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Nyheder2018juli06

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When the White House Is a Safe Space

I think a lot about the Dean Scream . The barbaric yawp that became a meme—and that because of its very yawp iness, the lore goes, helped to end a presidential candidacy—was such a recent thing, and yet in another way such a faraway thing: a final testament to the now-quaint idea that a campaign for the highest office in the land, conducted under the auspices of long-honed norms of the campaign t

49min

This is how, and why, explorers go cave diving

Technology Bring multiple light sources, more than enough air, and follow the line. The rules, and hazards, of modern cave diving.

21min

Preventative HIV vaccine candidate triggers desired immune responses in humans and monkeys, and protects monkeys from infection

A team of researchers led by Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center's Dan H. Barouch, M.D., Ph.D., in collaboration with Janssen Vaccines & Prevention and others, evaluated a series of preventative HIV vaccine regimens in uninfected human volunteers. In a similarly designed study, Barouch and colleagues tested the same vaccine for its ability to protect rhesus monkeys challenged with an HIV-like vir

34min

LATEST

Novel HIV vaccine candidate is safe and induces immune response in healthy adults and monkeys

New research published in The Lancet shows that an experimental HIV-1 vaccine regimen is well-tolerated and generated comparable and robust immune responses against HIV in healthy adults and rhesus monkeys. Moreover, the vaccine candidate protected against infection with an HIV-like virus in monkeys.

34min

The Atlantic Daily: Off the Stage

What We’re Following Economic Events: The latest report from the Department of Labor says that in June, the number of job openings in the United States exceeded the number of people looking for work for the first time ever recorded. That could mean the country is on its way to full employment—and if so, the city of Des Moines, Iowa, shows what workers can expect. Meanwhile, the Trump administrati

49min

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Trading Insults

-Written by Elaine Godfrey ( @elainejgodfrey ) Today in 5 Lines China imposed $34 billion in retaliatory tariffs on American goods, including soybeans and pork, after President Trump’s tariffs on Chinese products took effect early Friday. During a visit to Immigration and Customs Enforcement headquarters, Vice President Mike Pence criticized Democrats for their “spurious attacks” on the agency. T

1h

Why Scott Pruitt’s Critics Will Miss Him

Scott Pruitt is gone. During his time in office, Pruitt racked up a fabulous array of “bizarre and venal” controversies—so many that it verges on cliché to list them all. (My favorite: Pruitt’s dispatching a government-salaried aide to buy a used Trump-hotel mattress for his own—that is, Pruitt’s—personal repose.) His fall has delighted critics both of the Trump administration and of his own dist

1h

Bitcoin’s inherent economics could keep it from ever being very important

A new analysis shows how the cost of securing Bitcoin will constrain its growth.

1h

Canada heat wave death toll hits 54: officials

The death toll in a week-long eastern Canadian heat wave has reached 54, officials said on Friday.

1h

Updating Maps Swiftly After Natural Disasters

Updating Maps Swiftly After Natural Disasters Satellite imagery and artificial intelligence could help speed disaster relief by quickly mapping landslides. landslide.jpg Image credits: trekandshoot/ Shutterstock Earth Friday, July 6, 2018 – 16:30 Jennifer Leman, Contributor (Inside Science) — After a natural disaster, landslides can leave roads impassable. Emergency medical responders, utility w

2h

California fire kills 1 as heat stokes blazes in Western US

A wildfire raging through drought-stricken timber and brush near California's border with Oregon killed one person and destroyed multiple structures as it burns largely out of control, authorities said Friday.

2h

Families of girls killed in fire sue hoverboard distributors

The families of two girls killed in a Pennsylvania fire that was blamed on a hoverboard have filed a lawsuit against the distributors of the device.

2h

NASA's Aqua satellite spots the tiny, mighty Beryl

Tropical Depression 2 strengthened into a compact hurricane on July 6 as NASA's Aqua satellite gathered temperature data on the storm.

2h

Use of "Smart Drugs" on the Rise

European nations see biggest increases in use of stimulants such as Ritalin by people seeking brain-boosting effects — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

City size plays crucial role in migration patterns

People from smaller cities are more likely to migrate than people from larger cities, according to a new study.

2h

Scientists identify a protein complex that shapes the destiny of T cells

The protein complex is mTORC1, which regulates cell growth and metabolism. Immunologists found mTORC1 acts in response to cues from in and around developing T cells and intersects with metabolic activity, to influence whether the cells become conventional or unconventional T cells. To their surprise, researchers found that disrupting mTORC1 led to metabolic changes that favored development of unco

2h

Natural lipid acts as potent anti-inflammatory

Researchers have identified a naturally occurring lipid — a waxy, fatty acid — used by a disease-causing bacterium to impair the host immune response and increase the chance of infection. Inadvertently, they also may have found a potent inflammation therapy against bacterial and viral diseases.

2h

Biomarker discovered for pathogen that can blind or kill healthy young people

Researchers have have discovered several biomarkers that can accurately identify hypervirulent K. pneumoniae, a pathogen that infects completely healthy people and can cause blindness in one day and flesh-eating infections, brain abscesses and death in just a few days.

2h

Pruitt Is Gone. But These Five E.P.A. Policy Battles Are Still Ahead.Scott Pruitt EPA Trump

Here's how Andrew Wheeler, Scott Pruitt’s successor, is expected to roll back rules on power plants, water pollution, car emissions and more.

2h

Q&A: Why Is the Corpse Flower So Stinky?

A series of chemical compounds accompanies the blooming of Amorphophallus titanum, composing a scent that combines boiled cabbage and roadkill.

2h

Are Hot Summer Days Risky for Pregnant Women?

Getting too hot or dehydrated can pose a risk of pregnancy complications, experts say.

2h

The Cathartic Symphony of Future’s Beast Mode 2

At the tail end of 2014, the Atlanta rapper born Nayvadius Wilburn, best known as Future, began to free himself. That October, the rapper released his first mixtape since the lukewarm pop-rap record Honest , his second studio album—and since the contentious demise of his engagement to the R&B singer Ciara. Monster was dark and brooding. It pulsed with the pain of its self-loathing trap impresario

2h

Breaking the bond: To take part or not?

Physicists working have investigated if and how chemical reactions can be influenced by targeted vibrational excitation of the reactants. They were able to demonstrate that excitation with a laser beam does not affect the efficiency of a chemical exchange reaction and that the excited molecular group acts only as a spectator in the reaction.

2h

Scientists identify body's microreactors for innate immunity

A DNA-sensing enzyme forms droplets that act as tiny bioreactors creating molecules to stimulate innate immunity — the body's first response to infection, researchers report.

2h

New vaccine candidates for malaria

Researchers have shown that higher levels of Plasmodium falciparum antibodies are protective against severe malaria in children living in Papua New Guinea. Children who have higher levels of antibodies to a specific short amino acid sequence in the malaria parasite, P. falciparum, have much lower rates of clinical and severe malaria. This amino acid sequence, an antigen, is similar among P. falcip

2h

The Future of Former EPA Chief Scott Pruitt's Anti-Science LegacyScott Pruitt EPA Trump

Pruitt's replacement might be more effective at gutting environmental protection than Pruitt himself.

2h

Pruitt's replacement won't be any better for the EPAScott Pruitt EPA Trump

Environment Andrew Wheeler's discreetness could make him more effective at dismantling environmental protections The head of the Environmental Protection Agency has stepped down from his position, according to a Twitter announcement from President Donald Trump but there is little…

2h

It turns out spiders ’fly’ on magnoelectricity

Biologists at the University of Bristol demonstrate how the mysterious phenomenon of spider ballooning for great distances and at great heights works. Read More

3h

Jennifer Leman

Contributor Jennifer Leman is a contributing writer from Santa Cruz, California. She holds a bachelor’s degree in geoscience from Smith College and a master’s in science journalism from UC Santa Cruz. Her work has appeared in The San Jose Mercury News, Science, and The Monterey Herald. In her free time, Jennifer enjoys backpacking, painting, and pub trivia. Follow her at @ jlorileman . Author art

3h

76 years ago today, a Jewish family went into hiding when they couldn’t immigrate to the USA

Desperation made their family, and others. try to escape their home country. Read More

3h

Study: Psychopathy could be caused by impaired attention mechanisms in brain

Psychopathy is a “wildly misunderstood corner of mental health research,” according to the author of a new study on psychopathy and attention mechanisms in the brain. Read More

3h

Biomarker discovered for pathogen that can blind or kill healthy young people

UB researchers have have discovered several biomarkers that can accurately identify hypervirulent K. pneumoniae, a pathogen that infects completely healthy people and can cause blindness in one day and flesh-eating infections, brain abscesses and death in just a few days.

3h

Sonos' IPO Filing Shows Risks of Relying on Amazon and AppleSonos Amazon Apple

The maker of smart speakers connects to virtual assistants like Amazon's Alexa. But Amazon sells its own speakers, making for an uneasy partnership.

3h

A heat wave made this bridge too swole to function

Environment Climate change can pose some unexpected challenges to infrastructure. It was so hot last week, even steel bridges were sweating. The DuSable Bridge in Chicago was so overheated, firefighters had to hose it down with cold water.

3h

Kirigami-inspired technique manipulates light at the nanoscale

Nanokirigami has taken off as a field of research in the last few years; the approach is based on the ancient arts of origami (making 3-D shapes by folding paper) and kirigami (which allows cutting as well as folding) but applied to flat materials at the nanoscale, measured in billionths of a meter.

3h

Model automates molecule design to speed drug development

Designing new molecules for pharmaceuticals is primarily a manual, time-consuming process that's prone to error. But researchers have now taken a step toward fully automating the design process, which could drastically speed things up — and produce better results.

3h

Training artificial intelligence with artificial X-rays

AI holds real potential for improving both the speed and accuracy of medical diagnostics — but before clinicians can harness the power of AI to identify conditions in images such as X-rays, they have to 'teach' the algorithms what to look for. Now, engineers have designed a new approach: using machine learning to create computer generated X-rays to augment AI training sets.

3h

Savory foods may promote healthy eating through effects on the brain

Researchers have found that consuming a broth rich in umami — or savory taste — can cause subtle changes in the brain that promote healthy eating behaviors and food choices, especially in women at risk of obesity.

3h

Potential shortcoming of antibiotic lab tests

To determine which antibiotics reliably treat which bacterial infections, diagnostic laboratories that focus on clinical microbiology test pathogens isolated from patients. However, a recent study reveals that one aspect of these tests may fall short and not be stringent enough.

3h

High-power thermoelectric generator utilizes thermal difference of only 5ºC

Researchers have designed and successfully developed a high-power, silicon-nanowire thermoelectric generator which, at a thermal difference of only 5ºC, could drive various IoT devices autonomously in the near future.

3h

Investigational treatment for acne appears promising in laboratory studies

Topical retinoids, which target retinoic acid receptors, are commonly used to treat acne. New research reveals that trifarotene, a fourth-generation retinoid with potent and selective activity against only one particular retinoic acid receptor, may have an improved efficacy and safety profile compared with less selective retinoids.

3h

Ultra-thin sensor makes inflammation testing and curing 30 times faster

Researchers have developed a real-time ultraflexible sensor that makes inflammation testing and curing 30 times faster.

3h

Natural lipid acts as potent anti-inflammatory

National Institutes of Health researchers have identified a naturally occurring lipid — a waxy, fatty acid — used by a disease-causing bacterium to impair the host immune response and increase the chance of infection. Inadvertently, they also may have found a potent inflammation therapy against bacterial and viral diseases.

3h

NASA's Aqua satellite spots the tiny, mighty Beryl

Tropical Depression 2 strengthened into a compact hurricane on July 6 as NASA's Aqua satellite gathered temperature data on the storm.

3h

Bitcoin exchange brings on technology chief

A bitcoin exchange headed by Cameron and Tyler Winklevoss announced Friday it hired a former New York Stock Exchange executive to head its technology team as it seeks to bring cryptocurrency to a wider market.

4h

Beryl becomes first hurricane of Atlantic season

A hurricane has formed east of the Lesser Antilles, the first of the 2018 Atlantic season, according the US National Hurricane Center.

4h

Get To Know Andrew Wheeler, Ex-Coal Lobbyist With Inside Track To Lead EPAScott Pruitt EPA Trump

The agency's next acting chief has drawn praise as a capable administrator. But critics still say the transition from Scott Pruitt is a bit like "going from a train wreck to a house on fire." (Image credit: Courtesy Eric Vance/USEPA/Reuters)

4h

The New Old Age: He Called Older Employees ‘Dead Wood.’ Two Sued for Age Discrimination.

State governments “are still learning there’s an age law,” said one attorney, despite the fact it has been on the books for decades.

4h

NASA satellite imagery finds Fabio fizzling fast

NASA's Aqua satellite revealed showed deep convection in Fabio dissipated by the morning of July 6. The system now consists of a swirl of low- to-mid-level clouds.

4h

NASA satellite imagery finds Fabio fizzling fast

NASA's Aqua satellite revealed showed deep convection in Fabio dissipated by the morning of July 6. The system now consists of a swirl of low- to-mid-level clouds.

4h

Research suggests new vaccine candidates for malaria

Researchers have shown that higher levels of Plasmodium falciparum antibodies are protective against severe malaria in children living in Papua New Guinea. Children who have higher levels of antibodies to a specific short amino acid sequence in the malaria parasite, P. falciparum, have much lower rates of clinical and severe malaria. This amino acid sequence, an antigen, is similar among P. falcip

4h

Training artificial intelligence with artificial X-rays

Artificial intelligence (AI) holds real potential for improving both the speed and accuracy of medical diagnostics. But before clinicians can harness the power of AI to identify conditions in images such as X-rays, they have to 'teach' the algorithms what to look for.

4h

Model automates molecule design to speed drug development

Designing new molecules for pharmaceuticals is primarily a manual, time-consuming process that's prone to error. But MIT researchers have now taken a step toward fully automating the design process, which could drastically speed things up — and produce better results.

4h

How whale corpses feed ocean floors

Animals What happens when a whale dies? Whales that end up on the beach make headlines. But those that sink to the bottom of the ocean make new homes for sea life.

4h

The Mayor of a Ghost Town

Welcome to Ballarat, California, population one. Located in the heart of the unforgiving Death Valley, the former mining supply town has been abandoned for nearly 100 years. Were it not for Rock Novak, the town’s only resident, Ballarat would belong to the vultures. “I’m the caretaker, the mayor, the sheriff, the judge, and the undertaker [of Ballarat],” Novak says in Mickey Todiwala and Monika D

4h

Aqua Satellite zooms into Super Typhoon Maria's tiny eye

Super Typhoon Maria's seven nautical-mile wide eye appeared very clearly in a visible image from NASA's Aqua satellite on July 6.

4h

With More Opioid Use, People Are More Likely To Get Caught Up In The Justice System

A new study shows Americans with opioid addiction are more likely to have been arrested or convicted of a crime, suggesting a need to involve cops, courts and jails in treating addiction. (Image credit: Marie Hickman/Getty Images)

4h

Training artificial intelligence with artificial X-rays

AI holds real potential for improving both the speed and accuracy of medical diagnostics — but before clinicians can harness the power of AI to identify conditions in images such as X-rays, they have to 'teach' the algorithms what to look for. Now, U of T Engineering have designed a new approach: using machine learning to create computer generated X-rays to augment AI training sets.

4h

Breaking the bond: To take part or not?

Physicists working with Roland Wester at the University of Innsbruck have investigated if and how chemical reactions can be influenced by targeted vibrational excitation of the reactants. They were able to demonstrate that excitation with a laser beam does not affect the efficiency of a chemical exchange reaction and that the excited molecular group acts only as a spectator in the reaction.

4h

City size plays crucial role in migration patterns

People from smaller cities are more likely to migrate than people from larger cities, according to a new study by UCL academics.

4h

Kirigami-inspired technique manipulates light at the nanoscale

Nanokirigami is based on the ancient arts of origami (making 3D shapes by folding paper) and kirigami (which allows cutting as well as folding) but applied to flat materials at the nanoscale. Now, researchers at MIT and in China have applied this approach to the creation of nanodevices to manipulate light, potentially opening new possibilities for light-based communications, detection, or computat

4h

Scientists identify a protein complex that shapes the destiny of T cells

The protein complex is mTORC1, which regulates cell growth and metabolism. St. Jude immunologists found mTORC1 acts in response to cues from in and around developing T cells and intersects with metabolic activity, to influence whether the cells become conventional or unconventional T cells. To their surprise, researchers found that disrupting mTORC1 led to metabolic changes that favored developmen

4h

America’s greatest foreign policy successes are from diplomacy, not war

America's greatest international impact since World War 2 has been through its diplomacy, not its wars. Read More

4h

Elon Musk sends Boring Company & Tesla engineers to help rescue boys trapped in Thai caveElon Musk Thai BC SpaceX

Tech titan Elon Musk is sending engineers from two of his companies to help the Thai government rescue 12 boys and their soccer coach who’ve been trapped in a cave for nearly two weeks. Read More

4h

31% of U.S. voters think a second Civil War is likely

A recent poll shows a third of Americans think another civil war is likely. How worried should we be? Read More

4h

NASA's Aqua Satellite zooms into Super Typhoon Maria's tiny eye

Super Typhoon Maria's seven nautical-mile wide eye appeared very clearly in a visible image from NASA's Aqua satellite on July 6.

5h

Gallery: Rescuers Race Against Time to Save Soccer Team Trapped in Thai Cave

Government officials and rescue workers in Thailand are mobilizing to save a group of young boys and their soccer coach, stranded in a cave underground.

5h

City size plays crucial role in migration patterns

People from smaller cities are more likely to migrate than people from larger cities, according to a new study by UCL academics.

5h

Kirigami-inspired technique manipulates light at the nanoscale

Nanokirigami has taken off as a field of research in the last few years; the approach is based on the ancient arts of origami (making 3-D shapes by folding paper) and kirigami (which allows cutting as well as folding) but applied to flat materials at the nanoscale, measured in billionths of a meter.

5h

15 incredible photos taken by the Rosetta spacecraft

Space You can browse more than 100,000 images from space. Here are our favorite shots. The European Space Agency has completed the Rosetta image archive and you can download all of it for free.

5h

Obesity and overweight linked to long-term health problems after traumatic brain injury

Especially at longer follow-up times, overweight and obesity are associated with chronic disease risks for survivors of moderate to severe traumatic brain injury (TBI), according to a new study.

5h

DNA damage links to onset of skin cancer, melanoma mapped

A critical link in mapping recurrent mutations of melanoma — the most serious form of skin cancer in humans — has been discovered by researchers.

5h

Nature's antifreeze inspires revolutionary bacteria cryopreservation technique

The survival mechanisms of polar fish have led scientists to develop of a revolutionary approach to 'freeze' bacteria.

5h

Breast cancer growth signals are enhanced by a protein outside cells

New research uncovers how a sticky protein called fibronectin promotes the activity of estrogen in breast cancer cells.

5h

Detecting esophageal cancer cells

Researchers have developed a new nanoparticle-based platform for simultaneous imaging and treatment of esophageal cancer.

5h

Gene therapy method developed to target damaged kidney cells

Research has shown, in mice, that genetic material can be delivered to damaged cells in the kidneys, a key step toward developing gene therapy to treat chronic kidney disease. The potentially fatal condition affects 30 million Americans, most of whom don't realize they have chronic kidney disease.

5h

Beryl Becomes 'Very Tiny' First Hurricane Of Atlantic Season

The Category 1 storm is expected to cross the Lesser Antilles in the eastern Caribbean by late Sunday or early Monday. Some of the islands are still recovering from last year's hits by Maria and Irma. (Image credit: National Hurricane Center)

5h

Research points to potential shortcoming of antibiotic lab tests

To determine which antibiotics reliably treat which bacterial infections, diagnostic laboratories that focus on clinical microbiology test pathogens isolated from patients. However, a recent study out of Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center reveals that one aspect of these tests may fall short and not be stringent enough.

5h

Savory foods may promote healthy eating through effects on the brain

Researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center have found that consuming a broth rich in umami — or savory taste — can cause subtle changes in the brain that promote healthy eating behaviors and food choices, especially in women at risk of obesity.

5h

Scattering of W and Z bosons: Rare process like 'tiny lightsabers'

Particle physicists have discovered an extremely rare process that can be compared to tiny lightsabers. The researchers have shown that messenger particles of the so-called weak interaction interact with each other in a scattering process.

5h

Creating medicines without side effects

A new technique for precisely targeting molecules within cells is paving the way for safer medicines that are free of side effects. Big benefits are expected in the battle against cancer, autism, Alzheimer's and more.

5h

Melting bacteria to decipher antibiotic resistance

With antibiotic resistance spreading worldwide, there is a strong need for new technologies to study bacteria. Researchers have adapted an existing technique to study the melting behavior of proteins so that it can be used for the study of bacteria.

5h

New hope for patients with incurable and disabling hand condition, Dupuytren's disease

In a new study, scientists show that anti-TNF inhibits the cells responsible for Dupuytren's disease.

5h

New model for predicting neuroblastoma outcomes incorporates early developmental signals

Motivated by a desire to better understand the molecular circuitry underlying neuroblastoma and limitations of current methods for predicting disease progression and outcome, researchers set out to construct a logic-based model incorporating information about developmental signaling pathways implicated in the disease.

5h

Laser experiments lend insight into metal core at heart of Earth

Experiments replicating conditions at the core of Earth could help scientists understand how the planet and its atmosphere were formed.

5h

Photonic capsules for injectable laser resonators

Researchers have presented photonic capsules for injectable laser resonators using microfluidic technology. The capsule's diameter is comparable to a human hair and stable in gas and liquid media, so it is injectable into any target volume.

5h

Natural Killer Cells Prove Effective as a CAR Therapy in Mice

Stem-cell–derived natural killer cells engineered in a similar way to CAR-T cells may pave the way to “off the shelf” cancer therapies that aren’t patient-specific.

5h

nTIDE June 2018 jobs report: downturn in jobs ends trend for Americans with disabilities

A modest downturn for June indicated the end of 26 consecutive months of job gains for American with disabilities, according to today's National Trends in Disability Employment — Monthly Update (nTIDE), issued by Kessler Foundation and the University of New Hampshire's Institute on Disability (UNH-IOD).

5h

Top oncologist to study effect of diet on cancer drugs

Siddhartha Mukherjee says trial is first in a series on ‘rethinking human diets for cancer’ A groundbreaking clinical trial on whether diet could boost the effectiveness of cancer drugs is set to be launched by one of the world’s leading oncologists. The work, led by Siddhartha Mukherjee at Columbia University Medical Center in New York, will investigate whether a high-fat, low-carbohydrate diet

6h

UTSW scientists identify body's microreactors for innate immunity

A DNA-sensing enzyme forms droplets that act as tiny bioreactors creating molecules to stimulate innate immunity — the body's first response to infection, UT Southwestern researchers report.

6h

You can now use your favorite Lightroom presets on your phone

Technology Adobe’s mobile photo editing app gets more powerful. Last week Adobe announced a number of updates to Lightroom CC and Lightroom Classic CC—including the ability to sync presets and profiles in Lightroom CC across…

6h

Listeria monocytogenes multi-country outbreak: 47 cases including 9 deaths

Frozen corn and possibly other frozen vegetables produced in a company in Hungary are the likely source of an outbreak of Listeria monocytogenes that has been affecting Austria, Denmark, Finland, Sweden and the United Kingdom. Despite the product recall ordered by the Hungarian Food Chain Safety Office, new cases may still emerge, says the updated risk assessment published by ECDC and the European

6h

Particle physicists at TU Dresden involved in the discovery of scattering of W and Z bosons

Particle physicists from Technische Universität Dresden, together with international research colleagues, have discovered an extremely rare process that can be compared to tiny lightsabers.

6h

The Death of the Public Square

What is God? When the question first rattled my adolescent mind, I took it to my mom and dad, and received wildly divergent answers. I cracked the beige-in-every-way set of World Book encyclopedias in our attic. And after poking around on the shelves of my anti-clerical father, I found Nietzsche and realized that God was actually dead. If I were a boy now, we all know exactly where I would turn f

6h

A swarm of 3D printed cyclists reveals the best position in the pack

As the Tour de France begins, the world’s largest sporting computer simulation shows how riders can get ten times less air resistance than previously thought

6h

Chris Packham: ‘Let’s stop sleepwalking towards mass extinction’

We must wake up to the ecological apocalypse caused by intensive agriculture that is unfolding under our very noses, says Chris Packham

6h

7h

Iceland is having the worst summer for 100 years – is Britain’s heatwave to blame?

Reykjavík’s ice-cream vendors, camp sites and outdoor swimming pools are struggling as our unusually pleasant summer spells bad news for our north-western neighbours As you enjoy the sunshine, spare a thought for Iceland. It is having the greyest, wettest summer since 1914, preceded by rain every single day in May. According to Icelandic meteorologist Trausti Jonsson, the UK heatwave is to blame

7h

Global Health: In a Rare Success, Paraguay Conquers Malaria

But the infection is surging elsewhere, particularly in the Americas.

7h

Ancient DNA testing solves 100-year-old controversy in Southeast Asian prehistory

Two competing theories about the human occupation of Southeast Asia have been debunked by groundbreaking analysis of ancient DNA extracted from 8,000-year-old skeletons.

7h

Photos of the Week: Kansas Lightning, Afghan Pigeons, Sunken Wrecks

Cooling off in New York City, rescue operations in Thailand, World Cup action in Russia, migrants crossing the Mediterranean, a triathlon in Germany, wildfires in California, a presidential election in Mexico, a rocket explodes in Japan, and much more.

7h

Designer diamonds could one day help build a quantum internet

A new design in artificial diamonds stores and releases quantum information better than others.

7h

UVA develops way to create medicines without side effects

A new technique for precisely targeting molecules within cells is paving the way for safer medicines that are free of side effects. Big benefits are expected in the battle against cancer, autism, Alzheimer's and more.

7h

New method for turning skin cells into pluripotent stem cells

Researchers have for the first time succeeded in converting human skin cells into pluripotent stem cells by activating the cell's own genes.

7h

Fragment of impacting asteroid recovered in Botswana

On Saturday, June 23, 2018, a team of experts from Botswana, South Africa, Finland and the United States of America recovered a fresh meteorite in Botswana's Central Kalahari Game Reserve.

7h

A gene linked to job-related exhaustion in shift workers increases the risk of Alzheimer's

A new study shows that a variation in the melatonin receptor 1A gene is linked to the risk of Alzheimer's disease in the elderly. The same research team has previously demonstrated that the same genetic variation reduces tolerance to shift work among the working age population.

7h

This week's record-breaking heat has human fingerprints all over it

Nexus Media News Climate change is already here. This week's record-breaking heat has all the fingerprints of climate change.

7h

Famed British Geologist Was Spectacularly Wrong About Stonehenge

A seminal 1923 study on Stonehenge was exceptionally wrong.

7h

Tailored polymers from a printer

An ever-growing number of coatings, including varnishes and printing inks, as well as tooth fillings, are cured with light. Yet, homogenous, tailored, polymer networks cannot be produced, and the materials tend to be brittle, which limits the use of photopolymers in applications like 3D printing, biomedicine, and microelectronics. Researchers present a method by which methacrylate-based, homogenou

7h

It's official — spending time outside is good for you

Living close to nature and spending time outside has significant and wide-ranging health benefits — according to new research. A new report reveals that exposure to greenspace reduces the risk of type II diabetes, cardiovascular disease, premature death, preterm birth, stress, and high blood pressure.

7h

Stripes may be cool — but they don't cool zebras down

Biologists refute the theory that zebras have striped fur to stay cool in the hot sun. That hypothesis is wrong, according to new research.

7h

Complex brain circuitry revealed using new single-cell sequencing technology

Researchers are studying the brain's striatum, which not only is responsible for controlling how we move, but also contributes to the brain's decision-making and the initiation of action. Nearly 95 percent of the cells that make up the striatum are known as medium spiny neurons (MSN), which is associated with many psychiatric and neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's disease, Huntingto

7h

Smart bandages designed to monitor and tailor treatment for chronic wounds

A team of engineers has developed a prototype bandage designed to actively monitor the condition of chronic wounds and deliver appropriate drug treatments to improve the chances of healing. While the lab-tested bandages remain to be assessed in a clinical context, the research is aimed at transforming bandaging from a traditionally passive treatment into a more active paradigm to address a persist

7h

Students in Detroit Are Suing the State Because They Weren’t Taught to Read

What to do when a school is infested with vermin, when textbooks are outdated, when students can’t even read? Perhaps the answer is sue the government. That’s what seven students in Detroit have done. Their class-action suit filed against the state of Michigan asserts that education is a basic right, and that they have been denied it. Usually, such education-equity cases wend their way through st

7h

What Is the Point of a Trump Rally in 2018?

It’s hard to maintain any shtick for more than a couple years, especially when the shtick is as innovative as the Donald Trump political rally. It’s now been just longer than three years since the president descended the gold escalator at Trump Tower, inaugurating the form. What is the point of a Trump rally in 2018? Can it still work its magic? As the president’s appearance in Great Falls, Monta

7h

How is opioid use associated with health, other substance use, involvement in criminal justice system?

A public health approach to address the opioid epidemic in the United States needs to understand the populations of people affected, including their health, other substance use and any involvement they may have with the criminal justice system. This study examined that using data from the 2015-2016 National Survey on Drug Use and Health.

7h

Outdoor air pollution linked to higher diabetes risk

A new study links outdoor air pollution—even at levels deemed safe—to an increased risk of diabetes globally. The findings raise the possibility that reducing pollution may lead to a drop in diabetes cases in heavily polluted countries such as India and less polluted ones such as the United States. Diabetes, one of the fastest growing diseases, affects more than 420 million people worldwide and 3

8h

Ancient DNA testing solves 100-year-old controversy in Southeast Asian prehistory

Southeast Asia is one of the most genetically diverse regions in the world, but for more than 100 years scientists have disagreed about which theory of the origins of the population of the area was correct.

8h

Laser experiments shed light on Earth's core

Scientists have discovered fresh insights into the metallic core at the centre of our planet.

8h

Melting bacteria to decipher antibiotic resistance

With antibiotic resistance spreading worldwide, there is a strong need for new technologies to study bacteria. EMBL researchers have adapted an existing technique to study the melting behaviour of proteins so that it can be used for the study of bacteria. Molecular Systems Biology published their results—allowing researchers worldwide to start using the technique—on July 6.

8h

South Korea’s Ambassador Has a Message for All the North Korea Skeptics

South Korea’s ambassador to the United States acknowledges that Kim Jong Un hasn’t yet destroyed a major missile-engine test site, as the North Korean leader supposedly promised Donald Trump in Singapore he would. He says he’s “not in a position to confirm or deny” recent reports that North Korea may in fact be expanding nuclear-weapons facilities, despite promising to “work toward the complete d

8h

Laser experiments lend insight into metal core at heart of the Earth

Experiments replicating conditions at the core of the Earth could help scientists understand how the planet and its atmosphere were formed.

8h

Ancient DNA testing solves 100-year-old controversy in Southeast Asian prehistory

Two competing theories about the human occupation of Southeast Asia have been debunked by groundbreaking analysis of ancient DNA extracted from 8,000-year-old skeletons.

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UMN researchers develop algorithm to improve care delivery to seriously ill patients

The level of communication between patient and physician can make a monumental difference, specifically in the case of seriously ill hospitalized patients. Researchers at the University of Minnesota have found a way to better identify these patients with the hopes of better facilitating 'end-of-life' or specialized conversations and care.

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New model for predicting neuroblastoma outcomes incorporates early developmental signals

Motivated by a desire to better understand the molecular circuitry underlying neuroblastoma and limitations of current methods for predicting disease progression and outcome, researchers from the Kulesa Lab at the Stowers Institute for Medical Research and collaborators at the University of Michigan and Oxford University set out to construct a logic-based model incorporating information about deve

8h

Kilauea’s spectacular pyrotechnics show no signs of stopping

Watch some of the most striking videos and images of the strange, fiery beauty of the Hawaii volcano’s ongoing eruption.

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New hope for patients with incurable and disabling hand condition, Dupuytren's disease

Oxford scientists show anti-TNF inhibits the cells responsible for Dupuytren's disease.

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Melting bacteria to decipher antibiotic resistance

With antibiotic resistance spreading worldwide, there is a strong need for new technologies to study bacteria. EMBL researchers have adapted an existing technique to study the melting behavior of proteins so that it can be used for the study of bacteria. Molecular Systems Biology published their results — allowing researchers worldwide to start using the technique — on July 6.

8h

In patients with heart failure, anxiety and depression linked to worse outcomes

Symptoms of depression and anxiety are present in about one-third of patients with heart failure – and these patients are at higher risk of progressive heart disease and other adverse outcomes, according to a review and update in the July/August issue of Harvard Review of Psychiatry. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

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Obesity and overweight linked to long-term health problems after traumatic brain injury

Especially at longer follow-up times, overweight and obesity are associated with chronic disease risks for survivors of moderate to severe traumatic brain injury (TBI), reports a study in the July/August issue of the Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation (JHTR). The official journal of the Brain Injury Association of America, JHTR is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

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Extra testosterone gets guys into luxury brands

Giving men a single dose of testosterone increased their preference for higher-status goods, new research finds. The work supports previous findings that connect transient increases in testosterone levels to a rise in behaviors aimed at boosting social rank. In the animal kingdom, males of certain species possess flashy ornamentation that appears to do little to enhance their survival; think of a

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Dingoes Have Changed the Actual Shape of the Australian Desert

Stretching across some of the most remote, arid places on Earth is one of humanity’s largest built objects: the “dog fence,” a nearly 3,500-mile-long barrier erected to keep wild dingoes away from the sheep that graze on some of Australia’s most populated regions. Up close, the fence isn’t much to look at: four feet high or so, made out of chickenwire, lying like a long metal snake across the red

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Europe Is Running Low on CO2

The past few weeks in the United Kingdom have brought a steady stream of ominous food headlines: Beer is being rationed ! (In the middle of the World Cup, no less!) Barbecues might run out of meat ! Bakeries have stopped making crumpets ! And then our own Yasmeen Serhan checked in for a flight from Europe to find there would be no ice cream . That's it, holiday ruined pic.twitter.com/UKpWkYM5Ds —

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Age and education affect job changes

New research reveals that people are more likely to change jobs when they are younger and well educated, though not necessarily because they are more open to a new experience. Researchers found that both individual characteristics and the labor market are factors in career mobility. The results show that people were more likely to change their organizations, industries, and occupations when they w

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A crash course in organic chemistry | Jakob Magolan

Jakob Magolan is here to change your perception of organic chemistry. In an accessible talk packed with striking graphics, he teaches us the basics while breaking the stereotype that organic chemistry is something to be afraid of.

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This mindset shift could save your relationship

A little kindness goes a long way. Not being mean goes longer. Read More

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Two Strangers Met on a Plane—and the Internet Ruined It

Have you heard about #PlaneBae? The story that went viral on Twitter over the Fourth of July holiday, and was featured as one of those feel-good segments on the Today show and Good Morning America soon after? Just in case you haven’t, here’s a summary: Rosey Blair and her boyfriend, Houston Hardaway, wanting to sit together on a flight from New York to Dallas, asked Hardaway’s assigned seatmate w

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Buzz Aldrin's Son Tells His Side of the Story

In 2010, Buzz Aldrin, the second man to walk on the moon, celebrated his 80th birthday by swimming with sharks in the Galápagos Islands. Aldrin has loved scuba diving for years. “I’ve never really had a hobby, but when I am not working, scuba diving is one of my favorite things to do, and under the sea is my favorite place to be—on this planet,” Aldrin wrote in a memoir published in 2016. Aldrin

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Canada Could Come to the Fore in Cannabis Research

The coming legalization of recreational marijuana is already increasing funding for studies, but regulations on such research have been slow to change.

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Hawaiian Mythology | Countdown to Shark Week: The Daily Bite

In this episode of the Daily Bite, we take a trip to Hawaii to revisit some amazing mythology and natives who have a special connection to sharks. Shark Week 2018 starts Sunday July 22 9p! Stream The Daily Bite on Discovery GO: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/the-daily-bite/ Stream Classic Shark Week Episodes: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/shark-week/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly

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Lions Eat Men Suspected of Poaching Rhinos. Some Saw ‘Karma.’

Rangers discovered the remains along with a rifle fitted with a silencer, an ax and wire cutters on a private game reserve in South Africa.

8h

The Science (and the Scientists) Behind Ant-Man

A quantum physicist consulted with the filmmakers so that a surprising amount of the original film and its new sequel have a factual basis.

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Proof of Children’s Vaccinations? Italy Will Now Take Parents’ Word for It

A move that Italy’s government says is aimed at simplifying school enrollment has raised fear an increase in nonvaccinated children in Europe.

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It’s Hot Out. Here Are Some Tips to Stay Cool.

The heat wave in the northeastern United States was easing on Thursday, but steamy temperatures are headed west, forecasters say.

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How Andrew Wheeler, the New Acting E.P.A. Chief, Differs From Scott PruittScott Pruitt EPA Trump

Mr. Wheeler, who will run the agency now that Mr. Pruitt is gone, is known for opposing environmental regulations. But unlike Mr. Pruitt, he is known for staying out of the limelight.

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Feature: Who’s Afraid of the Big Bad Wolf Scientist?

Rob Wielgus was one of America’s pre-eminent experts on large carnivores. Then he ran afoul of the enemies of the wolf.

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Bristol University discovers how wingless spiders fly

Bristol University has discovered how spiders fly thousands of miles

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Lifejackets could save 180 or more lives a year

About 180 people died because they weren't wearing a lifejacket in UK waters in the last decade, according to new research.

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Tailored polymers from a printer

An ever-growing number of coatings, including varnishes and printing inks, as well as tooth fillings, are cured with light. Yet, homogenous, tailored, polymer networks cannot be produced, and the materials tend to be brittle, which limits the use of photopolymers in applications like 3D printing, biomedicine, and microelectronics. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, researchers present a method by w

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It's official — spending time outside is good for you

Living close to nature and spending time outside has significant and wide-ranging health benefits — according to new research from the University of East Anglia.A new report published today reveals that exposure to greenspace reduces the risk of type II diabetes, cardiovascular disease, premature death, preterm birth, stress, and high blood pressure.

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Extinction is a natural process, but it's happening at 1,000 times the normal speed

When Sudan the white rhino was put down by his carers earlier this year, it confirmed the extinction of one of the savannah's most iconic subspecies. Despite decades of effort from conservationists, including a fake Tinder profile for the animal dubbed "the most eligible bachelor in the world", Sudan proved an unwilling mate and died – the last male of his kind. His daughter and granddaughter rema

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An advanced civilization could resist the accelerating expansion of the universe

And Earth-bound astronomers should be able to tell if someone is out there doing it, a physicist says.

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The Improbable Beauty of Lukaku’s Hop

Romelu Lukaku’s hop was, to me, the most beautiful moment in the World Cup so far. It was 2–2, Belgium and Japan even, the game about to go into overtime. The play had been so beautiful that, even though I was rooting intently for a Belgium win, I also didn’t want the game to end. I wanted to see more. When it comes to the soccer played on the field, this World Cup tournament has been a study in

9h

Nature's antifreeze inspires revolutionary bacteria cryopreservation technique

The survival mechanisms of polar fish have led scientists at the University of Warwick to develop of a revolutionary approach to 'freeze' bacteria.

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Stripes may be cool — but they don't cool zebras down

Susanne Åkesson, a biologist at Lund University in Sweden, refutes the theory that zebras have striped fur to stay cool in the hot sun. That hypothesis is wrong, she and her colleagues show in a study recently published in Scientific Reports.

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Try Out This Physics Problem With a Baseball and a Neighbor

The best questions are always the ones that don't have a single clear answer.

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Campsite Cooking Gear: Combekk, Igloo, Coleman, Bialetti, Cuisinart

Here's some choice equipment for cooking like a pro in the wild.

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Let this app tell you which food option is healthier

A free mobile app is a bit like having a nutritionist with you in the store. Drop that yogurt, it might prompt. Instead, try this one with less sugar, fat, and fewer unpronounceable additives. “FoodSwitch is unique in that users don’t have to hunt for healthier alternatives. They’re all listed in the app,” says FoodSwitch collaborator Mark Huffman, associate professor of preventive medicine and m

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USA vil have ubemandede tankfly på vingerne fra 2021

De amerikanske hangarskibe skal om få år kunne sende en drone til lufttankning på vingerne.

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Why wildfires behave differently in boreal forests

Dr. Alena Zhdanova from Tomsk Polytechnic University is building a reliable database of litter density in boreal forests. She is investigating how thermophysical and thermokinetic characteristics of forest combustible materials affect extinguishing brush-wood fires

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Image: Reykjavik, Iceland

The Copernicus Sentinel-2A satellite takes us over the capital of Iceland, Reykjavik. As a volcanic island famous for its volcanoes, glaciers, lakes, lava and hot springs, Iceland attracts tourists all year round with its vast array of natural wonders.

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Efficient chain transfer for 3D-printing of tough photopolymers

An ever-growing number of coatings, including varnishes and printing inks, as well as tooth fillings, are cured with light. Yet, homogenous, tailored, polymer networks cannot be produced, and the materials tend to be brittle, which limits the use of photopolymers in applications like 3-D printing, biomedicine, and microelectronics. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, researchers present a method by

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Radio Atlantic: Are We Ready for the Next Pandemic?

“Humanity is now in the midst of its fastest-ever period of change,” writes Ed Yong in the July/August issue of The Atlantic. Urbanization and globalization mean pathogens can spread and become drug-resistant more quickly than ever. Yong joins executive editor Matt Thompson and fellow science writer Sarah Zhang to discuss what vulnerabilities exist a century after the 1918 pandemic, and how our s

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Chinese scientists achieve success in nitrogen metallization

A Chinese research team announced it has successfully metallized nitrogen at extreme conditions. The team, working at the Institute of Solid State Physics at the Hefei Institutes of Physical Science (CASHIPS), developed its own pulsed-laser heating system and ultra-fast optical detection technology to conduct the experiment.

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WSU researchers map DNA damage links to onset of skin cancer, melanoma

A critical link in mapping recurrent mutations of melanoma — the most serious form of skin cancer in humans — has been discovered by researchers at Washington State University School of Molecular Biosciences, in collaboration with researchers at Georgia State University.

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How do state policies on alcohol use affect pregnant women and infants?

It is well known that if women drink while they are pregnant, they increase the chances that children may be affected by alcohol, including a broad range of serious defects referred to as fetal alcohol spectrum disorder. Many states have enacted laws aimed at pregnant women intended to reduce these risks. But do the laws have the intended effects? A new, first of its kind study helps answer that q

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Photonic capsules for injectable laser resonators

A KAIST research group presented photonic capsules for injectable laser resonators using microfluidic technology. The capsule's diameter is comparable to a human hair and stable in gas and liquid media, so it is injectable into any target volume.

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How to keep your dog cool when temperatures get hot

DIY Protect your pet from heatwaves. As a pet owner, here’s a good rule of thumb to follow: If it’s too hot outside for you, then it’s way too hot for your dog. Here's how to keep your pup cool.

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This heatwave is just the start. Britain has to adapt to climate change, fast | Simon Lewis

Water, housing, farming … almost every aspect of public life needs to change. Why isn’t this top of the political agenda? Much of the world is in the grip of a heatwave. Britain is so hot and dry that we have Indonesia-style peat fires raging across our moorlands . Montreal posted its highest temperature ever, with the deaths of 33 people in Quebec attributed to the scorching heat . And if you thi

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Stripes may be cool— but they don't cool zebras down

Susanne Åkesson, a biologist at Lund University in Sweden, refutes the theory that zebras have striped fur to stay cool in the hot sun. That hypothesis is wrong, she and her colleagues show in a study recently published in Scientific Reports.

9h

High-power thermoelectric generator utilizes thermal difference of only 5C

A team of Japanese researchers from Waseda University, Osaka University, and Shizuoka University designed and successfully developed a high-power, silicon-nanowire thermoelectric generator which, at a thermal difference of only 5 degrees C, could drive various IoT devices autonomously in the near future.

9h

ISOLDE mints isotopes of chromium

CERN's nuclear physics facility, ISOLDE, has minted a new coin in its impressive collection of isotopes. The facility has forged neutron-rich isotopes of the element chromium for the first time, and in prodigious quantities. These isotopes were measured by the precision balance ISOLTRAP, which has been performing mass measurements at ISOLDE for the last 30 years. The new mass values, reported in P

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Not all aggressive kids are bullies

There’s a difference between general aggressive behavior and bullying, even among young children, according to a new study. That means spotting a bully is not as easy as it might seem, the study suggests. “It’s important for us to realize this distinction, in part because every aggressive behavior we see is not bullying,” says Jamie Ostrov, a professor in the psychology department at the Universi

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Team develops an ultra-thin sensor that makes inflammation testing and curing 30 times faster

Different from the inorganic counterparts like silicon, organic semiconductors can operate under bending or stretching. Usually a thinner film can have stronger capability to bend. Other than bending, a thinner or smaller device can also offer a faster response time which is particular important for sensor application if immediate information is needed. These ultra-flexible sensors are very popula

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Study finds bacteria adapted to the lungs are easier to kill with antibiotics

A study of cystic fibrosis patients finds new evidence that infected bacteria lower resistance to antibiotics as they become 'more comfortable' in the body

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Skyrmion reshuffler comes to the aid of stochastic computing

Researchers have designed a "skyrmion reshuffler"—just as a card shuffler shuffles a deck of cards, the skyrmion reshuffler does the same with a type of quasiparticle called magnetic skyrmions. The reshuffler is the first low-energy, compact device that can reshuffle signals of any kind (skyrmions, electrons, etc.) with a high efficiency, which may enable it to address one of the long-standing cha

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Nature's antifreeze inspires revolutionary bacteria cryopreservation technique

The survival mechanisms of polar fish have led scientists at the University of Warwick to develop of a revolutionary approach to 'freeze' bacteria. The new technique could radically improve the work to store and transport human tissue.

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Milking cows for data – not just dairy products

In the mid-1970s, the average American dairy farm had about 25 cows. Today, many operations have more than 3,000 – a number that was almost unheard of 25 years ago.

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The Very Real Risks of Rescuing the Boys Trapped in a Thai Cave

A massive operation is underway to rescue 12 Thai boys and their soccer coach, who have been trapped in a cave for nearly two weeks. But the rescue options are incredibly risky.

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Diver Dies During Rescue Efforts for Cave-Trapped Thai Boys

A diver died during an attempt to rescue the Thai youths trapped in a cave.

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Londons ansigtsgenkendelse giver 98 pct. falske hits: »Offentligheden forventer, at vi bruger det«

Ud af de 100 første ansigter genkendt af Londons nye system til ansigtsgenkendelse, er kun to korrekte. Ingen af de to var efterlyst.

9h

A Woman Who Takes Lady Liberty Seriously

Is any time or place better suited to protesting the Trump administration’s immigration policy than the one chosen by Therese Okoumou, the 44-year-old woman arrested for climbing onto the Statue of Liberty on the Fourth of July? Lady Liberty stands atop 14.7 acres officially named Liberty Island by an act of Congress. The tablet in her left hand is inscribed with the date when a group of American

9h

Is it true that eating alone is bad for you?

Headlines are quick to scream that solitary eating has a dark side, but the science is more complex While many people enjoy eating alone, recent headlines have been quick to scream that it has a dark side . But is it really bad for you? Research into eating alone is sparse, but some studies have suggested the practice might be linked to problems including depression , a blockage of blood supply t

9h

Changing ecosystems in Bavaria

Bavaria is changing: In regions such as Lower Franconia, climate change is producing drier and hotter conditions. At the same time, extreme weather gets a boost with heavy rainfall or hail leading to flooding and soil erosion.

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Cutting-edge heat shield installed on NASA's Parker Solar Probe

The launch of Parker Solar Probe, the mission that will get closer to the Sun than any human-made object has ever gone, is quickly approaching, and on June 27, 2018, Parker Solar Probe's heat shield—called the Thermal Protection System, or TPS—was installed on the spacecraft.

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HKU develops an ultra-thin sensor that makes inflammation testing and curing 30 times faster

Researchers from Engineering and Medicine at the University of Hong Kong collaborate and develop a real-time ultraflexible sensor that makes inflammation testing and curing 30 times faster.

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Investigational treatment for acne appears promising in laboratory studies

Topical retinoids, which target retinoic acid receptors, are commonly used to treat acne. New research published in the British Journal of Dermatology reveals that trifarotene, a fourth-generation retinoid with potent and selective activity against only one particular retinoic acid receptor, may have an improved efficacy and safety profile compared with less selective retinoids.

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A gene linked to job-related exhaustion in shift workers increases the risk of Alzheimer's

A new study shows that a variation in the melatonin receptor 1A gene is linked to the risk of Alzheimer's disease in the elderly. The same research team has previously demonstrated that the same genetic variation reduces tolerance to shift work among the working age population.

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Fragment of impacting asteroid recovered in Botswana

On Saturday, June 23, 2018, a team of experts from Botswana, South Africa, Finland and the United States of America recovered a fresh meteorite in Botswana's Central Kalahari Game Reserve (CKGR).

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Smart bandages designed to monitor and tailor treatment for chronic wounds

A team of engineers has developed a prototype bandage designed to actively monitor the condition of chronic wounds and deliver appropriate drug treatments to improve the chances of healing. While the lab-tested bandages remain to be assessed in a clinical context, the research, published today in the journal Small, is aimed at transforming bandaging from a traditionally passive treatment into a mo

9h

Breast cancer growth signals are enhanced by a protein outside cells

New research uncovers how a sticky protein called fibronectin promotes the activity of estrogen in breast cancer cells. The study, 'Fibronectin rescues estrogen receptor α from lysosomal degradation in breast cancer cells,' will be published July 6 in the Journal of Cell Biology (JCB).

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Complex brain circuitry revealed using new single-cell sequencing technology

Researchers at TGen and Circuit Therapeutics Inc. are studying the brain's striatum, which not only is responsible for controlling how we move, but also contributes to the brain's decision-making and the initiation of action. Nearly 95 percent of the cells that make up the striatum are known as medium spiny neurons (MSN), which is associated with many psychiatric and neurodegenerative diseases, in

9h

Support for refugees increases when refugees participate in integration programs

The executive branch has a fair amount of power to open or close U.S. borders, as the U.S. Supreme Court confirmed in its recent decision to uphold President Donald Trump's travel ban.

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Sex and gender diversity is growing across the US

Across the United States, more people of all ages are identifying as something other than male or female.

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Environmental Advocates Will Keep Pressure on Pruitt's Successor at EPA

Acting administrator and coal lobbyist Andrew Wheeler, or another nominee for the chief spot, will face tough review — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Researchers use AI to add 4-D effects to movies

James Cameron's 3-D film Avatar sought to revolutionize the movie-going experience when it was first released in 2009, creating an immersive world for viewers. But what if you also wanted to feel the heat and the wind, while flying on a banshee, direct from your cinema seat?

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AI and the future of oil

IBM and Galp, a Portuguese energy group with a global footprint, have developed an AI-based advisor to enhance seismic interpretation in the oil and gas exploration area. This tool can facilitate creation of enhanced geological models, risk assessment of new prospects, and optimization of the placement of new oil wells.

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NASA awards contract to study flying drones on Venus

In the coming decades, NASA and other space agencies hope to mount some ambitious missions to other planets in our Solar System. In addition to studying Mars and the outer Solar System in greater detail, NASA intends to send a mission to Venus to learn more about the planet's past. This will include studying Venus' upper atmosphere to determine if the planet once had liquid water (and maybe even l

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Why 'Ant-Man and the Wasp"s Heroine Is a Crystal Ball for Marvel

Hope Van Dyne is an indication of what Marvel's superheroines will look like in the future.

10h

The Transformative Power of Snoo, Reddit’s Alien Mascot

It’s a happy accident that the cofounder's hurried sketch left Snoo colorless and genderless, a form onto which everyone could map themselves.

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India's most populous state bans plastic, yet again

India's most populous state Uttar Pradesh, home to 220 million people, announced Friday a ban on plastic cups and polythene use from July 15, in its third such attempt.

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Frogwatching—charting climate change's impact in the here and now

We've arranged to meet in a gravel car park at the foot of Mt Majura, a darkening wedge above us in the dusk. My daughter and I wait in the car. It's winter. A woman passes along the nearby pavement, guiding her way by torchlight. Canberra's streets are kept dim, I learned recently, for the sake of astronomers at nearby Mt Stromlo observatory. In the decade I've lived here, I've had an ambivalent

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Say Hello to Full Employment

This morning, the Labor Department announced that the national unemployment rate ticked up to 4 percent in June for good reasons, as hundreds of thousands more Americans sought work. For the first time in recorded history, the number of job openings is higher than the number of people looking for a job. That has raised hopes that wage growth might finally begin to pick up, with employers bidding

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Did dinosaurs stop to smell the flowers? – Science Weekly podcast

Is it true that dinosaurs had a role to play in the emergence of flowers? Nicola Davis investigates whether herbivores caused plants to blossom

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High-power thermoelectric generator utilizes thermal difference of only 5ºC

A team of Japanese researchers from Waseda University, Osaka University, and Shizuoka University designed and successfully developed a high-power, silicon-nanowire thermoelectric generator which, at a thermal difference of only 5ºC, could drive various IoT devices autonomously in the near future.

10h

Detecting esophageal cancer cells

Researchers at the University of Texas at Arlington's College of Nursing and Health Innovation have developed a new nanoparticle-based platform for simultaneous imaging and treatment of esophageal cancer.

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Fifty years ago, at Lake Mungo, the true scale of Aboriginal Australians' epic story was revealed

This month marks the golden jubilee of a watershed event in the history of this nation that should cause all Australians to pause and reflect.

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Thousands of years ago, American dogs mysteriously vanished

Dogs’ ancestors in the Americas likely came from Siberia, according to a new study. The study also suggests that these early dog populations almost totally disappeared, but left future generations a cancerous tumor that is still found in their canine descendants today. The researchers collected genetic information from 71 ancient dog remains from the Americas and found that early dogs arrived alo

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Eyewire Cup Semifinals

The Eyewire Quarterfinals are complete. Congrats to the top 4 teams are moving onto the Semifinals: Antarctica, Egypt, Poland, and Switzerland! The Semifinals begin Sunday at noon, US ET and last 48 hours, coming to a close on Tues at noon , when we’ll be down to the final two teams. They will be followed by an Awards Ceremony at 12:30. In the Eyewire Cup Semifinals we have: Antarctica vs Poland

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What is it about yawning?

You know the feeling. It's impossible to resist. You just need to yawn.

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Sports got ancient foragers ready for war

Winning a national championship may be the ultimate goal of sports team today, but for foraging societies long ago, games involving contact may have helped hone skills for warfare, say researchers. “Skeletal evidence from Africa suggests that warfare dates back to at least 10,000 years ago,” says Michelle Scalise Sugiyama of the University of Oregon’s anthropology department. “People ask often as

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New superconductor technology for the transmission grid

The German energy transition makes it necessary to extend the transmission grid. Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), together with the grid operator TenneT, now studies the use of superconductor technology as an alternative to conventional power cables for short grid sections within the framework of the ENSURE Kopernikus Project. The superconductor cables designed by KIT for this purpose are

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Ultracold atoms and ultrafast lasers

Two separate research fields have been united in Hamburg for the very first time. Ultrashort laser pulses enable us to observe and manipulate matter on very short time scales, whereas ultracold atoms permit experiments with high precision and controllability. Scientists from Universität Hamburg have united the two research fields and succeeded in observing the emergence of ions in ultracold atoms.

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Site-directed RNA editing as an alternative to genetic scissors

The development of CRISPR/Cas gene editing tools marked a revolution in the targeted alteration of genetic information. It opened up a wealth of opportunities for basic research and genetic repairs. Yet changing DNA has its risks – any errors it causes will be stored permanently in the genome and could therefore cause problems later on in both the individual and his/her subsequent offspring.

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Data from Juno shows Jupiter moons causing footprints in aurorae

A team of researchers with members from Italy, the U.S. and Belgium has discovered that two of Jupiter's moons cause "footprints" in the planet's aurorae. In their paper published in the journal Science, the researchers describe what they found and how it helps better understand both the planet and its moons.

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Lydfolk: Derfor spillede Eminem for lavt på Roskilde

Roskilde Festival har et gennemprøvet og selvudviklet system til at holde et konsekvent lydniveau, og med specialuddannelse af lydteknikere og samarbejde med den amerikanske højttalerproducent Meyer Sound, har de en plan for at levere den bedst mulige musikoplevelse.

10h

Researchers use photons to separate metal ions

A Florida State University research team is using a simple, readily available energy source to separate metal ions, a process that could help purify water or even recycle nuclear waste.

10h

Gene drives accelerate evolution – but we need brakes

Worried about mice in the kitchen? Fed up with pigeons on your way to work? Teed off by weeds on your lawn? Recent work points to a way that might just reduce – or even eliminate – unwanted species in a short period. The method is based on something called a gene drive – a method of making changes to an entire population of a specific species by altering its genetic material (its genome).

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Opinion: We need to talk about the Higgs

It is six years ago that the discovery of the Higgs boson was announced, to great fanfare in the world's media, as a crowning success of CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The excitement of those days now seems a distant memory, replaced by a growing sense of disappointment at the lack of any major discovery thereafter.

11h

How to fight desertification and drought at home and away

A growing human population and runaway consumption are putting unsustainable pressures on the natural resources we depend on for survival. Our misuse and abuse of land and water is changing fertile land into deserts.

11h

Innovative music recommendation software to predict brand-fit music

The ABC_DJ project investigates and develops the future of Audio Branding. Researchers from ABC_DJ have created a powerful algorithm that automatically chooses brand-relevant music relying solely on the audio content of the songs themselves, rather than on manually assigned tags. With this software, brands and advertising agencies can automatically find the right music for any given brand or campa

11h

New compounds with anticarcinogenic compounds synthesised

The Stereochemistry and Asymmetric Synthesis Group at the Faculty of Pharmacy at the University of Seville, in collaboration with the Asymmetric Synthesis and Functional Nanosystems Group at the Chemical Research Institute of Cartuja, have managed to synthesise active, stable derivatives of sulforaphane, an anticarcinogenic compound with high bioavailability.

11h

Why you should think twice before getting in a pool

Health Pools are festering, pathogenic baths that we fool ourselves into thinking are clean. If anything, you’re more likely to get sick from the pathogens in pool water than a natural body of water.

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Czech Company Designs A Nonalcoholic Beer To Taste Good To Cancer Patients

A nonalcoholic brew joins the growing market to help chemo patients overcome the changes in their palates that make food unappealing. And it just might help them feel better, too. (Image credit: Elizabeth Zahradnicek-Haas)

11h

New model for large-scale 3-D facial recognition

Researchers from The University of Western Australia have designed a new system capable of carrying out large-scale 3-D facial recognition that could transform the entire biometrics industry.

11h

Technique to create medicines free of side effects

A new technique for precisely targeting molecules within cells is paving the way for medicines that are free of side effects.

11h

A Week of Darkness, for Your Health

ČELADNÁ, Czech Republic—The Beskid Rehabilitation Center sits on a rolling plot of land in the boomerang-shaped Beskid mountain range, a stretch of the Carpathians reaching from the Czech Republic across Poland and Slovakia, fading into western Ukraine and the Transylvanian Alps. Full of “alternative” therapies, the BRC is the kind of place you might visit if you were feeling fine, but wanted to

11h

Image of the Day: Ab Lab

Marine scientists are making efforts to replenish abalones along the shores of California.

11h

How To Free Up Space on Your iPhone

Don't let limited storage stop you from taking another Instagram-worthy photo.

11h

How CRISPR tools are unlocking new ways to fight disease

Recent leaps in gene editing technology have brought ideas that just a decade ago seemed like science fiction to the cusp of reality.

11h

Pollinator biodiversity

If you're moving pollen from one plant to another, you might be a pollinator.

11h

Building green cities

Singapore has had a long history as a green city – but a tri-sector partnership could help developing Asian countries kickstart a journey into climate change resilience. [This is a feature story published in the Tri-Sector Publication 2018 by Singapore Management University (SMU)]

11h

56-million-year-old fossils complicate long-held theories about mammalian body size

The discovery of a new species of mammal in Alberta's fossil record has shaken up some long-held beliefs about other species in its lineage.

11h

11h

Wearing a tie may be restricting blood flow to your brain

Tightly-worn ties have been found to impair the brain’s blood supply, prompting one scientist to suggest that it’s time to abandon them altogether

11h

Research aims to prevent deaths related to gypsum-laced manure emissions

Gypsum recycled from manufacturing and construction waste has gained popularity as a bedding source for the dairy industry. Its proponents cite affordability, increased moisture absorption, low bacteria growth and soil benefits as reasons for its use.

11h

Fragment of impacting asteroid recovered in Botswana

On Saturday, June 23, 2018, a team of experts from Botswana, South Africa, Finland and the United States of America recovered a fresh meteorite in Botswana's Central Kalahari Game Reserve (CKGR). The meteorite is one of the fragments of asteroid 2018 LA which collided with Earth on June 2, 2018 and turned into a meteor fireball that detonated over Botswana a few seconds after entering the atmosphe

11h

No matter their size, newborn stomachs need frequent filling

Studies on newborn stomach size help explain why the tiny humans need to eat so frequently.

11h

How Facebook Checks Facts and Polices Hate Speech

Chief product officer Chris Cox talks to WIRED about disinformation, filter bubbles, and the prospect of regulation.

12h

How Facebook’s Rise Fueled Chaos and Confusion in Myanmar

The social network exploded in Myanmar, allowing fake news and violence to consume a country emerging from military rule.

12h

How Pokémon Go Still Dominates Two Years After Its Explosive Debut

Two years after Pokémon Go's launch, a look at how it stuck around—and what that means for augmented reality.

12h

Never Prebook Your Return Flight From a Rocket Launch

Rocket Lab has scrubbed or delayed each of its first three launch attempts. That’s standard.

12h

Inside Scott Pruitt’s Tumultuous Final Months as EPA Administrator

On April 11, a top Environmental Protection Agency official texted me that something strange was happening. Moments before, the source told me, Administrator Scott Pruitt had strolled into the office “just to say hi.” “It’s been too long since we’ve caught up,” Pruitt told the source. “I just wanted to thank you for always working hard.” Pruitt then knocked on Ryan Jackson’s door, according to th

12h

Trump Has Already Started Four Trade Wars—and Counting

It’s been months since the Trump administration first started threatening massive tariffs against a number of countries. First it was the threat of tariffs on all aluminum and steel exported to the United States. Then it was the separate threat against China specifically, expected to affect billions’ worth of Chinese exports of a list of goods including flat-screen televisions. And then, in recen

12h

Were Our Ancestors Sleeping in Trees 3 Million Years Ago?

It happened fast—that’s all we know. Perhaps the young girl fell out of a tree or was struck by an illness. Maybe she drowned. But 3.3 million years ago, a roughly 3-year-old Australopithecus afarensis died in modern-day Ethiopia. From her misfortune has sprung a wealth of knowledge. She fossilized quickly, likely because she tumbled into a stream bed or rushing floodwaters. The movement of rocks

12h

More Recycling Won't Solve Plastic Pollution

It’s a lie that wasteful consumers cause the problem and that changing our individual habits can fix it — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

12h

The 'Blood Rain' in Siberia Was Probably Caused by a Bunch of Industrial Garbage

Don't worry — that rain of blood in Siberia is probably just a metal factory's windswept garbage.

12h

Decarbonising emissions is difficult, but not impossible, says new review

A new Imperial review suggests more work is needed to tackle emissions in easier sectors and the difficult.

12h

Solar-powered nanotech could automatically defrost your car

A new material that harvests energy from the sun has promising defrosting abilities, so could make life easier for winter drivers

12h

Humans need not apply

Will automation, AI and robotics mean a jobless future, or will their productivity free us to innovate and explore? Is the impact of new technologies to be feared, or a chance to rethink the structure of our working lives and ensure a fairer future for all?

12h

Watch This Frog Light Up After It Swallows a Firefly

A firefly kept right on flashing after being eaten by a frog.

12h

The Astronaut Who Never Left Earth

Scientific American speaks with a crew member from a NASA simulation of a long-duration space mission — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

12h

Automating molecule design to speed up drug development

Designing new molecules for pharmaceuticals is primarily a manual, time-consuming process that's prone to error. But MIT researchers have now taken a step toward fully automating the design process, which could drastically speed things up—and produce better results.

12h

Exciton limits are meant to be broken: OLED surpasses 100 percent exciton production efficiency

Researchers at Kyushu University's Center for Organic Photonics and Electronics Research (OPERA) in Japan have demonstrated a way to split energy in organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) and surpass the 100 percent limit for exciton production, opening a promising new route for creating low-cost and high-intensity near-infrared light sources for sensing and communications applications.

12h

Expansion of agricultural land reduces CO2 absorption

Plants absorb some of the carbon dioxide (CO2) released into the atmosphere by burning fossil fuels. But increasing deforestation and other changes in land use will reduce the CO2 absorption capacity of these areas in the future. This is what a study by climate researchers from Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) suggests. Their results are now published in Environmental Research Letters.

12h

Researchers develop a new method for turning skin cells into pluripotent stem cells

Our bodies consist of many different kinds of cells, each with their own role. The Japanese scientist Shinya Yamanaka had made earlier the discovery, earning the Nobel Prize in 2012, that cells from adult skin can be converted to cells typical of early embryos, so-called induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC). This process is called reprogramming.

12h

Global collaboration gives rise to 3-D printed field test kit

A three-cornered collaboration between South Australia, Texas and Ethiopia is using 3-D printed technology and design innovation to efficiently diagnose a deadly disease that infects a million people every year.

12h

New wasp species with a giant stinger discovered in Amazonia

Researchers from the University of Turku, Finland, have discovered a new wasp species in the Amazon with an exceptionally large stinger that surprised even the scientists. The new insect, which is found in the extremely diverse transitional zone between the Andes and the Amazonian lowland rainforest, uses its stinger both for laying eggs and injecting venom.

12h

A molecular label allows traceability for medical implants

A team of researchers at CNRS, Aix-Marseille Université and Université Paris 13 has demonstrated effective molecular labeling to unequivocally identify biomedical implants, even after a prolonged period inside a living subject. The results were published in Angewandte Chemie International Edition on July 5, 2018.

12h

Research team reconstructs motor-cargo complex for ciliary transport

Every living organism expresses fine cellular protrusions known as cilia. Flagellates need them to move, roundworms to find food, and sperm to move towards the egg. Cilia form fine protective hairs in the lungs and play a crucial role in the differentiation of organs in embryos. A research team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now reconstructed the protein complex responsible for tr

12h

Zero to hero: the psychological benefits of Gareth Southgate’s experience

Over two decades, Southgate has gone from whipping boy to national hero. What he’s gone through will have left lasting psychological impressions I don’t follow football. Never have. Nothing against it, just not my thing. Of course, I’ve absorbed some vague background awareness because you can’t get away from it in the UK . However, my limited knowledge has been thrown into sharp relief lately, as

12h

UV narrow-band photodetector based on indium oxide nanocrystals

An international team of researchers from Russia and India has created a narrow-band UV photodetector based on indium oxide nanocrystals embedded in a thin film of aluminum oxide

12h

Scientists develop highly sensitive molecular optical pressure sensor

Chemists at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) and at the Université de Montréal in Canada have developed a molecular system capable of very precise optical pressure measurements.

12h

New world record for direct solar water-splitting efficiency

Hydrogen will play a central role as a storage medium in sustainable energy systems. An international team of researchers has now succeeded in raising the efficiency of producing hydrogen from direct solar water-splitting to a record 19 percent. They did so by combining a tandem solar cell of III-V semiconductors with a catalyst of rhodium nanoparticles and a crystalline titanium dioxide coating.

12h

Foam pollution kills fish in River Great Ouse

The pollution has now "diluted" and is no longer causing problems, says the Environment Agency.

12h

Biorefineries will have only minimal effects on wood products and feedstocks markets

A new report from researchers from IIASA, Luleå University of Technology (LTU), and RISE Research Institutes of Sweden has shown that more biorefineries, which produce biobased fuels and chemicals, will have only a small effect on the availability and pricing of wood products and feedstocks.

12h

Hope for development of materials for 3-D displays and medical applications

Chiral molecules are mirror images of one another. They are non-superimposable and play a crucial role in advanced materials and technologies. However, there had been no reliable theoretical systems for the design and synthesis of chiral materials. These systems had seen only gradual development, with chemists making progress on the design and synthesis of chiral materials based on their intuition

12h

A hydrogen sensor that works at room temperature

Researchers at TU Delft have developed a highly sensitive and versatile hydrogen sensor that works at room temperature. The sensor is made of a thin layer of a material called tungsten trioxide.

12h

Don’t Pack the Courts

Progressives responding to Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy’s retirement with a proposal for court packing might argue that there’s nothing especially unusual about the proposal. The historian Jean Edward Smith has referred to packing , with some exaggeration, as a “hallowed tradition” in American politics. It has occurred a number of times, from the early days of the republic through, most

13h

Sorry to Bother You Is Fizzy, Flawed, and Fascinating

Sometimes, the smartest dystopian fiction knows that you need to give the real world just a little tweak to make it scary. Sorry to Bother You mostly seems to understand this: The film is a funny, harsh satire of race relations, the gig economy, and gentrification set in an America in which the volume is turned up to 11. The story’s heightened reality works best when it’s barely distinguishable f

13h

Test din reaktionstid: Alkohol gør dig langsom og giver tunnelsyn

Tunnelsyn, dårligere reaktionstid og manglende overblik er bare nogle af de svagheder, du vil opleve, hvis du kører bil med alkohol i blodet.

13h

Unge flokkes om ingeniørstudier: »De unge får afgørende betydning for fremtidens samfund«

Selv om færre søger en videregående uddannelse, oplever ingeniøruddannelserne øget søgning. Det vækker både lettelse og glæde.

13h

Festivalgæster tester polymer-solceller

Det danske firma infinityPV producerer trykte polymer-solceller og uddeler dem til gæster på Roskilde Festival for at teste teknologien, reklamere, og finde nye anvendelsesmuligheder. Undervejs oplader de folks telefoner.

13h

Supercoil me! The art of knotted DNA maintenance

Even living cells have their own tangled problems to solve. They involve knots that arise accidentally in DNA and that can comprise its functionality. Researchers now suggest that the DNA propensity to be supercoiled, just like telephone cords, prevents accidental knots. These coils can keep DNA knots locked in place long enough to be untied by specialised enzymes. The computational study, based o

13h

What does global climate have to do with erosion rates?

For the last several decades, geoscientists have been intrigued by a potential link between erosion rates at the Earth's surface and changes in global climate. Distinguishing the cause and effect remained unclear. However, a new study now calls into question the link itself. A team of researchers from the GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences in Potsdam, the University Potsdam, University of

13h

Hi-res image of structure of the origin recognition complex bound to DNA revealed

Cells propagate by making copies of themselves via genome replication. Arguably, replication of DNA is the most fundamental and conserved mechanism of all life forms. Cracking the secret of how this process is achieved with the utmost accuracy is the key to understanding the secret of life. When Watson and Crick first proposed how DNA is replicated based on the structure of the DNA double helix mo

13h

New receptor involved in symbiosis between legumes and nitrogen-fixing rhizobia identified

Legumes can grow in nitrogen-poor soils due to their ability to engage in symbiosis with nitrogen-fixing bacteria. There is a great interest in using the knowledge about this symbiosis to enable transfer to other non-symbiotic plants. An international research team has come a step closer to understanding this complex biological process.

13h

Promille-barometer: Sådan påvirker alkohol dine evner til at køre bil

Dårligere syn, langsommere reaktionsevne og problemer med at opfatte flere situationer. Se hvordan alkohol påvirker din hjerne.

13h

Researchers develop a new method for turning skin cells into pluripotent stem cells

Researchers at the University of Helsinki, Finland, and Karolinska Institutet, Sweden, have for the first time succeeded in converting human skin cells into pluripotent stem cells by activating the cell's own genes.

13h

Leverandør lækker data om 220 psykiatriske patienter – smides nu på porten

Data om 220 psykiatriske patienter – i enkelte tilfælde også diagnosedata – har ligget ubeskyttet på mailkonto.

13h

Record heatwaves are here to stay – welcome to our warming world

There’s nothing strange or unexpected about the extreme heat in many parts of the northern hemisphere – it’s exactly what’s expected on a warming planet

13h

Rolls-Royce sells commercial marine unit

British engine maker Rolls-Royce announced Friday it has agreed to sell its loss-making commercial marine business to Norwegian industrial group Kongsberg for £500 million.

14h

ICE Is Pressuring Separated Parents to Choose Deportation

Updated on July 6, 2018 at 12:03 p.m. Los Fresnos , Texas—Lilian is getting desperate. Locked inside the sprawling Port Isabel Service Processing Center, she has not seen her 5-year-old daughter in more than two weeks, and now deportation officers are offering a deal: Drop your asylum claim and agree to be deported, they say, and we’ll let you see your daughter again. On June 12, Lilian and her d

14h

EchoStar walks away from offer for Inmarsat just before deadline

Colorado-based firm’s cash and shares offer valued UK rival at £3.2bn US satellite company EchoStar has walked away from attempts to acquire Inmarsat after a second takeover bid was rejected by its UK rival. EchoStar said it had no intention of making a formal takeover bid on Friday afternoon, after issuing a statement earlier in the day saying that its latest cash and shares offer had been rejec

14h

The NHS needs a new breed of innovator for the information age | Kevin Fong

Technology is never going to replace doctors – or make healthcare cheaper. But data and artificial intelligence are the future From vaccines and antibiotics to memory metal stents that widen narrowed arteries and algorithms that process radiological images and let us see the earliest signs of disease, innovation has been saving lives since the inception of the National Health Service 70 years ago

15h

Samsung Electronics flags 5.2% rise in Q2 profit

South Korean telecom giant Samsung Electronics on Friday flagged a 5.2 percent rise in its second quarter operating profit from a year earlier, missing analyst estimates.

15h

Two more dead as 'record' heavy rain hits Japan

Two people were found dead near rain-swollen rivers in Japan on Friday, officials said, as "record" downpours prompted authorities to order more than 210,000 people to evacuate their homes.

16h

Let the Games begin: Netflix releases first Indian series

Netflix's first original Indian series premieres on Friday as the US streaming giant battles with Amazon Prime for a slice of the country's fast growing on-demand video market.

16h

Six-year boom pushes New York to mull Uber regulation

Should Uber be forced to pay drivers better? After years of untamed growth, app-based for-hire services have brought New York's iconic yellow cabs to their knees and the city is mulling regulatory action.

16h

Six major wealth funds agree to encourage greener economy

The sovereign wealth funds of major oil-producing countries have agreed upon a common roadmap to encourage investments toward a greener economy.

16h

California senators reach agreement on net neutrality bill

Key California lawmakers said Thursday they've reached an agreement on legislation to enshrine net neutrality provisions in state law after the Federal Communications Commission dumped rules requiring an equal playing field on the internet.

16h

Fires menace US West, tornado touches Colorado wildfire site

An erratic wildfire charging through extremely dry land in the heart of Colorado ski country destroyed three homes and forced people to flee, authorities said Thursday.

16h

Watch this and be positive [SCIENCE]

submitted by /u/MakingBetterAll [link] [comments]

16h

Efter G7-kollaps: Er Danmark rustet til WTO-sammenbrud?

Efter en kaotisk afslutning på G7-topmødet i Canada er en global handelskrig og sammenbrud…

16h

ePrivacy: Industri fører ophedet lobbykrig mod massivt forsinket forordning

Industrien har succes med at forsinke og fortynde ePrivacy-forordningen med massivt lobby-apparat, fortæller anti-lobby-aktivist. Naturlig konsekvens af overdrevent snæver fokus i lovgivning, mener Danske Medier.

16h

Did dinosaurs stop to smell the flowers? – Science Weekly podcast

Is it true that dinosaurs had a role to play in the emergence of flowers? Nicola Davis investigates whether herbivores caused plants to blossom

17h

Selvhelende maling skal gøre træbyggeri billigere

Hvis træbyggeri skal blive mere udbredt i Danmark, kræver det en ny type maling, der holder længere og er lettere at bruge. Forskningsprojekt til 18 mio. kr. eksperimenterer med selvhelende materialer

17h

Did dinosaurs stop to smell the flowers? – Science Weekly podcast

Is it true that dinosaurs had a role to play in the emergence of flowers? Nicola Davis investigates whether herbivores caused plants to blossom Subscribe and review on Acast , Apple Podcasts , Soundcloud , Audioboom and Mixcloud . Join the discussion on Facebook and Twitter From providing us with medicine to smelling like decaying flesh, plants have an amazing and diverse set of traits. (Without

18h

Global Cities and the Promise of "Comprehensive Innovation"

To take advantage of a new generation of technologies and solutions, cities also need to rethink municipal governance — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

18h

Millioner til naturprojekter: Her er de udvalgte steder i Danmark

Den Danske Naturfond uddeler 10 millioner til 15 lokale naturprojekter, der skal sikre sjældne dyrearter og vild natur.

18h

Exciton limits are meant to be broken: OLED surpasses 100 percent exciton production efficiency

Researchers have demonstrated an OLED that uses singlet fission to boost the percentage of excitons created per pair of electrical charges to over 100 percent. This increase of light-producing excitons when one singlet exciton is split into two triplet excitons through singlet fission results in a stronger emission intensity and is promising for the development of high-intensity near-infrared OLED

19h

Opioid epidemic responses overlook gender

Health experts warn that current efforts to confront the growth of opioid addiction and overdose deaths must better incorporate an understanding of how women fit into this epidemic.

19h

Progress in addressing a severe skin disease that affects dogs and humans

Both dogs and humans can suffer from ichthyosis, a disorder in which the skin becomes very dry, scaly, and prone to secondary infections. Medical researchers have uncovered new details about one form of the disease and took a step toward developing a topical therapy.

19h

Berry-gorging bears disperse seeds through scat and feed small mammals

Mice and voles scurry to bear scats to forage for seeds, finding nutritional value in the seeds and in some cases further dispersing them.

19h

Nanofiber-based wound dressings induce production of antimicrobial peptide

Nanofiber-based wound dressings loaded with vitamin D spur the production of an antimicrobial peptide, a key step forward in the battle against surgical site infections, or SSIs.

19h

A molecular label: Traceability for medical implants

A team of researchers has demonstrated effective molecular labeling to unequivocally identify biomedical implants, even after a prolonged period inside the living being.

19h

Revving up innate control of viral infection requires a three-cell ignition

The innate NK-cell response requires a rather carefully choreographed interaction of three cell types.

19h

Coastal nuisance flooding linked to special type of slow-moving ocean wave

A team of international researchers has found a link between seasonal fluctuations in sea level to a long-time phenomenon — Rossby Waves. And this connection may lead to a new tool to help.

19h

Establishing system for 911 video calling poses design challenges

A team of researchers suggests that while there may be obvious benefits to implementing video calling for 911, there are also technical and social challenges to ensuring the system works optimally.

19h

Precision genomics point the way to mutations associated with accelerated aging

Researchers are using precision genomics to search for undiscovered, inheritable genetic mutations that cause accelerated aging. Researchers conducted a study assessing 17 patients with short telomere syndromes — rare conditions that result in premature DNA and cellular deterioration. The ability to pinpoint the genetic abnormalities associated with short telomere syndromes is key to finding bett

19h

Where does Alzheimer’s disease begin?

Sometimes I forget what day of the week it is, where I put my keys, or when a friend’s birthday is- but I never stop to wonder if these brief moments of forgetfulness are normal or a sign of something more serious. For many, occasional short-term memory loss is a normal part of getting older, […]

20h

Oxygen therapy could help combat dementia in individuals with lung disease

Breathing in additional oxygen improves the function of blood vessels in the brain of people with breathing difficulties caused by lung conditions, according to new research published in Experimental Physiology. These findings could have implications for future research aiming to prevent the development of diseases affecting the brain, such as dementia.

21h

So Did Scott Pruitt Remake the EPA?

In the end, Scott Pruitt attributed it all to the Almighty. “I believe you are serving as president today because of God’s providence,” he wrote in an obsequious letter to President Trump this week. “I believe that same providence brought me into your service. I pray as I have served you that I have blessed you and enabled you to effectively lead the American people.” On Thursday, in the same let

22h

Fetch rover! Robot to retrieve Mars rocks

UK engineers will design a robot in an audacious plan to bring home Mars rocks to study for signs of life.

22h

Lord of the Rings toad on brink of extinction

A toad named after the Lord of the Rings character, Gollum, joins the list of species at risk of extinction.

23h

Arachnids may sense electrical fields to gain a true spidey sense

Animals Ballooning behavior might not just be about catching the breeze. Spiders: it shouldn’t be surprising that a creature with four times our number of legs and eyes sees the world a little differently.

23h

Age and education affect job changes, study finds

New research reveals that people are more likely to change jobs when they are younger and well educated, though not necessarily because they are more open to a new experience. Researchers found that both individual characteristics and the labor market are factors in career mobility. The results, published in the European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology, show that people were more lik

23h

People say online harassment’s OK if it’s punishment

People tend to feel online harassment is deserved and justified when the person on the receiving end commits an offense, even when participants agree that harassing behavior is not appropriate in principle, a new study shows. The severity of the offense doesn’t alter the perception that retributive harassment—a controversial form of social sanctioning—is OK in many cases. Researchers found that b

1d

Senior housing can be lonely, but also offers support

Older adults who live in public senior housing communities experience a large degree of loneliness, according to a new study. Those same communities may also, however, be ideal locations for reducing that loneliness, the same study finds. “There are many studies on loneliness among community-dwelling older adults; however, there is limited research examining the extent and correlates of lonelines

1d

How texting empowered Uganda’s voters to fight corruption

Mobile phone technology and official information about budget corruption can help citizens hold politicians accountable at election time, according to a new study in Uganda. Uganda, in eastern Africa, is notoriously corrupt, and many Ugandans have little faith that their leaders will provide them with honest information. The study details how Uganda’s ubiquitous mobile phones and targeted SMS tex

1d

Southern California is losing its protective A.M. clouds

Decreasing coastal cloud cover in Southern California increases the chance of bigger and more intense wildfires, research shows. According to the new study, a combination of intensifying urbanization and a warming climate are driving up summer temperatures and driving off once-common low-lying morning clouds in many southern coastal areas of the state. The investigators found a 25 to 50 percent d

1d

Age and education affect job changes, study finds

New research reveals that people are more likely to change jobs when they are younger and well educated, though not necessarily because they are more open to a new experience.

1d

Would dialing down this enzyme treat breast cancer?

The enzyme TLK2 displays lower levels of activity in intellectual disability, and overactivity in cases of breast cancer, say researchers. New research outlines the enzyme all the way to the molecular level using X-ray crystallography. The study, which appears in Nature Communications , suggests it may be possible to inhibit the enzyme in patients with breast cancer. “We are outlining the structu

1d

Tagging method gives new view of proteins inside our cells

Scientists have created a new way to view proteins inside human cells. The researchers’ method allows an electron microscope to view proteins precisely, unlike current methods. They named the new technique FerriTag because it is based on ferritin, which an electron microscope can view because iron scatters electrons. Ferritin is a large protein shell that our cells use to store iron. The team set

1d

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