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Scott Pruitt Steps Down From EPA

The embattled Environmental Protection Agency Administrator resigns amid persistent questions about his ethics and use of taxpayer dollars.

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Scott Pruitt Out At EPAScott Pruitt EPA Trump

After months of ethics scandals and investigations, the embattled Environmental Protection Agency head has resigned, the president said Thursday. (Image credit: Pete Marovich/Getty Images)

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Olielande gennemhuller klimakrav til fly med OK til 'ren olie'

Flybrændstof fra raffinaderier, der bruger strøm fra vedvarende energikilder, vil ifølge nye regler fra FN's luftfartsorganisation, tælle som et grønt brændstof.

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LATEST

Opioid epidemic responses overlook gender

Yale health experts warn that current efforts to confront the growth of opioid addiction and overdose deaths must better incorporate an understanding of how women fit into this epidemic.

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Exciton limits are meant to be broken: OLED surpasses 100 percent exciton production efficiency

Researchers at Kyushu University's Center for Organic Photonics and Electronics Research (OPERA) have demonstrated an OLED that uses singlet fission to boost the percentage of excitons created per pair of electrical charges to over 100 percent. This increase of light-producing excitons when one singlet exciton is split into two triplet excitons through singlet fission results in a stronger emissio

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Embattled EPA Chief Scott Pruitt Resigns–What's Next?

Deputy Andrew Wheeler, who has also worked to reverse climate legislation, takes over as acting administrator — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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New research detects brain cell that improves learning

The workings of memory and learning have yet to be clarified, especially at the neural circuitry level. But researchers have now discovered a specific brain neuron with a central role in learning. The study may have a bearing on the potential for counteracting memory loss in Alzheimer's disease.

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The Atlantic Daily: What Was the Final Straw for Scott Pruitt?

What We’re Following Pruitt’s Farewell: Scott Pruitt, the administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency, is stepping down. President Donald Trump defended Pruitt through a long series of financial and ethical scandals, even as White House aides and congressional Republicans began to criticize Pruitt. Here’s the chain of events that led to Pruitt leaving his post, and here’s a running list

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Scott Pruitt just resigned as EPA administratorScott Pruitt EPA Trump

Environment The "unrelenting attacks" had "taken a sizable toll." In his resignation letter, Pruitt wrote that "the unrelenting attacks on me personally, my family, are unprecedented and have taken a sizable toll on all of us."…

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What Finally Did in Scott Pruitt?

By the beginning of July, EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt was embroiled in so many scandals that even his critics were beginning to wonder if he was invincible. He was not. On Thursday afternoon, President Trump announced on Twitter that he accepted Pruitt’s resignation, ending a tumultuous, troubled tenure atop the agency. The abrupt departure came after months of Trump defending Pruitt, despite

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The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: EPA Scott-Free

-Written by Elaine Godfrey ( @elainejgodfrey ) Today in 5 Lines Embattled Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt resigned . “The unrelenting attacks on me personally, my family, are unprecedented and have taken a sizable toll on all of us,” Pruitt wrote in his resignation letter. Deputy Administrator Andrew Wheeler will take over as acting administrator of the agency. The Whit

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Man Tries to Smuggle 19 Raptor Eggs Through Heathrow Airport — And 2 Hatched

Two of the eggs hatched, revealing adorable vulture chicks.

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Poachers Tried to Kill Rhinos in South African Reserve. Instead, a Pride of Lions Killed Them.

A pride of hungry lions in a South African reserve just saved the day, at least for a herd of rhinos.

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In 'Light Of The Stars,' Adam Frank Studies Alien Worlds To Find Earth's Fate

Astrophysicist Adam Frank has a new book out, Light of the Stars: Alien Worlds and the Fate of the Earth . He talks to NPR's Mary Louise Kelly about it.

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BPA risk factor for inflammatory bowel disease

A recent study in a preclinical model of inflammatory bowel disease shows dietary exposure to bisphenol-A, or BPA, found in polycarbonate plastics and epoxy resins, can increase mortality and worsen its symptoms.

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Gene therapy method developed to target damaged kidney cells

Research led by Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis has shown, in mice, that genetic material can be delivered to damaged cells in the kidneys, a key step toward developing gene therapy to treat chronic kidney disease. The potentially fatal condition affects 30 million Americans, most of whom don't realize they have chronic kidney disease.

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Non-opioid drug relieves pain in mice, targets immune cells

Researchers have found that inhibiting a receptor on immune cells called macrophages may help relieve pain in some patients, particularly those with chronic neuropathic pain, such as those with conditions such as diabetic neuropathy.

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The rising price of Medicare Part D's 10 most costly medications

Researchers have found that the cost for the 10 'highest spend' medications in Medicare Part D — the US federal government's primary prescription drug benefit for older citizens — rose almost one-third between 2011 and 2015, even as the number of persons using these drugs dropped by the same amount.

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Potential new drug for two life-threatening diseases

Researchers have successfully created a drug compound, from the goji berry plant, that is active against the parasites that cause schistosomiasis and fascioliasis.

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Biomarker for salt sensitivity of blood pressure discovered

Researchers have identified a genetic marker (GNAI2) that is associated with the risk of salt sensitivity in blood pressure (BP) regardless of age or gender. It is hoped that with this discovery a simple test to identify salt sensitivity of BP during a clinical visit can be developed.

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Muscle stem cells derived from teratomas

Researchers have developed a process to regenerate skeletal muscle cells in mice with muscular dystrophy.

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Abnormal branched-chain amino acid breakdown may raise diabetes risk

A new study suggests that the irregular metabolism of branched-chain amino acids — components of proteins found in many foods — may be partially to blame for progression to type 2 diabetes.

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New California Bill Restores Strong Net Neutrality ProtectionsCalifornia Net Neutrality

Lawmaker who pushed changes that critics said gutted the original bill agrees to reinstate sweeping prohibitions on broadband providers.

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Original North American Dogs Descended From Siberian Populations

European settlers likely wiped out these ancient dogs, but the animals seem to have left a lasting legacy in a transmissible canine cancer.

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Berry-gorging bears disperse seeds through scat and feed small mammals

New research shows that mice and voles scurry to bear scats to forage for seeds, finding nutritional value in the seeds and in some cases further dispersing them.

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Soaring spiders may get cues from electric charges in the air

Spiders can sense atmospheric electric fields, which might give them cues to take to the air.

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Woman Declared Dead Found Alive in Morgue Fridge

A woman in South Africa who was declared dead after a grizzly car crash was actually still alive, and was found breathing in a morgue fridge, according to news reports.

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Berry-gorging bears disperse seeds through scat and feed small mammals

Mice and voles scurry to bear scats to forage for seeds, finding nutritional value in the seeds and in some cases further dispersing them.

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Data-sharing website may speed the response to new illegal drugs

The NPS DataHub allows forensic chemists to share data on new drug analogs, including their chemical structures and signatures, which are the keys to identifying them in the lab.

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Spleen microbes of wild animals change with tick-borne illness

Anaplasmosis, a tick-borne febrile disease, can be carried by wild mammals before being transmitted to humans through a tick bite. Now, researchers have found that Anaplasma bacteria alter the patterns of other microbes in the spleens of mice and shrews.

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Ranking locations for lion conservation in southern Africa — a new approach

An international team of scientists has developed a new strategy to rank locations for lion conservation activities, based on GPS collar data revealing lions' movements.

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Stopping a tiny — and deadly — fly in its tracks

New research presents a technique that could help treat African sleeping sickness, which impacts millions in sub-Saharan Africa and — in its late stages — can be fatal.

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Gonorrhea researchers identify novel route to vaccine, new antibiotic

Researchers have identified a protein that powers the virulence of the bacteria that causes gonorrhea, opening the possibility of a new target for antibiotics and, even better, a vaccine.

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Content of illicit cannabis extracts used to treat children with epilepsy revealed

A pioneering study has found carers who turned to medicinal cannabis to treat children with epilepsy overwhelmingly (75 percent) considered the extracts as 'effective'.

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Alfred Alberts, Lovastatin Discoverer, Dies

The Merck biochemist found the compound that led to a popular cholesterol-lowering drug.

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We're still not sure how long we can live, new study finds

Rates of centenarians are going to increase eightfold in the next three decades. Read More

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Greenhouse gas cooled the Eocene ‘hothouse’ period

Greenhouse gases were the main driver of climate throughout the warmest period of the past 66 million years, according to a new study that offers clues about the future of climate change. Antarctica and Australia separated around the end of the Eocene (56 to 22.9 million years ago), creating a deep water passage between them and changing ocean circulation patterns. Some researchers believe these

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Native Dogs of the Americas Were Wiped Out by European Colonization

The only trace remaining of dogs that lived in the Americas before Europeans arrived: A common canine tumor.

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Monthly Stats for Eyewire: June 2018

Ah, June! Did you know that it’s now been an entire year since we premiered our Mystic class? One year of MSTY and zfish! Besides that little anniversary, this past month we kicked off the first Eyewire Cup, completed 29 cells, and got a ton of new sponsored promotions. Check out the stats below! New Mentors: hwaaim New Scouts: Certh ninjew Crossharp NataliaGehenna 1sland lalonso leafy New Scythe

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Inferior vena cava filter trends over 2 decades

Inferior vena cava (IVC) filter placement and retrieval procedures have markedly declined over the last decade from previous large growth in Medicare beneficiaries, according to a new Harvey L. Neiman Health Policy Institute® study published online in the Journal of American College of Radiology (JACR).

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Progress in addressing a severe skin disease that affects dogs and humans

Both dogs and humans can suffer from ichthyosis, a disorder in which the skin becomes very dry, scaly, and prone to secondary infections. A team led by Penn's Elizabeth Mauldin uncovered new details about one form of the disease and took a step toward developing a topical therapy.

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New software designed for rapid, automated identification of dendritic spines

Researchers have released open source software, connecting and building the neuroscience coding community. The software has the potential to dramatically increase experiment workflow, shaving off hours of imaging time. Weaving in an element of machine learning, the algorithm can be taught how to differentiate between dendrite backbone and dendritic spines after being fed a training data set of pre

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An aggressor is not necessarily a bully — and the distinction matters

There is a difference between general aggressive behavior and bullying. They are not the same thing and the distinction matters, according to new findings.

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Web-based support system may help people lose weight and keep it off

In a randomized long-term lifestyle change trial, an Internet-based health behavior change support system was effective in improving weight loss and reduction in waist circumference for up to two years.

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Expansion of agricultural land reduces carbon dioxide absorption

Plants absorb some of the carbon dioxide released into the atmosphere by burning fossil fuels. But increasing deforestation and other changes in land use will reduce the carbon dioxide absorption capacity of these areas in the future, researchers have found.

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Described 28 years post collection, new grass species makes a strong case for conservation

Originally collected 28 years ago in Ecuador, the new species Poa laegaardiana has been just described, only to find out its prospects for surviving in its type location seem bleak due to intense farming in the area.

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Prostate cancer ultrasound treatment as effective as surgery or radiotherapy

Using high energy ultrasound beams to destroy prostate cancer tumours may be as effective as surgery or radiotherapy, but with fewer side effects.

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SATB1 vital for maintenance of hematopoietic stem cells

Researchers have revealed that expression of SATB1 was involved in both differences in HSC self-renewal ability and differences in the ability of HSCs to differentiate into lymphocytic lineages.

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Primate Conflicts Play Out in the Operating Room

By analyzing 200 surgeries, anthropologists found that mixed-gender operating room teams exhibited the highest levels of cooperation. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Heat-conducting crystals could help computer chips keep their cool

As consumers demand smaller, faster and more powerful electronic devices that draw more current and generate more heat, the issue of heat management is reaching a bottleneck. Researchers have created a potential solution — boron arsenide crystals with high thermal conductivity, which might be used in future electronics to help keep devices from overheating.

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Ancient genome analyses reveal mosaic pattern of goat domestication thousands of years ago

Goat domestication was a mosaic — not a singular — process, with capture from the wild impacting genetic diversity in different regions of the Fertile Crescent. These wild populations have left different genetic legacies in Asian, African and European populations today. Farmers were selecting specific traits in goats such as coat color and production ability as early as 8,000 years ago.

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Semiconductor quantum transistor opens the door for photon-based computing

Researchers have demonstrated the first single-photon transistor using a semiconductor chip.

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Supercoil me! The art of knotted DNA maintenance

Locking DNA knots in place thanks to DNA propensity to be supercoiled. A new study suggests that is one of the mechanisms that could be harnessed by the cellular machinery to deal with those accidental entanglements that can compromise DNA functionality.

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Higher ambition needed to meet Paris climate targets

The Joint Research Centre, the European Commission's science and knowledge service, contributes to a growing body of evidence showing the need for ramped up climate action to limit global warming.

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New small molecules pave the way for treating autoinflammatory disease

Scientists have discovered two small-molecule compound series that can effectively block a central pathway of the innate immune system, offering a promising new way for treating autoinflammatory diseases.

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Invaluable to the medical industry, the horseshoe crab is under threat

The biomedical industry depends on blood from horseshoe crabs for drug and environmental safety testing — but this commercial demand, together with capture for bait, climate change and habitat destruction, is threatening populations of these 'living fossils.' This in turn will detrimentally affect the surrounding ecosystem, such as migratory shorebirds who rely on horseshoe crab eggs for food. Su

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Swimming bacteria work together to go with the flow

Swimming bacteria can reduce the viscosity of ordinary liquids like water and make them flow more easily, sometimes down to the point where the viscosity becomes zero: the flow is then frictionless.

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Decarbonizing transport: Sell electric vehicles to untapped market of women, researchers suggest

Highly educated women are an untapped but potentially lucrative market for electric vehicle sales because they have greater environmental and fuel efficiency awareness than men, says a new study.

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UV narrow-band photodetector based on indium oxide nanocrystals

An international team of researchers from Russia and India has created a narrow-band UV photodetector based on indium oxide nanocrystals embedded in a thin film of aluminum oxide.Semiconductor quantum dots (nanocrystals just a few nanometers in size) have attracted researchers' attention due to the size dependent effects that determine their novel electrical and optical properties. By changing the

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When rabbits and hares are introduced to new areas: Factors to consider

Throughout history, humans have deliberately translocated rabbits and hares (leporids) around the world, so they now occupy every continent (except Antarctica). A new Mammal Review article examines studies on the 12 leporid species that have been introduced by humans to areas beyond their native ranges, highlighting the animals' effects on the ecosystem at different levels.

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Scott Pruitt quits as head of US environment agencyScott Pruitt EPA Trump

The EPA administrator has been embroiled in allegations of ethics violations for months.

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Nerve cells that help control hunger have been ID’d in mice

A mysterious bump on the human brain may be able to dial appetite up or down.

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Heat wave shattered records this past week in US, elsewhere

If you've been hot lately, you're not alone. Record high temperatures have been logged over the past week in the U.S. and around the world.

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Thyssenkrupp CEO resigns after Tata merger deal

The chief executive of German industrial giant Thyssenkrupp has handed in his resignation, less than a week after a merger of its steelmaking business with India's Tata, creating Europe's second biggest steelmaker, the group said Thursday.

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Implanting diamonds with flaws offers key technology for quantum communications

Diamonds are prized for their purity, but their flaws might hold the key to a new type of highly secure communications. Researchers are using diamonds to preserve fragile quantum information over long distances.

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Ultra-high-speed 'electron camera' catches molecules at a crossroads

An extremely fast 'electron camera' has produced the most detailed atomic movie of the decisive point where molecules hit by light can either stay intact or break apart. The results could lead to a better understanding of how molecules respond to light in processes that are crucial for life, like photosynthesis and vision, or that are potentially harmful, such as DNA damage from ultraviolet light.

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First dogs in the Americas arrived from Siberia, disappeared after European contact

A new study offers an enhanced view of the origins and ultimate fate of the first dogs in the Americas. The dogs were not domesticated North American wolves, as some have speculated, but likely followed their human counterparts over a land bridge that once connected North Asia and the Americas, the study found.

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A breakthrough to rescue the Northern White Rhino

Northern White Rhinos (NWR) are functionally extinct, as only two females of this species are left on the planet. An international team of scientists has now successfully created hybrid embryos from Southern White Rhino (SWR) eggs and NWR sperm using assisted reproduction techniques (ART). This is the first, ever reported, generation of blastocysts (a pre-implantation embryos) of rhinos in a test

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Healthy diet may lower eye disease risk

An analysis of recent high-quality research reveals that diet may affect individuals' risks related to the development and progression of age-related macular degeneration (AMD).

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Mighty mitochondria flex their DNA power to help nucleus run the cell

Researchers discovered humble mitochondria are sometimes boss over the cell nucleus. They send DNA-coded instructions to make the nucleus respond when the cell is under duress. That's new, as the nucleus was always thought to issue orders to cell members. The breakthrough helps explain intracellular communication, as communication breakdown leads to human diseases such as cancer and Alzheimer's. T

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New assay reveals biophysical properties that allow certain proteins to infect others

Scientists have identified a physical basis for the spread of corrupted proteins known as prions inside cells.

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New brain pathway for escaping predators found

New research reveals how the zebrafish brain perceives and reacts to predators.

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Immunotherapy for deadly bacteria shows early promise

Researchers have designed a strategy aimed at tagging Gram-negative bacteria for destruction via small molecule conjugates they have created that specifically home to bacterial cell surfaces and trigger an immune response. They observed a significant decrease in the number of live bacteria using their compound in experiments on E. coli in human serum.

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New tech could soon let you test whether your lettuce carries E. coli

Health But is at-home food testing actually beneficial? Short of swearing off fresh produce, how can you protect yourself from tainted meat, fruit, and vegetables? A new type of “smart” food packaging may hold the key to…

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Nanofiber-based wound dressings induce production of antimicrobial peptide

Nanofiber-based wound dressings loaded with vitamin D spur the production of an antimicrobial peptide, a key step forward in the battle against surgical site infections, or SSIs.

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Post-tropical cyclone Prapiroon's remnants moving over northern Japan

The remnants of Post-Tropical Cyclone Prapiroon were spotted by NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite as they were moving over Japan's Hokkiado Prefecture in northern Japan.

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Nanofiber-based wound dressings induce production of antimicrobial peptide

Nanofiber-based wound dressings loaded with vitamin D spur the production of an antimicrobial peptide, a key step forward in the battle against surgical site infections, or SSIs.

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New software designed for rapid, automated identification of dendritic spines

Researchers at the Max Planck Florida Institute for Neuroscience release open source software, connecting and building the neuroscience coding community. The software has the potential to dramatically increase experiment workflow, shaving off hours of imaging time. Weaving in an element of machine learning, the algorithm can be taught how to differentiate between dendrite backbone and dendritic sp

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The Rise of Iraq's Young Secularists

MOSUL, Iraq—Rayyan Hadidi was 18 years old when he lost his faith. It was July 2006, and he was on his way to school when he stumbled upon a cheering crowd that had gathered near a local mosque. The group, made up mostly of mosque leaders and worshippers, had encircled two men accused of volunteering with the Iraqi police force, which many saw as a puppet of the American occupiers. Al-Qaeda gunme

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Spiders go ballooning on electric fields

The aerodynamic capabilities of spiders have intrigued scientists for hundreds of years. Scientists have attributed the flying behavior of these wingless arthropods to 'ballooning', where spiders can be carried thousands of miles by releasing trails of silk that propel them up and out on the wind. However, the fact that ballooning has been observed when there is no wind to speak of, when skies are

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Pathway of Alzheimer's degeneration discovered

Scientists have used a unique approach to track brain degeneration in Alzheimer's disease, uncovering a pathway through which degeneration spreads from one region to another.

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Most Americans think funding science pays off

About 80 percent of U.S. adults say that federal spending on scientific and medical research provides value in the long run, a new survey finds.

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Satellite Images Hint North Korea Won't Disarm Anytime Soon

U.S. Secretary of State Michael Pompeo arrives Friday for negotiations, but the photos suggest North Korea leader Kim Jong-un’s regime is increasing its missile-making capabilities — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Post-tropical cyclone Prapiroon's remnants moving over northern Japan

The remnants of Post-Tropical Cyclone Prapiroon were spotted by NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite as they were moving over Japan's Hokkiado Prefecture in northern Japan.

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CES 2018: Checking in on new tech six months later

Technology Checking in on the new gadgets and promises from this years Consumer Electronics Show A half-year check-in on the new gadgets from CES 2018…

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Meteorologists just found the coldest natural temperatures on the planet

Science The bottom of the world could get down to -145 degrees this month. A brisk night on Mars is often balmier than a July evening in eastern Antarctica. The coldest place on earth sits atop the Eastern Antarctic Plateau.

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An aggressor is not necessarily a bully — and the distinction matters

There is a difference between general aggressive behavior and bullying. They are not the same thing and the distinction matters, according to the findings of a new paper by a University at Buffalo psychologist who is among the country's leading authorities on aggression, bullying and peer victimization.

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Gonorrhea researchers identify novel route to vaccine, new antibiotic

Researchers have identified a protein that powers the virulence of the bacteria that causes gonorrhea, opening the possibility of a new target for antibiotics and, even better, a vaccine.

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Is the USA the best place to work in the world? OECD study says …

"Wage growth is still missing in action." Read More

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Linked between Consumption of fast food and asthma, other allergic diseases

A new review and analysis of published studies reveals a link between fast food consumption and an increased likelihood of having asthma, wheeze, and several other allergic diseases such as pollen fever, eczema, and rhino-conjunctivitis.

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Drugs for treating severe hypertension in pregnancy compared

A recent meta-analysis of published studies has compared the efficacy and safety of antihypertensive drugs during pregnancy.

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Study examines alcohol's effects on sexual aggression

New research examines alcohol's 'in the moment' effects on sexual aggression, or the acute effects of alcohol on men's decisions about how to respond to sexual refusals in a dating simulation.

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Study reveals privacy issues in smartphone headache apps

Many commercial smartphone apps have been developed to help people track their headache pain. New research finds that such apps often share information with third parties, posing privacy risks.

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Obesity affects prostate cancer test results

New research shows that the results of the most widely used test for prostate cancer may be affected by obesity.

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What does global climate have to do with erosion rates?

Geoscientists have been intrigued by a potential link between erosion rates at the Earth's surface and changes in global climate. A new study now calls into question this link. A team of researchers re-examined 30 locations with reported accelerated erosion after the onset of glacial-interglacial cycles a few million years ago. In nearly all of the locations, the proposed link between erosion and

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New world record for direct solar water-splitting efficiency

An international team of researchers has now succeeded in raising the efficiency of producing hydrogen from direct solar water-splitting to a record 19 per cent. They did so by combining a tandem solar cell of III-V semiconductors with a catalyst of rhodium nanoparticles and a crystalline titanium dioxide coating.

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Ancient dog cancer still around today after 10,000 years

Dogs have been man's best friend for more than 10,000 years, but a new study shows it has been a doggone tough road to get here: their ancestors in the Americas likely came from Siberia, and these early dog populations almost totally disappeared, but not before leaving a cancerous tumor that is still found in their canine descendants today.

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Stopping a tiny — and deadly — fly in its tracks

New research presents a technique that could help treat African sleeping sickness, which impacts millions in sub-Saharan Africa and — in its late stages — can be fatal.

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Semiconductor quantum transistor opens the door for photon-based computing

Researchers at the University of Maryland have demonstrated the first single-photon transistor using a semiconductor chip.

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High-power electronics keep their cool with new heat-conducting crystals

The inner workings of high-power electronic devices must remain cool to operate reliably. High internal temperatures can make programs run slower, freeze or shut down. Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and The University of Texas, Dallas have collaborated to optimize the crystal-growing process of boron arsenide — a material that has excellent thermal properties and ca

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Researchers upend conventional wisdom on thermal conductivity

Researchers from around the United States have reported that a crystal grown from two relatively common mineral elements — boron and arsenic — demonstrates far higher thermal conductivity than any other semiconductors and metals currently in use, including silicon, silicon carbide, copper and silver.

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New study pinpoints ways to improve quality of food & nutrition research

In a study published today in PLOS ONE, experts analyzed reams of past food and nutrition research to help identify and spur action in areas where meaningful improvements can be made in the design and execution of future food and nutrition studies. This is one of the first studies to use 'Risk of Bias (ROB) domains,' as defined by Cochrane, in this way. Researchers typically use ROB domains to eva

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'Molecular movie' captures chemical reaction on atomic scale

A team of physicists from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Stanford University and Europe has captured the clearest glimpse yet of a photochemical reaction — the type of light-fueled molecular transformations responsible for photosynthesis, vision and the ozone layer. Appearing in the June 6 edition of the journal Science, the team's study marks the culmination of a years-long effort to advanc

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Ancient genome analyses reveal mosaic pattern of goat domestication thousands of years ago

Goat domestication was a mosaic — not a singular — process, with capture from the wild impacting genetic diversity in different regions of the Fertile Crescent. These wild populations have left different genetic legacies in Asian, African and European populations today. Farmers were selecting specific traits in goats such as coat color and production ability as early as 8,000 years ago.

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SLAC's ultra-high-speed 'electron camera' catches molecules at a crossroads

An extremely fast 'electron camera' at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory has produced the most detailed atomic movie of the decisive point where molecules hit by light can either stay intact or break apart. The results could lead to a better understanding of how molecules respond to light in processes that are crucial for life, like photosynthesis and vision, or that

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First dogs in the Americas arrived from Siberia, disappeared after European contact

A study reported in the journal Science offers an enhanced view of the origins and ultimate fate of the first dogs in the Americas. The dogs were not domesticated North American wolves, as some have speculated, but likely followed their human counterparts over a land bridge that once connected North Asia and the Americas, the study found.

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Investigative report on FDA advisory panels from Science's news department

An investigative report from Charles Piller, a contributing correspondent in the News department at Science, uncovers little recognized and unpoliced potential conflicts of interest among those who serve on FDA advisory panels to review drugs are under-reported.

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Hungry? A newly discovered neural circuit may be the cause

A particular subset of neurons located in an enigmatic region of the hypothalamus plays a central role in regulating feeding and body weight in mice, a new study reveals.

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Jupiter's moons create uniquely patterned aurora on the gas giant planet

New images from the Juno spacecraft show an unusual 'footprint' of Jupiter's moons on their parent planet's aurora.

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Genetic trails of the New World's oldest dogs and Near East goat domestication

The first dogs of North America arrived alongside humans and were not domesticated from North American wolves, but rather, from a Siberian ancestor, a new report says.

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Heat-conducting crystals could help computer chips keep their cool

As consumers demand smaller, faster and more powerful electronic devices that draw more current and generate more heat, the issue of heat management is reaching a bottleneck. Researchers at the University of Texas at Dallas and their collaborators have created a potential solution — boron arsenide crystals with high thermal conductivity, which might be used in future electronics to help keep devi

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Implanting diamonds with flaws offers key technology for quantum communications

Diamonds are prized for their purity, but their flaws might hold the key to a new type of highly secure communications. Princeton University researchers are using diamonds to preserve fragile quantum information over long distances.

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Ancient American dogs almost completely wiped out by arrival of European breeds

The arrival of Europeans to the Americas, beginning in the 15th century, all but wiped out the dogs that had lived alongside native people on the continent for thousands of years, according to new research published in Science.But one close relative of these native dogs lives on in an unexpected place — as a transmissible cancer whose genome is that of the original dog in which it appeared, but h

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'Blind' Cheetah 3 robot can climb stairs littered with obstaclesCheetah 3 MIT Robot

MIT's Cheetah 3 robot can now leap and gallop across rough terrain, climb a staircase littered with debris, and quickly recover its balance when suddenly yanked or shoved, all while essentially blind. The 90-pound mechanical beast — about the size of a full-grown Labrador — is intentionally designed to do all this without relying on cameras or any external environmental sensors.

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Neuronal 'barcodes' shape complex networks in the brain

Understanding how billions of brain cells succeed in making precise connections is a major challenge for neuroscientists. Researchers have unraveled a molecular code that determines the shape, location and function of connections between individual neurons. These findings could help us better understand brain disorders such as autism and schizophrenia.

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Reconstruction of underwater avalanche sheds light on geohazards that threaten underwater telecommunication cables

Researchers have reconstructed the 1929 Grand Banks underwater avalanche to better understand these common geohazards, which threaten critical seafloor infrastructure.

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Scientists develop highly sensitive molecular optical pressure sensor

Chemists have developed a molecular system capable of very precise optical pressure measurements. The gemstone ruby served as the source of inspiration.

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North America’s earliest dogs came from Siberia

North America’s first dogs have few descendants alive today, a study of ancient DNA suggests.

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Trilobites: Never Mind the Summer Heat: Earth Is at Its Greatest Distance From the Sun

During aphelion, our planet receives 7 percent less sunlight than in January, but changes in the planet’s orbit are not what causes our seasons.

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Eyewire Cup Quarterfinals: Results

Congrats to the top 4 teams moving on to the Semifinals: Antarctica, Egypt, Poland, and Switzerland! QF1: Antarctica vs Canada Winner: Antarctica MVP: galarun (Antarctica) Starting Lineup (Antarctica): galarun, Nseraf, Atani Starting Lineup (Canada): LeeMo127, PaulT, sbhope QF2: United States vs Egypt Winner: Egypt MVP: @m7md (Egypt) Starting Lineup (Egypt): m7md, LynneC, poorcollegestudent Start

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Hidden conflicts?

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America's lost dogs

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A single-photon gate

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A traffic jam of air

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Atmospheric blocking as a traffic jam in the jet stream

Atmospheric blocking due to anomalous, persistent meandering of the jet stream often causes weather extremes in the mid-latitudes. Despite the ubiquity of blocking, the onset mechanism is not well understood. Here we demonstrate a close analogy between blocking and traffic congestion on a highway by using meteorological data and show that blocking and traffic congestion can be described by a comm

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Single-crystal x-ray diffraction structures of covalent organic frameworks

The crystallization problem is an outstanding challenge in the chemistry of porous covalent organic frameworks (COFs). Their structural characterization has been limited to modeling and solutions based on powder x-ray or electron diffraction data. Single crystals of COFs amenable to x-ray diffraction characterization have not been reported. Here, we developed a general procedure to grow large sin

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Seeded growth of single-crystal two-dimensional covalent organic frameworks

Polymerization of monomers into periodic two-dimensional networks provides structurally precise, layered macromolecular sheets that exhibit desirable mechanical, optoelectronic, and molecular transport properties. Two-dimensional covalent organic frameworks (2D COFs) offer broad monomer scope but are generally isolated as powders comprising aggregated nanometer-scale crystallites. We found that 2

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A single-photon switch and transistor enabled by a solid-state quantum memory

Single-photon switches and transistors generate strong photon-photon interactions that are essential for quantum circuits and networks. However, the deterministic control of an optical signal with a single photon requires strong interactions with a quantum memory, which has been challenging to achieve in a solid-state platform. We demonstrate a single-photon switch and transistor enabled by a sol

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Observation of an environmentally insensitive solid-state spin defect in diamond

Engineering coherent systems is a central goal of quantum science. Color centers in diamond are a promising approach, with the potential to combine the coherence of atoms with the scalability of a solid-state platform. We report a color center that shows insensitivity to environmental decoherence caused by phonons and electric field noise: the neutral charge state of silicon vacancy (SiV 0 ). Thr

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Imaging CF3I conical intersection and photodissociation dynamics with ultrafast electron diffraction

Conical intersections play a critical role in excited-state dynamics of polyatomic molecules because they govern the reaction pathways of many nonadiabatic processes. However, ultrafast probes have lacked sufficient spatial resolution to image wave-packet trajectories through these intersections directly. Here, we present the simultaneous experimental characterization of one-photon and two-photon

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Tandem catalysis for asymmetric coupling of ethylene and enynes to functionalized cyclobutanes

Transformation of simple precursors into structurally complex cyclobutanes, present in many biologically important natural products and pharmaceuticals, is of considerable interest in medicinal chemistry. Starting from 1,3-enynes and ethylene, both exceptionally inexpensive starting materials, we report a cobalt-catalyzed route to vinylcyclobutenes, as well as the further enantioselective additio

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Biological uptake and reversible scavenging of zinc in the global ocean

Zinc (Zn) is a key micronutrient for marine phytoplankton, with a global distribution that is similar to silicic acid. The processes that govern this relationship, despite the very different biological cycling of Zn and silica, remain poorly understood. Here, we use diagnostic and mechanistic models to show that only a combination of Southern Ocean biological uptake and reversible scavenging of Z

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Regulation of feeding by somatostatin neurons in the tuberal nucleus

The tuberal nucleus (TN) is a surprisingly understudied brain region. We found that somatostatin (SST) neurons in the TN, which is known to exhibit pathological or cytological changes in human neurodegenerative diseases, play a crucial role in regulating feeding in mice. GABAergic tuberal SST ( TN SST) neurons were activated by hunger and by the hunger hormone, ghrelin. Activation of TN SST neuro

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The evolutionary history of dogs in the Americas

Dogs were present in the Americas before the arrival of European colonists, but the origin and fate of these precontact dogs are largely unknown. We sequenced 71 mitochondrial and 7 nuclear genomes from ancient North American and Siberian dogs from time frames spanning ~9000 years. Our analysis indicates that American dogs were not derived from North American wolves. Instead, American dogs form a

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Ancient goat genomes reveal mosaic domestication in the Fertile Crescent

Current genetic data are equivocal as to whether goat domestication occurred multiple times or was a singular process. We generated genomic data from 83 ancient goats (51 with genome-wide coverage) from Paleolithic to Medieval contexts throughout the Near East. Our findings demonstrate that multiple divergent ancient wild goat sources were domesticated in a dispersed process that resulted in gene

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The prehistoric peopling of Southeast Asia

The human occupation history of Southeast Asia (SEA) remains heavily debated. Current evidence suggests that SEA was occupied by Hòabìnhian hunter-gatherers until ~4000 years ago, when farming economies developed and expanded, restricting foraging groups to remote habitats. Some argue that agricultural development was indigenous; others favor the "two-layer" hypothesis that posits a southward exp

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Ancient genomes document multiple waves of migration in Southeast Asian prehistory

Southeast Asia is home to rich human genetic and linguistic diversity, but the details of past population movements in the region are not well known. Here, we report genome-wide ancient DNA data from 18 Southeast Asian individuals spanning from the Neolithic period through the Iron Age (4100 to 1700 years ago). Early farmers from Man Bac in Vietnam exhibit a mixture of East Asian (southern Chines

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New Products

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Structure basis for RNA-guided DNA degradation by Cascade and Cas3

Type I CRISPR-Cas system features a sequential target-searching and degradation process on double-stranded DNA by the RNA-guided Cascade (CRISPR associated complex for antiviral defense) complex and the nuclease-helicase fusion enzyme Cas3, respectively. Here, we present a 3.7-angstrom-resolution cryo–electron microscopy (cryo-EM) structure of the Type I-E Cascade/R-loop/Cas3 complex, poised to i

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News at a glance

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Honey Badger Takes on an Antelope, and It Doesn't Go Well

This honey badger was not backing down without a fight.

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Training in musical improvisation may teach your brain to think differently

Skilled improvisers were better than musicians with limited improvisational experience at distinguishing between chords that can be used interchangeably in a piece of music and those that cannot, a new study finds. The results suggest that musical improvisation, like so many other skills, improves with practice as the brain learns to categorize musical structures in a new way.

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Researchers upend conventional wisdom on thermal conductivity

Scientists have long known that diamond is the best material for conducting heat, but it has drawbacks: It is costly and is an electrical insulator; when paired with a semiconductor device, diamond expands at a different rate than the device does when it is heated.

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'Molecular movie' captures chemical reaction on atomic scale

Laser lights. Electron camera. Reaction.

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Ancient genome analyses reveal mosaic pattern of goat domestication thousands of years ago

An international team of scientists, led by geneticists from Trinity College Dublin, have sequenced the genomes from ancient goat bones from areas in the Fertile Crescent where goats were first domesticated around 8,500 BC. They reveal a 10,000-year history of local farmer practices featuring genetic exchange both with the wild and among domesticated herds, and selection by early farmers.

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Ranking locations for lion conservation in southern Africa—a new approach

An international team of scientists has developed a new strategy to rank locations for lion conservation activities, based on GPS collar data revealing lions' movements, in a study published July 5 in the open access journal PLOS ONE by Samuel Cushman of the U.S. Forest Service and colleagues.

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Semiconductor quantum transistor opens the door for photon-based computing

Transistors are tiny switches that form the bedrock of modern computing; billions of them route electrical signals around inside a smartphone, for instance.

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Implanting diamonds with flaws offers key technology for quantum communications

Diamonds are prized for their purity, but their flaws might hold the key to a new type of highly secure communications.

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Heat-conducting crystals could help computer chips keep their cool

If your laptop or cell phone starts to feel warm after playing hours of video games or running too many apps at one time, those devices are actually doing their job.

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First dogs in the Americas arrived from Siberia, disappeared after European contact

A study reported in the journal Science offers an enhanced view of the origins and ultimate fate of the first dogs in the Americas. The dogs were not domesticated North American wolves, as some have speculated, but likely followed their human counterparts over a land bridge that once connected North Asia and the Americas, the study found.

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Death toll from Canada heat wave rises to 33

A heat wave in Quebec has killed 33 people in the past week as high summer temperatures scorched eastern Canada, officials said Thursday.

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The Original American Dogs Are Gone

Between 14,000 and 18,000 years ago, the ancestors of today’s Native Americans first entered the land where they now live. They came from Asia, walking east across a broad land bridge that connected the two continents, snaking south past a stretch of retreating glaciers, and eventually spreading across a new land. A few millennia later, dogs followed them. The origin of those indigenous American

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The Lost Dogs of the Americas

Exhaustive DNA studies find that the dogs of European colonists completely replaced ancient American dogs.

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Machine learning to assist in building muscle

Sarcopenia (from Greek 'flesh poverty'), is one of the major age-related processes and involves the loss of skeletal muscle and its function. To address this challenge researchers from Insilico Medicine developed a novel deep-learning based model that predicts a biological age of a muscle and can be used to estimate the relevant importance of the genetic and epigenetic factors driving this process

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The rising price of Medicare Part D's 10 most costly medications

Researchers at Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences at University of California San Diego have found that the cost for the 10 'highest spend' medications in Medicare Part D — the US federal government's primary prescription drug benefit for older citizens — rose almost one-third between 2011 and 2015, even as the number of persons using these drugs dropped by the same amount.

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How to transform your Official Shark Week™ Box into a pet shark!

Order yours now: https://shrkbx.com/yoursharkweekbox Take your 2018 Shark Week™ to the next level with this limited edition box full of exclusive Shark Week apparel, merch, and collectibles—a must have for any Shark Week™ fin-atic! Quantities are limited–order now. The Official Shark Week™ Box includes: [1] Exclusive Shark Week™ Bobblehead [1] Exclusive Shark Week™ Heat-Changing Mug [4] Exclusive

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Beware those scientific studies—most are wrong, researcher warns

A few years ago, two researchers took the 50 most-used ingredients in a cook book and studied how many had been linked with a cancer risk or benefit, based on a variety of studies published in scientific journals.

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Zambia planning social media clampdown

Zambia said on Thursday it will introduce tough new laws to regulate social media use to fight cyber-crime and combat the consumption of pornography in the conservative African country.

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Should police use computers to predict crimes and criminals?

Years of secrecy by America's police departments about their use of computer programs predicting where crimes will occur, and who will commit them, are under fire in legal cases nationwide.

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Google says Google Documents is secure despite Russian issue

Google said Thursday that its document writing tool Google Documents was secure even as Russian internet users discovered scores of files that appeared to be intended for private use.

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Terra satellite apots second Atlantic Tropical Depression

The second tropical cyclone of the North Atlantic Hurricane season formed in the Central Atlantic Ocean and far from land. NASA's Terra satellite provided an early morning look at the small depression.

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Suomi NPP sees Typhoon Maria affecting Guam

The Pacific island of Guam continued to experience the effects of Typhoon Maria on July 5 as NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite showed a large band of storms over the island.

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Rising seas put salinity stress on Hawaiian coastal plants

With the increased likelihood of extreme weather events and sea-level rise associated with climate change, flooding poses a major risk to coastal regions. Seawater flooding is not only a threat to many already-threatened ecosystems, but also can cause socio-economic costs to the many millions of people that live on the coastal fringes around the world.

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NASA finds one small area of strong storms in Tropical Storm Fabio

Infrared imagery from NASA revealed that only one small area of storms remained in Tropical Storm Fabio.

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SBRT may be effective, safe alternative for patients, medically inoperable early-stage lung cancer

JAMA Oncology recently published data from NRG Oncology's RTOG 0618 trial, which shows that the utilization of Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) as a treatment for medically operable lung cancer is associated with favorable primary tumor control and local control rates.

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MGMT promoter methylation associated with improved survival for patients with WHO Grade II Gliomas

Further exploration into the endpoints of the NRGOncology/RTOG 0424 trial resulted in the discovery that MGMT promoter methylation is an independent prognostic biomarker of high-risk, low-grade glioma treated with temozolomide and radiation. This is the first study of its kind to validate the prognostic significance of MGMT promoter methylation in this patient population and treatment regimen.

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Non-opioid drug relieves pain in mice, targets immune cells

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found that inhibiting a receptor on immune cells called macrophages may help relieve pain in some patients, particularly those with chronic neuropathic pain, such as those with conditions such as diabetic neuropathy.

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NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP sees Typhoon Maria affecting Guam

The Pacific island of Guam continued to experience the effects of Typhoon Maria on July 5 as NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite showed a large band of storms over the island.

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NASA finds one small area of strong storms in Tropical Storm Fabio

Infrared imagery from NASA revealed that only one small area of storms remained in Tropical Storm Fabio.

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Why Drake Can’t Pull Off Being the ‘Good Guy’

Now let us make prayer hands : Drake is looking for the meaning of life. The rapper who christened himself “6 God,” coined our era’s WWJD with YOLO , and landed a smash chorus about “a higher power,” openly wonders about the status of his soul on his latest blockbuster, Scorpion . Astrology, “God’s Plan,” and mystical “stones and crystals” get mentioned across the sneakily engrossing double album

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The Democratic Party Hits a Fork in the Road

LOS ANGELES —The brilliant sunshine that bathed last weekend’s immigrant-rights rally here also illuminated one of the central strategic choices facing the Democratic Party. Almost halfway through Donald Trump’s tempestuous first term, Democrats are divided between two visions of how they can dislodge the Republican dominance of Washington and most state governments. One camp believes the party’s

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Reconstruction of Grand Banks event sheds light on geohazard threats to seafloor infrastructure

As part of an international team, a researcher from the University of Liverpool reconstructed the 1929 Grand Banks underwater avalanche to better understand these common geohazards, which threaten critical seafloor infrastructure.

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When rabbits and hares are introduced to new areas: Factors to consider

Throughout history, humans have deliberately translocated rabbits and hares (leporids) around the world, so they now occupy every continent (except Antarctica). A new Mammal Review article examines studies on the 12 leporid species that have been introduced by humans to areas beyond their native ranges, highlighting the animals' effects on the ecosystem at different levels.

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Described 28 years post collection, new grass species makes a strong case for conservation

Originally collected 28 years ago in Ecuador, new species Poa laegaardiana has been just described, only to find out its prospects for surviving in its type location seem bleak nowadays. The study was published in the open access journal PhytoKeys.

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Data-sharing website may speed the response to new illegal drugs

The drug overdose epidemic currently gripping the nation is so tenacious in part because it's being driven by fentanyl, a synthetic opioid that comes in many forms. Each form has a slightly different chemical structure, and clandestine chemists are constantly cooking up new ones. From a law-enforcement perspective, this makes fentanyl a moving target and very difficult to control.

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Researchers link coastal nuisance flooding to Rossby Waves

A team of international researchers has found a link between seasonal fluctuations in sea level to a long-time phenomenon—Rossby Waves. And this connection may lead to a new tool to help coastal communities, such as Miami, better anticipate and mitigate "nuisance flooding" impacts.

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Politics this week

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Business this week

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KAL’s cartoon

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Establishing system for 911 video calling poses design challenges

Implementing 911 video calling may not be far off, with the CRTC asking for new 911 infrastructure to be in place by 2020. But a team of researchers led by SFU professor Carman Neustaedter suggests that while there may be obvious benefits to video calling for 911, there are also technical and social challenges to ensuring the system works optimally.

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NASA's Terra satellite apots second Atlantic Tropical Depression

The second tropical cyclone of the North Atlantic Hurricane season formed in the Central Atlantic Ocean and far from land. NASA's Terra satellite provided an early morning look at the small depression.

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Amyloid beta protein protects brain from herpes infection by entrapping viral particles

A Massachusetts General Hospital study has found the mechanism by which amyloid beta — the protein deposited into plaques in the brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease — protects from the effects of herpes viruses commonly found in the brain.

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Training in musical improvisation may teach your brain to think differently

Skilled improvisers were better than musicians with limited improvisational experience at distinguishing between chords that can be used interchangeably in a piece of music and those that cannot, a new study by Columbia researchers finds. The results suggest that musical improvisation, like so many other skills, improves with practice as the brain learns to categorize musical structures in a new w

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Precision genomics point the way to mutations associated with accelerated aging

Mayo Clinic researchers are using precision genomics to search for undiscovered, inheritable genetic mutations that cause accelerated aging. In a study recently published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings, researchers conducted a study assessing 17 patients with short telomere syndromes — rare conditions that result in premature DNA and cellular deterioration. The ability to pinpoint the genetic abnorma

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Triple-Star Test Shows Einstein Was Right, Again

A natural stellar laboratory probes a prediction of general relativity to unprecedented precision — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Video: Hydrangeas and the science of do-overs

In a previous video, the Reactions team attempted to demonstrate the color-changing science of hydrangeas by using aluminum citrate to try to turn cut flowers from red to blue.

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Tiny mitochondria may be controlling genes in heart of our cells

The nucleus is the mighty genetic control room of a human cell – but new research suggests that mitochondria can pull the levers of power there too

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Young kids are surprisingly bad at using memory to plan ahead

We used to think children as young as four could plan for the future. But now it seems kids develop the type of memory needed to do this later than we thought

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Mere end 26.000 arter verden over er truet af udryddelse

Særligt Australiens reptiler står overfor flere udfordringer ifølge ny "rødliste" fra World Conservation Union, IUCN.

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Facebook algorithm finds the Declaration of Independence racist

A phrase buried deep in the Declaration of Independence set off alarms in Silicon Valley, and outrage in Texas. Read More

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Should you pull the plug on a suffering newborn? A new approach to a difficult question

What do we do when we know an infant will not have a life worth living? Philosophy is here to help. Read More

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Researchers detect Higgs boson coupling with top quark

Detection of Higgs-top quark interaction at LHC by CMS and Atlas international collaborations, with Brazilian researchers participating, confirms theoretical predictions of Standard Model of particle physics.

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Establishing system for 911 video calling poses design challenges

A team of researchers led by Simon Fraser University professor Carman Neustaedter suggests that while there may be obvious benefits to implementing video calling for 911, there are also technical and social challenges to ensuring the system works optimally.

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Figures reveal £1.77 billion mental health treatment gap for children and young people

A radical new Government Strategy focused on preventing, and not just treating, mental ill health in young people is required as a report by the University of Birmingham reveals today that an additional £1.77 billion funding and 23,800 staff are needed to plug the current treatment gap.

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'Blind' Cheetah 3 robot can climb stairs littered with obstacles

MIT's Cheetah 3 robot can now leap and gallop across rough terrain, climb a staircase littered with debris, and quickly recover its balance when suddenly yanked or shoved, all while essentially blind. The 90-pound mechanical beast — about the size of a full-grown Labrador — is intentionally designed to do all this without relying on cameras or any external environmental sensors.

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A molecular label: traceability for medical implants

A team of researchers at CNRS, Aix-Marseille Université and Université Paris 13 has demonstrated effective molecular labelling to unequivocally identify biomedical implants, even after a prolonged period inside the living being. These results were published in Angewandte Chemie International Edition on July 5, 2018.

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Rethinking neurodegenerative disease treatment: Target multiple pathological proteins

Targeting multiple proteins at once may be the real key to treating neurodegenerative diseases, according to a recent study.

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Three major failings in some apps used for the diagnosis of skin cancer

In the scramble to bring successful apps for the diagnosis of skin cancer to market, there is a concern that a lack of testing is risking public safety, according to new research.

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A Twist On Charles Dickens: He Was A Public Health Pioneer Too

A new museum exhibit in London reveals a hidden side of the literary great. It turns out he was prolific not just as a novelist, but also as a promoter of public health and medical discoveries. (Image credit: Herbert Watson/Charles Dickens Museum)

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New target in certain leukemias discovered, could be treated with existing drug

Researchers at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine and Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center have discovered a target in several types of leukemia that could be treated with an existing Food and Drug Administration-approved drug for other types of blood cancers.

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Ex-smokers crave lost identity, study shows

Ex-smokers may not be able to resist lighting up again in order to recover a sense of 'who they are'. New findings suggest that smokers who have quit often relapse because they want to recapture a sense of lost social identity. And that many ex-smokers experience quitting as a 'loss'.

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How to start a nanomotor

Cilia allow sperm to move, form fine protective hairs in the lungs and play a crucial role in the differentiation of organs in embryos. Researchers have now reconstructed the protein complex responsible for transport within cilia, which plays a decisive role in their functioning.

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New wasp species with a giant stinger discovered in Amazonia

A newly discovered wasp species in the Amazon has an exceptionally large stinger that surprised even scientists. The new insect, which is found in the extremely diverse transitional zone between the Andes and the Amazonian lowland rainforest, uses its stinger both for laying eggs and injecting venom.

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Spiders can use electricity in the air to balloon for kilometres

Spiders can detect atmospheric electricity and use it to fly – and maybe drones of the future could fly the same way too

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Forgotten Memories Brought Back in Mice

By stimulating specific neurons in mouse brains, researchers demonstrate that memories from infancy are not lost, but merely difficult to access.

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When Spiders Go Airborne, It's Electric — Literally

Many spiders ply the skies by riding "balloons" of silk. And they rely on something more than just the wind to take them high up and far away. (Image credit: Michael Hutchinson/Cell Press)

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New receptor involved in symbiosis between legumes and nitrogen-fixing rhizobia identified

Legumes are able to grow in nitrogen-poor soils due to their ability to engage in symbiosis with nitrogen-fixing bacteria. There is a great interest in using the knowledge about this symbiosis, to enable transfer to other non-symbiotic plants. An international research team has come a step further to understanding this complex biological process.

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Caffeine offers clues to ultra-transient positive charges' migration

Caffeine keeps physicists up at night. Particularly those concerned with the capacity of electrons to absorb energy. In a new study physicists have used the caffeine molecule as a playground to test the effect of ionizing radiation on its electrons as they approach excited states.

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Researchers link coastal nuisance flooding to special type of slow-moving ocean wave

A team of international researchers has found a link between seasonal fluctuations in sea level to a long-time phenomenon — Rossby Waves. And this connection may lead to a new tool to help.

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Hydrangeas and the science of do-overs (video)

In a previous video, the Reactions team attempted to demonstrate the color-changing science of hydrangeas by using aluminum citrate to try to turn cut flowers from red to blue. The experiment didn't work, but it did demonstrate why failing and trying again is so important in science. In this video, the team finally sticks the landing: https://youtu.be/WVAnvTjbmSE.

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Texas A&M AgriLife study shows BPA risk factor for inflammatory bowel disease

A recent study in a preclinical model of inflammatory bowel disease shows dietary exposure to bisphenol-A, or BPA, found in polycarbonate plastics and epoxy resins, can increase mortality and worsen its symptoms.

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Described 28 years post-collection, new grass species makes a strong case for conservation

Originally collected 28 years ago in Ecuador, new species Poa laegaardiana has been just described, only to find out its prospects for surviving in its type location seem bleak due to intense farming in the area. The study was published in the open-access journal PhytoKeys.

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Content of illicit cannabis extracts used to treat children with epilepsy revealed

A pioneering study has found carers who turned to medicinal cannabis to treat children with epilepsy overwhelmingly (75 percent) considered the extracts as 'effective.' Contrary to parental expectations, extracts tested by the University of Sydney's Lambert Initiative generally contained low doses of cannabidiol (CBD) — commonly considered to be a key therapeutic element and that has been success

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Abnormal branched-chain amino acid breakdown may raise diabetes risk

A new study suggests that the irregular metabolism of branched-chain amino acids — components of proteins found in many foods — may be partially to blame for progression to type 2 diabetes.

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Cultural practices may cause dermatologic side effects and complications

Population diversity and widespread immigration predispose physicians to encounter patients with a variety of backgrounds and cultural practices. While many of these practices are commonly performed, there has been limited medical literature describing their potential for complications.

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Noninvasive prenatal diagnosis can reliably detect trisomy 21

NIPD can reduce the number of invasive tests and hence the number of test-related miscarriages in women whose fetuses are at an increased risk of trisomy 21.

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Cash Lift: Episode 1 | The Game Show in an Elevator!

In the pilot episode of this hilarious new game show, two couples – from two different generations – see if they have the trivia chops to ride this elevator to the top. Stream Every Episode of Cash Lift on Discovery GO: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/cash-lift/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter

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No screening is better for women with low breast cancer risk, finds study

Number of women put through unnecessary tests would reduce if screening done by risk, find UCL researchers Women who are at lower risk of breast cancer – about a third of the population – would be better off not being invited for NHS screening for the disease, according to new research. Researchers at University College London have found in a modelling study that screening according to risk would

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Revving up innate control of viral infection requires a three-cell ignition

The innate NK-cell response requires a rather carefully choreographed interaction of three cell types.

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Potential new drug for two life-threatening diseases

Derived from nature, a potential new drug to treat two life-threatening tropical diseases has been discovered as a result of collaboration between two Welsh universities.

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Expansion of agricultural land reduces CO2 absorption

Plants absorb some of the carbon dioxide (CO2) released into the atmosphere by burning fossil fuels. But increasing deforestation and other changes in land use will reduce the CO2 absorption capacity of these areas in the future. This is what a study by climate researchers from Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) suggests. Their results are now published in Environmental Research Letters.

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Biomarker for salt sensitivity of blood pressure discovered

For the first time researchers have identified a genetic marker (GNAI2) that is associated with the risk of salt sensitivity in blood pressure (BP) regardless of age or gender. It is hoped that with this discovery a simple test to identify salt sensitivity of BP during a clinical visit can be developed.

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Prostate cancer ultrasound treatment as effective as surgery or radiotherapy

Using high energy ultrasound beams to destroy prostate cancer tumours may be as effective as surgery or radiotherapy, but with fewer side effects.

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Data-sharing website may speed the response to new illegal drugs

The NPS DataHub allows forensic chemists to share data on new drug analogs, including their chemical structures and signatures, which are the keys to identifying them in the lab.Identifying drugs quickly is critical. 'If people start overdosing and dying from a new drug analog, authorities need to identify it as quickly as possible,' said NIST research chemist Aaron Urbas. 'To focus your resources

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New wasp species with a giant stinger discovered in Amazonia

Researchers from the University of Turku, Finland have discovered a new wasp species in the Amazon which has an exceptionally large stinger that surprised even the scientists. The new insect, which is found in the extremely diverse transitional zone between the Andes and the Amazonian lowland rainforest, uses its stinger both for laying eggs and injecting venom.

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How to start a nanomotor?

Most people have never heard of them, and yet every living being needs them to survive: fine protrusions of cells known as cilia. They allow sperm to move, form fine protective hairs in the lungs and play a crucial role in the differentiation of organs in embryos. A research team at the Technical University of Munich has now reconstructed the protein complex responsible for transport within cilia,

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Ex-smokers crave lost identity, study shows

Ex-smokers may not be able to resist lighting up again in order to recover a sense of 'who they are' — according to new research from the University of East Anglia.New findings published today in the Journal of Substance Use suggest that smokers who have quit often relapse because they want to recapture a sense of lost social identity. And that many ex-smokers experience quitting as a 'loss.'

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Research finds three major failings in some apps used for the diagnosis of skin cancer

In the scramble to bring successful apps for the diagnosis of skin cancer to market there is a concern that a lack of testing is risking public safety, according to research led by the University of Birmingham.

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Rethinking neurodegenerative disease treatment: Target multiple pathological proteins

Targeting multiple proteins at once may be the real key to treating neurodegenerative diseases, according to a recent study published in Brain by Penn Medicine researchers.

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The tricks to playing extra time in the World Cup

With England's latest thriller going to extra time, what can teams do to overcome the increased fatigue and stress of that extra 30 minutes and be able to play again in just four days?

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Scientists teach the neural network to carry out video facial recognition — using a single photo

Researchers at the Higher School of Economics have proposed a new method of recognizing people on video with the help of a deep neural network. The results of the work have been published in the articles 'Fuzzy Analysis and Deep Convolution Neural Networks in Still-to-Video Recognition' and 'Unconstrained Face Identification Using Maximum Likelihood of Distances Between Deep Off- the-shelf Feature

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Web-based support system may help people lose weight and keep it off

In a randomized long-term lifestyle change trial, an Internet-based health behavior change support system (HBCSS) was effective in improving weight loss and reduction in waist circumference for up to 2 years. The findings are published in the Journal of Internal Medicine.

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ESMO and ASCO call on governments to improve cancer services and reduce cancer deaths

The European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) and the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), the world's two leading organizations for oncology professionals, today issued a joint statement calling upon governments to renew political commitment to improve cancer services and reduce cancer deaths.

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Study reveals privacy issues in smartphone headache apps

Headache diaries are a mainstay of migraine management, and many commercial smartphone apps have been developed to help people track their pain. A new Headache study found that such apps often share information with third parties, posing privacy risks partly because there are few legal protections against the sale or disclosure of data from medical apps to third parties.

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Scientists develop highly sensitive molecular optical pressure sensor

Chemists at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz in Germany and at the Université de Montréal in Canada have developed a molecular system capable of very precise optical pressure measurements. The gemstone ruby served as the source of inspiration.

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Extended tamoxifen therapy may increase risk of endometrial cancer

There is clear evidence that extended adjuvant tamoxifen therapy for 10 years reduces local recurrence and improves breast cancer-free survival in women with estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer.

7h

7h

Rays of hope for development of materials for 3D displays and medical applications

Scientists have aligned two hexahelicenes in various orientations, theoretically examined, and proposed that S- and X-shaped double hexahelicenes aligned in right symmetry were a key to improve the properties of helicenes. The researchers then synthesized double hexahelicenes to demonstrate their improved chiroptical properties as chiral materials: circular dichroism and circularly polarized lumin

7h

Urban greenways can reduce neighborhood carbon emissions

A new study provides some of the first direct proof that urban greenways reduce carbon emissions.

7h

Exposure of hummingbirds and bumble bees to pesticides

New research reveals that hummingbirds and bumble bees are being exposed to neonicotinoid and other pesticides through routes that are widespread and complex.

7h

New method discovered to view proteins inside human cells

Scientists have created a new way to view proteins that are inside human cells.

7h

New 2D spectroscopy methods

Optical spectroscopy allows investigating the energy structure and dynamic properties of complex quantum systems. Researchers now present two new approaches of coherent two-dimensional spectroscopy.

7h

Shining new light on the pineal gland

Biologists have identified a gene controlling left-right asymmetry in the brain and sleep-wake cycles.

7h

A bird's eye view of the Arctic

Drones and other unmanned technologies can cost-effectively collect weather data in harsh or remote environments and contribute to better weather and climate models, according to a new study.

7h

Researchers compare drugs for treating severe hypertension in pregnancy

A recent meta-analysis of published studies has compared the efficacy and safety of antihypertensive drugs during pregnancy.

7h

Synthesis of tetrapeptides and screening of their antioxidant properties

Tetrapeptide Pro-Ala-Gly-Tyr (PAGY) and its analogues, namely, Pro-Ser-Gly-Tyr (PSGY), Pro-Ala-Phe-Tyr (PAFY), Pro-Phe-Phe-Tyr (PFFY) and Pro-Ala-Ile-Tyr (PAIY), were successfully synthesized via a solid phase peptide synthesis method with the Fmoc/t-Bu strategy.

7h

Study examines alcohol's effects on sexual aggression

A new Aggressive Behavior study has examined alcohol's 'in the moment' effects on sexual aggression, or the acute effects of alcohol on men's decisions about how to respond to sexual refusals in a dating simulation.

7h

Reconstruction of Grand Banks event sheds light on geohazard threats to seafloor infrastructure

As part of an international team, a researcher from the University of Liverpool reconstructed the 1929 Grand Banks underwater avalanche to better understand these common geohazards, which threaten critical seafloor infrastructure.

7h

Neuronal 'barcodes' shape complex networks in the brain

The brain is an enormously complex organ. Understanding how billions of brain cells succeed in making precise connections is a major challenge for neuroscientists. Professor Joris de Wit and his team (VIB-KU Leuven) have unraveled a molecular code that determines the shape, location and function of connections between individual neurons. These findings could help us better understand brain disorde

7h

Biorefineries will have only minimal effects on wood products and feedstocks markets

A new report from researchers from IIASA, Luleå University of Technology, and RISE Research Institutes of Sweden has shown that more biorefineries, which produce biobased fuels and chemicals, will have only a small effect on the availability and pricing of wood products and feedstocks.

7h

New world record for direct solar water-splitting efficiency

An international team of researchers has now succeeded in raising the efficiency of producing hydrogen from direct solar water-splitting to a record 19 per cent. They did so by combining a tandem solar cell of III-V semiconductors with a catalyst of rhodium nanoparticles and a crystalline titanium dioxide coating.

7h

What does global climate have to do with erosion rates?

Geoscientists have been intrigued by a potential link between erosion rates at the Earth's surface and changes in global climate. A new study now calls into question this link. A team of researchers re-examined 30 locations with reported accelerated erosion after the onset of glacial-interglacial cycles a few million years ago. In nearly all of the locations, the proposed link between erosion and

7h

University of Minnesota research derives muscle stem cells from teratomas

Researchers at the University of Minnesota Medical School have developed a process to regenerate skeletal muscle cells in mice with muscular dystrophy.

7h

Spiders go ballooning on electric fields

The aerodynamic capabilities of spiders have intrigued scientists for hundreds of years. Charles Darwin himself mused over how hundreds of the creatures managed to alight on the Beagle on a calm day out at sea and later take-off from the ship with great speeds on windless day.

7h

High rate of nearsightedness among children in China

Nearsightedness (myopia) is a leading cause of visual impairment worldwide. A new study of about 4,700 Chinese schoolchildren suggests the rate of nearsightedness may be 20 percent to 30 percent each year from first grade onward. If such a frequency is confirmed with further testing, researchers suggest interventions to reduce the onset of nearsightedness, such as increasing the time spent outdoor

7h

Cost-effectiveness study of risk-based screenings for breast cancer

A cost-effectiveness study used a hypothetical group of women in the United Kingdom to compare risk-based breast cancer screening programs with a standard age-based screening program and no screening. Analysis was done from the perspective of the National Health Service.

7h

Immunotherapy for deadly bacteria shows early promise

Lehigh University's Marcos Pires and his team have designed a strategy aimed at tagging Gram-negative bacteria for destruction via small molecule conjugates they have created that specifically home to bacterial cell surfaces and trigger an immune response. They observed a significant decrease in the number of live bacteria using their compound in experiments on E. coli in human serum. The research

7h

Study finds new brain pathway for escaping predators

How the zebrafish brain perceives and reacts to predators has been determined by researchers at the University of Queensland. School of Biomedical Sciences Associate Professor Ethan Scott said the processing of visual threats by the brain represented a really interesting puzzle in neuroscience.

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New research detects brain cell that improves learning

The workings of memory and learning have yet to be clarified, especially at the neural circuitry level. But researchers at Uppsala University have now, jointly with Brazilian collaborators, discovered a specific brain neuron with a central role in learning. This study, published in Neuron, may have a bearing on the potential for counteracting memory loss in Alzheimer's disease.

7h

New assay reveals biophysical properties that allow certain proteins to infect others

Scientists at the Stowers Institute for Medical Research have identified a physical basis for the spread of corrupted proteins known as prions inside cells. Their research findings are reported in the July 5, 2018, issue of the scientific journal Molecular Cell.

7h

FSU research: Zika suppresses virus-fighting cells

Professor of Biological Science Hengli Tang and his postdoctoral researcher Jianshe Lang take a deep dive into the differences between Zika and the dengue virus. Tang and Lang found Zika has a unique ability to ferry the virus throughout the body when most viruses would be stopped.

7h

When spiders balloon through the air, it's (literally) electric

Spiders can travel many hundreds of miles through the air by releasing silk and floating away. Researchers had thought that ballooning behavior required drag forces from wind or thermals. But, now researchers reporting in the journal Current Biology on July 5 show that electric fields at strengths found in nature not only trigger ballooning, but also provide lift, even in the absence of any air mo

7h

Mighty mitochondria flex their DNA power to help nucleus run the cell

USC researchers discovered humble mitochondria are sometimes boss over the cell nucleus. They send DNA-coded instructions to make the nucleus respond when the cell is under duress. That's new, as the nucleus was always thought to issue orders to cell members. The breakthrough helps explain intracellular communication, as communication breakdown leads to human diseases such as cancer and Alzheimer'

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Healthy diet may lower eye disease risk

An analysis of recent high-quality research reveals that diet may affect individuals' risks related to the development and progression of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The findings are published in Clinical & Experimental Ophthalmology.

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A breakthrough to rescue the Northern White Rhino

Northern White Rhinos (NWR) are functionally extinct, as only two females of this species are left on the planet. An international team of scientists has now successfully created hybrid embryos from Southern White Rhino (SWR) eggs and NWR sperm using assisted reproduction techniques (ART). This is the first, ever reported, generation of blastocysts (a pre-implantation embryos) of rhinos in a test

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New drug uses immune system to wipe out deadly bacteria

Antibiotic-resistant bacteria are among those targeted by new ‘immunobiotic’ Scientists have created a new drug that hunts down and eliminates deadly antibiotic-resistant bacteria by engaging the body’s natural defences. Researchers at Lehigh University in Pennsylvania fused part of an existing antibiotic with a molecule that attracts antibodies unleashed by the immune system to fight invaders su

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Older patients with knee pain may benefit from allograft transplant technique

Knee pain in active patients over 40 is often difficult to treat but according to researchers.

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Young athletes' ACL injury risk increases with fatigue

ACL injuries are one of the most common sports injuries affecting adolescent athletes, leading to lost playing time and high healthcare costs. Research shows athletes who experience fatigue — tested on a standardized assessment — demonstrated increased risk of ACL injury. The study is the first to measure the direct impact of fatigue on injury risk in the adolescent population.

7h

The science of superstition

Science And why people believe in the unbelievable. The number 13, black cats, breaking mirrors, or walking under ladders, may all be things you actively avoid—if you’re anything like the 25% of people in the US who…

7h

Flere unge vil være ingeniør – men naturvidenskab er på tilbagegang

Hver femte, der har søgt ind på en videregående uddannelse denne sommer, har valgt en ingeniøruddannelse eller en anden naturvidenskabelig uddannelsesretning, men det er kun ingeniøruddannelserne, der er i vækst.

7h

Can trapped Thai boys be rescued by learning to scuba dive?

Rescuers are trying to help get out the twelve boys and their football coach stranded in a flooded cave system in Thailand before the waters rise more. What can they do?

7h

Snooze mobiles: How vibrations in cars make drivers sleepy

New research has found the natural vibrations of cars make people sleepier, affecting concentration and alertness levels just 15 minutes after drivers get behind the wheel.

7h

Summer fun: How plants beat the heat

Researchers at the RIKEN Center for Sustainable Resource Science in Japan have discovered a gene in plants that helps protect them from excessive heat. Published in the scientific journal Plant Cell, the study shows that the newly found gene prevents the destabilization of chloroplast membranes that occurs at very high temperatures.

7h

Exposure of hummingbirds and bumble bees to pesticides

New research reveals that hummingbirds and bumble bees are being exposed to neonicotinoid and other pesticides through routes that are widespread and complex. The findings are published in Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry.

7h

Research sheds light on mystery of how spiders 'take flight'

Arachnids may use natural electric fields to help them stay airborne for up to hundreds of miles, scientists say In October 1832 a young naturalist named Charles Darwin watched with delight as hundreds of tiny spiders dangling from short silk threads floated on to HMS Beagle as the ship made for Buenos Aires. Darwin reasoned that the spiders must have flown at least 60 miles before reaching the v

7h

Urban greenways can reduce neighborhood carbon emissions

Greenways are great for cyclists and strollers, runners and walkers, but do they really reduce carbon emissions, as city planners hope? A new study provides some of the first direct proof that they do.

7h

New assay reveals biophysical properties that allow certain proteins to infect others

Scientists at the Stowers Institute for Medical Research have identified a physical basis for the spread of corrupted proteins known as prions inside cells. Their research findings are reported in the July 5, 2018, issue of the scientific journal Molecular Cell.

7h

Spiders go ballooning on electric fields

The aerodynamic capabilities of spiders have intrigued scientists for hundreds of years. Charles Darwin himself mused over how hundreds of the creatures managed to alight on the Beagle on a calm day out at sea and later take-off from the ship with great speeds on windless day.

7h

Immunotherapy for deadly bacteria shows early promise

If immunotherapy—the harnessing of the body's immune system—can destroy cancer cells, as has been demonstrated, why not try to trigger the body's immune system to battle deadly bacteria?

7h

Mighty mitochondria flex their DNA power to help nucleus run the cell

USC researchers have discovered that transfer of vital genetic information within a cell isn't the one-way telegraph once thought, opening new pathways for understanding human disease and developing potential treatments, a new study shows.

7h

Obesity affects prostate cancer test results

University of Adelaide research shows that the results of the most widely used test for prostate cancer may be affected by obesity.

7h

Rays of hope for development of materials for 3D displays and medical applications

Scientists at Osaka University aligned two hexahelicenes in various orientations, theoretically examined, and proposed that S- and X-shaped double hexahelicenes aligned in right symmetry were a key to improve the properties of helicenes. The researchers then synthesized double hexahelicenes to demonstrate their improved chiroptical properties as chiral materials: circular dichroism and circularly

7h

Fiber-optic transmission of 4,000 km made possible by ultra-low-noise optical amplifiers

Researchers from Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, and Tallinn University of Technology, Estonia, have demonstrated a 4,000 kilometer fiber-optical transmission link using ultra low-noise, phase-sensitive optical amplifiers. This is a reach improvement of almost six times what is possible when using conventional optical amplifiers. The results are published in Nature Communications.

7h

Urban greenways can reduce neighborhood carbon emissions

A new study from the University of British Columbia provides some of the first direct proof that urban greenways reduce carbon emissions.

7h

Abdominal obesity linked to lower urinary tract symptoms

In a recent LUTS study, men with central (or abdominal) obesity were at increased risk of experiencing lower urinary tract symptoms, and increased waist-to-hip ratio was associated with worsened straining and weak stream.

7h

Summer fun: How plants beat the heat

Researchers at the RIKEN Center for Sustainable Resource Science in Japan have discovered a gene in plants that helps protect them from excessive heat. Published in the scientific journal Plant Cell, the study shows that the newly found gene prevents the destabilization of chloroplast membranes that occurs at very high temperatures.

7h

Global warming may be twice what climate models predict

Future global warming may eventually be twice as warm as projected by climate models under business-as-usual scenarios and even if the world meets the 2°C target sea levels may rise six metres or more, according to an international team of researchers from 17 countries.

7h

Snooze mobiles: How vibrations in cars make drivers sleepy

About 20 percent of fatal road crashes involve driver fatigue. Now researchers have discovered the natural vibrations of cars make people sleepier, affecting concentration and alertness levels just 15 minutes after drivers get behind the wheel.

7h

Merging antenna and electronics boosts energy and spectrum efficiency

By integrating the design of antenna and electronics, researchers have boosted the energy and spectrum efficiency for a new class of millimeter wave transmitters, allowing improved modulation and reduced generation of waste heat. The result could be longer talk time and higher data rates in millimeter wave wireless communication devices for future 5G applications.

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Spiders Can Fly Hundreds of Miles Using Electricity

On October 31, 1832, a young naturalist named Charles Darwin walked onto the deck of the HMS Beagle and realized that the ship had been boarded by thousands of intruders. Tiny red spiders, each a millimeter wide, were everywhere. The ship was 60 miles offshore, so the creatures must have floated over from the Argentinian mainland. “All the ropes were coated and fringed with gossamer web,” Darwin

7h

Personalized “deep learning” equips robots for autism therapy

A child-friendly robot demonstrates human emotions and engages children with autism in responding appropriately. MIT researchers have now developed a type of personalized machine learning that helps robots estimate the engagement and interest of each child during these interactions. Read More

7h

A new study suggests a mental trick for making running easier. Does it work?

The authors conclude that it does, after claiming it doesn't. Read More

7h

Can Ride-Hailing Improve Public Transportation Instead of Undercutting It?

Ride-hailing threatens does public transit but is also key to its future success with smart policies and the right price signals in place — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

Study examines salmon poisoning disease in grizzly bears

Salmon in the northwestern continental US often carry a fluke containing bacteria that can produce a deadly disease in bears called salmon poisoning disease (SPD). Current recovery plans for grizzly bears in the North Cascades of Washington and the mountains of central Idaho, where infected salmon currently occur, call for using bears from several interior populations; however, a new study reveals

7h

Eight cups of coffee a day make you live longer? Don’t bet on it

Drinking coffee has once more been linked to a lower risk of early death but there are good reasons this could turn out to be froth, says Naveed Sattar

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A new way to remove CO2 from the atmosphere | Jennifer Wilcox

Our planet has a carbon problem — if we don't start removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, we'll grow hotter, faster. Chemical engineer Jennifer Wilcox previews some amazing technology to scrub carbon from the air, using chemical reactions that capture and reuse CO2 in much the same way trees do … but at a vast scale. This detailed talk reviews both the promise and the pitfalls.

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Invaluable to the medical industry, the horseshoe crab is under threat

Blood from horseshoe crabs is essential for many drug, implant and environmental safety tests—but blood harvesting, together with capture for bait and impacts from climate change and habitat destruction, is threatening populations of these "living fossils." A review published in Frontiers in Marine Science highlights that these continuing threats will detrimentally affect the surrounding ecosystem

7h

Online reviews of spine surgeons — staff and office factors may negatively affect ratings

Spine surgeons earn high ratings for their skill and good clinical outcomes on internet review sites — but are more likely to receive negative ratings and comments on factors pertaining to clinic staff, billing, and wait times, reports a landmark study in Spine. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

8h

Study examines salmon poisoning disease in grizzly bears

Salmon in the northwestern continental US often carry a fluke containing bacteria that can produce a deadly disease in bears called salmon poisoning disease (SPD).

8h

Exposure of hummingbirds and bumble bees to pesticides

New research reveals that hummingbirds and bumble bees are being exposed to neonicotinoid and other pesticides through routes that are widespread and complex. The findings are published in Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry.

8h

Consumption of fast food linked with asthma and other allergic diseases

A new Respirology review and analysis of published studies reveals a link between fast food consumption and an increased likelihood of having asthma, wheeze, and several other allergic diseases such as pollen fever, eczema, and rhino-conjunctivitis.

8h

Pathway of Alzheimer's degeneration discovered

Scientists at the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital (The Neuro) of McGill University have used a unique approach to track brain degeneration in Alzheimer's disease, uncovering a pathway through which degeneration spreads from one region to another.

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Tiny fine particles of global impact — radiocarbon reveals the origin of black carbon

A technical breakthrough was achieved in the source determination of very small carbon samples at the Accelerator Laboratory and the Laboratory of Chronology of the University of Helsinki. The development work is essential in climate research as it facilitates disentangling the origin of, for instance, black carbon particles.

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100 times faster broadband is coming: 5G passes first test at University of Sussex

Initial testing on the next generation of mobile technology with the capability of delivering 100 times faster broadband has been successful, engineers at the University of Sussex and collaborators from telecom consultancy firm Plum have confirmed.

8h

This diet may make cancer drugs more effective

A very low-carbohydrate, high-fat diet called the ketogenic diet may improve the effectiveness of an emerging class of cancer drugs, according to new research. In a study in Nature , scientists provide a possible explanation for why the drugs, which target the insulin-activated enzyme phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K) whose mutations have been implicated in many cancers, haven’t performed as w

8h

Volte-face: Research advises selling electric vehicles to untapped market of women

More focused marketing of electric cars to women could be more effective in creating the required revolution away from more polluting vehicles than universal government intervention, a new study has said.

8h

What Is the Sun Made Of and When Will It Die?

Like any star in its prime, the sun consists mainly of hydrogen atoms fusing two by two into helium, unleashing immense energy in the process. But it’s the sun’s tiny concentration of heavier elements, which astronomers call metals, that controls its fate. “Even a very small fraction of metals is sufficient to alter the behavior of a star completely,” explained Sunny Vagnozzi , a physicist at Sto

8h

Results for female ACL graft repair methods differ among younger athletes

Female athletes are two to eight more times likely to injure their ACL than males, however utilizing one graft repair treatment method in females may be more beneficial than another.

8h

Current ACL return to sport criteria fails to identify second injury risk

Returning to your sport after an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury and not suffering a second injury is often difficult but for a kid who suffers an ACL injury figuring out how to prevent reinjury is even more tricky, say researchers.

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Limited shoulder function is leading factor for rotator cuff surgery, research shows

For patients with rotator cuff tears, improving shoulder function is the most important reason for moving forward with surgical repair. Researchers also found that through arthroscopic rotator cuff repair (ARCR), these patients consistently saw significant functional improvements and relief from pain.

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'Skinny fat' in older adults may predict dementia, Alzheimer's risk

A first-of-its-kind study has found that 'skinny fat' — the combination of low muscle mass and strength in the context of high fat mass — may be an important predictor of cognitive performance in older adults. Using data from a series of community-based aging and memory studies, researchers assessed the relationship of sarcopenic obesity or 'skinny fat' with performance on various cognition test

8h

Will Your Melanin Protect You From The Sun?

There are lots of misconceptions about dark skin and sunshine. One of the most common? That black people can't get skin cancer. (Image credit: Getty Images)

8h

Old-school lessons could make artisan cheese safer

While current training for food safety and sanitation usually incorporates high-tech presentations, such as videos and slideshows, there is still a need for low-tech approaches, according to new research. For unique audiences, such as employees of small-scale dairies that produce artisan cheeses, old-school teaching strategies that do not require electricity may work best. Workers in this sector

8h

How 'eavesdropping' African herbivores respond to each other's alarm calls

Many animals live in a world characterised by a bewildering array of signals from other species. But to what extent are individuals able to extract useful information from these signals? In a new study, scientists from the Universities of Liverpool and York have for the first time tested the responses of African savanna herbivores to the alarm calls of their neighbours across the whole community.

8h

Volte-face: Research advises selling electric vehicles to untapped market of women

Highly educated women are an untapped but potentially lucrative market for electric vehicle sales because they have greater environmental and fuel efficiency awareness than men, says a new study by researchers at the University of Sussex and Aarhus University in Denmark.

8h

Invaluable to the medical industry, the horseshoe crab is under threat

The biomedical industry depends on blood from horseshoe crabs for drug and environmental safety testing — but this commercial demand, together with capture for bait, climate change and habitat destruction, is threatening populations of these 'living fossils.' This in turn will detrimentally affect the surrounding ecosystem, such as migratory shorebirds who rely on horseshoe crab eggs for food. Su

8h

A new study to improve seabird conservation in Patagonian ecosystems

Preserving a 300,000 square km area in Patagonian waters could improve the conservation of 20 percent of the population of sea birds in their natural habitat, according to a study published in the journal Conservation Biology and led by the expert Francisco Ramírez, researcher from the Faculty of Biology and the Biodiversity Research Institute of the University of Barcelona (IRBio).

8h

Shining new light on the pineal gland

Biologists from the University of Freiburg identify a gene controlling left-right asymmetry in the brain and sleep-wake cycles.

8h

New 2D spectroscopy methods

Optical spectroscopy allows investigating the energy structure and dynamic properties of complex quantum systems. Researchers from the University of Würzburg present two new approaches of coherent two-dimensional spectroscopy.

8h

DTU'ere tester mobil vindmølle på Roskilde

Den mobile vindmølle skal løse problemer, hvor den er. I fremtiden kunne det være i flygtningelejre eller til at drive fjern infrastruktur, men på Roskilde Festival handler det om at oplade telefoner og anlæg.

8h

How butterflies get color patterns on their wing tops

Butterflies often display strikingly different color or patterns on the dorsal (top) and ventral (bottom) sides of their wings. A new study reveals the gene responsible for the dorsal side. Researchers made the discovery while looking at the expression and functions of apterous A in the African squinting bush brown butterfly Bicyclus anynana , which has a well-annotated genome, during its wing de

8h

Caffeine offers clues to ultra-transient positive charges' migration

Caffeine keeps physicists up at night. Particularly those concerned with the capacity of electrons to absorb energy. In a new study published in EPJ B, a Franco-Japanese team of physicists have used the caffeine molecule as a playground to test the effect of ionising radiation on its electrons as they approach excited states. Their model accounts for the ionisation phenomenon in electrons, which a

8h

Trust the machines? Funds run by artificial intelligence

A computer can trounce a human chess master and solve complex mathematical calculations in seconds. Can it do a better job investing your money than a flesh-and-blood portfolio manager?

8h

Given a satellite image, machine learning creates the view on the ground

Geographers could use the technique to determine how land is used.

8h

New method discovered to view proteins inside human cells

Scientists at the University of Warwick have created a new way to view proteins that are inside human cells.

8h

Caffeine offers clues to ultra-transient positive charges' migration

Caffeine keeps physicists up at night. Particularly those concerned with the capacity of electrons to absorb energy. In a new study published in EPJ B, a Franco-Japanese team of physicists have used the caffeine molecule as a playground to test the effect of ionising radiation on its electrons as they approach excited states.

8h

Supercoil me! The art of knotted DNA maintenance

Locking DNA knots in place thanks to DNA propensity to be supercoiled. A new study by SISSA suggests that is one of the mechanisms that could be harnessed by the cellular machinery to deal with those accidental entanglements that can compromise DNA functionality.

8h

Hi-res image of Structure of the origin recognition complex bound to DNA revealed

The Meier-Gorlin syndrome is a heritable developmental disorder in human. Individuals afflicted with this abnormality have unusually short stature with mal-deformed bone structure among other developmental defects. Several inherited gene variants associated with this syndrome have been identified. They are mutant variants of ORC (Origin Recognition Complex) and Cdc6, which all have to do with defe

8h

New small molecules pave the way for treating autoinflammatory disease

EPFL scientists have discovered two small-molecule compound series that can effectively block a central pathway of the innate immune system, offering a promising new way for treating autoinflammatory diseases. The study is published in Nature.

8h

Swimming bacteria work together to go with the flow

Swimming bacteria can reduce the viscosity of ordinary liquids like water and make them flow more easily, sometimes down to the point where the viscosity becomes zero: the flow is then frictionless.

8h

Higher ambition needed to meet Paris climate targets

The Joint Research Centre, the European Commission's science and knowledge service, contributes to a growing body of evidence showing the need for ramped up climate action to limit global warming.

8h

The Best Way to Shade Earth

Researchers show where to release sulfur aerosols into the atmosphere with the least chance of causing droughts or flooding rains — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

The Standard Model of Physics Is a Tyrant

Its apparent infallibility saps the vitality of the field. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

Strange spaghetti crystals shrink when hot and wet

A crystal that becomes a spaghetti-like tangle and shrinks when exposed to water or heat could come in useful as a building material

8h

So you bought a smart TV. Now you need these apps.

DIY Built for the big screen. Why bother buying a smart television? These nine apps, available for Apple TV and Android TV, make the tech worth it.

8h

Einstein's Theory of Gravity Passes Toughest Test to Date

Einstein's theory of general relativity has passed its most stringent test to date with flying colors, a new study reports.

8h

New receptor involved in symbiosis between legumes and nitrogen-fixing rhizobia identified

Legumes are able to grow in nitrogen-poor soils due to their ability to engage in symbiosis with nitrogen-fixing bacteria. There is a great interest in using the knowledge about this symbiosis, to enable transfer to other non-symbiotic plants. An international research team has come a step further to understanding this complex biological process.

9h

Pneumococcal DNA predicts course of infection

Besides the patient's condition, pneumococcal DNA also appears to provide information about the course of an infection. In the next issue of Clinical Infectious Diseases, Radboudumc researchers describe several pneumococcal genes predicting whether a patient runs the risk of developing meningitis or dying from the disease. Use of such genetic tests can improve infection diagnostics.

9h

SATB1 vital for maintenance of hematopoietic stem cells

Osaka University-led researchers revealed that expression of SATB1 was involved in both differences in HSC self-renewal ability and differences in the ability of HSCs to differentiate into lymphocytic lineages.

9h

Porous materials shed light on environmental purification

An international collaboration between Osaka University, Japan, and the University of Castilla, Spain, developed stable single-crystalline porous hydrogen-bonded organic frameworks that are thermally and chemically durable and have large surface area and fluorescence properties. Through one-dimensionally stacked molecules and hydrogen-bonding, they fabricated the stable and rigid frameworks despit

9h

Upper and lower plate controls on the 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake

Researchers at Tohoku University's Department of Geophysics, have been studying the great Tohoku-oki earthquake which occurred on March 11, 2011, to the east of Japan's Honshu Island.

9h

Facebook creates three Bay Area job hubs of three million square feet

Facebook has created three Bay Area work hubs that each total at least one million square feet, following big leases with two legendary developers that widen its Silicon Valley footprint.

9h

‘Frankenstein’ proteins offer better control for immunotherapy

Researchers have come up with a tool that offers a means of control over engineered cells, and it comes from a seemingly unlikely source: the hepatitis C genome. In combination with a widely available antiviral medication, the new system offers a novel tool: a highly specific way to turn engineered cells on and off, with an existing, proven medication. Most pharmaceutical drugs are blunt instrume

9h

Some of the world's poorest people are bearing the costs of tropical forest conservation

Researchers show that new conservation restrictions in Madagascar bring very significant costs to local people (representing up to 85 percent of local annual incomes). The researchers estimate that 27,000 people have been negatively impacted by the conservation project.

9h

Call to turn oil rigs into nature reserves

Controversial survey suggests oil platforms can act like offshore reefs and encourage wildlife.

9h

Boeing taking over Embraer's commmercial jets in joint venture deal

Boeing will take control of the commercial business of Brazil's Embraer, the companies announced Thursday, better positioning the US aerospace giant to compete with rival Airbus in the market for smaller jets.

9h

A bird's eye view of the Arctic

Drones and other unmanned technologies can cost-effectively collect weather data in harsh or remote environments and contribute to better weather and climate models, according to a new study from CIRES and NOAA researchers. Unmanned aircraft and instrument-bearing tethered balloons are helping fill in critical data gaps over difficult-to-sample surfaces in the Arctic, including newly forming sea i

9h

A bird's eye view of the Arctic

Drones and other unmanned technologies can cost-effectively collect weather data in harsh or remote environments and contribute to better weather and climate models, according to a new study from CIRES and NOAA researchers.

9h

New form of wound healing revealed by parasitic gut worms

Experiments using parasitic worms in the mouse gut have revealed a surprising new form of wound repair, a finding that could help scientists develop ways to enhance the body's natural healing abilities.

9h

Countdown to Shark Week: The Daily Bite | Badass Breaches

There’s nothing shark fans love more than a good breach. We’ve got some of the best breaches here for you in addition to some shark vocab and one of the coolest shark gadgets ever made on Shark Week. Shark Week 2018 starts Sunday July 22 9p! Stream The Daily Bite on Discovery GO: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/the-daily-bite/ Stream Classic Shark Week Episodes: https://www.discovery.com/tv-sh

9h

Bacteria-powered solar cell converts light to energy, even under overcast skies

Researchers have found a cheap, sustainable way to build a solar cell using bacteria that convert light to energy. Their cell generated a current stronger than any previously recorded from such a device, and worked as efficiently in dim light as in bright light. This innovation could be a step toward wider adoption of solar power in places like British Columbia and parts of northern Europe where o

9h

Get a sad polar bear and other free climate emojis

A committee of artists has created climate change emojis, called “Climojis” to amplify conversations and inspire action on the issue. They’re available free for download as a sticker pack on iPhones and Android devices. “…if a starving polar bear becomes a metaphor for personal despair, then the language of climate change might actually be entering into the common discourse.” The project began in

9h

The Boat Circling the Planet on Renewable Energy and Hydrogen

The French-built Energy Observer is on a years-long, 50-country tour of the planet, spreading the gospel of fossil fuel–free ocean travel.

9h

Huawei MateBook X Pro Review: About That Webcam…

Huawei's MateBook X Pro is an incredible laptop with one unforgivable flaw. Our full review.

9h

Stem cell therapy drug may protect against smoke-related COPD symptoms

A drug used in stem cell therapy to treat certain cancers may also protect against cigarette smoke-induced lung injury.

9h

Sleep disorder linked with changes to brain structure typical of dementia

Obstructive sleep apnea is associated with changes to the structure of the brain that are also seen in the early stages of dementia, according to a new study.

9h

The Annoying Genius Who Makes the World Cup Worth Watching

There’s one transcendent player left at this World Cup, a player whom the eye irresistibly trails as he moves across the pitch—and, if you’ve ever seen him, you probably hate him. Or at least, you’re being trained to hate him. Neymar da Silva Santos Júnior, of Brazil, is the sort of human being that English and American soccer pundits, schooled in the cult of manly stoicism and prone to self-righ

9h

Isoglucose and sucrose

Isoglucose, also known as high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS), is used in the food industry as a substance to sweeten processed foods such as soft drinks, creams, cakes, confectionery, yogurts etc. The German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR) has been asked by various parties whether these sweeteners, which contain a high proportion of the free monosaccharide (simple sugar) fructose, pose a

9h

Higher risk of heart defects in babies of mothers with type 1 diabetes

Pregnant women with type 1 diabetes run a higher risk of having babies with heart defects, especially women with high blood glucose levels during early pregnancy, a study from Karolinska Institutet and the Sahlgrenska Academy in Sweden published in The BMJ shows.

9h

Novichok poisoning: How could it happen again in Salisbury?

Health officials have said the risk to the public is low after a couple in Wiltshire have been exposed to the nerve agent Novichok

9h

Our sun grew fat when a sausage collided with the Milky Way

Astronomers have discovered that a major prang between galaxies 10 billion years ago supplied extra gases that helped our sun grow

9h

UK Couple Poisoned by Same Nerve Agent That Struck an Ex-Russian Spy and His Daughter

Novichok, the nerve agent that let an ex-Russian spy and his daughter unconscious on a park bench in March, strikes again. Here's how the poison works.

9h

Marvel Gets It Right Again With Ant-Man and the Wasp

Pardon me if this sounds academic, but the best thing about Ant-Man and the Wasp is when things change in size. The film offers plenty of variations on this theme: Sometimes large things become very small, and other times small things become very large. One time, Ant-Man himself (Paul Rudd) shrinks a little bit and spends a scene standing at about three feet high, just for kicks. The movie’s MacG

10h

How likely is it that Amesbury novichok is from Skripal batch?

Experts say nerve agent degrades slowly and direct contact is most likely route of exposure The latest novichok case raises the question of whether the British couple Dawn Sturgess and Charlie Rowley were exposed to the same source of the nerve agent that poisoned the Russian former spy Sergei Skripal and his daughter Yulia in March. There has been no official comment on this question, but it is

10h

Baltic Sea oxygen levels at '1,500-year low due to human activity'

Nutrient run-off from agriculture and urban sewage are likely to be to blame, scientists say The coastal waters of the Baltic have been starved of oxygen to a level unseen in at least 1,500 years largely as a result of modern human activity, scientists say. Nutrient run-off from agriculture and urban sewage are thought to be to blame. “Dead zones” – areas of sea, typically near the bottom, with a

10h

Russian search engine alerts Google to possible data problem

The Russian Internet company Yandex said Thursday that its public search engine has been turning up dozens of Google documents that appear meant for private use, suggesting there may have been a data breach.

10h

Seven percent of Australia's reptiles 'risk extinction'

Australia's reptiles, including lizards and snakes, are facing growing threats from invasive species and climate change, with seven percent on the verge of extinction, conservationists said Thursday.

10h

Model suggests sequestering CO2 in deep sea sediments might be viable option

A pair of researchers at Peking University has found evidence that suggests liquid CO2 could be safely sequestered in deep sea sediments. In their paper posted on the open access site Science Advances, Yihua Teng and Dongxiao Zhang describe a model they built to mimic CO2 injections beneath the ocean floor and what it showed.

10h

2018 has been full of weird weather so far

Science Huzzah for snow in June and ice in Florida! There was snow where it had no right to be, blistering heat in mid-winter, and Arctic sea ice was nowhere to be found. It’s been a weird year the world around.

10h

New study: Oxygen loss in the coastal Baltic Sea is 'unprecedentedly severe'

The Baltic Sea is home to some of the world's largest dead zones, areas of oxygen-starved waters where most marine animals can't survive. But while parts of this sea have long suffered from low oxygen levels, a new study by a team in Finland and Germany shows that oxygen loss in coastal areas over the past century is unprecedented in the last 1,500 years. The research is published today in the Eur

10h

10h

Yes! We have no bananas: Why the song may come true again

The wild banana that might save the world's banana crop may itself go extinct, scientists have revealed.

10h

Oxygen loss in the coastal Baltic Sea is 'unprecedentedly severe'

The Baltic Sea is home to some of the world's largest dead zones, areas of oxygen-starved waters where most marine animals can't survive. But while parts of this sea have long suffered from low oxygen levels, a new study by a team in Finland and Germany shows that oxygen loss in coastal areas over the past century is unprecedented in the last 1500 years. The research is published today in the Euro

10h

How to Take a Screenshot on a Mac

Because in 2018, you need the receipts.

10h

Welcome To The Highly Probable World of Improbability

Humans love to read meaning into the improbable, even when such events—from Germany's World Cup loss to Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez's Congressional win—happen frequently

10h

The Sooty Logistics of Fighting 2018's First Major Wildfire

As the 2018 fire season gets going, a report from Durango, Colorado lays out how firefighters tackle major blazes like the 416 Fire.

10h

An Astronomer Explains Black Holes at 5 Levels of Difficulty

His specialty: The structure of the universe. (That's the official name of his research group at NASA.)

10h

Are We All a Little Paranoid?

Kafka’s novel, The Trial, is often described as a descent into the ravings of a paranoid mind. Yet could there be a little paranoia in us all? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

10h

Image of the Day: Warp Speed

Snipefish use a recoil mechanism to feed rapidly.

10h

Weltklasse: Tysk fusionsanlæg sætter ny rekord

For fusionsanlæg er produktet af temperaturen, plasmaets tæthed og indeslutningstiden den afgørende faktor. Wendelstein 7-X har nu sat ny verdensrekord for dette produkt for fusionsreaktorer af stellarator-typen

10h

Road block for Uber-Grab deal in Singapore

Singapore on Thursday threatened to reverse the sale of Uber's Southeast Asian business to Grab, calling for changes to be made to the deal, which it said infringed competition rules.

11h

(Dis)trust in Science

Can we cure the scourge of misinformation? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

Game Over, Man: This Australian Wasp Lays Chest-Bursting 'Alien' Eggs Inside Caterpillars

When this wasp matures, it eats its host from the inside out.

11h

Some of the world's poorest people are bearing the costs of tropical forest conservation

Researchers from Bangor University in the UK and the University of Antananarivo in Madagascar show that new conservation restrictions in Madagascar bring very significant costs to local people (representing up to 85 percent of local annual incomes). The researchers estimate that 27,000 people have been negatively impacted by the conservation project.

11h

India's richest man unveils broadband plan

India's richest man Mukesh Ambani, who turned the country's mobile market upside down by offering free voice calls for life, is zeroing in on a new market—broadband internet.

11h

EU Parliament rejects controversial copyright law

The European Parliament rejected Thursday a highly controversial EU copyright law proposal that has pitted Beatles legend Paul McCartney against internet giants and the creators of Wikipedia.

11h

Resurrection of the northern white rhino – could this be the turning point?

A major scientific breakthrough, officially announced in a press release today, could signal a seismic shift in the survival prospects of the world's rarest rhino.

11h

NASA’s Parker probe is about to get up close and personal with the sun

The Parker Solar Probe is about to make a historic voyage to touch the sun.

11h

Worms may hold the secret to longer life

Research into the remarkable regenerative powers of worms and the insights they can give into battling diseases could help humans live longer and healthier lives.

11h

Why Do Babies Barely Blink?

Stare into a baby's eyes, and you might notice something odd: Babies rarely blink.

11h

Traces of 'Sonic Boom' Meteorites Found in the Ocean

The first mission designed to hunt a meteorite that crashed into the ocean has now discovered what may be tiny fragments of the meteorite's crust, researchers say.

11h

Ecosystems across Australia are collapsing under climate change

To the chagrin of the tourist industry, the Great Barrier Reef has become a notorious victim of climate change. But it is not the only Australian ecosystem on the brink of collapse.

11h

The Air Force Is Already Betting on SpaceX's Brand-New Falcon Heavy

The Falcon Heavy has only flown once, but the Air Force is already buying in.

11h

How to Check App Permissions on iOS, Android, Windows, and macOS

It's never a bad time to audit your app permissions. In fact, it's more important than ever.

11h

Review: 'Ant-Man and the Wasp' and the Importance of Small Stories in Big Universes

Marvel releases a light-hearted crowd-pleaser just in the nick of time.

11h

These 2 Wine Barrels Were Used As Bathrooms During the Renaissance

After drinking the last drops of wine from two gigantic wine barrels about 300 years ago, someone had the brilliant idea of repurposing the vats into toilets.

11h

Cryo-electron microscopy reveals common herpes virus structure

For the first time, researchers have been able to use cryo-electron microscopy, to reveal the detailed structure of the common herpes virus.

11h

Study finds 29 pesticides in Devon river

Researchers have found 29 different pesticides in a single river in Devon.

11h

New research shows link between ethnicity and bias

New research from The Australian National University (ANU) has shown people demonstrate unconscious negative biases when they encounter a person of ethnic appearance or hear a foreign accent.

11h

Make your garden frog friendly – amphibians are in decline thanks to dry ponds

Garden frogs and toads are in decline. The latest data from RSPB Garden Birdwatch reveals that we are seeing one-third fewer toads and 17% fewer frogs compared to 2014. Many people forget that our gardens can be important havens for wildlife. But with ponds drying up, amphibians are losing out.

11h

Some of the world's poorest people are bearing the costs of tropical forest conservation

Tropical forests are important to all of us on the planet. As well as being home for rare and fascinating biodiversity (like the lemurs of Madagascar), tropical forests lock up enormous amounts of carbon helping to stabilise our climate. However tropical forests are also home to many hundreds of thousands of people whose lives can be affected by international conservation policies.

11h

A Frightening New Reason to Worry About Air Pollution

It’s fairly well known that a bad diet, a lack of exercise, and genetics can all contribute to type 2 diabetes. But a new global study points to an additional, surprising culprit: the air pollution emitted by cars and trucks. Though other research has shown a link between diabetes and air pollution in the past, this study is one of the largest of its kind, and it’s unique because it both is longi

11h

The Problem With Generalizing About ‘America’s Schools’

Thirty-five years ago, in April of 1983, Ronald Reagan appeared before the press to publicize a government report warning of “a rising tide of mediocrity” that had begun to erode America’s education system. Were such conditions imposed by an unfriendly foreign power, the authors declared, “we might well have viewed it as an act of war.” Despite its grave tone, the report, titled “A Nation at Risk

11h

Batswana set to weigh in on whether ban on elephant hunting should be lifted

The government of President Mokgweetsi Masisi in Botswana has announced that it will hold a two-month nationwide consultation to review the ban on hunting, notably of elephants. The ban, introduced by Masisi's predecessor, Ian Khama in 2014, has come under increasing criticism from people living in areas with significant wildlife populations as well as impoverished communities previously reliant o

11h

Nairobi is planning car-free days—they could bring many benefits

Kenya's capital, Nairobi, is the second most congested city in the world. To reduce congestion, Nairobi County has proposed car-free Wednesdays and Saturdays in two of the busiest parts of the city.

11h

Cambridge Analytica used our secrets for profit – the same data could be used for public good

Ever since it was revealed that Cambridge Analytica had taken data from 87m users via a Facebook app that exploited the social media site's privacy settings, it has been suggested that anything from Donald Trump's election in the US to the European Union referendum result in the UK could have been the result of the persuasive power of targeted advertisements based on voter preferences.

11h

Robotic exoskeleton allows disabled people to eat or drink by themselves

Researchers of the Biomedical Neuro-engineering group of the Universidad Miguel Hernández (UMH) of Elche, Spain, have developed a robotic exoskeleton which, attached to a robotic wheelchair, helps people with varying degrees of disability carry out daily activities including eating, drinking or washing.

11h

Fibre-optic transmission of 4000 km made possible by ultra-low-noise optical amplifiers

Researchers from Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, and Tallinn University of Technology, Estonia, have demonstrated a 4000 kilometre fibre-optical transmission link using ultra low-noise, phase-sensitive optical amplifiers. This is a reach improvement of almost six times what is possible when using conventional optical amplifiers. The results are published in Nature Communications.

11h

Brazilian Forests Fall Silent as Yellow Fever Decimates Threatened Monkeys

Researchers are scrambling to understand the virulent outbreak, and backing policies to save several already beleaguered species — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

Tiny fine particles of global impact – radiocarbon reveals the origin of black carbon

A technical breakthrough was achieved in the source determination of very small carbon samples at the Accelerator Laboratory and the Laboratory of Chronology of the University of Helsinki. The development work is essential in climate research as it facilitates disentangling the origin of black carbon particles.

11h

New 2-D spectroscopy methods

"Put an excitation into the system and observe how it evolves." According to physicist Professor Tobias Brixner, this is the credo of optical spectroscopy. Various methods are known in literature. But generally only the behaviour of a single excitation and its consequences are investigated.

11h

Bacterial survival in salty antifreeze raises hope for life on Mars and icy moons

New research by a trans-Atlantic team of scientists suggests that bacteria could survive in briny chemicals that exist on Mars, Enceladus, Europa, Pluto and possibly elsewhere.

11h

Data science can tell us which political party is dominating

Young scientists from the University of Auckland and Victoria University of Wellington have come up with a novel way to figure out which party or parties in New Zealand's Parliament are dominating any particular political debate or discourse.

11h

How 'eavesdropping' African herbivores respond to alarm calls

Many animals live in a world characterised by a bewildering array of signals from other species. But to what extent are individuals able to extract useful information from these signals?

12h

Global warming may be twice what climate models predict

A new study based on evidence from past warm periods suggests global warming may be double what is forecast.

12h

Study finds potential in brackish groundwater desalination

New research suggests there's a large untapped resource for many of the increasingly water-limited regions of the U.S. and around the world: brackish groundwater, which, in theory at least, would require much less energy to desalinate than seawater.

12h

Swimming bacteria work together to go with the flow

Swimming bacteria can reduce the viscosity of ordinary liquids like water and make them flow more easily, sometimes down to the point where the viscosity becomes zero: the flow is then frictionless.

12h

Limited shoulder function is leading factor for rotator cuff surgery, research shows

For patients with rotator cuff tears, improving shoulder function is the most important reason for moving forward with surgical repair, according to research presented today at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine's Annual Meeting in San Diego. Researchers also found that through arthroscopic rotator cuff repair (ARCR), these patients consistently saw significant functional improve

12h

Current ACL return to sport criteria fails to identify second injury risk, say researchers

Returning to your sport after an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury and not suffering a second injury is often difficult but for a kid who suffers an ACL injury figuring out how to prevent reinjury is even more tricky, say researchers presented today at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine's Annual Meeting in San Diego. This research study also received the STOP Sports Injurie

12h

Results for female ACL graft repair methods differ among younger athletes, say researchers

Female athletes are two to eight more times likely to injure their ACL than males, however utilizing one graft repair treatment method in females may be more beneficial than another, according to researchers presenting their work today at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine's (AOSSM) Annual Meeting in San Diego.

12h

Young athletes' ACL injury risk increases with fatigue, new research shows

ACL injuries are one of the most common sports injuries affecting adolescent athletes, leading to lost playing time and high healthcare costs. Research presented today at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine's Annual Meeting in San Diego shows athletes who experience fatigue — tested on a standardized assessment — demonstrated increased risk of ACL injury. The study is the first

12h

Older patients with knee pain may benefit from allograft transplant technique

Knee pain in active patients over 40 is often difficult to treat but according to researchers presenting their work today at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine's (AOSSM) Annual Meeting in San Diego utilizing a special kind of allograft may be a step in the right direction.

12h

After you: the psychology of queues and how to beat them – video explainer

Queues are simple: you join at the back and wait your turn. But there's a whole branch of psychology devoted to studying how they work. Wimbledon publishes a guidebook on how to queue and major brands are obsessed with stopping you leaving to go elsewhere. The Guardian's science editor, Ian Sample, explains Continue reading…

12h

Nej til plastik: Kina vil ikke længere være verdens skraldespand

I årevis har verden sendt plastikaffald til Kina. Nu siger kineserne stop. Og nu hober affaldet sig op.

12h

Colombia sætter glyphosatdroner ind mod kokainproduktionen

Præsidenten tyr til nye metoder i kampen mod de kriminelle kartellers kokainproduktion. Han mener, sprøjtedroner er en oplagt løsning.

12h

The toxic side of the Moon

When the Apollo astronauts returned from the Moon, the dust that clung to their spacesuits made their throats sore and their eyes water. Lunar dust is made of sharp, abrasive and nasty particles, but how toxic is it for humans?

13h

Scientists make fascinating feather find

Ever wondered where parrots get their bright plumage? An Otago-led project may have just solved the mystery.

13h

Shrinking rivers affect fish populations

New research from the University of Canterbury published today has found that a shrinking river is less able to support larger predatory fish, such as the highly-valued sports fish like brown trout or at-risk native fish like galaxiids and eels.

13h

Roskilde-nørders hjemmelavede batteri er større end en Prius'

En gruppe festivalentusiaster har udviklet deres lejr fra at være en typisk druklejr til at være en magtdemonstration af hardware, strøm, batterier og musikanlæg i felten.

14h

Keep on moving: the bizarre dance epidemic of summer 1518

Five centuries ago, the world’s longest rave took place in Strasbourg – a ‘plague’ of dancing that was fatal for some. What caused it? Art, poetry and music of the time can provide some clues It started with just a few people dancing outdoors in the summer heat. Arms flailing, bodies swaying and clothes soaked with sweat, they danced through the night and into the next day. Seldom stopping to eat

17h

UK's top surgeon calls for new procedures to undergo clinical trials

Prof Derek Alderson says innovations should be backed by evidence before use on NHS NHS at 70: all our anniversary coverage in one place Britain’s most eminent surgeon has called for new surgical procedures and implants to be tested in clinical trials before being made routinely available on the NHS. Prof Derek Alderson, the president of the Royal College of Surgeons, said the benefits of surgica

17h

Respected health news media watchdog to shut down, citing lack of funding

The only U.S. media watchdog devoted exclusively to health news, HealthNewsReview.org, will shut down at the end of the year for lack of funding, a huge loss to the science-based medicine community.

17h

Forsøg: Patienter med tarmsygdom skal drikke æg fra parasitter

Hvidovre Hospital afprøver lige nu, hvordan parasit-æg dæmper symptomer fra blødende tyktarmsbetændelse.

17h

Stem cell therapy drug may protect against smoke-related COPD symptoms

A drug used in stem cell therapy to treat certain cancers may also protect against cigarette smoke-induced lung injury. The study, published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology–Lung Cellular and Molecular Physiology, was chosen as an APSselect article for July.

18h

'Skinny fat' in older adults may predict dementia, Alzheimer's risk

A first-of-its-kind study has found that 'skinny fat' — the combination of low muscle mass and strength in the context of high fat mass — may be an important predictor of cognitive performance in older adults. Using data from a series of community-based aging and memory studies, researchers assessed the relationship of sarcopenic obesity or 'skinny fat' with performance on various cognition test

18h

Bacteria-powered solar cell converts light to energy, even under overcast skies

UBC researchers have found a cheap, sustainable way to build a solar cell using bacteria that convert light to energy. Their cell generated a current stronger than any previously recorded from such a device, and worked as efficiently in dim light as in bright light. This innovation could be a step toward wider adoption of solar power in places like British Columbia and parts of northern Europe whe

18h

Vitamin D deficiency affects many pregnant women

Only one in five women follows the recommendations for taking vitamin D supplements during pregnancy. Vitamin D deficiency can have serious repercussions for the skeletal health of both mother and child.

18h

Region H gamblede med sikkerheden: Tog Sundhedsplatformen i brug uden vigtig test

Region H valgte at tage Sundhedsplatformen i brug uden først at færdiggøre en funktionel kravtest. Selvom regionen vidste, at det kunne kompromittere patienternes sikkerhed, lyder kritikken.

18h

Reviderede regler beskytter rådgivere mod nye bobledæk-mareridt

Forslaget til nye standardkontrakter i byggeriet indeholder store ændringer. Rådgiverne skal automatisk betale bod for mangler. Til gengæld beskyttes de også mod store erstatningskrav udenom de normale kontrakter, som det skete i den såkaldt bobledæksag.

19h

Prehistoric two-year-old could grip tree branches with her feet

A young hominin who lived 3.3 million years ago had flexible feet that she could use to climb trees like a chimp, suggesting our ancestors kept this trait for a long time

20h

Polluters exposed by new eye in the sky satellite

Europe's Sentinel satellite tasked with tracking dirty air maps the major emissions of sulphur dioxide.

21h

 

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