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Nyheder2018juli09

 

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What Your Facebook Network Reveals about How You Use Your Brain

If your friends mostly know each other only indirectly, through you, you're likely to be a better problem solver and to be more successful overall — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

 

Cross species transfer of genes has driven evolution

Far from just being the product of our parents, University of Adelaide scientists have shown that widespread transfer of genes between species has radically changed the genomes of today's mammals, and been an important driver of evolution.

11h

 

450.000 nye biler på 10 år: Trængslen vokser med uformindsket styrke

Det tager i dag over syv minutter at køre én kilometer i København i myldretiden. Og frem til 2030 vil også motorveje i Jylland og på Fyn blive ramt af kritisk belastning, forudser Vejdirektoratet.

13h

LATEST

 

To find life on Mars, we'll need new orbiters, more advanced rovers, and humans

Space There’s a good reason NASA hasn’t said they’ve found life on Mars—it’s beyond their current capabilities. Yet again–life wasn’t found on Mars. And NASA won’t be announcing the discovery of life on Mars anytime soon. It’s not disinterest on the agency’s part, but instead it’s…

14min

 

Altitude sickness drug appears to slow progression of glioblastoma

A drug used to treat altitude sickness may help patients with glioblastoma, according to a study published July 4, 2018, in the journal Science Translational Medicine.

16min

 

19min

 

The Science — And Environmental Hazards — Behind Fish Oil Supplements

Author Paul Greenberg says the harvesting of tiny fish for omega-3 supplements is having a ripple effect, leading to less healthy and bountiful oceans. His new book is The Omega Principle.

23min

 

Elon Musk sends “kid-size submarine” to help rescue boys trapped in Thai caveElon Musk Thai Submarine

Tech inventor Elon Musk has developed a “tiny, kid-size submarine” that could help rescue the four boys and their soccer coach who remain trapped in a flooded cave in Thailand. Read More

25min

 

UK heatwave reveals unknown archaeology sites

The heatwave scorching Britain is revealing the outline of ancient buildings – some previously unknown to archaeologists Read More

25min

 

NASA sees a well-organized typhoon Maria

Maria appeared as a well-organized storm on infrared NASA satellite imagery on July 9. Maria has fluctuated between typhoon and super typhoon strength and was a typhoon when NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead.

30min

 

New patch boosts brightness in medical diagnostic tests

A multidisciplinary team from Washington University in St. Louis and the Air Force Research Laboratory at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base has developed a high-tech fix that brings some medical diagnostic tests out of the dark and into the light.

30min

 

Depression screening rates among adults increased slightly in recent years, but remain low

Rates of routine screening of U.S. adults for depression have increased slightly in recent years, but remain very low. Adults were screened in about 3 percent of office visits in 2015, up from a low of less than 1 percent in 2008, according to a study published online today in Psychiatric Services in Advance. Routine screening for depression among all adults has been recommended by the US Preventi

30min

 

NASA gets infrared view of Carolina Chris, the tropical storm

Tropical Storm Chris was strengthening when NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the US Eastern Seaboard on July 9. Aqua analyzed Tropical Storm Chris in infrared light.

30min

 

Synthetic surfactant could ease breathing for patients with lung disease and injury

In a collaborative study between Lawson Health Research Institute and Stanford University, scientists have developed and tested a new synthetic surfactant that could lead to improved treatments for lung disease and injury.

30min

 

Brains of Children with Autism Show Unusual Folding Patterns

The brains of children with autism fold differently than those of their typical peers. Whether they are unusually smooth or convoluted depends on location and age — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

33min

 

2018 Audubon Photography Awards

The winners of the the ninth annual Audubon Photography Awards competition have just been announced. Photographers entered images in three categories: professional, amateur, and youth. More than 8,000 images depicting birdlife from all 50 states and 10 Canadian provinces were judged. This year’s competition celebrates the 100th anniversary of the Migratory Bird Treaty Act, and the many bird speci

45min

 

Where river meets ocean

Oceanographer uncovers the relationship between size and productivity in one of the world's most complex ecosystems.

51min

 

Pucker up, baby! Lips take center stage in infants' brains, study says

Researchers used brain imaging to gauge how the hand, foot and lips are represented in the brains of 2-month-olds — a much younger age than has been studied previously. It is believed to be the first to reveal the greater neurological activity associated with the lips than with other body parts represented in the infant brain. It also indicates how soon infants' brains begin to make sense of thei

51min

 

Brazil's Forest Code can balance the needs of agriculture and the environment

If fully implemented, Brazil's Forest Code, an environmental law designed to protect the country's native vegetation and regulate land use, will not prevent growth in Brazilian agriculture, according to new IIASA-led research.

51min

 

Fitness app revealed data on military, intelligence personnel

Mobile fitness app Polar has suspended its location tracking feature after security researchers found it had revealed sensitive data on military and intelligence personnel from 69 countries.

55min

 

CRISPR Gene Drive Used to Alter Mouse Coat Color

It’s the first demonstration of the technology in mammals.

56min

 

Researchers demonstrate how to make modern living sustainable with new eco-housing

UN Environment and Yale University in collaboration with UN Habitat today unveiled a new eco-housing module, to spark public discussion and new ideas on how sustainable design can provide decent, affordable housing while limiting the overuse of natural resources and climate change.

1h

 

World Cup Showcases Elite Players’ Fight Against Fatigue

World Cup Showcases Elite Players’ Fight Against Fatigue New research suggests that despite being tired, athletes can still sprint at top speed near the end of a long match. TiredPlayer_topNteaser.jpg Image credits: Michael715 via Shutterstock Sports Monday, July 9, 2018 – 12:15 Chris Gorski, Editor (Inside Science) — Players in the World Cup don't lack for motivation. But fatigue can compromise

1h

 

Forest ecology shapes Lyme disease risk in the eastern US

In the eastern US, risk of contracting Lyme disease is higher in fragmented forests with high rodent densities and low numbers of resident fox, opossum, and raccoons. These are among the findings from an analysis of 19 years of data on the ecology of tick-borne disease in a forested landscape, recently published in the journal Ecology.

1h

 

Forest ecology shapes Lyme disease risk in the eastern US

In the eastern US, risk of contracting Lyme disease is higher in fragmented forests with high rodent densities and low numbers of resident fox, opossum, and raccoons. These are among the findings from an analysis of 19 years of data on the ecology of tick-borne disease in a forested landscape, recently published in the journal Ecology.

1h

 

The sea anemone, an animal that hides its complexity well

Despite its apparent simplicity — a tube-like body topped with tentacles — the sea anemone is actually a highly complex creature. Scientists have just discovered over a hundred different cell types in this small marine invertebrate as well as incredible neuronal diversity. This surprising complexity was revealed when the researchers built a real cell atlas of the animal.

1h

 

Majority of drivers don't believe texting while driving is dangerous

New study shows that many drivers are still willing to take the risk, as 'fear of missing out' and separation anxiety keep them from abiding by the law. The study reveals that many drivers don't perceive texting and driving to be dangerous in certain driving scenarios.

1h

 

New way for cells to conserve energy confirmed

By proving a theory that was first proposed almost 40 years ago, researchers have confirmed a new way that cells conserve energy. The study gives scientists a better understanding of how organisms conserve energy and function as a part of the global carbon cycle.

1h

 

New insights on mosquitoes that spread disease

The Asian tiger mosquito (Aedes albopictus) is a highly invasive species and a vector of multiple pathogens including various viruses, such as chikungunya, dengue, and Zika. A new Medical and Veterinary Entomology study that evaluated the relationship between the mosquito's presence and habitat variables at a small scale provides important information for planning effective prevention and control

1h

 

Generating electrical power from waste heat

Researchers have developed a tiny silicon-based device that can harness what was previously called waste heat and turn it into DC power.

1h

 

Gene-editing technique cures genetic disorder in utero

Researchers have for the first time used a gene editing technique to successfully cure a genetic condition in a mouse model. Their findings present a promising new avenue for research into treating genetic conditions during fetal development.

1h

 

What Do You See in the Moon?

From our vantage point on Earth, humanity has only ever seen, and will always see, one side of the moon. Our planet’s gray companion rotates on its axis at the same speed that it orbits Earth, a celestial arrangement that keeps the same side perpetually turned toward us. The landscape has remained largely unchanged for hundreds of millions of years, but we human beings have managed to imagine all

1h

 

Discoveries by archaeology team give new clues on life in ancient Jewish village

Recent discoveries by a team of specialists and students at Huqoq in Israel's Galilee, led by University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill professor Jodi Magness, shed new light on the life and culture of an ancient Jewish village. The discoveries indicate villagers flourished under early fifth century Christian rule, contradicting a widespread view that Jewish settlement in the region declined dur

1h

 

Research confirms a new way for cells to conserve energy

By proving a theory that was first proposed almost 40 years ago, researchers have confirmed a new way that cells conserve energy.

1h

 

Study reveals what natural greenhouse emissions from wetlands and permafrosts mean for Paris Agreement targets

Global fossil fuel emissions would have to be reduced by as much as 20% more than previous estimates to achieve the Paris Agreement targets, because of natural greenhouse gas emissions from wetlands and permafrost, new research has found.

1h

 

Cliff jumping: Lucky escape for boys after Llanberis rock fall

A boy who jumped off a cliff into water in Llanberis escaped injury when rocks fell in after him.

1h

 

How our cells build different antennae to sense the world around us

Our cells communicate with each other and with the environment using tiny antennae, called cilia. Some of these antennae can also move, and are altered in several diseases. A team from the Gulbenkian Institute of Science has now discovered that the foundation of these antennae is diverse, contributing to the assembly of antennae with different functions. This study, now published in Nature Cell Bi

1h

 

Can we get the immune system to tolerate organ transplants?

Currently, people receiving organ transplants must take drugs to suppress the inflammatory immune response that leads to rejection. Even so, almost all recipients eventually lose their transplant. A new approach, which maintains a population of immune cells that naturally temper immune responses, known as Tregs, could greatly enhance people's long-term tolerance for transplants.

1h

 

Human clinical trial reveals verapamil as an effective type 1 diabetes therapy

Researchers have discovered a safe and effective novel therapy to reduce insulin requirements and hypoglycemic episodes in adult subjects with recent onset type 1 diabetes by promoting the patient's own beta cell function and insulin production — the first such discovery to target diabetes in this manner.

1h

 

Visual perceptual skills are updated by process similar to memory reconsolidation, study finds

A new study shows that updating visual perceptual skills — which humans rely on to recognize what they see, including potential threats, and ignore unimportant background — is an active process with many similarities to the way they stabilize memories.

1h

 

Fingerprint of ancient abrupt climate change found in Arctic

A research team led by Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) found the fingerprint of a massive flood of fresh water in the western Arctic, thought to be the cause of an ancient cold snap that began around 13,000 years ago.

1h

 

‘Left-cradling bias’ linked to better social cognitive abilities in children

Children who cradle dolls on the left tend to show higher social cognitive abilities than those who do not, according to new research.

1h

 

Physicists uncover why nanomaterial loses superconductivity

Physicists have discovered that superconducting nanowires made of MoGe alloy undergo quantum phase transitions from a superconducting to a normal metal state when placed in an increasing magnetic field at low temperatures. The study is the first to uncover the microscopic process by which the material loses its superconductivity.

1h

 

Qubits as valves: Controlling quantum heat engines

Researchers are designing nano-sized quantum heat engines to explore whether they may be able to outperform classical heat engines in terms of power and efficiency.

1h

 

Genome editing reduces cholesterol in large animal model, laying human trial groundwork

Using genome editing to inactivate a protein called PCSK9 effectively reduced cholesterol levels in rhesus macaques. This is the first demonstration of a clinically relevant reduction of gene expression in a large animal model using genome editing. The study describes a possible new approach for treating heart disease patients who do not tolerate PCSK9 inhibitors — drugs that are commonly used to

1h

 

Simple test to predict rare cancers' likely spread

Circulating tumor cell clusters in the blood of head and neck patients with locally and regionally advanced cancer have been found to be strongly associated with distant metastases within six months.

1h

 

Medical errors may stem more from physician burnout than unsafe health care settings

Physician burnout is at least equally responsible for medical errors as unsafe medical workplace conditions, if not more so, according to a new study.

1h

 

NASA satellite tracking remnants of ex-Tropical Cyclone Beryl

Infrared imagery from NASA revealed two small area of strong storms remained in the remnants of Tropical Storm Beryl, moving into the eastern Caribbean Sea.

1h

 

NASA added up Typhoon Prapiroon's rainfall

Tropical Cyclones can generate a tremendous amount of rainfall, and NASA's IMERG program utilizes a variety of data to create rainfall maps. Those maps provide estimates of where the heaviest rainfall occurred and NASA recently added up the rainfall dropped from Typhoon Prapiroon in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean.

1h

 

Starbucks, citing ocean threat, is ditching plastic strawsStarbucks Plastic Straws

Starbucks will eliminate plastic straws from all of its locations within two years, citing the environmental threat to oceans.

1h

 

Government halts vaginal mesh surgery in NHS hospitals

Suspension in England too late for women suffering ‘lifelong disabling complications’ The government has accepted the use of vaginal mesh implants to treat complications after childbirth should be stopped immediately to prevent further risk of “life-changing and life-threatening injuries” to women. It would effectively suspend the use of vaginal mesh implants in NHS hospitals in a major victory f

1h

 

Gene-editing technique cures genetic disorder in utero

Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University and Yale University have for the first time used a gene editing technique to successfully cure a genetic condition in a mouse model. Their findings, published in Nature Communications, present a promising new avenue for research into treating genetic conditions during fetal development.

1h

 

The ideal of equality makes opera thrive in Finland

Instead of court aristocrats and mythological heroes, the contemporary Finnish opera brings characters such as addicts, smugglers, miners and plumbers to the center stage. The diverse list of themes may include anything from genetic manipulation to school bullying and human trafficking.

1h

 

Certain antibodies against a sugar are associated with malaria protection

Certain type of antibodies against α-Gal- a carbohydrate expressed by many organisms including the malaria parasite- could protect against malaria, according to a new study led by ISGlobal, an institution supported by 'la Caixa' Foundation. The results, published in Scientific Reports, indicate that a-Gal is an interesting candidate to include in future vaccines against malaria and other infectiou

1h

 

Generating electrical power from waste heat

Researchers from Sandia National Laboratories have developed a tiny silicon-based device that can harness what was previously called waste heat and turn it into DC power. Their advance was recently published in Physical Review Applied.

1h

 

NASA satellite tracking remnants of ex-Tropical Cyclone Beryl

Infrared imagery from NASA revealed two small area of strong storms remained in the remnants of Tropical Storm Beryl, moving into the eastern Caribbean Sea.

1h

 

New insights on mosquitoes that spread disease

The Asian tiger mosquito (Aedes albopictus) is a highly invasive species and a vector of multiple pathogens including various viruses, such as chikungunya, dengue, and Zika. A new Medical and Veterinary Entomology study that evaluated the relationship between the mosquito's presence and habitat variables at a small scale provides important information for planning effective prevention and control

1h

 

New chemical compounds make catalysts more efficient

A team from Ruhr-Universität Bochum has developed new chemical compounds that make catalysts more efficient. With their electronic and spatial properties, the new class of what are known as phosphine ligands ensures that catalysts are more active and more stable. In the journal "Angewandte Chemie", they described how the new ligands act on gold catalysts. The group assumes that the results can be

1h

 

This Woman Broke a Bone in Her Eye Socket by Blowing Her Nose Too Hard

A British woman who blew her nose a bit too hard didn't just end up with a snot-filled tissue.

1h

 

Vaginal microbiome may influence stress levels of offspring

Exposing newborn mice to vaginal microbes from stressed female mice may transfer the effects of stress to the newborns, according to a new study. These changes resemble those seen specifically in the male offspring of moms that were stressed during pregnancy.

2h

 

Fingerprint of ancient abrupt climate change found in Arctic

A research team found the fingerprint of a massive flood of fresh water in the western Arctic, thought to be the cause of an ancient cold snap that began around 13,000 years ago.

2h

 

E-cigarettes increase cardiovascular risk as much as cigarettes do

The usage of e-cigarettes containing nicotine has a significant impact on vascular functions claims new study. New research shows significant health risks of e-cigarettes with nicotine. The study revealed that smokers of e-cigarettes experienced the same, if not higher level of cardiovascular elevation for prolonged periods after smoking the e-cigarette.

2h

 

Charcoal: Major missing piece in the global carbon cycle

Most of the carbon resulting from wildfires and fossil fuel combustion is rapidly released into the atmosphere as carbon dioxide. Researchers have now shown that the leftover residue, so-called black carbon, can age for millennia on land and in rivers en route to the ocean, and thus constitutes a major long-term reservoir of organic carbon. The study adds a major missing piece to the puzzle of und

2h

 

First-trimester screening of pregnant women for elevated bacteria levels in urine

First-trimester screening of pregnant women for asymptomatic bacteriuria — higher than normal bacteria levels without symptoms of a bladder infection — is recommended by the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care in an updated guideline in the Canadian Medical Association Journal.

2h

 

NASA added up Typhoon Prapiroon's rainfall

Tropical cyclones can generate a tremendous amount of rainfall, and NASA's IMERG program utilizes a variety of data to create rainfall maps. Those maps provide estimates of where the heaviest rainfall occurred and NASA recently added up the rainfall dropped from Typhoon Prapiroon in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean.

2h

 

The sea anemone, an animal that hides its complexity well

Despite its apparent simplicity — a tube-like body topped with tentacles — the sea anemone is actually a highly complex creature. Scientists from the Institut Pasteur, in collaboration with the CNRS, have just discovered over a hundred different cell types in this small marine invertebrate as well as incredible neuronal diversity. This surprising complexity was revealed when the researchers buil

2h

 

Mitochondrial DNA in exosomes is the alarm that initiates the antiviral response

CNIC researchers demonstrate that exosomes transferred from T lymphocytes to dendritic cells contain mitochondrial DNA.The study explains how the distinct cellular components of the immune response communicate to mount an effective response to pathogens.

2h

 

Research confirms a new way for cells to conserve energy

By proving a theory that was first proposed almost 40 years ago, researchers have confirmed a new way that cells conserve energy. The study, led by William Metcalf, G. William Arends Professor of Molecular and Cellular Biology and leader of the Mining Microbial Genomes research theme at the University of Illinois Carl R. Woese Institute for Genomic Biology, was published in mBio and gives scientis

2h

 

Manipulating single atoms with an electron beam

All matter is composed of atoms, which are too small to see without powerful modern instruments including electron microscopes. The same electrons that form images of atomic structures can also be used to move atoms in materials. This technique of single-atom manipulation, pioneered by University of Vienna researchers, is now able to achieve nearly perfect control over the movement of individual s

2h

 

Majority of drivers don't believe texting while driving is dangerous

New study shows that many drivers are still willing to take the risk, as 'fear of missing out' and separation anxiety keep them from abiding by the law. The study, published in Risk Analysis: An International Journal, reveals that many drivers don't perceive texting and driving to be dangerous in certain driving scenarios.

2h

 

Teenagers can thank their parents' positive attitude for avoiding obesity

Teenagers are less likely to be overweight if their mum or dad had a positive attitude during pregnancy, a new study by the University of Bristol and Emory University revealed today (Monday 9 July).

2h

 

Haemophilia A/sialorrhoea: Comparator therapies not implemented, added benefit not proven

In two early benefit assessments, IQWiG was unable to derive an added benefit from the data presented because current standards of care were not implemented in the studies.

2h

 

Long-term cannabis study finds no significant relief for chronic pain

But there were some serious oversights. Read More

2h

 

Why the 'gig economy' isn't real

Tech companies claim the gig economy is booming. Data beg to differ. Read More

2h

 

Why Danes are so eager to fly the nest (and Slovaks aren’t)

Virtually all young Danes have left the parental home by the time they're 34. Yet in Slovakia, almost 57% of young adults still reside in the Hotel of Mum and Dad. Read More

2h

 

Senolytic drugs reverse damage caused by senescent cells in mice

Injecting senescent cells into young mice results in a loss of health and function but treating the mice with a combination of two existing drugs cleared the senescent cells from tissues and restored physical function. The drugs also extended both life span and health span in naturally aging mice.

2h

 

Gene therapy shown to cure type 2 diabetes and obesity in mice, researchers report

A single administration of a therapeutic vector in mouse models cures type 2 diabetes and obesity in the absence of long-term side effects, researchers report. In healthy mice, the therapy prevents age-associated weight gain and insulin resistance and promotes healthy aging.

2h

 

Oil rigs may end their days as valuable artificial reefs

A large group of international researchers have just published a scientific article in which they encourage environmental authorities across the globe to rethink the idea of removing oil rigs, wind turbines and other installations in the sea when they are worn out.

2h

 

Transmission of NDM bacteria between dogs and humans established

In 2015, a New Delhi-metallo-beta-lactamase (NDM) Escherichia coli bacteria was discovered in two Finnish dogs. A new article reveals that the dogs' owner did also carry the bacterium. This is presumably the first time in the world that the transmission of NDM-bacteria between a dog and a human has been reported.

2h

 

New microscopy works at extreme heat, sheds light on alloys for nuclear reactors

A new microscopy technique allows researchers to track microstructural changes in real time, even when a material is exposed to extreme heat and stress. Recently, researchers show that a stainless steel alloy called alloy 709 has potential for elevated temperature applications such as nuclear reactor structures.

2h

 

Kissing bugs kiss their hiding spots goodbye, thanks to tiny radio transmitters

Researchers have successfully attached miniature radio transmitters to kissing bugs and tracked their movements. Also known as triatomine bugs, kissing bugs transmit the pathogen that causes Chagas disease in humans and animals. They typically move at night and hide during day, and uncovering their secretive movements could play a key role in reducing their impact as a disease vector.

2h

 

Lifetime sentence: Incarcerated parents impact youth behavior

Young adults who had parents incarcerated during childhood do not receive timely healthcare and have more unhealthy behaviors, researchers find.

2h

 

Cell and Gene Therapy Tracker: Global CAR T-Cell Trials

More and more researchers are conducting clinical trials that test the efficacy of the immunotherapy. Here is a global accounting of these experiments.

2h

 

Slime Molds Remember — but Do They Learn?

Slime molds are among the world’s strangest organisms. Long mistaken for fungi, they are now classed as a type of amoeba. As single-celled organisms, they have neither neurons nor brains. Yet for about a decade, scientists have debated whether slime molds have the capacity to learn about their environments and adjust their behavior accordingly. For Audrey Dussutour , a biologist at France’s Natio

2h

 

The complex physics behind bending it like a World Cup player

Science Fluid dynamics experts weigh in on how Ronaldo and Pavard score seemingly impossible goals. For a player at this level, bending the ball is an intuitive motion, just a kick to the edge of the ball to arc it in the right direction. For a physicist, modeling air…

2h

 

Insights from metabolites get us closer to a test for chronic fatigue syndrome

A study led by researchers at the Center for Infection and Immunity at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health has identified a constellation of metabolites related to myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome. Combining this data with data from an earlier microbiome study, the researchers now report they can predict whether or not someone has the disorder with a confidence

2h

 

Distant quasar providing clues to early-universe conditions

The sharp radio 'vision' of the VLBA gives astronomers a detailed look at a galaxy as it appeared when the Universe was a small fraction of its current age, providing clues about conditions at that early time.

2h

 

Long term use of some pesticides is killing off dung beetle populations

New research led by scientists at the University of Bristol has uncovered that long-term use of some pesticides to treat cattle for parasites is having a significantly detrimental effect on the dung beetle population.

2h

 

Discoveries by archaeology team give new clues on life in ancient Jewish village

Recent discoveries at Huqoq in Israel's Galilee, led by University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill professor Jodi Magness, shed new light on the life and culture of an ancient Jewish village. The discoveries indicate villagers flourished under early fifth century Christian rule, contradicting a widespread view that Jewish settlement in the region declined during that period. The large size and el

2h

 

What natural greenhouse gases from wetlands and permafrosts mean for Paris Agreement goals

Global fossil fuel emissions would have to be reduced by as much as 20 percent more than previous estimates to achieve the Paris Agreement targets, because of natural greenhouse gas emissions from wetlands and permafrost, new research has found. The additional reductions are equivalent to five to six years of carbon emissions from human activities, according to a paper led by the UK's Centre for E

2h

 

Following the fresh water

A research team led by Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution found the fingerprint of a massive flood of fresh water in the western Arctic, thought to be the cause of an ancient cold snap that began around 13,000 years ago.

2h

 

Sleeping sickness: Pathogens camouflage themselves with sugar

It has long been known that the pathogens causing sleeping sickness evade the immune system by exchanging their surface proteins. But now scientists at the German Cancer Research Center have found an additional parasite strategy to escape the immune system: they confuse the defense system with sugar. The sugar chains on the coat protein prevent the binding of protective antibodies and thus increas

2h

 

Change health messaging to focus on potential impact to help stop the next pandemic

Changing public health messaging to focus on the impact of our actions — for example the potentially harmful impact of infecting a colleague with a cold, rather than whether we will infect them if we go into work in the first place — could have significant implications for how we deal with global threats, according to a new study from City University of London, the Oxford Martin School (Universi

2h

 

Charcoal: Major missing piece in the global carbon cycle

Most of the carbon resulting from wildfires and fossil fuel combustion is rapidly released into the atmosphere as carbon dioxide. Researchers at the University of Zurich have now shown that the leftover residue, so-called black carbon, can age for millennia on land and in rivers en route to the ocean, and thus constitutes a major long-term reservoir of organic carbon. The study adds a major missin

2h

 

Qubits as valves: Controlling quantum heat engines

Researchers from Aalto University are designing nano-sized quantum heat engines to explore whether they may be able to outperform classical heat engines in terms of power and efficiency.

2h

 

Scientists create a complete atlas of lung tumor cells

Researchers from VIB, Leuven University and University Hospital Leuven studied thousands of healthy and cancerous lung cells to create the first comprehensive atlas of lung tumor cells. Their results reveal that tumors are much more complex than previously appreciated, distinguishing 52 different types of cells. This new information can be used to identify new research lines for treatment. The res

2h

 

Farming fish alter 'cropping' strategies under high CO2

Fish that 'farm' their own patches of seaweed alter their 'cropping' practices under high CO2 conditions, researchers at the University of Adelaide in Australia have found.

2h

 

Fighting back: New study reveals unprecedented details of plant-pathogen co-evolution

The co-evolution of plant-pathogen interactions has been revealed in unprecedented detail in a study of one of the world's deadliest crop killers. This is the rice blast pathogen, which destroys enough food to feed more than 60 million people every year — almost the population of the UK.

2h

 

Penn study finds mutation driving deadlier brain tumors and potential therapy to stop it

A poorly understood mutation in the brain cancer glioblastoma (GBM) is now being implicated for the first time as the driver of rare but deadlier cases of the disease.

2h

 

Roots of leukemia reveal possibility of predicting people at risk

Scientists have discovered that it is possible to identify people at high risk of developing acute myeloid leukemia (AML) years before diagnosis. Wellcome Sanger Institute researchers and collaborators found that patients with AML had genetic changes in their blood years before they suddenly developed the disease. The study published in Nature shows that further research could allow earlier detect

2h

 

Switching brain circuits on and off without surgery

By combining ultrasound, gene therapy, and synthetic drugs, researchers have figured out a way to noninvasively control the brain.

2h

 

Evolution of melanoma reveals opportunities for intervention

UC San Francisco researchers have identified the sequence of genetic changes that transform benign moles into malignant melanoma in a large cohort of human skin cancer patients and have used CRISPR gene editing to recreate the steps of melanoma evolution one by one in normal human skin cells in the lab. The research identified key molecular warning signs that could be used by clinicians to catch d

2h

 

Leukemia researchers discover way to predict healthy people at risk for developing AML

An international team of leukemia scientists has discovered how to predict healthy individuals at risk of developing acute myeloid leukemia (AML), an aggressive and often deadly blood cancer.

2h

 

What is association of infant sleep, early introduction of solid foods?

Infants waking during the night is a reason some British mothers introduce solid foods earlier than recommended by the British government, which advises exclusive breastfeeding for about six months. A secondary analysis of a randomized clinical trial that included infants from England and Wales looked at whether the early introduction of solid foods was associated with influences on infant sleep.

2h

 

Nanoparticles give immune cells a boost

MIT researchers have devised a novel way to boost the effectiveness of T cell therapy against solid tumors. By attaching nanoparticle 'backpacks' carrying immune-stimulating drugs directly to T cells, the MIT engineers showed that they could enhance those T cells' response without inducing harmful side effects.

2h

 

Environmental impact passed on to offspring

Exposure to cold prior to conception causes the resulting offspring to have more brown adipose tissue, which protects against excess weight and metabolic disorders. Scientists studying mice have discovered that this information is passed on by the sperm, and there is a similar correlation in humans.

2h

 

Physicists uncover why nanomaterial loses superconductivity

Physicists have discovered that superconducting nanowires made of MoGe alloy undergo quantum phase transitions from a superconducting to a normal metal state when placed in an increasing magnetic field at low temperatures. The study is the first to uncover the microscopic process by which the material loses its superconductivity. The findings are fully explained by the critical theory proposed by

2h

 

Brain cancer: Typical mutation in cancer cells stifles immune response

The exchange of a single amino acid building block in a metabolic enzyme can lead to cancer. In addition, it can impair the immune system, scientists from the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), the University Hospitals in Mannheim and Heidelberg, and the German Cancer Consortium now report. It thus blocks the body's immune response in the battle against the mutant molecule and also impedes immu

2h

 

Study finds that babies introduced to solids early slept longer and woke less frequently

A study by King's College London and St. George's University of London has found that babies introduced to solid foods early, slept longer, woke less frequently at night and suffered fewer serious sleep problems, than those exclusively breastfed.

2h

 

Genome editing reduces cholesterol in large animal model, laying human trial groundwork

Using genome editing to inactivate a protein called PCSK9 effectively reduced cholesterol levels in rhesus macaques. This is the first demonstration of a clinically relevant reduction of gene expression in a large animal model using genome editing. The study describes a possible new approach for treating heart disease patients who do not tolerate PCSK9 inhibitors — drugs that are commonly used to

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Senolytic drugs reverse damage caused by senescent cells in mice

Injecting senescent cells into young mice results in a loss of health and function but treating the mice with a combination of two existing drugs cleared the senescent cells from tissues and restored physical function. The drugs also extended both life span and health span in naturally aging mice, according to a new study in Nature Medicine, published on July 9, 2018.

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Vaginal microbiome may influence stress levels of offspring

Exposing newborn mice to vaginal microbes from stressed female mice may transfer the effects of stress to the newborns, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. These changes resemble those seen specifically in the male offspring of moms that were stressed during pregnancy.

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Senolytics improve health, extend life: Preclinical research findings

The presence of senescent or dysfunctional cells can make young mice age faster. And using senolytic drugs in elderly mice to remove these rogue cells can improve health and extend life. These findings from Mayo Clinic researchers and collaborators provide a foundation on which to move forward in this area of aging research. The results appear in Nature Medicine.

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Feeding your baby solids early may help them sleep, study suggests

Advice on when to introduce babies to solid food has been hotly disputed for years, but the latest research seems to indicate that earlier is better Introducing solid food to babies before they reach six months might offer a small improvement to their sleep, new research suggests. Researchers from the UK and US looked at data collected as part of a clinical trial exploring whether early introduct

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15 minutes of exercise can make a new skill stick

As little as a single 15-minute bout of cardiovascular exercise increases brain connectivity and efficiency, according to new research. If you want to learn to walk a tightrope, for example, it’s a good idea to go for a short run after each practice session, the research suggests. The recent study, which appears in NeuroImage , shows that exercise performed immediately after practicing a new moto

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Samsung opens world's biggest smartphone factory in IndiaIndia Samsung World

Samsung opened the world's largest smartphone factory in India on Monday, a move Prime Minister Narendra Modi said would help transform Asia's third-largest economy into a global manufacturing hub.

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Releasing our inner jellyfish in the fight against infection

How mucus genes dating back to our time as a jellyfish could be key in our quest for new antibiotics.

2h

 

Jumping genes: Cross species transfer of genes has driven evolution

Far from just being the product of our parents, scientists have now shown that widespread transfer of genes between species has radically changed the genomes of today's mammals, and been an important driver of evolution.

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New targets found to reduce blood vessel damage in diabetes

Levels of the enzyme PDIA1, which enables a healthy homeostasis of endothelial cells as well as production of new blood vessels, decrease in diabetes, while activity of Drp1, a key regulator of fission regulated by PDIA1, goes way up, a new study finds.

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Parents who had severe trauma, stresses in childhood more likely to have kids with behavioral health problems

A new study finds that severe childhood trauma and stresses early in parents' lives are linked to higher rates of behavioral health problems in their own children.

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Scientists capture breaking of glacier in Greenland

A team of scientists has captured on video a four-mile iceberg breaking away from a glacier in eastern Greenland, an event that points to one of the forces behind global sea-level rise.

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Motivating gamers with personalized game design

A team of multidisciplinary researchers has identified three basic video game player traits that will help to make game design more personalized and more effectively motivate gamers in both entertainment and work applications.

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Under pressure: The surgeon's conundrum in decision making

In a small study based on conversations with 20 hospital-based surgeons, researchers say they found that most report feeling pressure to operate under severe emergency situations, even when they believe the patients would not benefit.

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How does Parkinson's disease develop? Study raises doubts on theory of Parkinson's disease

Parkinson's disease was first described by a British doctor more than 200 years' ago. The exact causes of this neurodegenerative disease are still unknown. Scientists now questioned the previous understanding of this disease.

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Protein function repairing genetic damage in spermatogenesis identified

Researchers have unmasked the functioning of a protein involved in DNA repair, ATR, in the meiotic recombination process which takes place during the development of spermatocytes — sperm precursor cells — and how inhibiting this protein causes anomalies which block spermatogenesis.

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Salt is key ingredient for cheaper and more efficient batteries

A new design of rechargeable battery, created using salt, could lead the way for greener energy. Researchers have designed the novel energy store which allows for greater power while also lasting longer than conventional batteries.

2h

 

Intense conditions turn nitrogen metallic

New work from a team led by Carnegie's Alexander Goncharov confirms that nitrogen, the dominant gas in Earth's atmosphere, becomes a metallic fluid when subjected to the extreme pressure and temperature conditions found deep inside the Earth and other planets.

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New study finds that e-cigarettes increase cardiovascular risk as much as cigarettes

The usage of e-cigarettes containing nicotine has a significant impact on vascular functions claims new study. Research published in the SAGE journal, Vascular Medicine, has brought new research to light on the significant health risks of e-cigarettes with nicotine. The study revealed that smokers of e-cigarettes experienced the same, if not higher level of cardiovascular elevation for prolonged p

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All Party Parliamentary Group's report on children's social care criticizes new policies

When he speaks at the Westminster launch of a new all-party report on children's social care, the University of Huddersfield's Professor Paul Bywaters will stress the vital importance of gathering data on parents as way of fully understanding the problems faced by families.

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Nanoparticles give immune cells a boost

Programming the body's immune system to attack cancer cells has had promising results for treating blood cancers such as lymphoma and leukemia. This tactic has proven more challenging for solid tumors such as breast or lung cancers, but MIT researchers have now devised a novel way to boost the immune response against solid tumors.

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Farming fish alter 'cropping' strategies under high CO2

Fish that 'farm' their own patches of seaweed alter their 'cropping' practices under high CO2 conditions, researchers at the University of Adelaide in Australia have found.

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Physicists uncover why nanomaterial loses superconductivity

The struggle to keep drinks cold during the summer is a lesson in classical phase transitions. To study phase transitions, apply heat to a substance and watch how its properties change. Add heat to water and at the so-called "critical point," watch as it transforms into a gas (steam). Remove heat from water and watch it turn into a solid (ice).

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Fighting back: New study reveals unprecedented details of plant-pathogen co-evolution

The co-evolution of plant—pathogen interactions has been revealed in unprecedented detail in a study of one of the world's deadliest crop killers. This is the rice blast pathogen, which destroys enough food to feed more than 60 million people every year—almost the population of the UK.

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Audit finds 70 percent of British Columbia fish-processing plants do not comply with environmental regulations

An audit of British Columbia fish-processing plants sparked by gory video of a pipe spewing bloody water into the Salish Sea has found that more than 70 percent of plants audited are out of compliance with environmental regulations, and some operate under rules decades behind modern standards.

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Genome editing reduces cholesterol in large animal model, laying human trial groundwork

Using genome editing to inactivate a protein called PCSK9 effectively reduces cholesterol levels in rhesus macaques, a species of monkey, according to researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. This is the first demonstration of a clinically relevant reduction of gene expression in a large animal model using genome editing. The team published their study th

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France sees red after Spanish rose wine found in domestic bottles

Summer is the ideal time for breaking out a bottle of rose, but fans of French wine might think twice after millions of bottles were found to contain less costly Spanish tipple instead.

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The rapid growth of the Chinese internet — and where it's headed | Gary Liu

The Chinese internet has grown at a staggering pace — it now has more users than the combined populations of the US, UK, Russia, Germany, France and Canada. Even with its imperfections, the lives of once-forgotten populations have been irrevocably elevated because of it, says South China Morning Post CEO Gary Liu. In a fascinating talk, Liu details how the tech industry in China has developed —

3h

 

Study examines what lives in the Gulf of Mexico after BP disaster

Eight years ago, when the Deepwater Horizon rig exploded and sank off Louisiana, one of the big problems facing scientists trying to assess the damage caused by the oil spill was that no one knew much about what lives in the Gulf of Mexico.

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Cement Producers Are Developing a Plan to Reduce CO2 Emissions

Without action, the industry could jeopardize the Paris Agreement’s global climate target — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Seeing yourself as Einstein may change the way you think

People experiencing Albert Einstein's body as their own through a virtual reality simulation were less likely to unconsciously stereotype older people, while those with low self-esteem scored better on a cognitive test. The results suggest that the experience allowed people with low self-esteem to change how they saw themselves and increase their cognitive potential. The technique could be useful

3h

 

Immunity could be key to addressing coral crisis

Coral reefs support a quarter of all marine life, feed hundreds of millions of people and contribute vastly to the global economy.

3h

 

Essential mechanism to generate healthy muscle

A group of researchers identifies in muscle cells a new mechanism that activates locally the movement of the nucleus to its correct position.

3h

 

Meningococcal infection: Bacterial aggregates form thick honey-like liquid that flows through blood vessels

Medical researchers and physicists have unraveled a key stage in infection by Neisseria meningitidis, a human pathogen responsible for meningitis in infants and young adults. Bacterial aggregates in blood vessels appear to facilitate the progression of the disease. Even if treatment is administered rapidly, the mortality rate due to meningococcal infections remains very high.

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The best radiocarbon-dated site in all recent Iberian prehistory

Archeologists have published a study that includes 130 radiocarbon datings. Together with the 45 previous datings, with 180 C14 datings, the Archaeological Site in Valencina de la Concepción (Seville) has become the site with currently the most radiocarbon dating in all Recent Iberian Prehistory (which includes the Neolithic period, the Copper Age and the Bronze Age).

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Mechanisms of genetic diversification in major fungal pathogen of humans

Candida albicans is a fungal species causing infection in humans. A team of scientists decided to sequence and analyze the genomes of 182 strains of C. albicans from around the world. They confirmed the clonal reproduction of this human pathogen but also showed that parasexual reproduction, previously only observed in a laboratory setting, contributes to the genetic diversity of C. albicans and th

3h

 

A new study identifies 40 genes related to aggressive behavior in humans and mice

The origins of the violent behavior are multifactorial and respond to the interaction of several factors –biological, cultural, social, etc. — which can modify the expression of the human behavior. Now, an international study has identified forty genes related to aggressive behavior in humans and mice.

3h

 

National school food policies have potential to improve health now and later

Providing free fruits and vegetables and limiting sugary drinks in schools could have positive health effects in both the short- and long-term, finds a new Food-PRICE study.

3h

 

Realization of color filter-free image sensors

A research team has succeeded in discovery of a high efficiency organic image sensor which is expected to replace silicon image sensors.

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The Overlooked Emotions of Sperm Donation

Sperm donation offers a tidy solution to an aggravating problem: When a person or a couple wants a baby and needs a different ingredient than what they’ve currently got to make one, a man with viable sperm swoops in to help. The process can look like a seamless way to create a family, and for many, it is. That’s a big reason why it has gained so much popularity in the past half century, a period

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Amazon may put out a toy catalog, a holiday tradition up for grabs after Toys 'R Us bankruptcy

It seems like you might find a little extra in your Amazon box as the holidays near. The Seattle e-commerce giant may be putting out a toy catalog this holiday season, filling the void left by the demise of Toys 'R Us.

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New microscopy works at extreme heat, sheds light on alloys for nuclear reactors

A new microscopy technique allows researchers to track microstructural changes in real time, even when a material is exposed to extreme heat and stress. Recently, researchers show that a stainless steel alloy called alloy 709 has potential for elevated temperature applications such as nuclear reactor structures.

3h

 

Plasma-spewing quasar shines light on universe's youth, early galaxy formation

Astronomers found a quasar with the brightest radio emission ever observed in the early universe, due to it spewing out a jet of extremely fast-moving material. Scientists have revealed in unprecedented detail the jet shooting out of a quasar that formed within the universe's first billion years of existence.

3h

 

Birds eat 400 to 500 million tons of insects annually

Birds around the world eat 400 to 500 million metric tons of beetles, flies, ants, moths, aphids, grasshoppers, crickets and other anthropods per year. The research highlights the important role birds play in keeping plant-eating insect populations under control.

3h

 

Blood flow in the heart revealed in a flash

Researchers have for the first time been able to use information from computer tomography images to simulate the heart function of an individual patient. Some of the modeling methods they use have been developed in the motor industry.

3h

 

Releasing our inner jellyfish in the fight against infection

Mucus is able to protect us from infection thanks to ancient genes that have been conserved throughout 350 million years of evolution—dating back to our days as a jellyfish.

3h

 

Orcas of the Pacific Northwest Are Starving and Disappearing

The population of endangered black-and-white killer whales has hit a 30-year-low, numbering only 75 this year.

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Transmission of NDM bacteria between dogs and humans established

In 2015, a New Delhi-metallo-beta-lactamase (NDM) Escherichia coli bacteria was discovered in two Finnish dogs. An article recently published in the journal Eurosurveillance reveals that the dogs' owner did also carry the bacterium. This is presumably the first time in the world that the transmission of NDM-bacteria between a dog and a human has been reported.

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Oil rigs may end their days as valuable artificial reefs

A large group of international researchers have just published a scientific article in which they encourage environmental authorities across the globe to rethink the idea of removing oil rigs, wind turbines and other installations in the sea when they are worn out.

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UAB researchers cure type 2 diabetes and obesity in mice using gene therapy

A single administration of a therapeutic vector in mouse models cures type 2 diabetes and obesity in the absence of long-term side effects. In healthy mice, the therapy prevents age-associated weight gain and insulin resistance and promotes healthy aging. The research constitutes the basis to support the future clinical translation of a gene therapy for these metabolic diseases in humans and is pu

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Releasing our inner jellyfish in the fight against infection

How mucus genes dating back to our time as a jellyfish could be key in our quest for new antibiotics.

3h

 

Kissing bugs kiss their hiding spots goodbye, thanks to tiny radio transmitters

In a new pilot study, researchers in Texas successfully attached miniature radio transmitters to kissing bugs and tracked their movements. Also known as triatomine bugs, kissing bugs transmit the pathogen that causes Chagas disease in humans and animals. They typically move at night and hide during day, and uncovering their secretive movements could play a key role in reducing their impact as a di

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Fern’s genome could be secret weapon against pesky bugs

Scientists have sequenced the full genome of a tiny fern with leaves the size of gnats that could help in cutting atmospheric carbon dioxide, fixing nitrogen in agriculture, and shooing insects from crops. Azolla filiculoides is a water fern often found fertilizing rice paddies in Asia, but its ancestry goes much further back. “Fifteen million years ago, Earth was a much warmer place. Azolla, thi

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Men with cancer are less likely to accept palliative care

Men with advanced cancer are 30 percent less likely than women to consider palliative care, according to a new study. The findings reflect social norms about gender roles—as well as widespread messages in the media and society about “fighting” cancer—say the researchers. Often men see themselves as the family protector, says the study’s lead author, Fahad Saeed, a palliative care specialist and a

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The tech behind the Thailand cave rescueElon Musk Thai Submarine

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Anti-Vaxxers Are Targeting a Vaccine for a Virus Deadlier Than Ebola

C edars Ernest was a certifiable goofball. He was a purebred Shire, a type of British draft horse that once specialized in hauling carts of ale. Nicknamed Ernie, he tipped the scales at more than a ton, and had a chocolate-brown coat with luxuriant white hair feathering his hooves. His owner, Nicole Carloss, a horse trainer in Queensland, Australia, adopted him in 2013, when he was 7 years old, a

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Photo of the Week: Taking to the Sky to End Open-Water Salmon Farms

A Canadian nonprofit alliance is trying to save a staple fish supply—via drone photography.

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Kissing bugs kiss their hiding spots goodbye, thanks to tiny radio transmitters

With the continuing advance of technology, radio tracking devices keep getting smaller and smaller. And that's bad news for stealthy insects like kissing bugs.

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Insectivorous birds consume annually as much energy as the city of New York

The world's insectivorous birds consume annually 400 to 500 million tons of prey and thereby use as much energy as the megacity New York. This is demonstrated by zoologists in the journal 'The Science of Nature.' Especially in forested areas, insectivorous birds play a significant role in the suppression of pest insects.

3h

 

A new study identifies 40 genes related to aggressive behavior in humans and mice

The origins of the violent behavior are multifactorial and respond to the interaction of several factors –biological, cultural, social, etc. — which can modify the expression of the human behavior. Now, an international study published in the journal Molecular Psychiatry has identified forty genes related to aggressive behavior in humans and mice.

3h

 

Salt is key ingredient for cheaper and more efficient batteries

A new design of rechargeable battery, created using salt, could lead the way for greener energy. Researchers at the University of Nottingham Ningbo China have joined forces with a specialist group at the Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences on designs for the novel energy store which allows for greater power while also lasting longer than conventional batteries.

3h

 

Candida albicans: Progress in the understanding of the mechanisms of genetic diversification in a major fungal pathogen of humans

Candida albicans is a fungal species causing infection in humans. A team of scientists decided to sequence and analyze the genomes of 182 strains of C. albicans from around the world. They confirmed the clonal reproduction of this human pathogen but also showed that parasexual reproduction, previously only observed in a laboratory setting, contributes to the genetic diversity of C. albicans and th

3h

 

It takes a village…

A group of researchers led by Edgar Gomes, Group Leader at Instituto de Medicina Molecular João Lobo Antunes (iMM; Portugal) identifies in muscle cells a new mechanism that activates locally the movement of the nucleus to its correct position.

3h

 

The best radiocarbon-dated site in all recent Iberian prehistory

This project, the result of a five-year collaboration between the Universities of Seville, Huelva, Cardiff and the Museum of Valencina, includes a statistical modelled complex of the radiocarbon datings to give a more precise approximation of the time of use of the Valencina site, and to know in a more detailed manner the social processes and cultural phenomena that occurred there

3h

 

Watch a 4-mile long iceberg collapse into the ocean

Scientists have captured on video a four-mile iceberg breaking away from a glacier in eastern Greenland, an event that points to one of the forces behind global sea-level rise. The resulting iceberg, broken off from Greenland’s Helheim Glacier, would stretch from lower Manhattan up to Midtown in New York City. “Global sea-level rise is both undeniable and consequential,” observes David Holland, a

3h

 

New microscopy works at extreme heat, sheds light on alloys for nuclear reactors

A new microscopy technique allows researchers to track microstructural changes in real time, even when a material is exposed to extreme heat and stress. Recently, researchers show that a stainless steel alloy called alloy 709 has potential for elevated temperature applications such as nuclear reactor structures.

4h

 

How to send and receive texts from the comfort of your computer

DIY Don't let your phone distract you. When you're already sitting at your desk, you don't want to keep digging your phone out of your pocket to peck out SMS messages. So send them from your computer…

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Device uses sound waves to split tumor cells from blood

Researchers have developed a gentle, contact-free method that uses sound waves to separate circulating tumor cells from blood samples quickly and efficiently enough for clinical use. Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are small pieces of a tumor that break away and flow through the bloodstream. They contain a wealth of information about the tumor, such as its type, physical characteristics, and genet

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Plasma-spewing quasar shines light on universe's youth, early galaxy formation

Carnegie's Eduardo Bañados led a team that found a quasar with the brightest radio emission ever observed in the early universe, due to it spewing out a jet of extremely fast-moving material.

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Meningococcal infection: Bacterial aggregates form a thick honey-like liquid that flows through blood vessels

The Inserm team led by Guillaume Duménil at the Institut Pasteur, in collaboration with several teams of physicists, has unraveled a key stage in infection by Neisseria meningitidis, a human pathogen responsible for meningitis in infants and young adults. Bacterial aggregates in blood vessels appear to facilitate the progression of the disease. Even if treatment is administered rapidly, the mortal

4h

 

Blood flow in the heart revealed in a flash

Researchers at Linköping University have for the first time been able to use information from computer tomography images to simulate the heart function of an individual patient. Some of the modeling methods they use have been developed in the motor industry.

4h

 

Protein function repairing genetic damage in spermatogenesis identified

Researchers from the Department of Cell Biology, Physiology and Immunology and the Institute for Biotechnology and Biomedicine of the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, have unmasked the functioning of a protein involved in DNA repair, ATR, in the meiotic recombination process which takes place during the development of spermatocytes — sperm precursor cells — and how inhibiting this protein caus

4h

 

How does Parkinson's disease develop? Study raises doubts on theory of Parkinson's disease

Parkinson's disease was first described by a British doctor more than 200 years' ago. The exact causes of this neurodegenerative disease are still unknown. In a study recently published in eLife, a team of researchers led by Professor Henning Stahlberg from the Biozentrum of the University of Basel has now questioned the previous understanding of this disease.

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Birds eat 400 to 500 million tonnes of insects annually

Birds around the world eat 400 to 500 million metric tonnes of beetles, flies, ants, moths, aphids, grasshoppers, crickets and other anthropods per year. These numbers have been calculated in a study led by Martin Nyffeler of the University of Basel in Switzerland. The research, published in Springer's journal The Science of Nature, highlights the important role birds play in keeping plant-eating

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18-qubit entanglement sets new record

Physicists have experimentally demonstrated 18-qubit entanglement, which is the largest entangled state achieved so far with individual control of each qubit. As each qubit has two possible values, the 18 qubits can generate a total of 218 (or 262,144) combinations of output states. Since quantum information can be encoded in these states, the results have potential applications anywhere quantum i

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Laserkanoner skal tælle norske lakselus – og brænde dem

Stingray Marine Solutions leverer 'laserkanoner', der kan bekæmpe lakselus i havdambrug. Nu er systemet udviklet, så det via machine learning også kan klare den obligatoriske optælling af de små skadedyr.

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Pancreatic cancer: Mutable cancer cells are more dangerous

Pancreatic cancer often spreads, forming metastases in the liver or lungs. The prognosis is better for patients with metastases in the lungs. However, the organ that is more likely to be affected depends on the cancer cells' ability to alter their characteristics and shape — as a research team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has discovered.

4h

 

Realization of color filter-free image sensors

A research team in DGIST succeeded in discovery of a high efficiency organic image sensor which is expected to replace silicon image sensors.

4h

 

National school food policies have potential to improve health now and later

Providing free fruits and vegetables and limiting sugary drinks in schools could have positive health effects in both the short- and long-term, finds a new Food-PRICE study led by researchers from the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts University.

4h

 

Plasma-spewing quasar shines light on universe's youth, early galaxy formation

A team led by Carnegie's Eduardo Bañados found a quasar with the brightest radio emission ever observed in the early universe, due to it spewing out a jet of extremely fast-moving material. The initial discovery was followed up by Emmanuel Momjian of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory, which revealed in unprecedented detail the jet shooting out of a quasar that formed within the universe's f

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Novel PET imaging method more fully evaluates extent of rheumatoid arthritis inflammation

A new positron emission tomography (PET) imaging method more fully evaluates the extent of rheumatoid arthritis by targeting translocator protein (TSPO) expression in the synovium (joint lining tissue). The study is featured in the July issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine.

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Simple test to predict rare cancers' likely spread

Circulating tumor cell clusters in the blood of head and neck patients with locally and regionally advanced cancer have been found to be strongly associated with distant metastases within six months.

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Faint outburst of an accreting millisecond X-ray pulsar observed by astronomers

European astronomers have spotted a new outburst of the accreting millisecond X-ray pulsar designated SAX J1748.9-2021. The outburst, which started on September 29, 2017, is fainter and shorter than previous outbursts of this pulsar. The discovery is reported in a paper published June 28 on arXiv.org.

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Photonic capsules for injectable laser resonators

A KAIST research group presented photonic capsules for injectable laser resonators using microfluidic technology. The capsule's diameter is comparable to a human hair and stable in gas and liquid media, so it is injectable into any target volume. The research group, headed by Professor Shin-Hyun Kim in the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, applied an interesting optical property

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Comedian Nore Davis and the Aquarium | Countdown to Shark Week: The Daily Bite

In this episodes special, comedian Nore Davis takes on his fear of sharks as he learns from shark experts at the New York Aquarium and conquers his fears. Shark Week 2018 starts Sunday July 22 9p! Stream The Daily Bite on Discovery GO: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/the-daily-bite/ Stream Classic Shark Week Episodes: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/shark-week/ Subscribe to Discovery: http:

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Immunity could be key to addressing coral crisis

Coral reefs support a quarter of all marine life, feed hundreds of millions of people and contribute vastly to the global economy. But they are dying in mass bleaching events, as climate change warms our oceans and breaks down vital relationships between corals and energy-providing algae.

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Eco-Friendly Backpacks: Truce Drop Liner, Mafia Deep Blue Bag

Tread gently on the planet with a versatile pack made mostly from recycled materials.

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Don't Just Lecture Robots—Make Them *Learn*

By drawing on prior experience, a humanoid-ish robot can watch a human pick up an apple and drop it in a bowl, then do the same itself, even if it’s never seen an apple before.

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I’ve had breast cancer. But I know some screening can do more harm than good | Fay Schopen

Although there are benefits to genetic screening, it could take a great psychological toll on women who carry mutations Approximately one in eight women in the UK will be diagnosed with breast cancer in their lifetime, and early screening can save lives – around 1,300 a year, according to the NHS. That’s one in every 200 women screened; all women aged between 50 and 70 are invited for a mammogram

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Bone study sheds new light on the history of Britain's weaning habits

Archaeologists from the University of Aberdeen have led a significant new study on the history of Britain's weaning habits and have discovered that the early cessation of breastfeeding is not rooted in the Victorian era, as commonly perceived, but as early as the 16th and 17th centuries.

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Protein function repairing genetic damage in spermatogenesis identified

Researchers from the Department of Cell Biology, Physiology and Immunology and the Institute for Biotechnology and Biomedicine of the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (IBB-UAB) have unmasked the function of a protein involved in DNA repair, ATR, in the meiotic recombination process which takes place during the development of spermatocytes – sperm precursor cells– and how inhibiting this protein c

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China's CATL to build first EU electric car battery plant in Germany

Chinese firm CATL will build a battery factory in central Germany to supply the country's key auto industry in its transformation toward electric cars, an investment hailed Monday by Chancellor Angela Merkel as a "new step" in Sino-European cooperation.

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Amazon to bring 1,700 jobs to Italy in 2018

Amazon will bring 1,700 new jobs to Italy by the end of the year, the online commerce giant announced Monday, bringing its number of employees working in the country's groaning economy to 5,200.

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Five unscientific methods some sports coaches use

Sports coaches are often under pressure to maximise the performance of their athletes and teams. With good intentions, they often turn to the latest hyped psychological techniques and ideas – many of which are not well supported by scientific evidence.

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7.5 billion and counting—how many humans can the Earth support?

Humans are the most populous large mammal on Earth today, and probably in all of geological history. This World Population Day, humans number in the vicinity of 7.5 to 7.6 billion individuals.

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Tiny fossil foot: Toddlers once had toes for climbing trees

A new analysis of a child’s foot from a 3.3 million-year-old fossil skeleton shows that our human ancestors, at least the youngest ones, not only stood on two feet and walked upright, but also had adaptations to help them climb trees like their apelike cousins. The tiny foot, about the size of a human thumb, is part of the nearly complete skeleton of a young female Australopithecus afarensis . “T

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Tysk privacy-gruppe ransaget for ting, den intet havde at gøre med

Et blogopslag på en side for voldelige demonstrationer ledte angiveligt til, at en tysk non-profit organisation er blevet ransaget af tysk politi.

5h

 

Laser beam excitation does not affect nucleophilic substitution reaction

Physicists working with Roland Wester at the University of Innsbruck have investigated if and how chemical reactions can be influenced by targeted vibrational excitation of the reactants. They were able to demonstrate that excitation with a laser beam does not affect the efficiency of a chemical exchange reaction and that the excited molecular group acts only as a spectator in the reaction.

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Mystery of phase change in sub-nanosecond-octahedra structure motif

Phase change random access memory (PCRAM) has been successfully applied in the computer storage architecture, as storage class memory, to bridge the performance gap between DRAM and Flash-based solid-state drive due to its good scalability, 3-D integration ability, fast operation speed and compatible with CMOS technology. Focusing on phase change materials and PCRAM for decades, we have successful

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Long-term use of some pesticides is killing off dung beetle populations

New research led by scientists at the University of Bristol has uncovered that long-term use of some pesticides to treat cattle for parasites is having a significantly detrimental effect on the dung beetle population.

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This summer's solar eclipses from the ends of the Earth

Solar eclipses will occur at opposite ends of the Earth this summer, 2018. Both will be merely partial solar eclipses as seen from the Earth's surface, not as dramatic as last summer's total solar eclipse whose path of totality crossed the United States, with partial eclipses being seen from as far north as Canada and as far south as northern South America. Prof. Jay Pasachoff, Chair of the Intern

5h

 

10 products you may not realise are threatened by the CO2 shortage

I have found myself in a rather unexpected place over the past few days. For more than two decades, I have been incessantly proclaiming that we produce far too much carbon dioxide (CO₂) with the associated risks of global warming. But while ever more is being pumped into the atmosphere, Europe and Mexico are also running out of usable CO₂ – as several plants that produce CO₂ have closed down for m

5h

 

Insectivorous birds consume annually as much energy as the city of New York

Insectivorous birds, represented by more than 6,000 species, are found across the world in all major land ecosystems. The fact that they are extremely useful as natural enemies of herbivorous insects had been known for some time. Zoologists at the University of Basel, the University of Utah (Salt Lake City), the University of Illinois (Chicago), and Koç University (Istanbul) have now used calculat

5h

 

Math explains why your bus is late—and could help fix it

Science Bunching up at stops makes everyone run off schedule. Researchers have used mathematical models to study the behavior of bus transit systems to better understand why this happens. The mathematics identify what causes this…

5h

 

Under pressure: The surgeon's conundrum in decision making

In a small study based on conversations with 20 hospital-based surgeons, Johns Hopkins researchers say they found that most report feeling pressure to operate under severe emergency situations, even when they believe the patients would not benefit.

5h

 

Scientists capture breaking of glacier in Greenland

A team of scientists has captured on video a four-mile iceberg breaking away from a glacier in eastern Greenland, an event that points to one of the forces behind global sea-level rise.

5h

 

We need a bank of DNA from dirt and water to protect Australia's environment

Measuring biodiversity used to mean laboriously collecting samples and manually identifying the plants, animals and fungi. This might involve careful inspection under a microscope to spot identifying features. This takes a lot of time and generally requires an expert who has specific knowledge of each group of organisms.

5h

 

Groundbreaking study sheds new light on galaxy evolution

Using integral field spectroscopy (IFS) and advanced modeling tools, Instituto de Astrofísica e Ciências do Espaço (IA) researchers Iris Breda and Polychronis Papaderos have achieved an important milestone towards solving a long standing enigma in extragalactic astronomy – the nature and formation of the central spherical component in spiral galaxies like the Milky Way.

5h

 

Generating electrical power from waste heat

Directly converting electrical power to heat is easy. It regularly happens in your toaster, that is, if you make toast regularly. The opposite, converting heat into electrical power, isn't so easy.

5h

 

Scientists capture breaking of glacier in Greenland

A team of scientists has captured on video a four-mile iceberg breaking away from a glacier in eastern Greenland, an event that points to one of the forces behind global sea-level rise.

5h

 

Manipulating single atoms with an electron beam

All matter is composed of atoms, which are too small to see without powerful modern instruments including electron microscopes. The same electrons that form images of atomic structures can also be used to move atoms in materials. This technique of single-atom manipulation, pioneered by University of Vienna researchers, is now able to achieve nearly perfect control over the movement of individual s

5h

 

Largest-ever solid rocket motor poised for first hot firing

This week, the largest solid rocket motor ever built in one piece will be test fired at Europe's Spaceport in French Guiana for the first time.

5h

 

How your personality predicts your attitudes towards Brexit

The first big psychological study of Brexit has revealed how age, personality, numeracy skills and mental flexibility are linked to different Brexit views

5h

 

How to protect your children from wildfire smoke

We're very careful about what our kids eat, but what about the air they breathe?

5h

 

Deutsche Bahn dropper højhastighedstog mellem London og Frankfurt

En rute, der skulle have bragt britiske forretningsfolk hurtigt til EU efter Brexit, må se sig udkonkurreret af billige flyruter.

5h

 

Where Can Climate Activists Find Common Ground?

Fights over renewable standards and nuclear power can be vicious. Here's a list of views that climate hawks share.

5h

 

How Silicon Valley Fuels an Informal Caste System

The on-demand economy gives fewer opportunities for people to interact with those outside their class—creating impermeable inequality.

5h

 

Riese & Müller Load Review: The Minivan of Bicycles

Groceries, toddlers, and tools all fit in the cargo box of the Riese & Müller Load.

5h

 

Virtual Reality May Help Save Ancient Egypt's 'Sistine Chapel'

A new virtual reality experience may help save an ancient Egyptian tomb built for Queen Nefertari whose paintings are so beautiful that it has been compared to Italy's Sistine Chapel.

5h

 

Image of the Day: Blooming Algae

The British Phycological Society declares the winners of a photography contest for images of algae.

5h

 

Magnetic force

The idea struck him one day after spotting a billboard as he was driving home from work. When he came to learn that it cost businesses $425 a week to rent the sign space, he decided there should be a more affordable option, especially for small businesses.

5h

 

Novel synaptic architecture for brain inspired computing

The brain and all its magnificent capabilities is powered by less than 20 watts. Stop to think about that for a second. As I write this blog my laptop is using about 80 watts, yet at only a fourth of the power, our brain outperforms state-of-the-art supercomputers by several orders of magnitude when it comes to energy efficiency and volume. Nature is truly remarkable.

5h

 

What makes for an excellent human life?

Practical philosopher Andrew Taggart talks about what is an excellent human life, what are the first steps to achieving it and what a society without work looks like. Read More

5h

 

Biomarkers identify sight-stealing, flesh-eating infection

Scientists have discovered several biomarkers that can accurately identify what could be the next superbug—hypervirulent Klebsiella pneumoniae . The pathogen infects completely healthy people and can cause blindness in one day and flesh-eating infections, brain abscesses, and death in just a few days. What’s more, it’s also resistant to all antibiotics. Until now, there has been no accurate metho

5h

 

New test procedures will save dairy cows from Mycoplasma bovis disease

Mette Bisgaard Petersen, Liza Rosenbaum Nielsen and Matt Denwood

6h

 

How Novichok is different from radioactive poisons – and what this means for decontamination

A man and a woman were found unconscious in Wiltshire, England, on July, after having been exposed to the nerve agent Novichok. The woman has now died while the man is in critical condition. This is the same substance that was used to poison the former Russian spy Sergei Skripal and his daughter in March.

6h

 

7,000-Year-Old Massacre: 9 Neolithic Outsiders Murdered with Blows to the Head

About 7,000 years ago, the bodies of nine murdered people were dumped into a mass grave. The individuals were possibly raiders or prisoners of war, archaeologists say.

6h

 

How imagery and media coverage influence our empathy for strangers

Footage of 12 boys trapped in a cave system in Thailand has inundated our screens in recent days.

6h

 

Armband mimics a person's touch

Imagine a virtual world where someone touches your arm during a conversation and you feel the sensation as though they were with you.

6h

 

NASA's Kepler spacecraft pauses science observations to download science data

Earlier this week, NASA's Kepler team received an indication that the spacecraft fuel tank is running very low. NASA has placed the spacecraft in a hibernation-like state in preparation to download the science data collected in its latest observation campaign. Once the data has been downloaded, the expectation is to start observations for the next campaign with any remaining fuel.

6h

 

Europa's ocean ascending

This animation demonstrates how deformation in the icy surface of Europa could transport subsurface ocean water to the moon's surface.

6h

 

Image: Utah's Dollar Ridge fire explodes after July 1 Start

The Dollar Ridge fire began on July 1, 2018. Investigators have determined the fire was human started. From that start it has exploded in size to 42,044 acres in just 6 days. The fire is located 8 miles southwest of Duchesne, UT and is only 4% contained.

6h

 

Hubble's dazzling display of galaxies

This busy image is a treasure trove of wonders. Bright stars from the Milky Way sparkle in the foreground, the magnificent swirls of several spiral galaxies are visible across the frame, and a glowing assortment of objects at the center makes up a massive galaxy cluster. Such clusters are the biggest objects in the universe that are held together by gravity and can contain thousands of galaxies of

6h

 

Japanese knotweed—not such a knotty problem?

Ecologists can find no evidence Japanese knotweed causes significant structural damage.

6h

 

Dramatic Video Captures Moment Towering Iceberg Splits from Greenland Glacier

The berg is so big that it could partially cover the island of Manhattan.

6h

 

Scientists dig deep to track down California's ever-changing groundwater supply

Erica Woodburn first fell in love with hydrogeology – the study of the distribution and movement of groundwater – as an undergraduate majoring in geology. "I was fascinated by the idea that we don't know where and how groundwater moves a lot of the time, and that we don't know how much of it we have to rely on for the future," she said.

6h

 

Neuroscience Outreach Champions Honored at the FENS Forum 2018 in Berlin

Today, Roland Pochet , Laura López-Mascaraque , and Université Côte d’Azur were awarded prestigious prizes for their contribution to advancing public education and awareness about the progress and promise of brain research. The awards are sponsored by the Dana Foundation and the European Dana Alliance for the Brain (EDAB), in partnership with the Federation of European Neuroscience Societies (FEN

6h

 

Lydekspert: Nutidens lyd er én lang pølse uden nuancer

Selv det mest fantastiske stykke musik er afhængig af lydkvaliteten. Og det står rigtig skidt til, mener ekspert.

6h

 

Image: Ice block avalanche

One of the most actively changing areas on Mars are the steep edges of the North Polar layered deposits. This image from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) shows many new ice blocks compared to an earlier image in December 2006.

6h

 

A new semiconductor with record-high thermal conductivity

Scientists at UCLA, for the first time, experimentally realized a new compound single crystal, boron arsenide (BAs) and explored its thermal conductivity limit when crystals are free of defects. They observed the highest isotropic thermal conductivity, 1300 W/mK, beyond all common metals and semiconductors. This study established a new benchmark thermal materials that could potentially revolutioni

6h

 

Project to elucidate the structure of atomic nuclei at the femtoscale

The Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF), a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science User Facility, has selected 10 data science and machine learning projects for its Aurora Early Science Program (ESP). Set to be the nation's first exascale system upon its expected 2021 arrival, Aurora will be capable of performing a quintillion calculations per second, making it 10 times more pow

6h

 

What powers the most luminous galaxies?

Galaxy-galaxy interactions have long been known to influence galaxy evolution. They are commonplace events, and a large majority of galaxies show signs of interactions, including tidal tails or other morphological distortions. The most dramatic collisions trigger the galaxies to light up, especially in the infrared, and they are some of the most luminous objects in the sky. Their brightness allows

6h

 

How a particle accelerator helped recover tarnished 19th century images

Chemists used a synchrotron to peek beneath 150 years of grime on damaged daguerreotype images, revealing hidden portraits.

6h

 

Laser-Shooting Planes Uncover the Horror and Humanity of World War I

Instead of digging into Belgium's Ypres Salient, archaeologists used lidar laser scanners to map the war zone and turn up some remarkable finds.

6h

 

The Worst Cybersecurity Breaches of 2018 So Far

There haven't been as many hacks and attacks compared to this time last year, but that's where the good news ends.

6h

 

How an App Could Give Some Gig Workers a Safety Net

Alia, which allows employers to pay voluntary contributions toward benefits for domestic workers, could be a model for others without insurance or paid time off.

6h

 

Sci-Fi Invades Netflix—as They Both Invade Your Home

We’re witnessing, it seems, the localization of the genre, if not its full-on domestication—and Tau embodies that domestication.

6h

 

Creating displays with richer colours

National University of Singapore researchers have developed a colour-enhancement film that could bring richer and more natural colours to next-generation flat-panel electronic displays.

6h

 

Quarks observed to interact via minuscule 'weak lightsabers'

Two among the rarest processes probed so far at the Large Hadron Collider, the scattering between W and Z bosons emitted by quarks in proton-proton collisions, have been established by the ATLAS experiment at CERN.

6h

 

Compact and flexible supercapacitor developed using simple spray coating method

A lightweight, compact and efficient supercapacitor printed on a flexible plastic sheet has been developed by researchers at the Indian Institute of Science (IISc).

6h

 

First evidence that amino acids formed soon after the Big Bang

A new measurement of chemical evolution suggests that amino acids filled the early universe some nine billion years before life emerged. That has important implications for understanding the origin of life and attempting to re-create it in the lab.

6h

 

Extracting signals of elusive particles from giant chambers filled with liquefied argon

Neutrinos are subtle subatomic particles that scientists believe play a key role in the evolution of our universe. They stream continuously from nuclear reactions in our Sun and other stars but pass through almost everything—even our bodies and Earth itself—without leaving a trace. Scientists who want to study these peculiar, lightweight particles must build extremely sensitive detectors.

7h

 

Plasma accelerators could overcome size limitations of Large Hadron Collider

Plasma particle accelerators more powerful than existing machines could help probe some of the outstanding mysteries of our universe, as well as make leaps forward in cancer treatment and security scanning—all in a package that's around a thousandth of the size of current accelerators. All that's left is for scientists to build one.

7h

 

More than 100 dead as floods and landslides devastate south-west Japan

Authorities warned that landslides could strike even after rain subsides as the calamity shaped up to be potentially the worst in decades

7h

 

Ancient Dog DNA Reveals Close Relationship with Contagious Cancer

North America’s first domesticated dogs died out after European colonization, but they share a genetic link to a transmissible tumor spread globally — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

 

The Lesson of the Great War

There are the wars we remember, and the wars that seem to drift away. Korea is one such, but at least there is a monument in Washington to the startled World War II veterans recalled from the post-1945 American recovery to do battle on those cold and barren hills. The doughboys of World War I do not even have that yet, although commissions and architects are actively bickering about what one migh

7h

 

Exoskeleton that allows humans to work and play for longer

The technology to give people superhuman powers is being developed, but is it the right thing to do?

7h

 

Heatwaves show global warming is not just a future threat

Better climate models and fast computers are helping us see how our carbon emissions are already causing severe weather events

7h

 

Techtopia #60: Elbiler leverer strøm til Roskilde Festival, mens AI spiller beer pong med gæster

Studerende fra DTU bruger Roskilde Festival som laboratorium for smart strømstyring og oplæring af kunstig intelligens. Techtopia kigger på to projekter.

7h

 

Unge flokkes om uddannelse i kunstig intelligens

DTU har ramt mere end plet med en helt ny bacheloruddannelse, hvor 164 studerende kæmper om 30 pladser. DTU forventer derfor et historisk højt karaktergennemsnit.

7h

 

The New York Democrat Who Progressive Activists Are Targeting Next

BROOKLYN, N.Y.— “Do you love me?” Andrew Cuomo, his arms outstretched, bellowed these four words to a gymnasium filled, mostly, with his supporters last week. The response was a mix of cheers and chuckles. The governor’s question had come somewhat in jest, tacked to the end of a lengthy list of love-seeking entreaties for the many local elected Democrats who had joined him inside a poorly-ventila

7h

 

Me Time: How to Recover Like an Elite Athlete

What if your training program began with a nap? Our columnist books a session.

8h

 

Immunity could be key to addressing coral crisis

Coral reefs support a quarter of all marine life, feed hundreds of millions of people and contribute vastly to the global economy.

8h

 

Nissan admits falsifying emissions data on cars made in Japan

Nissan admitted Monday that data on exhaust emissions and fuel economy had been deliberately "altered", dealing a blow to the Japanese car giant's efforts to recover trust after an inspection scandal last year.

8h

 

An Indian State Bans Plastic Bags, Straws And More. Will It Work?

In Mumbai, beaches are strewn with plastic trash, so now there's a ban on plastics — and set penalties for violators. But there are some exceptions. (Image credit: Lauren Frayer/NPR)

8h

 

To Repel Ticks, Try Spraying Your Clothes With A Pesticide That Mimics Mums

Just in time for summer hikes and outdoor play, a study finds that the ticks that often convey Lyme disease become unable to bite, and soon die, after exposure to clothing treated with permethrin. (Image credit: Pearl Mak/NPR)

8h

 

Canada’s Secret to Escaping the ‘Liberal Doom Loop’

The world is burning with the fires of illiberal populism. The flames take on different shapes in different nations. There is Trump’s xenophobia in America, Brexit in Britain, a right-wing government in Poland, a “People's Party” smoldering in both Denmark and Austria, Marine le Pen’s Front National in France, Geert Wilders’s “blond beastliness” in the Netherlands, and the Kultur- warriors of Ger

8h

 

Phoenix Tries To Reverse Its 'Silent Storm' Of Heat Deaths

By 2100, Phoenix summers could resemble the 114-degree averages found in Kuwait. The city wants to become a model for coping in a warming world. (Image credit: Matt Mawson/Getty Images)

8h

 

Landmine muncher automatically sifts soil and explodes them

A giant landmine-munching machine that can sift through tonnes of soil every hour will soon be clearing landmines in Zimbabwe

9h

 

Den skjulte teknik: Sådan fik du kolde fadøl på festivalen

Der skal transporteres, opbevares, køles og tappes i omegnen af en million liter øl i løbet af en Roskilde Festival. Det kræver meget planlægning, store tekniske anlæg og hjælp fra ildsjæle.

9h

 

Flavors are key to smokers switching to vaping — US study

New peer-reviewed research published today in the Harm Reduction Journal shows that flavors play a critical role in attracting — and retaining — smokers into the vaping category, directly contributing to tobacco harm reduction.

9h

 

Musk proposes mini-submarine to save Thai cave boysElon Musk Thai Submarine

American tech entrepreneur Elon Musk has proposed a mini-submarine to save the boys trapped inside a flooded Thai cave, floating the idea on social media while linking it to his space exploration business.

9h

 

Why have record Japan rains been so deadly?

Japan is famously prone to natural disasters including earthquakes and tsunamis, and is generally considered well-prepared to cope. So why has record rainfall caused at least 100 deaths?

10h

 

First quolls born in Australian wild in half a century

The first eastern quolls in 50 years have been born in the wild on the Australian mainland, with the rice grain-sized pups offering hope to a species of marsupial devastated by foxes.

10h

 

Report accuses China firms over ozone-depleting gas

An environmental pressure group claimed Monday that Chinese factories are illegally using ozone-depleting CFCs, which have recently seen a spike in emissions that has baffled scientists.

10h

 

Clínica 0-19: False hope in Monterrey for brain cancer patients (part 3 of 3)

This is the conclusion of my series on Clínica 0-19, the cancer clinic where Drs. Alberto Siller and Alberto Garcia see patients with DIPG, a deadly brain tumor, whom they treat at Hospital Angeles in Monterrey Mexico with an unproven combination of intra-arterial chemotherapy with up to 11 drugs and a poorly defined dendritic cell immunotherapy. Some people have asked me: What's the harm? In this

10h

 

Monsanto known for controversial chemicals

The Monsanto company name has become so strongly associated with being an enemy of nature that a tribunal in The Hague once called for a law making "ecocide" a crime.

11h

 

Eco-warriors battle glyphosate in Argentine countryside

"They can't spray!" screamed Sofia Gatica, waving her arms before police led her away from the soybean field, handcuffed for having illegally entered private property.

11h

 

Shares in China's Xiaomi dip on Hong Kong debut

Chinese smartphone giant Xiaomi fell on its Hong Kong stock debut Monday, following a long-awaited initial public offering overshadowed by China-US trade tensions and falling global markets.

11h

 

'Round Up' pesticide cancer link on trial

During more than a century of business, US agrochemical colossus Monsanto has been vilified for products critics say harm people and the environment.

11h

 

Motivating gamers with personalized game design

A team of multidisciplinary researchers at the University of Waterloo has identified three basic video game player traits that will help to make game design more personalized and more effectively motivate gamers in both entertainment and work applications.

11h

 

Corporate Innovation

Momondo blev stiftet af tre ansatte som forlod McKinsey, fordi de hellere ville være i et startup miljø. Vi hører historien igen og igen samtidig med forlydender om at Google og Facebook allerede har rekrutteringsudfordringer, fordi de i Silicon Valley bliver betragtet som gamle mastodonter. På m…

11h

 

A particle physicist in Whitehall

Adventures on the Royal Society Policy Secondment Scheme The Royal Society has started a Policy Secondment Scheme: placing research fellows in Governmental departments to foster communication between scientists and science policy-makers. Dr Lily Asquith is a Royal Society Dorothy Hodgkin Research Fellow based at the University of Sussex, and is one of three participants on the pilot round for thi

11h

 

Books to get inside your head: Tim Parks picks the smartest books about the brain

Is consciousness internal, readable, even uploadable? Does it exist in the external world? Here are some mind-bending reads that have the answers Humankind has been reflecting on consciousness from the moment thought became possible. What is this business of experiencing colour, touch, taste, sound, smell? How does it happen, and where? Is the world as we experience it? There’s hardly a philosoph

12h

 

UK fertility regulator to issue new rules on expensive IVF add-ons

Patients will have to be told when fertility treatment extras are not likely to be effective IVF patients will need to be told when expensive “add-ons” to fertility treatments are not likely to be effective, under new rules due to be issued to clinics later this year. The crackdown by the government’s fertility regulator, the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority, comes as an increasing nu

12h

 

Spiludvikling: YOUROPA – et C++-skuffeprojekt, der endelig blev færdigt

Udvikler hev næsten færdigt spil op af skuffen. Den hjemmegjorte spilmotor og selv spillet fungerede uden store fejl, på trods af det var 10 år gammelt og 3 år siden der sidst var blevet arbejdet med det.

12h

 

3 Ways Cities Can Become More Sustainable

With the majority of the population moving into urban centers in coming decades, the actions of city planners now could create a better future for us all. But how? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

12h

 

Danske topforskere skal opklare universets tidlige mysterier

Et nyt dansk forskningscenter får plads på forreste række, når universets allerførste stjerner og galakser skal kortlægges.

13h

 

Motivating gamers with personalized game design

A team of multidisciplinary researchers at the University of Waterloo has identified three basic video game player traits that will help to make game design more personalized and more effectively motivate gamers in both entertainment and work applications.

13h

 

New targets found to reduce blood vessel damage in diabetes

In diabetes, both the tightly woven endothelial cells that line our blood vessels and the powerhouses that drive those cells start to come apart as early steps in the destruction of our vasculature.

13h

 

Seeing yourself as Einstein may change the way you think

People experiencing Albert Einstein's body as their own through a virtual reality simulation were less likely to unconsciously stereotype older people, while those with low self-esteem scored better on a cognitive test. The results suggest that the experience allowed people with low self-esteem to change how they saw themselves and increase their cognitive potential. The technique could be useful

13h

 

Parents who had severe trauma, stresses in childhood more likely to have kids with behavioral health problems

A new study finds that severe childhood trauma and stresses early in parents' lives are linked to higher rates of behavioral health problems in their own children.

13h

 

Physician burnout in small practices is dramatically lower than national average

Physicians who work in small, independent primary care practices — also known as SIPs — report dramatically lower levels of burnout than the national average (13.5 percent versus 54.4 percent), according to a study led by researchers at NYU School of Medicine publishing online July 9 in the Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine.

13h

 

Younger patients don't attain survival benefit from current rectal cancer treatment recommendations

A new study reveals that individuals younger than 50 years of age who are diagnosed with rectal cancer do not experience an overall survival benefit from currently recommended treatments. Specifically, the addition of chemotherapy and radiation to surgery does not prolong life for these patients.

13h

 

Lifetime sentence: Incarcerated parents impact youth behavior

Young adults who had parents incarcerated during childhood do not receive timely healthcare and have more unhealthy behaviors, Lurie Children's researchers find.

13h

 

First-trimester screening of pregnant women for elevated bacteria levels in urine

First-trimester screening of pregnant women for asymptomatic bacteriuria — higher than normal bacteria levels without symptoms of a bladder infection — is recommended by the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care in an updated guideline in CMAJ.

13h

 

Medical errors may stem more from physician burnout than unsafe health care settings

Physician burnout is at least equally responsible for medical errors as unsafe medical workplace conditions, if not more so, according to a study led by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine.

13h

 

Ozone hole mystery: China insulating chemical said to be source of rise

A banned chemical used to make household insulation is implicated in damage to the ozone layer.

14h

 

Electric cars: Charge points could be requirement in new build homes

Hundreds of thousands more charge points could be installed under plans from the transport secretary.

16h

 

Your brain "wiggles" a little with every heartbeat

Looking for a heartbeat? Advances in the MRI field can now show you. Read More

16h

 

Cross species transfer of genes has driven evolution

Far from just being the product of our parents, University of Adelaide scientists have shown that widespread transfer of genes between species has radically changed the genomes of today's mammals, and been an important driver of evolution.

17h

 

Potential drug for pain doesn’t work like an opioid

An investigational non-opioid drug that targets receptors on immune cells may be an effective way to treat chronic pain, a study with mice shows. Faced with the epidemic of opioid addiction, researchers looking for other strategies to treat pain have largely focused on nerve cells that transmit signals to the spinal cord and brain. The new research, which appears in the Journal of Neuroscience ,

17h

 

How the Medici family created and lost their banking empire

The Medici family had a long and powerful influence in European history for hundreds of years. They were well known for their banking prowess and are synonymous as an unparalleled patron of the arts during the Italian Renaissance. Read More

18h

 

Lifelong virus actually strengthens older immune systems

A virus called cytomegalovirus, or CMV, may strengthen, rather than harm, the immune system in old age, according to new research with mice. Our immune system is at its peak when we’re young, but after a certain age, it declines and it becomes more difficult for our bodies to fight off new infections. “…there is more capacity in the immune system at an older age than we thought.” “That’s why olde

19h

 

Most inner-belt asteroids come from just 5 or 6 planets

Most asteroids and meteorites originate from the splintering of a handful of minor planets formed during the infancy of our solar system, a new study shows. “These large bodies whiz by the Earth, so of course we’re very concerned about how many of these there are and what types of material are in them.” The study, published in Nature Astronomy , finds at least 85 percent of 200,000 asteroids in t

19h

 

Opioid interventions overlook women’s needs

Current efforts to confront the growth of opioid addiction and overdose deaths need to do a better job of incorporating how women fit into the epidemic, health experts say. A commentary in The Lancet calls on researchers, clinicians, and policymakers to account for the different ways in which women encounter opioid addiction and treatment. “As we tackle this epidemic, we must be sure that action

19h

 

Why do people like things on Facebook

submitted by /u/allthingsfascinating [link] [comments]

19h

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Pr. 9. juli 2018 fandtes følgende artikler på sciencenews.dk (som udgives af Novo Nordisk Fonden; artiklerne må kopieres med kildeangivelse:

 

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