Canyon likely grew their own food

Researchers think they have a better understanding for how ancient North Americans thrived for centuries in northwestern New Mexico's arid desert.

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Shedding light on the energy-efficiency of photosynthesis

A new study suggests that photorespiration wastes little energy and instead enhances nitrate assimilation, the process that converts nitrate absorbed from the soil into protein.

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Buying under the influence (of testosterone)

A new study shows that men with increased testosterone levels have a greater preference for goods that are considered status symbols.

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Feeling young could mean your brain is aging more slowly

While some people are young at heart, others feel older than their age — and a recent study finds that this 'subjective age' may reflect brain aging. Researchers found that elderly people who feel younger than their age had a younger estimated brain age, compared with those who felt their age, or older than their age. The study is the first to find a link between brain aging and subjective age.

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Efficient synthesis of multi-substituted anilines by domino rearrangement

A new class of aniline derivatives has been produced by researchers in Japan.

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Athletic 'pull' increases campus diversity

The next time you see your favorite collegiate athlete on the field or court, think again about their road to getting there.

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Personality pressure

In a recent study, Harvard scientists have demonstrated a link between individual variation in risk-taking behavior and survival of animals in changing environments.

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Breakthrough synthesis strategy could mean wave of new medicinal compounds

In pharmacology, not all molecular structures are created equal. Some frameworks are overrepresented in nature, making them especially attractive to scientists on the hunt for more effective drugs.

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University of Gothenburg Moves to Fire Professor for Misconduct

An investigation finds regenerative medicine researcher Suchitra Sumitran-Holgersson manipulated data in seven papers.

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How Disgust Shapes Ecosystems

How Disgust Shapes Ecosystems Parasites may have profound impacts even before they infect hosts. lemon.jpg Image credits: dimitrisvetsikas1969 via Pixabay Creature Tuesday, July 3, 2018 – 15:00 Nala Rogers, Staff Writer (Inside Science) — Clearly, parasites can make you sick. But in the grand scheme of things, animals' efforts to avoid things like viruses, tapeworms and salmonella may be an even

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Metformin reverses established lung fibrosis

Researchers have shown — for the first time — that established lung fibrosis can be reversed using a drug treatment that targets cell metabolism. The finding is important because, despite significant advances to reveal the pathological mechanisms of persistent fibrosis, effective treatment interventions are lacking.

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What to Do If You Come Face-to-Face with an Alligator

A teenage girl rafting in a creek got the fright of her life when an alligator nearly as long as two grand-size pianos chased her up a tree in Florida's Ocala National Forest on Friday (June 29).

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Higher testosterone leads to higher purchase of status symbols in men

Finally, a study that proves that maybe it's not a good idea to spend $295,000 on a bottle of champagne. Read More

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Why subclinical narcissists have a competitive advantage

New research shows narcissists aren't smarter than the average person, but they have a secret weapon that helps them succeed: mental toughness. Read More

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After 10 Days Trapped in a Cave in Thailand, a Difficult Rescue Lies Ahead

In northern Thailand, hundreds of international rescue workers spent the past 10 days searching for a group of 12 boys, ages 11 to 16, and their 25-year-old soccer coach who became trapped in a cave after flooding caused by relentless monsoon rains. Late on July 2, rescue teams discovered all of the boys and their coach alive and in relatively good health, sheltering deep inside the cave complex.

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How good bacteria can help keep a gut healthy

New research reveals a cellular mechanism by which good bacteria can help the gut stay healthy.

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Ancestral people of Chaco Canyon likely grew their own food

A multidisciplinary team of experts from the University of Cincinnati determined that the sandy soils of Chaco Canyon were not too salty to grow crops such as maize, beans and squash for the more than 1,200 people who occupied this beautiful but harsh landscape during its most prolific years. The study suggests people of Chaco Canyon largely were self-sufficient.

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For Women Over 30, There May Be A Better Choice Than The Pap Smear

A new study adds weight to the evidence that an HPV test can more accurately test for cervical cancer risk than a Pap smear. (Image credit: BSIP/UIG via Getty Images )

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Surf And Turf: To Reduce Gas Emissions From Cows, Scientists Look To The Ocean

When cows burp, they emit the potent greenhouse gas methane into the atmosphere. But by adding seaweed to the cows' diets, researchers are noticing a dramatic reduction in methane production. (Image credit: Merrit Kennedy/NPR)

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Breakthrough synthesis strategy could mean wave of new medicinal compounds

Florida State scientists have devised a new strategy for synthesizing notoriously difficult carbocyclic 5-8-5 fused ring systems, a molecular structure with broad therapeutic potential.

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Descended testicles: DNA study drops new hints on secrets of low hanging glands

Science Keeping everything outside the body seems like a strange choice. The scrotum is a mystery. Why do most male mammals have their reproductive glands so vulnerably located in a sack of skin and muscle outside the body?

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Exomoons: On the hunt for distant worlds

Researchers have found that moons in distant solar systems may be the most plentiful habitats in the galaxy.

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Does Trump Know What ICE Does?

The image suggested by President Trump’s tweets is dramatic. One can almost see the swarms of Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents, decked out in tactical gear, pouring out of armored personnel carriers and rappelling from helicopters. They sweep into towns and cities overrun by gang members, blowing through barricades and rounding up criminals like special operators taking out ISIS. You mi

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TV coverage of cycling races can help document the effects of climate change

Analyzing nearly four decades of archive footage from the Tour of Flanders, researchers have been able to detect climate change impacts on trees.

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Consciousness is partly preserved during general anesthesia

Researchers have gained new information on brain activity during general anesthesia by recording changes in the electrical activity of the brain. They discovered that changes in electroencephalogram correlated with the loss of consciousness itself and also by the non-specific effects of the drugs. Nearly all participants recalled dreaming during unresponsiveness and, somewhat surprisingly, words p

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The impact of the sugar tax in Chile: A bittersweet success?

A new sugar tax introduced on soft drinks in Chile has been effective in reducing consumption of sugary drinks, new research carried out in the country has revealed.However, the international research team, led by academics from the University of York, say although consumption may have dropped, it may not be enough to reduce socioeconomic inequalities in diet-related health.

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In a warming world, could air conditioning make things worse?

As climate change continues to push summer temperatures ever higher, the increased use of air conditioning in buildings could add to the problems of a warming world by further degrading air quality and compounding the toll of air pollution on human health, according to a new study.

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Climate change and health: A special issue in PLOS Medicine

This week, we see the first papers in PLOS Medicine's Special Issue on Climate Change and Health being published, advised by Guest Editors Jonathan Patz of the Global Health Institute at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the John P. Holton Chair in Health and the Environment, and Madeleine Thomson of the International Research Institute for Climate and Society (IRI) and the Mailman School of

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Thermacell's Radius Zone mosquito repellent keeps your blood inside your body

Gadgets It creates a protective dome around you. A dead-simple system for keeping away blood-suckers.

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Scientists identify mechanism that may explain why males are more at risk than females for neurodevelopmental disorders

Researchers have recently begun to realize that biological sex plays a key role in disease risk. Sex plays a role in hypertension, diabetes, arthritis — and in many neurological and psychiatric disorders. Depression and anxiety affect females more, while neurodevelopmental disorders, including autism spectrum disorders, early onset schizophrenia, and attention deficit hyperactivity, affect more m

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New clues to sepsis may speed diagnosis

Researchers at Columbia University Irving Medical Center have found a clue in understanding how an infection can spiral into sepsis by blunting the body's immune response. This research may also help doctors identify the patients who may need immediate intensive treatment to save their lives.

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How Twitter Became Home to the Teen Status Update

A decade ago, if you were a bored teen looking to post about suburban life, relationship problems, Starbucks, or fleeting thoughts like, “The holidays are approaching and being single sucksssss lol,” you might turn to Facebook. But of course, today’s teens don’t use Facebook. Instead, they take their most #relatable thoughts to Twitter, often racking up hundreds of thousands of retweets and faves

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Astronomy at the Speed of Light

Future space probes traveling at relativistic velocities would offer a unique vantage point for studying the universe — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Archaeologists urge Albania to protect underwater heritage

Researchers are urging Albanian authorities to build a museum to display hundreds of Roman and Greek artifacts and ancient shipwrecks that are sitting under Albania's least explored coastline.

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A first look at interstitial fluid flow in the brain

Interstitial fluid transports nutrients and removes waste between the organs and tissues in our body. In the brain, interstitial fluid is thought to be composed of circulating cerebrospinal fluid, cellular waste and blood plasma, and past research has shown a link between interstitial fluid flow and an increased invasion rate of glioblastoma, or brain tumor, cells. A team of biomedical researchers

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Milky Way type dust particles discovered in a galaxy 11 billion light years from Earth

An international research team has found the same type of interstellar dust that we know from the Milky Way in a distant galaxy 11 billion light years from Earth. This type of dust has been found to be rare in other galaxies and the new discovery plays an important role in understanding what it takes for this particular type of interstellar dust to be formed.

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Spearfishing makes fishes more timid

Fisheries scientists have studied the response of fish in the Mediterranean Sea to spearfishing. The fish are able to finely discriminate if divers carry a speargun or not. They adjust their escape behavior and keep a safe distance outside the shooting range. This is good for the fish and a challenge for the spearfisher.

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Expecting a stressful day may lower cognitive abilities throughout the day

There may be some truth to the saying 'getting up on the wrong side of the bed,' according to researchers who say starting your morning by focusing on how stressful your day will be may be harmful to your mindset throughout the day.

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Molecular oxygen in comet's atmosphere not created on its surface

Scientists have found that molecular oxygen around comet 67P is not produced on its surface, as some suggested, but may be from its body.

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Small talk not as bad as previously thought

People who engage in more substantive conversations tend to be happier, a new study confirms. Yet researchers found, contrary to previous findings, that idle small talk is not necessarily negatively related to well-being.

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Neuroscientists uncover secret to intelligence in parrots

Neuroscientists have identified the neural circuit that may underlay intelligence in birds, according to a new study. The discovery is an example of convergent evolution between the brains of birds and primates, with the potential to provide insight into the neural basis of human intelligence.

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Material could help windows both power your home and control its temperature

Environmentally friendly building trends have boosted the popularity of window coatings that keep heating and cooling costs down by blocking out unneeded parts of sunlight. They have also inspired scientists and engineers to create thin, see-through solar cells to turn windows into miniature electricity generators. Researchers have gone a step further and combined these two functions into one wind

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Superstar Eta Carinae shoots cosmic rays

NASA's NuSTAR space telescope shows that Eta Carinae, the most luminous and massive stellar system within 10,000 light-years, is accelerating cosmic rays.

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'Find your passion' may not be the best advice after all

As the world becomes increasingly interdisciplinary, having diverse interests can help people make important connections across fields, such as between the Arts and Sciences. A new study suggests that one's belief about the nature of interests might prevent those insights from happening.

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A first look at interstitial fluid flow in the brain

Past research has shown a link between interstitial fluid flow and an increased invasion rate of glioblastoma cells, and biomedical researchers and electrical engineers recently developed a new method to measure and reconstruct interstitial fluid flow velocities in the brain. This method gives a first look at interstitial fluid flow dynamics in glioma models, and the technique can readily translat

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UTA urban researcher shows impact of urban sprawl on life expectancy, innovation hubs

A recently published study by a University of Texas at Arlington urban researcher shows a correlation between urban sprawl and a decreased life expectancy in the United States.

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Illinois child care providers need resources to serve children with disabilities

Illinois child care providers often lack the resources to serve children with disabilities, study finds.

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How the Pentagon Keeps Its App Store Secure

To keep malware at bay, the GEOINT App Store has created a screening process that no commercial platform could ever match.

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Sajid Javid looks into easing rules on medical cannabis prescription

Advisory Council on the Misuse of Drugs to carry out study for home secretary The home secretary, Sajid Javid, is considering whether cannabis could be made easier to prescribe for medical use, Downing Street has said. It comes after a review last month was published in which the chief medical officer of England, Sally Davies, concluded there was evidence of “therapeutic benefit” for some conditi

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Study: Small talk not as bad as previously thought

People who engage in more substantive conversations tend to be happier, a new study from the University of Arizona confirms. Yet researchers found, contrary to previous findings, that idle small talk is not necessarily negatively related to well-being.

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Facebook gave 61 companies special access to user data after updating rules in 2015

Facebook disclosed to Congress last week that it gave 61 companies special access to user data in 2015, a revelation that differs from the social media company's past claims. Read More

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Forskere sporer Tjernobyl-ulv: Har forladt det radioaktive område

Ulvens rejse giver forskere mulighed for at lære, om den har muterede gener, der eventuelt kan spredes.

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In Memoriam: Nobel Laureate Arvid Carlsson, a Pioneer in Parkinson’s Treatment

Photo: Johan Wingborg/University of Gothenburg We regret to announce the loss of Dana Alliance member Arvid Carlsson , M.D., Ph.D., who passed away last Friday at 95 years old. Carlsson laid the groundwork for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease by discovering dopamine is a neurotransmitter that plays an important role in motor function. In 2000, this research won him the Nobel Prize in Physiolo

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Neuroscientists uncover secret to intelligence in parrots

University of Alberta neuroscientists have identified the neural circuit that may underlie intelligence in birds, according to a new study. The discovery is an example of convergent evolution between the brains of birds and primates, with the potential to provide insight into the neural basis of human intelligence.

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Pelvic exams do not help diagnose STDs in adolescent girls, study says

New research shows that pelvic exams do not help diagnose certain STDs in adolescent females.

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We Should Reward Scientists for Communicating to the Public

Universities need to rethink how they evaluate academics for promotion — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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US car sales mostly up in 1H as larger vehicles reign

Leading automakers reported mostly higher US sales for the first half of 2018 on Tuesday, bolstered by a strengthening economy and robust demand for larger vehicles despite higher gasoline prices.

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Southeast Asian forest loss greater than expected, with negative climate implications

Researchers using satellite imaging have found much greater than expected deforestation since 2000 in the highlands of Southeast Asia, a critically important world ecosystem. The findings are important because they raise questions about key assumptions made in projections of global climate change as well as concerns about environmental conditions in Southeast Asia in the future.

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