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A Landmark Legal Shift Opens Pandora’s Box for DIY Guns

Cody Wilson makes digital files that let anyone 3-D print untraceable guns. The government tried to stop him. He sued—and won.

3h

 

Want an expensive engagement ring? Looks count

Men are willing to purchase more showy, expensive engagement rings when they imagine themselves with an attractive woman rather than a woman with average looks. Appearance also plays a role for women but, in contrast to men, they are more likely to select an expensive ring with a big stone when they are partnered with a less attractive man.

7h

 

DTU-bil bliver dobbelt vinder i internationalt miljø-race

Et hold bestående af 25 DTU-studerende har netop vundet to kategorier af Shell Eco Marathon i London. De studerendes bil kørte mest brændstoføkonomisk og var samtidig den bedste selvkørende bil.

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LATEST

 

NASA recorded what Saturn sounds like, hear it for yourself!

NASA recorded an interplanetary exchange. And it sounds not entirely unlike the beginning to a certain Daft Punk song. Read More

14min

 

Do trade wars really put America first?

President Trump has placed retaliatory tariffs on the U.S.’s closest allies. His justification for this policy is national security and the protection of America’s businesses. But history has shown us that trade wars don’t put America first. Read More

14min

 

Extinction is a natural process, but it’s happening at 1,000 times the normal speed

Animal extinction is, after all, inevitable in the natural world — some have even called it the “engine of evolution”. So why should extinction matter to us? Read More

14min

 

A woman died working at SeaWorld, and SCOTUS nominee Brett Kavanaugh was a judge in the OSHA case.

The killer whale involved in the incident, Tilikum, has been involved in 3 deaths of humans while in captivity. Read More

14min

 

What is the world's oldest color? Science now knows

For millions of years, this popular color dominated the world. Read More

14min

 

This is the comedy special we need right now

Hannah Gadsby claims "Nanette" is her exit from the stage. But she can change her mind. Read More

14min

 

Many Paleontologists Today Are Part Of The 'Jurassic Park' Generation

Paleontology is experiencing a golden age, with a new dinosaur species discovered every 10 days on average. Those inspired by the film Jurassic Park as children are now exiting Ph.D. programs and injecting the field with new talent.

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Researchers prevent, reverse renal injury by inhibiting immune-regulating molecule

Study findings from a team of scientists led by George C. Tsokos, MD, Chief of the Division of Rheumatology at BIDMC, overturn conventional wisdom about kidney disease.

37min

 

Birdwatch: seasonal flow in a farewell call and dusky drapes

It’s mid-summer yet the cuckoo’s adieu and spotted redshank’s dark plumage hint at autumn It may be the hottest, driest, summer since 1976 but on the first day of July I said goodbye to spring and greeted the coming of autumn, within a few short hours. The farewell to spring came in the form of a calling cuckoo at the RSPB’s flagship Ham Wall reserve in Somerset. Continue reading…

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Spotted Lanternfly Could Be Worst Invasive Species In 150 Years

International shipping sometimes brings unwanted guests: invasive species. The latest invader, the spotted lanternfly, threatens fruit and hardwoods. It's recently spread to Pennsylvania.

52min

 

Ancient find may be earliest extract of epic Homer poem Odyssey

Clay slab believed to date from 3rd century AD discovered near ancient city of Olympia Archaeologists have unearthed an ancient tablet engraved with 13 verses of the Odyssey in the ancient city of Olympia, southern Greece, in what could be the earliest record of the epic poem , the Greek culture ministry said. Related: The Odyssey by Homer – the first step Continue reading…

54min

 

IBM-EPFL-NJIT team demonstrates novel synaptic architecture for brain inspired computing

Two New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT) researchers, working with collaborators from the IBM Research Zurich Laboratory and the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, have demonstrated a novel synaptic architecture that could lead to a new class of information processing systems inspired by the brain.

58min

 

Male couples report as much domestic violence as straight couples

Nearly half of all men in a new study about intimate partner violence in male couples report being victims of abuse.

1h

 

Altered gene regulation is more widespread in cancer than expected

Researchers identified hundreds of cancer-associated genes for which structural rearrangements in their regulatory regions were associated with altered expression in cancer.

1h

 

Researchers confine mature cells to turn them into stem cells

Recent research has revealed that mature cells can be reprogrammed into re-deployable stem cells without direct genetic modification — by confining them to a defined geometric space for an extended period of time.

1h

 

Ecology and AI

Using more than three million photographs from the citizen science project Snapshot Serengeti, researchers trained a deep learning algorithm to automatically identify, count and describe animals in their natural habitats. Results showed the system was able to automate the process for up to 99.3 percent of images as accurately as human volunteers.

1h

 

Researchers discover a way to peer inside proteins to see how they are wired

Understanding how a protein is wired could help researchers develop ways to control its activity, and scientists believe they've come up with a reliable way to determine this, according to a newly published study.

1h

 

Scientists trigger hot flashes in female and male mice

By activating a single type of neuron, scientists triggered hot-flash-like symptoms in mice. Researchers show that so-called Kiss1 neurons in the hypothalamus that project to a brain region controlling body temperature may be the link between sex hormone fluctuations and the hot flashes that plague many menopausal women.

1h

 

Biologists discover process that neutralizes tumors

Researchers discovered an unexpected twist in the tumor vs. T cell battle. Tumors employ a protein called PD-L1 to blind T cells from carrying out their functions. PD-L1 protects tumors through a 'molecular brake' known as PD-1. Researchers have found that some tumor cells display not only their PD-L1 weapon, but also the PD-1 'brake,' essentially a neutralizing function. The unexpected mechanism

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NASA’s most prolific planet-hunting telescope is taking a nap

Space But the end is fast approaching. If anything deserves a rest, it’s Kepler. In less than 10 years, the Kepler Space Telescope confirmed the existence of over 2,500 worlds beyond our own.

1h

 

How we study the microbes living in your gut | Dan Knights

There are about a hundred trillion microbes living inside your gut — protecting you from infection, aiding digestion and regulating your immune system. Yet as our bodies have adapted to life in modern society, we've started to lose some of our normal microbes; at the same time, diseases linked to a loss of diversity in the gut are skyrocketing in developed nations. Computational microbiologist Da

1h

 

Game changing game changes

Using stochastic games to analyze evolution of cooperation, leads to a surprising discovery. The tragedy of the commons is resolved if the environment deteriorates in response to defection. The new approach offers invaluable insight into how cooperation plays a role in social issues ranging from sustainability to curbing climate change. It can also help policy makers to design systems which empowe

1h

 

Challenging the conventional wisdom on calculus

Contrary to widely-held opinion, taking high school calculus isn't necessary for success later in college calculus — what's more important is mastering the prerequisites, algebra, geometry, and trigonometry — that lead to calculus. That's according to a study of more than 6,000 college freshmen at 133 colleges carried out by the Science Education Department of the Harvard Smithsonian Center for

1h

 

Living in areas with less sun may increase your risk of OCD

Living at higher latitudes, where there is also less sunlight, could result in a higher prevalence rate of obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York.

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Discovery of 'First Giant' Dinosaur Is a Huge Evolutionary Finding

The discovery of the "first giant" dinosaur has provided a gigantic clue on how these paleo-beasts got to be the largest animals to walk on Earth.

1h

 

Apple's China-Friendly Censorship Caused an iPhone-Crashing Bug

The bug serves as a reminder of China-friendly censorship code hidden in all iOS devices.

1h

 

Patients with early kidney cancer benefit from robotic partial nephrectomy

A comprehensive study by the Keck School of Medicine of USC has found that robotic partial nephrectomy offers significantly better patient outcomes as compared with open or laparoscopic techniques.

1h

 

Controversial CRISPR "Gene Drives" Tested in Mammals for the First Time

Experiments in mice suggest the technology has a long way to go before being used for pest control in the wild — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

 

The future internet could be built of diamonds

Researchers at Princeton engineer a new type of diamond with silicon and boron that solves past issues with quantum data storage and retrieval. Read More

2h

 

Ravens are bigger, but crows are the boss.

When crows and ravens fight, it’s the smaller crows being the aggressor about 97% of the time. It may be them being protective of their nest or it may be competition, but ravens are the ones being bullied. Read More

2h

 

Mitochondrial Infusions Given to Babies with Heart Damage

Among 11 infants treated to date, most survived and their heart function improved.

2h

 

Images From Ivan Kupala Night

In parts of Ukraine, Belarus, Poland, and Russia, an ancient pagan summer rite called Kupala combined with the traditional Orthodox feast of Saint John the Baptist, becoming Ivan Kupala Night, a festival celebrating the summer solstice. On Ivan Kupala Night, young people wear wreaths symbolizing purity, people sing and dance around bonfires, and they bathe naked in rivers and lakes. Many gather u

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Differences in the mouths of youth born with HIV may increase their risk of dental decay

A team of scientists from The Forsyth Institute, a global leader in oral health research, in collaboration with the NIH-funded Pediatric HIV/AIDS Cohort Study (PHACS), has published the results of a new study indicating that differences in the mouth bacteria of youth born with HIV may increase their risk of cavities. The researchers found that HIV-infected youth, compared with uninfected youth, ha

2h

 

The 'Big Bang' of Alzheimer's: Scientists ID genesis of disease

Scientists have discovered a "Big Bang" of Alzheimer's disease – the precise point at which a healthy protein becomes toxic but has not yet formed deadly tangles in the brain.

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Judge: Experts can testify that Roundup linked to cancer

Evidence that Roundup weed killer can cause cancer seems "weak," but experts can still make that claim at trial, a U.S. judge ruled Tuesday.

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Carbon is the new black

Engineers with the University of Cincinnati are leveraging a partnership with Wright-Patterson Air Force Base to create clothing that can charge your cell phone.

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Israeli unmanned spacecraft to land on Moon in 2019

It will be the first privately-funded unmanned spacecraft to land on the lunar surface.

2h

 

How (and why) to teach a polar bear to walk on a treadmill

Animals What it takes to find food in the rapidly melting Arctic. Biologists put bears on treadmills to determine how much energy it costs them to walk. Data could predict what it takes to find food as sea ice continues to disappear.

2h

 

Promising clinical trial results of tucatinib with T-DM1 against HER2+ breast cancer

Of 57 patients treated, 48 percent responded to the combination, with cancer control of median 8.2 months.

2h

 

Carbon is the new black

Engineers with the University of Cincinnati are leveraging a partnership with Wright-Patterson Air Force Base to create clothing that can charge your cell phone.What makes this possible are the unique properties of carbon nanotubes: a large surface area that is strong, conductive and heat-resistant.

2h

 

England’s Unfamiliar Emotion: Hope

LONDON—It says a lot about England’s state of soccer fandom that its unofficial anthem is a paean to dreaming through disillusionment. “Three Lions,” a single recorded in 1996 by the comedians Frank Skinner and David Baddiel with the Lightning Seeds’ Ian Broudie, acknowledges the eternal disappointment of rooting for England in bald terms. “So many jokes, so many sneers,” Baddiel sings in the sec

2h

 

How Mycobacterium tuberculosis escapes death in macrophages

The bacteria that cause the devastating disease tuberculosis have the ability to escape destruction and grow after they are engulfed by lung macrophages, the immune cells that are supposed to destroy pathogens. Now researchers have described key biochemical steps between the bacteria Mycobacterium tuberculosis and the macrophage responsible for that ability.

2h

 

Algae, seaweed discolor Florida waters and beaches

Tourism, fishing and public health are being threatened by contaminants discoloring stretches of beaches at the southern end of the Florida peninsula.

2h

 

Wider access to HIV prevention drugs still needed

Anti-HIV drugs are highly effective, yet new infections continue because not everyone has equal access to treatment. A new study co-authored by San Francisco State University identifies obstacles that keep people from being treated and suggests interventions.

2h

 

An ATM that dispenses antioxidants

Research led by a Salk Institute professor along with collaborators from Yale, Appalachian State University and other institutions found that a protein called ATM (short for ataxia-telangiectasia mutated) can sense the presence of ROS and responds by sounding the alarm to trigger the production of antioxidants.

2h

 

Suppressing negative emotions during health scare may whip up spiral of fear

Trying to suppress worries during a health scare, like the recent Zika outbreak, may lead to an ever-intensifying cycle of emotional suppression and fear, according to a team of researchers.

2h

 

Extreme heat and reduced cognitive performance in adults in non-air-conditioned buildings

Students in dormitories without air conditioning performed worse on cognitive tests during a heat wave compared with students living in air-conditioned dorms. This is the first field study to show the detrimental cognitive effects of a heat wave in a group of young healthy individuals.

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On the 10th anniversary of the App store, it’s time to delete most of your apps

Technology Unused apps on your phone can do more harm than simply taking up space. Apps are amazing, but getting rid of them sure feels great.

3h

 

The Loaded Language Shaping the Trans Conversation

Editor’s Note: This article is part of a series of responses to Jesse Singal’s Atlantic article, “ When Children Say They’re Trans .” It’s a scene I know well: the awkward first moments when I’ve just stepped into a stranger’s house. Looking around, taking in the family portraits, the furniture, the smells, placating the family dog. The handshakes and offers of coffee or water. The first, tentati

3h

 

Why some people get dizzy when hearing certain sounds

Researchers have discovered why certain people experience dizziness when they hear a particular sound, such as a musical tone. For patients with semicircular canal dehiscence, there is a pathological hole in the bone that the inner ear is encased in, and certain acoustic tones cause the inner ear fluid to pump. As a result, the ear sends an incorrect signal to the brain, causing dizziness and vert

3h

 

Wetting of surfaces is surprisingly difficult to measure reliably

A group of researchers have provided a standardized approach to improve the accuracy and reliability of contact angle measurements of surfaces.

3h

 

Underlying mechanism discovered for magnetic effect in superconducting spintronics

Superconductor-ferromagnet structures are widely regarded as the building blocks of superconducting spintronic technology. More conventional spintronic devices typically require large currents, so researchers are investigating the viability of low-resistance superconductors. Their new results could answer longstanding questions about how SF structures interact.

3h

 

Improved immunity against reinfections

Researchers have discovered a connection between the body's memory cells and a unique protein in the body called purinergic receptor P2RX7, influencing the body's long-term immune system.

3h

 

Newly discovered properties of ferroelectric crystal shed light on branch of materials

Ferroelectric materials are behind some of the most advanced technology available today. Findings that ferroelectricity can be observed in materials that exhibit other spontaneous transitions have given rise to a new class of materials, known as hybrid improper ferroelectrics. The properties of this type of material, however, are still far from being fully understood. New findings published in App

3h

 

Drug's impact on amino acid transporter may offer non-small cell lung cancer patients new hope

An amino acid transporter named xCT may affect the growth and progression of non-small cell lung cancer, a discovery that may predict the five-year survival rate of patients suffering from this cancer, now at 16 percent, researchers have concluded.

3h

 

Gene Editing Reduces Monkeys’ Cholesterol

The results could lead to a treatment to lower cholesterol in patients with hypercholesterolemia.

3h

 

Supreme Court Nominee Draws Concern from Environmentalists

President Trump's pick, Judge Brett Kavanaugh, has often opposed court involvement in environmental and health regulations.

3h

 

UA researchers preparing for quick radiation diagnostic test in case of a nuclear disaster

Researchers' goal is to improve radiation testing through gene expression.

3h

 

Brain arousal compound noradrenaline plays critical role in sensory perception

A new study suggests that noradrenaline, a neurotransmitter responsible for arousal in the brain, plays a vital role in early sensory perceptions of the world.

3h

 

Finding a weak link in the frightful parasite Schistosoma

Researchers have shed light on the complex life cycle of Schistosoma, a parasite responsible for sickening hundreds of millions of people in the developing world.

3h

 

Rising carbon dioxide levels pose a previously unrecognized threat to monarch butterflies

A new study reveals a previously unrecognized threat to monarch butterflies: Mounting levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide reduce the medicinal properties of milkweed plants that protect the iconic insects from disease.

3h

 

Stop antibiotics before resistance 'tipping point'

Treatments using antibiotics should stop as soon as possible to prevent patients passing the 'tipping point' of becoming resistant to their effects, new research has shown.

3h

 

Grasslands more reliable carbon sink than trees

A study has found that increased drought and wildfire risk make grasslands and rangelands a more reliable carbon sink than trees in 21st century California. As such, the study indicates they should be given opportunities in the state's cap-and-and trade market, which is designed to reduce California's greenhouse gas emissions to 40 percent below 1990 levels by 2030.

3h

 

Zimbabwe launches space agency

Zimbabwean President Emmerson Mnangagwa Tuesday launched a space agency, hailing it as a "milestone" as he campaigns ahead of elections at the end of the month.

3h

 

How to eliminate MYCN-positive hepatic cancer stem cells to prevent the recurrence? [Biological Sciences]

I read with great interest the work of Qin et al. (1), in which the authors reveal that acyclic retinoid (ACR) selectively eliminates cancer stem cells (CSCs) of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), which highly express MYCN with enhanced Wnt/β-catenin signal pathway. There exist several molecules that are highly expressed in HCC-CSCs,…

3h

 

Reply to Yoshida: Liver cancer stem cells: Identification and lipid metabolic reprogramming [Biological Sciences]

As a molecular basis by which acyclic retinoid (ACR) prevents recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), we identify MYCN+ liver cancer stem cell (CSC)-like cell serves as a biomarker and therapeutic target to be selectively eliminated by ACR (1). In the Letter by Yoshida (2), the author makes two important comments…

3h

 

Genome diversity of the potato [Biological Sciences]

In a recent issue of PNAS, Hardigan et al. (1) state that the genetic diversity of the potato is much greater than that of other major crops, based on 68.9 million SNPs identified from the resequencing of 67 accessions of wild and cultivated potatoes. We questioned this conclusion based on…

3h

 

Reply to Huang et al.: Avoiding “one-size-fits-all” approaches to variant discovery [Biological Sciences]

Huang et al. (1) argue that variant calling methods less conservative than GATK’s Best Practices workflow (2) increased false-positive variant discovery in our study of wild and cultivated potatoes (3), impacting diversity estimates. We disagree with their conclusion and highlight the rationale for the variant calling methods used in our…

3h

 

Vibrational coherence transfer in the ultrafast intersystem crossing of a diplatinum complex in solution [Chemistry]

We investigate the ultrafast transient absorption response of tetrakis(μ-pyrophosphito)diplatinate(II), [Pt2(μ-P2O5H2)4]4− [hereafter abbreviated Pt(pop)], in acetonitrile upon excitation of its lowest singlet 1A2u state. Compared with previously reported solvents [van der Veen RM, Cannizzo A, van Mourik F, Vlček A, Jr, Chergui M (2011) J Am Chem Soc 133:305–315], a significant…

3h

 

Kinetically guided radical-based synthesis of C(sp3)-C(sp3) linkages on DNA [Chemistry]

DNA-encoded libraries (DEL)-based discovery platforms have recently been widely adopted in the pharmaceutical industry, mainly due to their powerful diversity and incredible number of molecules. In the two decades since their disclosure, great strides have been made to expand the toolbox of reaction modes that are compatible with the idiosyncratic…

3h

 

Learning atoms for materials discovery [Physics]

Exciting advances have been made in artificial intelligence (AI) during recent decades. Among them, applications of machine learning (ML) and deep learning techniques brought human-competitive performances in various tasks of fields, including image recognition, speech recognition, and natural language understanding. Even in Go, the ancient game of profound complexity, the…

3h

 

Developmental prosopagnosics have widespread selectivity reductions across category-selective visual cortex [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

Developmental prosopagnosia (DP) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by severe deficits with facial identity recognition. It is unclear which cortical areas contribute to face processing deficits in DP, and no previous studies have investigated whether other category-selective areas function normally in DP. To address these issues, we scanned 22 DPs…

3h

 

Unusual duplication mutation in a surface loop of human transthyretin leads to an aggressive drug-resistant amyloid disease [Biochemistry]

Transthyretin (TTR) is a globular tetrameric transport protein in plasma. Nearly 140 single amino acid substitutions in TTR cause life-threatening amyloid disease. We report a one-of-a-kind pathological variant featuring a Glu51, Ser52 duplication mutation (Glu51_Ser52dup). The proband, heterozygous for the mutation, exhibited an unusually aggressive amyloidosis that was refractory to…

3h

 

Gene expression distribution deconvolution in single-cell RNA sequencing [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Single-cell RNA sequencing (scRNA-seq) enables the quantification of each gene’s expression distribution across cells, thus allowing the assessment of the dispersion, nonzero fraction, and other aspects of its distribution beyond the mean. These statistical characterizations of the gene expression distribution are critical for understanding expression variation and for selecting marker…

3h

 

Reversible inhibition of the ClpP protease via an N-terminal conformational switch [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Protein homeostasis is critically important for cell viability. Key to this process is the refolding of misfolded or aggregated proteins by molecular chaperones or, alternatively, their degradation by proteases. In most prokaryotes and in chloroplasts and mitochondria, protein degradation is performed by the caseinolytic protease ClpP, a tetradecamer barrel-like proteolytic…

3h

 

Structural basis for recognition of human 7SK long noncoding RNA by the La-related protein Larp7 [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

The La and the La-related protein (LARP) superfamily is a diverse class of RNA binding proteins involved in RNA processing, folding, and function. Larp7 binds to the abundant long noncoding 7SK RNA and is required for 7SK ribonucleoprotein (RNP) assembly and function. The 7SK RNP sequesters a pool of the…

3h

 

Targeting {beta}1-integrin inhibits vascular leakage in endotoxemia [Cell Biology]

Loss of endothelial integrity promotes capillary leakage in numerous diseases, including sepsis, but there are no effective therapies for preserving endothelial barrier function. Angiopoietin-2 (ANGPT2) is a context-dependent regulator of vascular leakage that signals via both endothelial TEK receptor tyrosine kinase (TIE2) and integrins. Here, we show that antibodies against…

3h

 

PIP30/FAM192A is a novel regulator of the nuclear proteasome activator PA28{gamma} [Cell Biology]

PA28γ is a nuclear activator of the 20S proteasome involved in the regulation of several essential cellular processes, such as cell proliferation, apoptosis, nuclear dynamics, and cellular stress response. Unlike the 19S regulator of the proteasome, which specifically recognizes ubiquitylated proteins, PA28γ promotes the degradation of several substrates by the…

3h

 

F-actin homeostasis through transcriptional regulation and proteasome-mediated proteolysis [Cell Biology]

Many organisms possess multiple and often divergent actins whose regulation and roles are not understood in detail. For example, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has both a conventional actin (IDA5) and a highly divergent one (NAP1); only IDA5 is expressed in normal proliferating cells. We showed previously that the drug latrunculin B (LatB)…

3h

 

Phosphatases control PKA-dependent functional microdomains at the outer mitochondrial membrane [Cell Biology]

Evidence supporting the heterogeneity in cAMP and PKA signaling is rapidly accumulating and has been largely attributed to the localization or activity of adenylate cyclases, phosphodiesterases, and A-kinase–anchoring proteins in different cellular subcompartments. However, little attention has been paid to the possibility that, despite homogeneous cAMP levels, a major heterogeneity…

3h

 

Whole-genome data reveal the complex history of a diverse ecological community [Ecology]

How widespread ecological communities assemble remains a key question in ecology. Trophic interactions between widespread species may reflect a shared population history or ecological fitting of local pools of species with very different population histories. Which scenario applies is central to the stability of trophic associations and the potential for…

3h

 

Real-time dynamics of mutagenesis reveal the chronology of DNA repair and damage tolerance responses in single cells [Genetics]

Evolutionary processes are driven by diverse molecular mechanisms that act in the creation and prevention of mutations. It remains unclear how these mechanisms are regulated because limitations of existing mutation assays have precluded measuring how mutation rates vary over time in single cells. Toward this goal, I detected nascent DNA…

3h

 

Evolutionary genomic dynamics of Peruvians before, during, and after the Inca Empire [Genetics]

Native Americans from the Amazon, Andes, and coastal geographic regions of South America have a rich cultural heritage but are genetically understudied, therefore leading to gaps in our knowledge of their genomic architecture and demographic history. In this study, we sequence 150 genomes to high coverage combined with an additional…

3h

 

Gentamicin induces LAMB3 nonsense mutation readthrough and restores functional laminin 332 in junctional epidermolysis bullosa [Genetics]

Herlitz junctional epidermolysis bullosa (H-JEB) is an incurable, devastating, and mostly fatal inherited skin disease for which there is only supportive care. H-JEB is caused by loss-of-function mutations in LAMA3, LAMB3, or LAMC2, leading to complete loss of laminin 332, the major component of anchoring filaments, which mediate epidermal-dermal adherence….

3h

 

Fatty acid metabolism complements glycolysis in the selective regulatory T cell expansion during tumor growth [Immunology and Inflammation]

The tumor microenvironment restrains conventional T cell (Tconv) activation while facilitating the expansion of Tregs. Here we showed that Tregs’ advantage in the tumor milieu relies on supplemental energetic routes involving lipid metabolism. In murine models, tumor-infiltrating Tregs displayed intracellular lipid accumulation, which was attributable to an increased rate of…

3h

 

Disrupting LXR{alpha} phosphorylation promotes FoxM1 expression and modulates atherosclerosis by inducing macrophage proliferation [Medical Sciences]

Macrophages are key immune cells for the initiation and development of atherosclerotic lesions. However, the macrophage regulatory nodes that determine how lesions progress in response to dietary challenges are not fully understood. Liver X receptors (LXRs) are sterol-regulated transcription factors that play a central role in atherosclerosis by integrating cholesterol…

3h

 

Drosophila model of myosin myopathy rescued by overexpression of a TRIM-protein family member [Medical Sciences]

Myosin is a molecular motor indispensable for body movement and heart contractility. Apart from pure cardiomyopathy, mutations in MYH7 encoding slow/β-cardiac myosin heavy chain also cause skeletal muscle disease with or without cardiac involvement. Mutations within the α-helical rod domain of MYH7 are mainly associated with Laing distal myopathy. To…

3h

 

Autoantibodies reactive to adrenocorticotropic hormone can alter cortisol secretion in both aggressive and nonaggressive humans [Medical Sciences]

Violent aggression in humans may involve a modified response to stress, but the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. Here we show that naturally present autoantibodies reactive to adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) exhibit distinct epitope-binding profiles to ACTH peptide in subjects with a history of violent aggression compared with controls. Namely,…

3h

 

Coupled laboratory and field investigations resolve microbial interactions that underpin persistence in hydraulically fractured shales [Microbiology]

Hydraulic fracturing is one of the industrial processes behind the surging natural gas output in the United States. This technology inadvertently creates an engineered microbial ecosystem thousands of meters below Earth’s surface. Here, we used laboratory reactors to perform manipulations of persisting shale microbial communities that are currently not feasible…

3h

 

Direct cell-cell contact activates SigM to express the ESX-4 secretion system in Mycobacterium smegmatis [Microbiology]

Conjugal cell–cell contact between strains of Mycobacterium smegmatis induces the esxUT transcript, which encodes the putative primary substrates of the ESAT-6 secretion system 4 (ESX-4) secretion system. This recipient response was required for conjugal transfer of chromosomal DNA from the donor strain. Here we show that the extracytoplasmic σ factor,…

3h

 

Arthropod EVs mediate dengue virus transmission through interaction with a tetraspanin domain containing glycoprotein Tsp29Fb [Microbiology]

Dengue virus (DENV) is a mosquito-borne flavivirus that causes dengue fever in humans, worldwide. Using in vitro cell lines derived from Aedes albopictus and Aedes aegypti, the primary vectors of DENV, we report that DENV2/DENV3-infected cells secrete extracellular vesicles (EVs), including exosomes, containing infectious viral RNA and proteins. A full-length…

3h

 

Inhibitor of intramembrane protease RseP blocks the {sigma}E response causing lethal accumulation of unfolded outer membrane proteins [Microbiology]

The outer membrane (OM) of Gram-negative bacteria forms a robust permeability barrier that blocks entry of toxins and antibiotics. Most OM proteins (OMPs) assume a β-barrel fold, and some form aqueous channels for nutrient uptake and efflux of intracellular toxins. The Bam machine catalyzes rapid folding and assembly of OMPs….

3h

 

In vivo imaging of the pathophysiological changes and neutrophil dynamics in influenza virus-infected mouse lungs [Microbiology]

The pathophysiological changes that occur in lungs infected with influenza viruses are poorly understood. Here we established an in vivo imaging system that combines two-photon excitation microscopy and fluorescent influenza viruses of different pathogenicity. This approach allowed us to monitor and correlate several parameters and physiological changes including the spread…

3h

 

Piano training enhances the neural processing of pitch and improves speech perception in Mandarin-speaking children [Neuroscience]

Musical training confers advantages in speech-sound processing, which could play an important role in early childhood education. To understand the mechanisms of this effect, we used event-related potential and behavioral measures in a longitudinal design. Seventy-four Mandarin-speaking children aged 4–5 y old were pseudorandomly assigned to piano training, reading training,…

3h

 

Amyloid clearance defect in ApoE4 astrocytes is reversed by epigenetic correction of endosomal pH [Physiology]

Endosomes have emerged as a central hub and pathogenic driver of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The earliest brain cytopathology in neurodegeneration, occurring decades before amyloid plaques and cognitive decline, is an expansion in the size and number of endosomal compartments. The strongest genetic risk factor for sporadic AD is the ε4…

3h

 

Multigenome analysis implicates miniature inverted-repeat transposable elements (MITEs) in metabolic diversification in eudicots [Plant Biology]

Plants produce a plethora of natural products, including many drugs. It has recently emerged that the genes encoding different natural product pathways may be organized as biosynthetic gene clusters in plant genomes, with >30 examples reported so far. Despite superficial similarities with microbes, these clusters have not arisen by horizontal…

3h

 

Degradation of unmethylated miRNA/miRNA*s by a DEDDy-type 3' to 5' exoribonuclease Atrimmer 2 in Arabidopsis [Plant Biology]

The 3′ end methylation catalyzed by HUA Enhancer 1 (HEN1) is a crucial step of small RNA stabilization in plants, yet how unmethylated small RNAs undergo degradation remains largely unknown. Using a reverse genetic approach, we here show that Atrimmer 2 (ATRM2), a DEDDy-type 3′ to 5′ exoribonuclease, acts in…

3h

 

Action potential counting at giant mossy fiber terminals gates information transfer in the hippocampus [Neuroscience]

Neuronal communication relies on action potential discharge, with the frequency and the temporal precision of action potentials encoding information. Hippocampal mossy fibers have long been recognized as conditional detonators owing to prominent short-term facilitation of glutamate release displayed during granule cell burst firing. However, the spiking patterns required to trigger…

3h

 

Dissecting the neurofunctional bases of intentional action [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

Here we challenge and present evidence that expands the what, when, and whether anatomical model of intentional action, which states that internally driven decisions about the content and timing of our actions and about whether to act at all depend on separable neural systems, anatomically segregated along the medial wall…

3h

 

Correction for LeClere et al., Cross-resistance to dicamba, 2,4-D, and fluroxypyr in Kochia scoparia is endowed by a mutation in an AUX/IAA gene [Correction]

AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES Correction for “Cross-resistance to dicamba, 2,4-D, and fluroxypyr in Kochia scoparia is endowed by a mutation in an AUX/IAA gene,” by Sherry LeClere, Chenxi Wu, Philip Westra, and R. Douglas Sammons, which was first published March 12, 2018; 10.1073/pnas.1712372115 (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 115:E2911–E2920). The authors wish…

3h

 

Correction for Artemenko et al., Chemical and mechanical stimuli act on common signal transduction and cytoskeletal networks [Correction]

CELL BIOLOGY Correction for “Chemical and mechanical stimuli act on common signal transduction and cytoskeletal networks,” by Yulia Artemenko, Lucas Axiotakis Jr., Jane Borleis, Pablo A. Iglesias, and Peter N. Devreotes, which was first published November 7, 2016; 10.1073/pnas.1608767113 (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 113:E7500–E7509). The authors note that the…

3h

 

Correction for Lampert et al., Shear force-based genetic screen reveals negative regulators of cell adhesion and protrusive activity [Correction]

CELL BIOLOGY Correction for “Shear force-based genetic screen reveals negative regulators of cell adhesion and protrusive activity,” by Thomas J. Lampert, Nadine Kamprad, Marc Edwards, Jane Borleis, Ayende J. Watson, Marco Tarantola, and Peter N. Devreotes, which was first published August 28, 2017; 10.1073/pnas.1616600114 (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 114:E7727–E7736)….

3h

 

Correction for Edwards et al., Insight from the maximal activation of the signal transduction excitable network in Dictyostelium discoideum [Correction]

CELL BIOLOGY Correction for “Insight from the maximal activation of the signal transduction excitable network in Dictyostelium discoideum,” by Marc Edwards, Huaqing Cai, Bedri Abubaker-Sharif, Yu Long, Thomas J. Lampert, and Peter N. Devreotes, which was first published March 30, 2018; 10.1073/pnas.1710480115 (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 115:E3722–E3730). The authors…

3h

 

In This Issue [This Week in PNAS]

Piano training might improve language skills Piano training is tied to improved linguistic skills. Image courtesy of iStock/ClarkandCompany. Music training has been tied to improved linguistic ability in children and adolescents, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. To probe the link, Yun Nan et al. (pp. E6630–E6639) recruited 74 cognitively…

3h

 

QnAs with Ewine F. van Dishoeck [QnAs]

In the last 15 years, two major international projects—the Herschel Space Observatory and the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA)—have transformed researchers’ ability to investigate interstellar space at the farthest reaches of the universe. The 2018 recipient of the James Craig Watson Medal of the National Academy of Sciences, Ewine F….

3h

 

Single-cell mutagenic responses and cell death revealed in real time [Genetics]

When musing about evolution, the physician and scientific essayist Lewis Thomas wrote, “The capacity to blunder slightly is the real marvel of DNA. Without this special attribute, we would still be anaerobic bacteria and there would be no music” (1). Understanding how DNA mutations arise in cells, either spontaneously or…

3h

 

Prepatterned liquid crystal elastomers as a step toward artificial morphogenesis [Applied Physical Sciences]

Morphogenesis, a biological process that translates nanoscale details of molecular organization into a macroscopic shape of an organism, is a marvel of nature. Morphogenesis starts with a placement of predesigned molecules of different chemical structure into predetermined locations, with subsequent out-of-equilibrium interactions and developments fueled by an influx of energy….

3h

 

Designing nanocellulose materials from the molecular scale [Engineering]

Cellulose, in the form of cellulose nanocrystals, cellulose nanofibrils, or bacterial cellulose, has emerged as a renewable material with countless potential applications in materials science and engineering (1). Its anisotropy and excellent mechanical properties, together with its biocompatibility and tunable surface chemistry, have made cellulose-based nanomaterials a cornerstone in a…

3h

 

Psychological health and socioeconomic status among non-Hispanic whites [Social Sciences]

Much attention has been paid of late to drug abuse and mortality among less-educated whites. This group, often referred to as the “white working class,” is typically defined as non-Hispanic whites who do not have Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science college degrees (1). Mortality rates have risen for…

3h

 

US nuclear power: The vanishing low-carbon wedge [Sustainability Science]

Nuclear power holds the potential to make a significant contribution to decarbonizing the US energy system. Whether it could do so in its current form is a critical question: Existing large light water reactors in the United States are under economic pressure from low natural gas prices, and some have…

3h

 

Near-optimal matrix recovery from random linear measurements [Applied Mathematics]

In matrix recovery from random linear measurements, one is interested in recovering an unknown M-by-N matrix X0 from n

3h

 

Universal inverse design of surfaces with thin nematic elastomer sheets [Applied Physical Sciences]

Programmable shape-shifting materials can take different physical forms to achieve multifunctionality in a dynamic and controllable manner. Although morphing a shape from 2D to 3D via programmed inhomogeneous local deformations has been demonstrated in various ways, the inverse problem—finding how to program a sheet in order for it to take…

3h

 

Symmetric shear banding and swarming vortices in bacterial superfluids [Applied Physical Sciences]

Bacterial suspensions—a premier example of active fluids—show an unusual response to shear stresses. Instead of increasing the viscosity of the suspending fluid, the emergent collective motions of swimming bacteria can turn a suspension into a superfluid with zero apparent viscosity. Although the existence of active superfluids has been demonstrated in…

3h

 

Close-packed block copolymer micelles induced by temperature quenching [Applied Physical Sciences]

Close-packed structures of uniformly sized spheres are ubiquitous across diverse material systems including elements, micelles, and colloidal assemblies. However, the controlled access to a specific symmetry of self-assembled close-packed spherical particles has not been well established. We investigated the ordering of spherical block copolymer micelles in aqueous solutions that was…

3h

 

Dynamically reinforced heterogeneous grain structure prolongs ductility in a medium-entropy alloy with gigapascal yield strength [Applied Physical Sciences]

Ductility, i.e., uniform strain achievable in uniaxial tension, diminishes for materials with very high yield strength. Even for the CrCoNi medium-entropy alloy (MEA), which has a simple face-centered cubic (FCC) structure that would bode well for high ductility, the fine grains processed to achieve gigapascal strength exhaust the strain hardening…

3h

 

Identification and nanomechanical characterization of the fundamental single-strand protofilaments of amyloid {alpha}-synuclein fibrils [Biochemistry]

The formation and spreading of amyloid aggregates from the presynaptic protein α-synuclein in the brain play central roles in the pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease. Here, we use high-resolution atomic force microscopy to investigate the early oligomerization events of α-synuclein with single monomer angstrom resolution. We identify, visualize, and characterize directly…

3h

 

Catalytic iron-carbene intermediate revealed in a cytochrome c carbene transferase [Biochemistry]

Recently, heme proteins have been discovered and engineered by directed evolution to catalyze chemical transformations that are biochemically unprecedented. Many of these nonnatural enzyme-catalyzed reactions are assumed to proceed through a catalytic iron porphyrin carbene (IPC) intermediate, although this intermediate has never been observed in a protein. Using crystallographic, spectroscopic,..

3h

 

The mutagen and carcinogen cadmium is a high-affinity inhibitor of the zinc-dependent MutL{alpha} endonuclease [Biochemistry]

MutLα (MLH1-PMS2 heterodimer), which acts as a strand-directed endonuclease during the initiation of eukaryotic mismatch repair, has been postulated to function as a zinc-dependent enzyme [Kosinski J, Plotz G, Guarné A, Bujnicki JM, Friedhoff P (2008) J Mol Biol 382:610–627]. We show that human MutLα copurifies with two bound zinc…

3h

 

Structure of the Lassa virus glycan shield provides a model for immunological resistance [Biochemistry]

Lassa virus is an Old World arenavirus endemic to West Africa that causes severe hemorrhagic fever. Vaccine development has focused on the envelope glycoprotein complex (GPC) that extends from the virion envelope. The often inadequate antibody immune response elicited by both vaccine and natural infection has been, in part, attributed…

3h

 

Ionophoric effects of the antitubercular drug bedaquiline [Biochemistry]

Bedaquiline (BDQ), an inhibitor of the mycobacterial F1Fo-ATP synthase, has revolutionized the antitubercular drug discovery program by defining energy metabolism as a potent new target space. Several studies have recently suggested that BDQ ultimately causes mycobacterial cell death through a phenomenon known as uncoupling. The biochemical basis underlying this, in…

3h

 

Capsid protein structure, self-assembly, and processing reveal morphogenesis of the marine virophage mavirus [Biochemistry]

Virophages have the unique property of parasitizing giant viruses within unicellular hosts. Little is understood about how they form infectious virions in this tripartite interplay. We provide mechanistic insights into assembly and maturation of mavirus, a marine virophage, by combining structural and stability studies on capsomers, virus-like particles (VLPs), and…

3h

 

Structure of RNA polymerase complex and genome within a dsRNA virus provides insights into the mechanisms of transcription and assembly [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Most double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) viruses transcribe RNA plus strands within a common innermost capsid shell. This process requires coordinated efforts by RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) together with other capsid proteins and genomic RNA. Here we report the near-atomic resolution structure of the RdRp protein VP2 in complex with its cofactor…

3h

 

ZNF281 inhibits neuronal differentiation and is a prognostic marker for neuroblastoma [Cell Biology]

Derangement of cellular differentiation because of mutation or inappropriate expression of specific genes is a common feature in tumors. Here, we show that the expression of ZNF281, a zinc finger factor involved in several cellular processes, decreases during terminal differentiation of murine cortical neurons and in retinoic acid-induced differentiation of…

3h

 

Formation of HONO from the NH3-promoted hydrolysis of NO2 dimers in the atmosphere [Chemistry]

One challenging issue in atmospheric chemistry is identifying the source of nitrous acid (HONO), which is believed to be a primary source of atmospheric “detergent” OH radicals. Herein, we show a reaction route for the formation of HONO species from the NH3-promoted hydrolysis of a NO2 dimer (ONONO2), which entails…

3h

 

Design principles for photonic crystals based on plasmonic nanoparticle superlattices [Chemistry]

Photonic crystals have been widely studied due to their broad technological applications in lasers, sensors, optical telecommunications, and display devices. Typically, photonic crystals are periodic structures of touching dielectric materials with alternating high and low refractive indices, and to date, the variables of interest have focused primarily on crystal symmetry…

3h

 

Kinetics teach that electronic coupling lowers the free-energy change that accompanies electron transfer [Chemistry]

Electron-transfer theories predict that an increase in the quantum-mechanical mixing (HDA) of electron donor and acceptor wavefunctions at the instant of electron transfer drives equilibrium constants toward unity. Kinetic and equilibrium studies of four acceptor–bridge–donor (A-B-D) compounds reported herein provide experimental validation of this prediction. The compounds have two redox-active..

3h

 

O-GlcNAcylation regulates the stability and enzymatic activity of the histone methyltransferase EZH2 [Chemistry]

Protein O-glycosylation by attachment of β-N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) to the Ser or Thr residue is a major posttranslational glycosylation event and is often associated with protein folding, stability, and activity. The methylation of histone H3 at Lys-27 catalyzed by the methyltransferase EZH2 was known to suppress gene expression and cancer development,…

3h

 

Fisheries bycatch risk to marine megafauna is intensified in Lagrangian coherent structures [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

Incidental catch of nontarget species (bycatch) is a major barrier to ecological and economic sustainability in marine capture fisheries. Key to mitigating bycatch is an understanding of the habitat requirements of target and nontarget species and the influence of heterogeneity and variability in the dynamic marine environment. While patterns of…

3h

 

Large-scale replicated field study of maize rhizosphere identifies heritable microbes [Ecology]

Soil microbes that colonize plant roots and are responsive to differences in plant genotype remain to be ascertained for agronomically important crops. From a very large-scale longitudinal field study of 27 maize inbred lines planted in three fields, with partial replication 5 y later, we identify root-associated microbiota exhibiting reproducible…

3h

 

Disease outbreak thresholds emerge from interactions between movement behavior, landscape structure, and epidemiology [Ecology]

Disease models have provided conflicting evidence as to whether spatial heterogeneity promotes or impedes pathogen persistence. Moreover, there has been limited theoretical investigation into how animal movement behavior interacts with the spatial organization of resources (e.g., clustered, random, uniform) across a landscape to affect infectious disease dynamics. Importantly, spatial heterogeneit

3h

 

Cellulose crystals plastify by localized shear [Engineering]

Cellulose microfibrils are the principal structural building blocks of wood and plants. Their crystalline domains provide outstanding mechanical properties. Cellulose microfibrils have thus a remarkable potential as eco-friendly fibrous reinforcements for structural engineered materials. However, the elastoplastic properties of cellulose crystals remain poorly understood. Here, we use atomistic si

3h

 

Fast charging of lithium-ion batteries at all temperatures [Engineering]

Fast charging is a key enabler of mainstream adoption of electric vehicles (EVs). None of today’s EVs can withstand fast charging in cold or even cool temperatures due to the risk of lithium plating. Efforts to enable fast charging are hampered by the trade-off nature of a lithium-ion battery: Improving…

3h

 

Ionic liquids for oral insulin delivery [Engineering]

With the rise in diabetes mellitus cases worldwide and lack of patient adherence to glycemia management using injectable insulin, there is an urgent need for the development of efficient oral insulin formulations. However, the gastrointestinal tract presents a formidable barrier to oral delivery of biologics. Here we report the development…

3h

 

Molecular model of human tropoelastin and implications of associated mutations [Engineering]

Protein folding poses unique challenges for large, disordered proteins due to the low resolution of structural data accessible in experiment and on the basis of short time scales and limited sampling attainable in computation. Such molecules are uniquely suited to accelerated-sampling molecular dynamics algorithms due to a flat-energy landscape. We…

3h

 

Aerosol microdroplets exhibit a stable pH gradient [Environmental Sciences]

Suspended aqueous aerosol droplets (<50 µm) are microreactors for many important atmospheric reactions. In droplets and other aquatic environments, pH is arguably the key parameter dictating chemical and biological processes. The nature of the droplet air/water interface has the potential to significantly alter droplet pH relative to bulk water. Historically,…

3h

 

Changes in brain architecture are consistent with altered fear processing in domestic rabbits [Evolution]

The most characteristic feature of domestic animals is their change in behavior associated with selection for tameness. Here we show, using high-resolution brain magnetic resonance imaging in wild and domestic rabbits, that domestication reduced amygdala volume and enlarged medial prefrontal cortex volume, supporting that areas driving fear have lost volume…

3h

 

Mutational and transcriptional landscape of spontaneous gene duplications and deletions in Caenorhabditis elegans [Evolution]

Gene duplication and deletion are pivotal processes shaping the structural and functional repertoire of genomes, with implications for disease, adaptation, and evolution. We employed a mutation accumulation (MA) framework partnered with high-throughput genomics to assess the molecular and transcriptional characteristics of newly arisen gene copy-number variants (CNVs) in Caenorhabditis elegans…

3h

 

miR-34a directly targets tRNAiMet precursors and affects cellular proliferation, cell cycle, and apoptosis [Genetics]

It remains unknown whether microRNA (miRNA/miR) can target transfer RNA (tRNA) molecules. Here we provide evidence that miR-34a physically interacts with and functionally targets tRNAiMet precursors in both in vitro pulldown and Argonaute 2 (AGO2) cleavage assays. We find that miR-34a suppresses breast carcinogenesis, at least in part by lowering…

3h

 

Sex-chromosome dosage effects on gene expression in humans [Genetics]

A fundamental question in the biology of sex differences has eluded direct study in humans: How does sex-chromosome dosage (SCD) shape genome function? To address this, we developed a systematic map of SCD effects on gene function by analyzing genome-wide expression data in humans with diverse sex-chromosome aneuploidies (XO, XXX,…

3h

 

Targeting the IL33-NLRP3 axis improves therapy for experimental cerebral malaria [Immunology and Inflammation]

Cerebral malaria (CM) is a serious neurological complication caused by Plasmodium falciparum infection. Currently, the only treatment for CM is the provision of antimalarial drugs; however, such treatment by itself often fails to prevent death or development of neurological sequelae. To identify potential improved treatments for CM, we performed a…

3h

 

Resistance to Plasmodium falciparum in sickle cell trait erythrocytes is driven by oxygen-dependent growth inhibition [Mathematics]

Sickle cell trait (AS) confers partial protection against lethal Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Multiple mechanisms for this have been proposed, with a recent focus on aberrant cytoadherence of parasite-infected red blood cells (RBCs). Here we investigate the mechanistic basis of AS protection through detailed temporal mapping. We find that parasites in…

3h

 

Enhancement of Ebola virus infection by seminal amyloid fibrils [Microbiology]

The 2014 western Africa Ebola virus (EBOV) epidemic was unprecedented in magnitude, infecting over 28,000 and causing over 11,000 deaths. During this outbreak, multiple instances of EBOV sexual transmission were reported, including cases where the infectious individual had recovered from EBOV disease months before transmission. Potential human host factors in…

3h

 

Staphylococcus aureus biofilms release leukocidins to elicit extracellular trap formation and evade neutrophil-mediated killing [Microbiology]

Bacterial biofilms efficiently evade immune defenses, greatly complicating the prognosis of chronic infections. How methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) biofilms evade host immune defenses is largely unknown. This study describes some of the major mechanisms required for S. aureus biofilms to evade the innate immune response and provides evidence of key…

3h

 

Interplay of a secreted protein with type IVb pilus for efficient enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli colonization [Microbiology]

Initial attachment and subsequent colonization of the intestinal epithelium comprise critical events allowing enteric pathogens to survive and express their pathogenesis. In enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC), these are mediated by a long proteinaceous fiber termed type IVb pilus (T4bP). We have reported that the colonization factor antigen/III (CFA/III), an operon-encoded…

3h

 

Focal, remote-controlled, chronic chemical modulation of brain microstructures [Neuroscience]

Direct delivery of fluid to brain parenchyma is critical in both research and clinical settings. This is usually accomplished through acutely inserted cannulas. This technique, however, results in backflow and significant dispersion away from the infusion site, offering little spatial or temporal control in delivering fluid. We present an implantable,…

3h

 

Tandem internal models execute motor learning in the cerebellum [Neuroscience]

In performing skillful movement, humans use predictions from internal models formed by repetition learning. However, the computational organization of internal models in the brain remains unknown. Here, we demonstrate that a computational architecture employing a tandem configuration of forward and inverse internal models enables efficient motor learning in the cerebellum….

3h

 

Opinion: Offshore aquaculture in the United States: Untapped potential in need of smart policy [Political Sciences]

The United States had a $14 billion seafood trade deficit in 2016, importing more than 2.5 million tons of edible fishery products, 90% of the value of the seafood Americans eat (1). Half of those seafood imports are from aquaculture (2). Meanwhile, demand in the United States for local, fresh,…

3h

 

How gender determines the way we speak about professionals [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

Gender inequality persists in many professions, particularly in high-status fields, such as science, technology, engineering, and math. We report evidence of a form of gender bias that may contribute to this state: gender influences the way that people speak about professionals. When discussing professionals or their work, it is common…

3h

 

Costs, needs, and integration efforts shape helping behavior toward refugees [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

Recent political instabilities and conflicts around the world have drastically increased the number of people seeking refuge. The challenges associated with the large number of arriving refugees have revealed a deep divide among the citizens of host countries: one group welcomes refugees, whereas another rejects them. Our research aim is…

3h

 

Dual-process theory of racial isolation, legal cynicism, and reported crime [Social Sciences]

Why is neighborhood racial composition linked so strongly to police-reported crime? Common explanations include over-policing and negative interactions with police, but police reports of crime are heavily dependent on resident 911 calls. Using Sampson’s concept of legal cynicism and Vaisey’s dual-process theory, we theorize that racial concentration and isolation consciously…

3h

 

Declining mental health among disadvantaged Americans [Social Sciences]

Although there is little dispute about the impact of the US opioid epidemic on recent mortality, there is less consensus about whether trends reflect increasing despair among American adults. The issue is complicated by the absence of established scales or definitions of despair as well as a paucity of studies…

3h

 

A strategy for making 'no-mining zones' in the deep sea

An international team of researchers has developed a comprehensive set of criteria to help the International Seabed Authority (ISA) protect local biodiversity from deep-sea mining activities. These guidelines should help identify areas of particular environmental importance where no mining should occur.

3h

 

NASA Just Released the Song of the Summer

In Gustav Holst’s “The Planets,” a sweeping, seven-part composition inspired by Earth’s neighbors in the solar system, the song of Saturn begins softly, with the gentle hum of flutes. The melody, solemn and nostalgic, marches slowly forward. Then the woodwinds subside, and there’s an explosion of sound, a frenzy of horns and clanging bells. Melancholy seems to morph into menace. The roar is brief

3h

 

Strategy for 'No-Mining Zones' in the Deep Sea

An international team of researchers has developed a comprehensive set of criteria to help the International Seabed Authority (ISA) protect local biodiversity from deep-sea mining activities. These guidelines should help identify areas of particular environmental importance where no mining should occur. The new ecological framework is a set of 18 quantitative metrics to assess whether the number,

3h

 

From corn to flake: Health-promoting phenolic acids lost during food processing

For many Americans, highly processed foods are on the menu for breakfast, lunch, and dinner. Even when the raw materials — grains, for example — are high in vitamins and health-promoting phenolic compounds, processing can rob the final product of these nutrients. Scientists reveal what happens to cancer-fighting phenolic acids in corn when it is processed into cornflakes.

3h

 

Genome's gyrations fit right into new model

Computer models show that energy landscape theory can predict not only the form of DNA contained in a cell's nucleus during interphase, but also its dynamic behavior. The model also revealed DADs — chromatin domains that behave coherently.

3h

 

All 12 boys and soccer coach rescued safely from flooded Thai cave

The 12 boys and their soccer coach who were trapped in a flooded cave in Thailand have all finally been rescued, ending an 18-day ordeal that gripped local and international onlookers. Read More

3h

 

New human study: Short-term improved vascular function after consuming red raspberries

A recent randomized controlled trial, published in the Archives of Biochemistry and Biophysics, provides insights on the promising outcomes of short-term improvements in blood vessel function among healthy males who consumed dietary achievable amounts of red raspberries.

3h

 

Strategy for 'no-mining zones' in the deep sea

An international team of researchers has developed a comprehensive set of criteria to help the International Seabed Authority (ISA) protect local biodiversity from deep-sea mining activities. These guidelines should help identify areas of particular environmental importance where no mining should occur. The new ecological framework is a set of 18 quantitative metrics to assess whether the number,

3h

 

Eyewire Cup Semifinals: Results

Congrats to the top 2 teams advancing to the Eyewire Cup Finals: Antarctica vs Egypt! The finals begin Thurs, July 12 at noon and last 24 hours. Join the Eyewire Cup Closing Ceremony Friday at 12:30 on https://eyewire.org/. Semifinal 1: Antarctica vs Poland Winner: Antarctica with 2,547,866 points MVP: Nseraf with 329,524 points (Antarctica) Starting Lineup (Antarctica): Nseraf, galarun , hewhoam

3h

 

Illegal ivory openly sold across Europe: study

Traders are selling illegal ivory openly across the European Union through a loophole allowing trade in "antique" items, the campaign group Avaaz charged Tuesday.

4h

 

How private prison companies are influencing immigration policy

Private prison stocks soared in the aftermath of President Donald Trump's 2016 election. Given his tough stance on immigration as a candidate, it's easy to understand why.

4h

 

Bank network shifts signaled financial crisis—and may prevent another

Ever since the devastating financial crisis of 2008, researchers have been probing the financial markets to understand what went wrong and how to prevent another crippling recession.

4h

 

Asian residents are exposed to nine times more air pollution than Americans or Europeans

According to the World Health Organisation, about 88 percent of premature deaths in low- and middle-income countries in Asia can be attributed to air pollution. The number of road vehicles in Beijing increased from 1.5 million in 2000 to more than 5 million in 2014 and the number in Delhi, India, is expected to increase from 4.7 million in 2010 to 25.6 million by 2030.

4h

 

The Epic Battle Between Breast Milk and Infant-Formula Companies

It was an issue over which a strong show of American exceptionalism wasn’t exactly expected: breast milk. According to a recent report from The New York Times ’ Andrew Jacobs , American officials at the World Health Assembly in Geneva this spring wanted to modify a breastfeeding resolution, and they went to the mat to do it, threatening other countries unless they promised to drop it. The America

4h

 

China cracks top 20 in Global Innovation Index

China broke into the world's top 20 most-innovative economies as Switzerland retained its No. 1 spot in the Global Innovation Index (GII) ranking published annually by Cornell University, INSEAD and the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO). Rounding out the GII 2018 top 10, from highest ranking to lowest: the Netherlands, Sweden, the United Kingdom, Singapore, United States, Finland, De

4h

 

How private prison companies are influencing immigration policy

In a new article, a trio of researchers led by Loren Collingwood, a political scientist at the University of California, Riverside, reported the discovery of a significant link between the presence of an ICE-contracted private detention facility in a federal legislator's district and that legislator's co-sponsorship of punitive immigration bills. Legislators representing districts where privately

4h

 

Rocky planet neighbor looks familiar, but is not Earth's twin

Last autumn, the world was excited by the discovery of an exoplanet called Ross 128 b, which is just 11 light years away from Earth. New work has for the first time determined detailed chemical abundances of the planet's host star, Ross 128.

4h

 

Alternative splicing is crucial to muscle mass maintenance

Alternative splicing plays a crucial role in maintaining adult muscle mass, which has implications in aging and chronic disease.

4h

 

Livestock feed accurately predicts toxic chemicals in food

Scientists have tracked the presence of a class of synthetic flame retardants called polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), which were once a popular additive to increase fire resistance in consumer products such as electronics, textiles, and plastics.

4h

 

As brain extracts meaning from vision, study tracks progression of processing

Study finds that six brain regions shared more responsibility than thought for how the brain moves from raw perception to determining the categorical meaning of what's seen.

4h

 

Method of Making Oxygen from Water in Zero Gravity Raises Hope for Long-Distance Space Travel

One of the main challenges with long-distance space flight is transporting enough oxygen for astronauts to breathe and enough fuel to power complex electronics — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

 

Fishy chemicals in farmed salmon

Persistent organic pollutants—or POPs—skulk around the environment threatening human health through direct contact, inhalation, and most commonly, eating contaminated food. As people are becoming more aware of their food's origin, new research at the University of Pittsburgh suggests it might be just as important to pay attention to the origin of your food's food.

4h

 

Underlying mechanism discovered for magnetic effect in superconducting spintronics

The emerging field of spintronics leverages electron spin and magnetization. This could enhance the storage capacity of computer hard drives and potentially play an important role in quantum computing's future. Superconductor-ferromagnet (SF) structures are widely regarded as the building blocks of this superconducting spintronic technology. More conventional spintronic devices typically require l

4h

 

Kan du sove i sommerheden? Dit varme soveværelse gør dig dummere

Varmen i dit hjem påvirker dine kognitive færdigheder, viser nyt studie.

4h

 

To Make Sense of the Present, Brains May Predict the Future

submitted by /u/NaiveSkeptic [link] [comments]

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4h

 

Dragons return to Kew Gardens pagoda after 200-year absence

Replacements installed during £5m restoration of spectacular garden folly The dragons are back at Kew after more than two centuries, tails curled, wings neatly furled to make them less of a wind catcher, gazing down with glittering eyes on the acres of gardens and thousands of visitors far below. The most spectacular garden folly in England, the great pagoda towers 50 metres over Kew Gardens. It

4h

 

To Make Sense of the Present, Brains May Predict the Future

Last month, the artificial intelligence company DeepMind introduced new software that can take a single image of a few objects in a virtual room and, without human guidance, infer what the three-dimensional scene looks like from entirely new vantage points. Given just a handful of such pictures, the system, dubbed the Generative Query Network, or GQN, can successfully model the layout of a simple

4h

 

Watch These Ghostly Faces Suddenly Reappear in the World's Oldest Photos

Like ghostly apparitions, faces that have long since disappeared from some of the world's oldest photographs have suddenly reappeared in all their eerie detail.

4h

 

Male couples report as much domestic violence as straight couples

Nearly half of all men in a new study about intimate partner violence in male couples report being victims of abuse.

5h

 

Brain metastases common and difficult to treat in ROS1 lung cancer

Brain metastases were found to be fairly common in stage IV ROS1-positive cancers and in 47 percent of ROS1 patients, the brain was the first and only site of progression.

5h

 

Mapping the genetic controllers in heart disease

Researchers have developed a 3D map of the gene interactions that play a key role in cardiovascular disease, a study in eLife reports.

5h

 

The Boldest Bites | Shark Week's Most Intense Encounters

Sharks are inquisitive creatures and they bite to investigate things in the water. These Shark Week experts just happened to be in the wrong place at the wrong time! Shark Week 2018 starts Sunday July 22 9p! Stream Shark Week's Most Intense Encounters on Discovery GO: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/shark-weeks-most-intense-encounters/ Stream Classic Shark Week Episodes: https://www.discovery.

5h

 

Developmental screening and surveillance rates remain low, new study suggests

Only about one-third of young children in the US receive recommended screenings or surveillance designed to catch developmental delays.

5h

 

Study unveils components of successful key account management

Dynamic capabilities play a key role in successful key account management, according to a new study by researchers from the University of Eastern Finland, Cranfield University and the University of Portsmouth. The study found that in key account management, companies should invest in market sensing, opportunity creation, continuous improvement of processes and value propositions, as well as capabi

5h

 

Face value

Norah Dunbar's NSF-funded video game trains people to better discern truth from lies — and how to spot deceptive behavior.

5h

 

As brain extracts meaning from vision, study tracks progression of processing

Study finds that six brain regions shared more responsibility than thought for how the brain moves from raw perception to determining the categorical meaning of what's seen.

5h

 

Asian residents are exposed to 9 times more air pollution than Americans or Europeans

Asian car drivers are exposed to nine times more pollution than their European and American counterparts, a comprehensive study has found.

5h

 

Fishy chemicals in farmed salmon

The American Chemical Society journal Environmental Science & Technology featured research by Carla Ng, assistant professor of civil and environmental engineering at Pitt's Swanson School of Engineering, on the cover of its June 19 issue. Dr. Ng tracked the presence of a class of synthetic flame retardants called polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), which were once a popular additive to increas

5h

 

What is the role of the physician when a patient discloses intimate partner violence perpetration?

Intimate partner violence (IPV) is prevalent and has lasting impacts on the health and well-being of the entire family involved. Unfortunately, very little research and guidance about how to address perpetration of IPV in the health care setting, especially among primary care physicians who are in a role to potentially intervene has been available until now.

5h

 

Rocky planet neighbor looks familiar, but is not Earth's twin

Last autumn, the world was excited by the discovery of an exoplanet called Ross 128 b, which is just 11 light years away from Earth. New work from a team led by Diogo Souto of Brazil's Observatório Nacional and including Carnegie's Johanna Teske has for the first time determined detailed chemical abundances of the planet's host star, Ross 128.

5h

 

Alternative splicing is crucial to muscle mass maintenance

Alternative splicing plays a crucial role in maintaining adult muscle mass, which has implications in aging and chronic disease.

5h

 

Unique brain 'fingerprint' can predict drug effectiveness

Personalized medicine — delivering therapies specially tailored to a patient's unique physiology — has been a goal of researchers and doctors for a long time. New research provides a way of delivering personalized treatments to patients with neurological disease.

5h

 

Long-necked dinosaurs grew to be giants in more ways than one

Some early relatives of giant, long-necked sauropods may have used a different strategy to grow to colossal sizes than previously thought.

5h

 

Revealing the mechanism behind animals' sixth sense

A research team in DGIST discovered genes that detect and control movement and identified the motor mechanism of proprioception sense receptors. The finding provides clues to the cause of walking disorders caused by cerebellum damage and degenerative brain diseases.

5h

 

Want to be an elite weightlifter? It takes a strong pair of knees

Researchers from China's Ningbo University have discovered what makes the critical difference between an elite snatch style weightlifter and a sub-elite one, according to a new study published in the journal Heliyon. In the Olympic sport of snatch style weightlifting, athletes squat, take hold of a barbell on the ground, and then lift it with outstretched arms overhead, using one continuous motion

5h

 

Bypass maneuver

It is possible to enroll at a Russian university without sitting the Unified State Exam (USE) via a 'hybrid' vocational track originally created to encourage upward mobility of disadvantaged social groups. According to the authors of 'Slipping Past the Test: Heterogeneous Effects of Social Education in the Context of Inconsistent Selection Mechanisms in Higher Education,' this pathway to universit

5h

 

Towards winning the war on feral wild rabbits

New research shows how two biological control agents have been effective in reducing the numbers of feral rabbits in Australia. Using data from the largest wild rabbit study in the world, scientists have examined the long-term interaction of myxoma and rabbit haemorrhagic disease viruses.

5h

 

UMN Medical School discovery could mean improved immunity against reinfections

University of Minnesota researchers have discovered a connection between the body's memory cells and a unique protein in the body called purinergic receptor P2RX7, influencing the body's long-term immune system.

5h

 

Underlying mechanism discovered for magnetic effect in superconducting spintronics

Superconductor-ferromagnet structures are widely regarded as the building blocks of superconducting spintronic technology. More conventional spintronic devices typically require large currents, so researchers are investigating the viability of low-resistance superconductors. Their new results could answer longstanding questions about how SF structures interact. They reveal a general mechanism of t

5h

 

Diagnosis is a collaborative process

According to family physician Norbert Donner-Banzhoff, building an effective relationship with a patient and making a diagnosis are not separate skills. Rather, diagnosing a patient efficiently and effectively is a process best shared by patient and physician.

5h

 

NUS researchers confine mature cells to turn them into stem cells

Recent research led by Professor G.V. Shivashankar of the Mechanobiology Institute at the National University of Singapore and the FIRC Institute of Molecular Oncology in Italy, has revealed that mature cells can be reprogrammed into re-deployable stem cells without direct genetic modification — by confining them to a defined geometric space for an extended period of time.

5h

 

‘416,’ ‘Witch,’ ‘Not Creative’: How Fires Get Their Names

Names usually come from where fires started. But sometimes, officials shrug and land on something more obscure.

5h

 

First global maps of Pluto and Charon from NASA's New Horizons mission published

Until 2015, it was not known whether Pluto or its largest moon, Charon, had mountains or valleys or even impact craters. After the spectacular success of New Horizons in July 2015, scientists were amazed at the towering peaks and deep valleys that were revealed in the returned data. Now, thanks to the efforts of the New Horizons team, the first official validated global map and topographic maps of

5h

 

Rocky planet neighbor looks familiar, but is not Earth's twin

Last autumn, the world was excited by the discovery of an exoplanet called Ross 128 b, which is just 11 light years away from Earth. New work from a team led by Diogo Souto of Brazil's Observatório Nacional and including Carnegie's Johanna Teske has for the first time determined detailed chemical abundances of the planet's host star, Ross 128.

5h

 

Who is Judge Brett Kavanaugh, Trump’s Supreme Court nominee?Brett Kavanaugh SC

President Donald Trump on Monday nominated 53-year-old Judge Brett M. Kavanaugh to replace Justice Anthony M. Kennedy’s seat on the Supreme Court, a pick that could establish a solid conservative majority in the court for years to come. Read More

5h

 

Trump Supreme Court Pick's Environmental Rulings Worry Climate Advocates

Brett Kavanaugh has been skeptical of EPA authority to regulate carbon emissions — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

 

Steve Ditko’s Ordinary People

Near the end of The Amazing Spider-Man ’s ninth issue (published in 1964), the costumed hero finally figures out how to stymie Electro, the bad guy of the month, by soaking him in water. “Life sure is funny!” Spider-Man says. “Here’s one of the most powerful criminals of all time! And what finally beat him?? Just a dousing from a plain, ordinary water hose!” He then goes to remove Electro’s mask,

5h

 

Pulse of the polar vortex revealed: A key to mapping future storms

If you can predict the path of the jet stream, the upper atmosphere's undulating river of wind, then you can predict weather — not just for a week or two, but for an entire season. A new study moves toward that level of foresight by revealing a physical link between the speed and location of the jet stream and the strength of the polar vortex, a swirl of air that usually hovers over the Arctic.

5h

 

Teen crash risk highest during first three months after getting driver's license

Teenage drivers are eight times more likely to be involved in a collision or near miss during the first three months after getting a driver's license, compared to the previous three months on a learner's permit, suggests a new study.

5h

 

World Trade Center response crews may face higher heart attack, stroke risk

Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) may increase the risk for stroke and heart attack in both male and female city workers and volunteers who cleaned debris in the aftermath of the World Trade Center plane attack on Sept. 11, 2001. The study sheds light on long-term consequences of PTSD 11-15 years after the event occurred in a general population.

5h

 

Catching Lightning With Photography

Catching Lightning With Photography How photographers took the first pictures of lightning. Catching Lightning With Photography Video of Catching Lightning With Photography Earth Tuesday, July 10, 2018 – 11:00 Emilie Lorditch, Staff Writer An Interview with Terry Nathan at the University of California, Davis. “The history of photographing lightning really starts with the history of photography. T

5h

 

Indian IT giant TCS's profits soar 24 percent

India's largest IT services firm Tata Consultancy Services (TCS) reported on Tuesday a 24 percent rise in quarterly earnings thanks to strong growth in its banking and financial services division.

5h

 

Wetting of surfaces is surprisingly difficult to measure reliably

A group of researchers from Aalto University in Finland and Sun Yat-sen University in China provide a standardized approach to improve the accuracy and reliability of contact angle measurements of surfaces.

5h

 

Warm handoffs do not improve attendance at behavioral health intake appointments

In programs that integrate behavioral health services into primary care, 'warm handoffs,' in which primary care clinicians introduce patients to behavioral health professionals, are commonly used. Researchers at Boston Medical Center have found that warm handoffs are not associated with improved attendance at behavioral health intake appointments.

5h

 

Individual characteristics that predict multiple chronic conditions are identified

Results of a 10-year study find that, for adults age 50 and older, risks of developing multimorbidity are positively associated with age and are higher for those with low socioeconomic status, obesity, low level of physical activity, or an external locus of control (believing that life events are outside of their control).

5h

 

Booklet on childhood fever reduces antibiotic prescriptions if used

Antibiotic prescribing rates are not affected (to a statistically significant degree) when physicians have access to a parent-focused booklet on childhood fever but do decrease if the booklet is used.

5h

 

Physician views of self-monitoring blood glucose in patients not on insulin

Physicians continue to recommend routine self-monitoring of blood glucose for patients with non-insulin treated type 2 diabetes, in spite of its lack of effectiveness, because they believe it drives the lifestyle change needed to improve glycemic control.

5h

 

NASA spots Typhoon Maria's ragged eyewall replacement

NASA's Terra satellite passed over the Northwestern Pacific Ocean early on July 10 and obtained a visible image of Typhoon Maria. Maria's eye appeared ragged and forecasters noted that the storm was experiencing eyewall replacement.

5h

 

Scribes may be more financially viable under capitated payment

Team documentation (i.e., the use of scribes) has the potential to improve primary care clinician satisfaction and efficiency, yet little has been known about the financial and time use implications. A new study finds that, compared to fee-for-service payment, capitation-based systems may require less external financing to support team documentation.

5h

 

That sound makes me dizzy

Researchers from the University of Utah have discovered why certain people experience dizziness when they hear a particular sound, such as a musical tone. For patients with semicircular canal dehiscence, there is a pathological hole in the bone that the inner ear is encased in, and certain acoustic tones cause the inner ear fluid to pump. As a result, the ear sends an incorrect signal to the brain

5h

 

Physicians and patients perceive good communication differently

Family physicians have a different view of what constitutes good communication compared to patients and trained clinical raters.

5h

 

Tropical Storm Chris gives NASA satellite a signature 'C'

When NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the northwestern Atlantic Ocean, an instrument aboard looked at Tropical Storm Chris' water vapor and cloud temperatures. Appropriately, the image showed a backwards 'C' or comma shaped storm. The water vapor imagery indicated Tropical Storm Chris has the potential to generate heavy rainfall.

5h

 

Drug's impact on amino acid transporter may offer non-small cell lung cancer patients new hope

An amino acid transporter named xCT may affect the growth and progression of non-small cell lung cancer, a discovery that may predict the five-year survival rate of patients suffering from this cancer, now at 16 percent, researchers at Georgia State University and Vanderbilt University Medical Center have concluded.

5h

 

Perceptions of primary care notes by patients with mental health diagnoses

Primary care patients with mental health diagnoses are as enthusiastic about the utility of viewing their doctors' notes as other patients.

5h

 

Alcohol consumption is associated with nocturnal leg cramps

New research finds that, among patients over 60 years old, there is a strong association between consumption of alcoholic beverages and nocturnal leg cramps.

5h

 

July/August 2018 Annals of Family Medicine media tip sheet

Annals of Family Medicine is a peer-reviewed, indexed research journal that provides a cross-disciplinary forum for new, evidence-based information affecting the primary care disciplines.

5h

 

How Mycobacterium tuberculosis escapes death in macrophages

The bacteria that cause the devastating disease tuberculosis have the ability to escape destruction and grow after they are engulfed by lung macrophages, the immune cells that are supposed to destroy pathogens. Now researchers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham have described key biochemical steps between the bacteria Mycobacterium tuberculosis and the macrophage responsible for that abili

5h

 

Biologists discover process that neutralizes tumors

Researchers discovered an unexpected twist in the tumor vs. T cell battle. Tumors employ a protein called PD-L1 to blind T cells from carrying out their functions. PD-L1 protects tumors through a 'molecular brake' known as PD-1. Researchers have found that some tumor cells display not only their PD-L1 weapon, but also the PD-1 'brake,' essentially a neutralizing function. The unexpected mechanism

5h

 

Altered gene regulation is more widespread in cancer than expected

Researchers identified hundreds of cancer-associated genes for which structural rearrangements in their regulatory regions were associated with altered expression in cancer.

5h

 

Testosterone prescriptions have sharply dropped in the past few years

Testosterone use in the United States tripled between 2001 and 2011, mostly in men without a clear indication for it. This new study shows, however, that testosterone use dropped significantly after testosterone use was reported to be linked to heart attacks and strokes.

5h

 

Newly discovered properties of ferroelectric crystal shed light on branch of materials

Ferroelectric materials are behind some of the most advanced technology available today. Findings that ferroelectricity can be observed in materials that exhibit other spontaneous transitions have given rise to a new class of materials, known as hybrid improper ferroelectrics. The properties of this type of material, however, are still far from being fully understood. New findings published in App

5h

 

Two new USPSTF recommendation statements

In two new statements, the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) concludes current evidence is insufficient to make recommendations assessing cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk with certain nontraditional risk factors and screening for peripheral artery disease (PAD) and CVD risk with the ankle-brachial index (ABI).

5h

 

Mobile health devices diagnose hidden heart condition in at-risk populations

New research shows wearable mobile health devices improved the rate of diagnosis of a dangerous heart condition called atrial fibrillation.

5h

 

Can acupuncture reduce treatment-related pain for women with early-stage breast cancer?

Treatment for breast cancer with aromatase inhibitors often results in joint pain, which can contribute to treatment nonadherence. Several small studies have suggested that acupuncture may decrease aromatase inhibitor-related joint pain.

5h

 

Use of prescribed testosterone therapy in US decreases in recent years

Testosterone use in the United States tripled from 2001 through 2011, mostly in men without a clear indication. In late 2013 and early 2014, two studies reported increased heart attack and stroke associated with testosterone use, and the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued a safety bulletin in early 2014.

5h

 

Study examines safety and efficacy of TPA in mild stroke cases

A national study looking at IV tPA treatment in mild stroke cases, led by researchers at the University of Cincinnati (UC) College of Medicine, is published in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

5h

 

Can a home-based, self-applied ECG patch improve the diagnosis of atrial fibrillation?

For approximately 20 percent of individuals who experience a stroke due to atrial fibrillation (AF; an irregular and often rapid heart rate), the occurrence of AF was not diagnosed until the time of their stroke or shortly afterward. Improved AF diagnosis and treatment could reduce the risk of stroke.

5h

 

Scientists trigger hot flashes in female and male mice

By activating a single type of neuron, scientists triggered hot-flash-like symptoms in mice. In the July 10 issue of Cell Reports, researchers show that so-called Kiss1 neurons in the hypothalamus that project to a brain region controlling body temperature may be the link between sex hormone fluctuations and the hot flashes that plague many menopausal women.

5h

 

Tesla announces deal for Shanghai factoryTesla China Shanghai

Electric car producer Tesla will build its first factory outside the United States in Shanghai under an agreement signed Tuesday, becoming the first wholly foreign-owned automaker in China.

6h

 

Ladybug, where have you gone? Aphid fighters tend to roam

To some casual observers, ladybugs (or lady beetles) are colorful symbols of good luck—harbingers of fortune and fame. Gardeners value them for their utility as ravenous insects that prey upon plant pests. They buy them by the hundreds online or from garden centers, and then free them to hunt.

6h

 

Tropical Storm Chris gives NASA satellite a signature 'C'

When NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the northwestern Atlantic Ocean, an instrument aboard looked at Tropical Storm Chris' water vapor and cloud temperatures. Appropriately, the image showed a backwards "C" or comma shaped storm. The water vapor imagery indicated Tropical Storm Chris has the potential to generate heavy rainfall.

6h

 

NASA spots Typhoon Maria's ragged eyewall replacement

NASA's Terra satellite passed over the Northwestern Pacific Ocean early on July 10 and obtained a visible image of Typhoon Maria. Maria's eye appeared ragged and forecasters noted that the storm was experiencing eyewall replacement.

6h

 

Every person has a unique brain anatomy

Like with fingerprints, no two people have the same brain anatomy, a study has shown. This uniqueness is the result of a combination of genetic factors and individual life experiences.

6h

 

Big Data analysis identifies new cancer risk genes

Researchers have developed a new method to systematically identify genes contributing to heritable cancer risk. Their work is a success story for data sharing and openness in science. Just three researchers identified new cancer genes only using publicly available data.

6h

 

What separates the strong from weak among connections in the brain

Some synapses are much stronger than most of their neighbors. A new study imaged individual 'active zones' to discern what specific components make them that way and how they develop.

6h

 

Conductive property of graphene, advancing promise of solar technology

Researchers have connected a graphene layer with two other atomic layers (molybdenum diselenide and tungsten disulfide) thereby extending the lifetime of excited electrons in graphene by several hundred times. The work may speed development of ultrathin and flexible solar cells with high efficiency.

6h

 

Multivitamins do not promote cardiovascular health

Multivitamins and mineral supplements do not prevent heart attacks, strokes or cardiovascular death. Data pooled from multiple studies show no health benefit of multivitamins.

6h

 

Artificial intelligence helps researchers predict drug combinations' side effects

Millions of people take upwards of five medications a day, but testing the side effects of such combinations is impractical. Now, computer scientists have figured out how to predict side effects using artificial intelligence.

6h

 

Regulation reality gap for small businesses bodes ill for Brexit

Small business owners lack understanding of critical regulations and compound the problem with over-confidence, shows research from the University of Bath which suggests small businesses will struggle to comply with the raft of regulatory changes post Brexit.

6h

 

How Shelby County v. Holder Broke America

Thurgood Marshall spent much of his career dissenting. Tasked with helping the Supreme Court bridge the gap between Jim Crow and whatever came next, the first black justice and the man whom President Lyndon B. Johnson once called “an advocate whose lifelong concern has been the pursuit of justice for his fellow man” was often forced to write that road map to justice in opposition to his colleague

6h

 

GPM satellite obtains excellent views of Beryl's remnants

As the remnants of former tropical cyclone Beryl moved through the northern Leeward Islands and Puerto Rico, the Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite gathered important rainfall data on the storm.

6h

 

Researchers discover a way to peer inside proteins to see how they are wired

The proteins in our bodies are sophisticated structures that perform specific jobs to keep us functioning and healthy. In many cases, these tiny machines are switched on or off through a two-step process where one part of the protein sends messages to another part called the "active site," triggering the protein to start or stop its job. Sometimes this process—known as allostery—is disrupted, whic

6h

 

Stronger west winds blow ill wind for climate change

Stronger westerly winds in the Southern Ocean could be the cause of a sudden rise in atmospheric CO2 and temperatures in a period of less than 100 years about 16,000 years ago, according to a study published in Nature Communications.

6h

 

American Association of Feline Practitioners releases new feline anesthesia guidelines

The American Association of Feline Practitioners (AAFP) today released the first feline-specific anesthesia guidelines to the veterinary community, which are published in the Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery. General anesthesia is an essential component of felinepractice, without which surgery and certain other treatment modalities and diagnostic procedures would be impossible. These feline-

6h

 

Admitting community college students to med school can increase and diversify workforce

With both a growing demand for primary care physicians and declining medical student interest in the field, a new study offers a possible pathway to meeting the United States' primary care workforce needs. The study of US medical school graduates from 2010 to 2012 finds that graduates who attended community college as pre-medical students are more likely to train in family medicine than those who

6h

 

Six transformations needed to achieve the UN Sustainable Development Goals: New report

The World in 2050 (TWI2050) initiative has launched a new report, setting out six key transformations that will enable the world to meet the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

6h

 

Brain arousal compound noradrenaline plays critical role in sensory perception

A new Tel Aviv University study suggests that noradrenaline, a neurotransmitter responsible for arousal in the brain, plays a vital role in early sensory perceptions of the world.

6h

 

Apps portray mental health issues as commonplace and easy to manage

A new analysis finds that mental health apps convey two dominant messages: that virtually everyone has some type of mental health problem and that individuals can easily manage those problems by using an app.

6h

 

Aspirin desensitization improves alcohol-induced allergies in patients with underlying respiratory disease

Patients who suffer from aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD) often experience an additional allergic reaction when drinking alcohol, including nasal congestion, wheezing, and a runny nose. Now a new study led by researchers in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania finds a common treatment for AERD — aspirin desensitization — can also help alleviate the alco

6h

 

Diabetes diagnosis can improve health of the household

Partners of people with newly diagnosed diabetes are more likely to change their health behaviors than partners of people without the disease.

6h

 

Baker's yeast helped MSU-based biologists to understand drug resistance in fungi

MSU-based biologists advanced in understanding of fungal drug resistance mechanisms. To study them the scientists used baker's yeast expressing fluorescent proteins fused with the membrane transporters. Fungi activate the protection mechanisms in response to accumulation of toxic compounds in their cells. The study showed that the resistance of yeast (and possibly pathogenic fungi) to antimycotic

6h

 

Contribution of MOTs to road safety

The study 'Contribution of MOTs to road safety and the protection of citizens' health and the environment,' conducted by the Motor Vehicle Safety Institute 'Duque de Santomauro' of Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, reveals that the Ministry of Transport tests (MOTs) prevent 133 deaths, nearly 12,000 injuries of differing severity and at least 17,700 traffic accidents a year.

6h

 

Newly discovered properties of ferroelectric crystal shed light on branch of materials

In ferroelectric materials the crystal structure distorts, giving rise to a spontaneously formed polarization and electric field. Because of this unique property, ferroelectrics can be found in anything from ultrasound machines and diesel fuel injectors to computer memory. Ferroelectric materials are behind some of the most advanced technology available today. Findings that ferroelectricity can be

6h

 

Cellular 'garbage disposal' has another job

Researchers have found that the cellular 'garbage disposal,' known to scientists as proteasomes, may not only be responsible for the removal of cellular waste, but actually work on some of the most important proteins to neuronal development.

6h

 

A chaperonin protein, GroEL, has a more complex mechanism than was thought before

Scientists have studied molecular interactions in the chaperonin protein GroEL. GroEL is alternately bound and unbound by a co-chaperonin, GroES. Against expectations, the 'football' complex — where two GroES units cap the cylindrical GroEL at either end — was roughly as prevalent as the single-bound 'bullet' complex. This implies that negative allosteric interactions preventing double-binding o

6h

 

Evolutionary outcomes can be predicted

Biologists show that evolutionary outcomes can be predicted.

6h

 

Vitamin D no defense against dementia

New research has shown that vitamin D (also commonly known as the sunshine vitamin) is unlikely to protect individuals from multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease or other brain-related disorders.

6h

 

How HIV is shielded from immune attack

Scientists have discovered that the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) hijacks a small molecule from the host cell to protect itself from being destroyed by the host's immune system.

6h

 

Global quadrupling of cooling appliances to 14 billion by 2050

Soaring global need for cooling by 2050 could see world energy consumption for cooling increase five times as the number of cooling appliances quadruples to 14 billion — according to a new report.

6h

 

Want an expensive engagement ring? Looks count

Men are willing to purchase more showy, expensive engagement rings when they imagine themselves with an attractive woman rather than a woman with average looks. Appearance also plays a role for women but, in contrast to men, they are more likely to select an expensive ring with a big stone when they are partnered with a less attractive man.

6h

 

What does the koala genome tell us about the taste of eucalyptus?

Sequencing of the koala genome has revealed some interesting qualities about these marsupials on their sense of taste. They have more bitter taste receptor genes than any other Australian marsupial, and most mammals. This possibly enables the animals to detect toxic metabolites contained in eucalyptus. Koalas even have functional receptors for both sweetness and umami.

6h

 

Immune discovery should help develop improved vaccines for infants and newborns

Specific immune danger signals are highly efficient in triggering immune responses in infants and newborns, whose immune systems function very differently to those of adults. The scientists believe their discovery could reduce both the age at which vaccines can be first administered, and the need for multiple booster shots.

6h

 

Pay less, take more: Success in getting patients to take their medicine

New evidence shows the power of a method aimed at changing the longstanding problem of encouraging patients with chronic diseases to take their medicine faithfully: insurance plans that charge patients less for the medicines that could help them most. Some plans even make some of the medicines free to the patients with certain conditions.

6h

 

A Fresh Look at Quark-Gluon Plasma Soup

A Fresh Look at Quark-Gluon Plasma Soup Theoretical physicists come up with a new way to analyze the firework of signals coming from particle collision experiments. top-collision.gif Animated gif created using conceptual visual art piece by Moritz Heller . Rights information: CC BY-SA 3.0 Physics Tuesday, July 10, 2018 – 09:15 Yuen Yiu, Staff Writer (Inside Science) — Quarks and gluons are the b

6h

 

‘He’ll Never Really Lose the Support and Money of the Party’

President Trump’s nomination of Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court offered a rare moment of unity across the Republican Party, pleasing conservatives and offering a measure of relief to establishment Republicans hoping to maintain their congressional majorities in November. Assuming Democrats vote en bloc—which may or may not happen—Republicans can afford to lose just two votes on Kavanaugh’s c

6h

 

Every person has a unique brain anatomy

Like with fingerprints, no two people have the same brain anatomy, a study by researchers of the University of Zurich has shown. This uniqueness is the result of a combination of genetic factors and individual life experiences.

6h

 

Mapping the urban vitality of Barcelona

Researchers at the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona have mapped Barcelona and its conurbation using a new methodology based on urbanism activist Jane Jacobs' ideas on how cities should be configured to become vital spaces.

6h

 

NASA's GPM satellite obtains excellent views of Beryl's remnants

As the remnants of former tropical cyclone Beryl moved through the northern Leeward Islands and Puerto Rico, the Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite gathered important rainfall data on the storm.

6h

 

Novel approach to making therapeutic proteins at point of care

A novel approach to making therapeutic proteins allows medicine to be developed in a suitcase-size system.

6h

 

Regulation reality gap for small businesses bodes ill for Brexit

Small business owners lack understanding of critical regulations and compound the problem with over-confidence, shows research from the University of Bath which suggests small businesses will struggle to comply with the raft of regulatory changes post Brexit.

6h

 

Cold temps lead to offspring with more ‘good fat’

Males who spend time in low temperatures prior to mating will produce offspring with more active brown adipose tissue, according to new research in mice. This quite literally means that the environmental impact a father experiences is passed on to his offspring. Anyone with lots of brown adipose tissue, or brown fat, can count themselves lucky: this tissue—which is found in some people under the

6h

 

How farming could employ Africa's young workforce — and help build peace | Kola Masha

Africa's youth is coming of age rapidly, but job growth on the continent isn't keeping up. The result: financial insecurity and, in some cases, a turn towards insurgent groups. In a passionate talk, agricultural entrepreneur Kola Masha details his plan to bring leadership and investment to small farmers in Africa — and employ a rising generation.

6h

 

Global quadrupling of cooling appliances to 14 billion by 2050

Soaring global need for cooling by 2050 could see world energy consumption for cooling increase five times as the number of cooling appliances quadruples to 14 billion—according to a new report by the University of Birmingham, UK.

6h

 

Cellular 'garbage disposal' has another job

Johns Hopkins researchers have found that the cellular "garbage disposal," known to scientists as proteasomes, may not only be responsible for the removal of cellular waste, but actually work on some of the most important proteins to neuronal development.

6h

 

Image: Tricorder

This gadget looks like a precursor to the devices medical officers use to scan patients in science fiction, and it is not far off. The MyotonPRO tests muscle tension and stiffness.

6h

 

Court orders Ryanair to comply with Dutch law

A Dutch appeals court has ruled that employees of the Irish budget carrier Ryanair who are based in the Netherlands are covered by Dutch law, in a decision made public Tuesday.

6h

 

A long fuse: 'The Population Bomb' is still ticking 50 years after its publication

"The battle to feed all of humanity is over," Stanford biologist and ecologist Paul Erhlich declared on the first page of his 1968 best-seller, "The Population Bomb." Because the "stork had passed the plow," he predicted, "hundreds of millions of people are going to starve to death."

6h

 

Seal serum offers protection from inflammation

Seal serum seems to posses anti-inflammatory properties, which protects the delicate lung tissues that one would expect would sustain damage following deep dives.

6h

 

Big Data analysis identifies new cancer risk genes

Researchers at the Centre for Genomic Regulation (CRG) in Barcelona developed a new method to systematically identify genes contributing to heritable cancer risk. Their work, which is published in Nature Communications, is a success story for data sharing and openness in science. Just three researchers identified new cancer genes only using publically available data.

6h

 

Immune discovery should help develop improved vaccines for infants and newborns

Specific immune danger signals are highly efficient in triggering immune responses in infants and newborns, whose immune systems function very differently to those of adults. The scientists believe their discovery could reduce both the age at which vaccines can be first administered, and the need for multiple booster shots.

6h

 

American Cancer Society outlines blueprint for cancer control in the 21st century

The American Cancer Society is outlining its vision for cancer control in the decades ahead in a series of articles that forms the basis of a national cancer control plan.

6h

 

Global Innovation Index 2018: China cracks top 20

China broke into the world's top 20 most-innovative economies as Switzerland retained its No. 1 spot in the Global Innovation Index (GII) published annually by Cornell University, INSEAD, the World Intellectual Property Organization, and GII Knowledge Partners.The GII ranks 126 economies based on 80 indicators, ranging from intellectual property filing rates to scientific and technical publication

6h

 

Rock 'n' roll is noise pollution – with ecological implications that can spread through a food web

Despite being one of the best-selling albums of all time, ideology from AC/DC's "Back in Black" album has gone unchallenged for nearly 40 years. The album's closing track posited a testable hypothesis, asserting with rock-star confidence that "Rock 'n' roll ain't noise pollution." Opinions may vary from person to person, but little scientific evidence has been evaluated to determine if rock music

6h

 

See-through fish could reveal origins of neuroblastoma

A new type of zebrafish that produces fluorescent tags in migratory embryonic nerve precursor cells could help researchers find the origins of the third-most common pediatric cancer in the US. “You can see they’ve already started to migrate that way, and a lot of them are transitioning,” Rosa Uribe says in her office as she traces the movements of green neural crest cells in a time-lapse movie pl

6h

 

Strengthening west winds close to Antarctica previously led to massive outgassing of carbon

A new explanation for the Heinrich 1 event, where temperatures over Antarctica rose 5C in less than a century, suggests strengthening westerlies around the Antarctic led to a substantial increase in atmospheric carbon. Today, human-caused climate change is causing these same westerly winds to contract towards Antarctica and strengthen, suggesting an unexpected spike in carbon dioxide could occur a

6h

 

Has the tide turned towards responsible metrics in research?

A new report takes stock of how metrics are being used and abused in research management across UK universities In his 2003 bestseller Moneyball , the writer Michael Lewis describes how the fortunes of the Oakland Athletics baseball team were transformed by the rigorous use of predictive data and modelling to identify undervalued talent. These approaches soon spread through baseball and into othe

7h

 

Uddannelses-besparelser sender Danmark ned ad innovations-rangliste

Danmark falder fra sjettepladsen til ottendepladsen på Global Innovation Index.

7h

 

Stakeholders consider the future of serious games

Serious games have become a social phenomenon that resonates way beyond the gaming world. But the truth is that many of these games, primarily funded by public authorities, lost their fun factor in the process. Work under the Gaming Horizons project opens the door to new approaches.

7h

 

An online game to educate children on safe internet use

Irish SME Zeeko wants to reduce the number of negative online experiences for children, through education. Can its software live up to EU expectations on the matter?

7h

 

Space IoT takes off

We know that current networks are not equipped to deal with the Internet of Things and the exponential growth in connected devices it entails. Whilst Low Power Wide Area (LPWA) technologies will be crucial to cope with future needs, experts increasingly look towards satellites as a complementary solution, especially for scarcely populated areas. The IoTEE project is proposing a receiver/emitter de

7h

 

How well-meaning statements can spread stereotypes unintentionally

While saying "girls are as good as boys at math" is meant as encouragement, it can unfortunately backfire.

7h

 

Finding the pulse of the polar vortex

If you can predict the path of the jet stream, the upper atmosphere's undulating river of wind, then you can predict weather – not just for a week or two, but for an entire season. A new Stanford study moves toward that level of foresight by revealing a physical link between the speed and location of the jet stream and the strength of the polar vortex, a swirl of air that usually hovers over the A

7h

 

Researchers find organic material in the Antennae Galaxies

A study led by the researcher of the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC) Ana Monreal Ibero proves the presence of probable organic molecules in galaxies beyond the Milky Way.

7h

 

Capacitor-based architecture for AI hardware accelerators

IBM is reaching beyond digital technologies with a capacitor-based cross-point array for analog neural networks, exhibiting potential orders of magnitude improvements in deep learning computations. Analog computing architectures exploit the storage capability and physical attributes of certain memory devices not just to store information, but also to perform computations. This has the potential to

7h

 

Can Your Electronic Gadgets Interfere With Your Compass?

Electric currents have magnetic fields, so the right kind could mess with your navigation.

7h

 

Brava Smart Oven: Price, Specs, Release Date

Is Brava’s idea of the oven of the future just right or overdone?

7h

 

Surprise! This shark looks like a male on the outside, but it’s made babies

External male reproductive organs hid internal female capacity to give birth among hermaphrodite sharks in India.

7h

 

American Association of Feline Practitioners releases new feline anesthesia guidelines

The American Association of Feline Practitioners today released the first feline-specific anesthesia guidelines to the veterinary community, which are published in the Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery. General anesthesia is an essential component of felinepractice, without which surgery and certain other treatment modalities and diagnostic procedures would be impossible. These feline-focused

7h

 

What does the koala genome tell us about the taste of eucalyptus?

Sequencing of the koala genome has revealed some interesting qualities about these marsupials on their sense of taste. They have more bitter taste receptor genes than any other Australian marsupial, and most mammals. This possibly enables the animals to detect toxic metabolites contained in eucalyptus. Koalas even have functional receptors for both sweetness and umami.

7h

 

Researchers discover a way to peer inside proteins to see how they are wired

Understanding how a protein is wired could help researchers develop ways to control its activity, and scientists at the Advanced Science Research Center (ASRC) at The Graduate Center, CUNY, believe they've come up with a reliable way to determine this, according to a newly published study in eLife.

7h

 

How Brett Kavanaugh Could Reshape Environmental Law From the Supreme CourtBrett Kavanaugh SC

Judge Kavanaugh voted in a number of high-profile cases to limit E.P.A. rules on issues like climate change and air pollution.

7h

 

Incarcerating parents endangers kids’ health later

Young adults who had a parent incarcerated during their childhood are more likely to skip needed health care, smoke cigarettes, engage in risky sexual behaviors, and abuse alcohol, prescription, and illicit drugs, a new study shows. The findings have potentially broad impact, as over five million children in the United States have had a parent in jail or prison. Incarceration of a mother during c

7h

 

Three reasons why the U.S. is vulnerable to big disasters—and getting more vulnerable all the time

Science We're heading in the wrong direction. As a complex emergency researcher, I investigate why some countries can better withstand and respond to disasters.

7h

 

Carbon farming in WA

Reducing our carbon footprint is a critical step to combat climate change, and WA is doing its part with new approaches to farm CO2.

7h

 

What if your car spied on you?

Driverless cars are set to change many aspects of everyday life, including an area you may not have thought of: privacy.

7h

 

Early Life Experience: It's in Your DNA

Surprising study suggests experiences while young causes brain to experience changes to the genome — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

 

Snapchat has a hidden visual search functionSnapchat Lens Explorer

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How to reduce the risk of failure for environmental projects

New Zealand's government has committed to planting one billion trees as part of a transition to a low-emission economy, in line with its commitments under the Paris Agreement.

7h

 

Quantum dots found to reduce fibrils in Parkinson's mouse models

A large team of researchers with members from several institutions in the U.S., Korea and Japan has found that injecting quantum dots into the bloodstreams of mice led to a reduction in fibrils associated with Parkinson's disease. In their paper published in the journal Nature Nanotechnology, the group describes their studies of the impact of quantum dots made of graphene on synuclein and what the

7h

 

Brett Kavanaugh on the Supreme Court Could Be Trouble for Tech

Brett Kavanaugh's nomination is likely to rankle tech leaders who oppose his perspective on issues related to privacy and net neutrality.

7h

 

There's Spooky Plasma Music Traveling From Saturn to its Weirdest Moon

Researchers for the first time recorded the gas giant's vibrating plasma signal to Enceladus. And now you can listen to it too.

7h

 

How the psychology of the England football team could change your life

England players seem happier and more grounded – and much of the credit goes to psychologist Pippa Grange. What can the team’s approach teach us all about facing fear and failure? This week, the England midfielder Dele Alli was asked if he was nervous about the big tests up ahead: first, of course, the team’s semi-final against Croatia on Wednesday. “Excited, not nervous,” he replied. His apparen

7h

 

How to get culture right when embedding it into AI

If, like Rip Van Winkle, you've been asleep for the last decade and have just woken up, that flip phone you have has become super-popular among retro technologists and survivalists alike, and, oh yeah, Artificial Intelligence (AI) is either going to kill you or save you.

7h

 

The bigger the sports fan, the more politically conservative they tend to be

Basketball is the exception, which leans very left. Read More

7h

 

Fighting ticks with a few taps of the phone

Summer has arrived and so, unfortunately, have the ticks. On top of this, warmer temperatures throughout the US have opened entirely new areas for them to flourish.

7h

 

Wolves in Chernobyl could spread to other areas, help support other populations

The Chernobyl Exclusion Zone (CEZ) is a 1,660 square mile area surrounding the remains of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant, which exploded on April 25, 1986, and released large amounts of radiation into the area. Living in the zone remains prohibited 32 years later, and the resulting lack of human presence has led some to call the zone a de-facto nature reserve. In particular, the gray wolf popul

7h

 

Genes – way weirder than you thought

Pretty much everyone, at least in societies with access to public education or exposure to media in its various forms, has been introduced to the idea of the gene, but "exposure does not equate to understanding" (see Lanie et al., 2004). Here I will argue that part of the problem is that instruction in genetics (or in more modern terms, the molecular biology of the gene and its role in biological

7h

 

Global quadrupling of cooling appliances to 14 billion by 2050 — new report

Soaring global need for cooling by 2050 could see world energy consumption for cooling increase five times as the number of cooling appliances quadruples to 14 billion — according to a new report by the University of Birmingham, UK.

7h

 

Study shows how HIV is shielded from immune attack

Scientists from UNSW Sydney and the UK have discovered that the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) hijacks a small molecule from the host cell to protect itself from being destroyed by the host's immune system.

7h

 

Tablet computers can be of use in speech therapy for kids

Thus, computer games have been established to be a potential benefit for speech therapy and for children's motivation and satisfaction from classes. Moreover, games can be used both in hospitals and in outpatient activities.

7h

 

Vitamin D no defense against dementia

New research from South Australian scientists has shown that vitamin D (also commonly known as the sunshine vitamin) is unlikely to protect individuals from multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease or other brain-related disorders.

7h

 

Removing barriers to advance care planning for cancer patients and their family caregivers

A pilot study from the Regenstrief Institute and Indiana University School of Medicine explores whether mindfulness, the psychological process of bringing one's attention to experiences occurring in the present, can enhance the ability of cancer patients and their families to consider and discuss emotionally challenging topics — such as end-of-life preparations — and support timely advance care

7h

 

Evolution does repeat itself after all

A team of University of Konstanz biologists led by Professor Axel Meyer shows that evolutionary outcomes can be predicted.

7h

 

Researchers develop model of toxoplasmosis evolution

Toxoplasmosis is an infectious disease caused by the spread of Toxoplasma gondii, a parasitic alveolite with an interesting life cycle. It exists in three forms. First, oocysts are produced in cats and passed in feces or urine. The oocytes can then be transmitted to humans and other intermediate hosts, including house mice. Toxoplasma gondii then develops into tachyzoites, which rapidly multiply b

7h

 

Touch to baby’s lips sets off intense brain response

New research reveals a special neural signature associated with touching a baby’s lips. It’s an indicator of how soon infants’ brains begin to make sense of their own bodies and a first step toward other developmental milestones. A typically developing 2-month-old baby can make cooing sounds, suck on her hand to calm down and smile at people. At that age, the mouth is the primary focus: Such youn

7h

 

A chaperonin protein, GroEL, has a more complex mechanism than was thought before

A Japanese research team led by Kanazawa University studied molecular interactions in the chaperonin protein GroEL. GroEL is alternately bound and unbound by a co-chaperonin, GroES. Against expectations, the 'football' complex — where two GroES units cap the cylindrical GroEL at either end — was roughly as prevalent as the single-bound 'bullet' complex. This implies that negative allosteric inte

7h

 

Peering deep into the cell to reveal essential components in cell division

The nucleolus has been shown to disassemble at the onset of mitosis; however, the relationship between cell cycle progression and nucleolar integrity remains unclear. Japanese researchers recently found that the depletion of NOL11 delayed entry into the mitotic phase and reduced ribosomal RNA levels, leading to caused nucleolar disruption during interphase. The findings suggest that maintenance of

7h

 

Stronger west winds blow ill wind for climate change

A new explanation for the Heinrich 1 event, where temperatures over Antarctica rose 5C in less than a century, suggests strengthening westerlies around the Antarctic led to a substantial increase in atmospheric carbon. Today, human-caused climate change is causing these same westerly winds to contract towards Antarctica and strengthen, suggesting an unexpected spike in carbon dioxide could occur a

7h

 

Breakthrough discovery will change treatment for COPD patients

Permanent lung damage caused by chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) starts much earlier than previously thought, even before patients are showing symptoms.

7h

 

Could mental health apps lead to overdiagnosis?

Mental health app marketing commonly presents mental health problems as ubiquitous and individuals as responsible for mental wellbeing; overdiagnosis and denial of the social factors related to mental health could result.

7h

 

Researchers improve conductive property of graphene, advancing promise of solar technology

Among researchers, graphene has been the hottest material for a decade. Now, two researchers from the University of Kansas have connected a graphene layer with two other atomic layers (molybdenum diselenide and tungsten disulfide) thereby extending the lifetime of excited electrons in graphene by several hundred times. The work may speed development of ultrathin and flexible solar cells with high

7h

 

8h

 

Rescued Thai Boys Being Watched for Illnesses Caught from Cave Animals

Medical responders will be on the lookout for signs of infection — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

 

How fragile memories help us learn new stuff

Updating visual perceptual skills—which humans rely on to recognize what we see (including potential threats) and ignore unimportant background—is an active process with many similarities to the way we stabilize memories, according to a new study. In the study, which appears in Nature Human Behavior , researchers tested whether memory reconsolidation, observed in animals, occurs in humans and whe

8h

 

What are the Ampullae of Lorenzini? | Countdown to Shark Week: The Daily Bite

The Daily Bite shares another segment of Top Sharks revisiting some of the legendary sharks of shark week. Also, we test your knowledge with some shark vocab. while the New york Aquarium gives you your healthy dose of conservation tips. Shark Week 2018 starts Sunday July 22 9p! Stream The Daily Bite on Discovery GO: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/the-daily-bite/ Stream Classic Shark Week Epis

8h

 

New, real-time milk and feed measurement system helps optimise dairy production

VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland and the Natural Resources Institute Finland (Luke) are together developing a new, smart, competitive technology platform for improving the profitability of dairy farms and for introducing commercial products through the contributions of business partners.

8h

 

The Linguist Who Helps Police Catch Child Predators

At a digital-forensics conference in 2011, British police asked Tim Grant if he could help undercover agents pose as young girls online. Grant, the director of Aston University’s Center for Forensic Linguistics, had just given a talk on how to identify the author of online messages by parsing their language. An officer in a regional organized-crime unit came up to him, he says, and told him there

8h

 

How a ‘Cancer Cure’ Video Blasted Bad Science—and Went Viral

"This NATURAL TRICK can CURE YOUR CANCER" isn't at all what it looks like.

8h

 

Book Excerpt: How Music Fans Built the Internet

In an excerpt from her new book, Microsoft researcher Nancy Baym demonstrates how music lovers used fan culture to build a worldwide web.

8h

 

Image: Nevada's Martin Fire largest in U.S.

The Martin Fire near the small Northern Nevada town of Paradise Valley erupted on July 05, 2018. The cause of the fire is under investigation. Between Thursday and today, July 09, 2018, the fire has exploded in size and updated mapping on Monday, has the fire just shy of 400,000 acres which is roughly 624 square miles. Contained is low at 8 percent.

8h

 

The Real Love Affair on GLOW

This article contains spoilers through the second season of Netflix’s GLOW. When the first season of GLOW ended, it was on a cliffhanger. Over 10 episodes, Ruth (Alison Brie) and Debbie (Betty Gilpin) had crafted new identities as Zoya the Destroyer and Liberty Belle, two women wrestlers with an intense, Cold War–inspired rivalry. In the final episode, Zoya and Liberty Belle faced off after weeks

8h

 

ICESat-2 lasers pass final ground test

On June 23, ICESat-2 engineers at Vandenberg Air Force Base in California successfully finished the final ground-based test of the lasers, which are part of the satellite's sole instrument called the Advanced Topographic Laser Altimeter System (ATLAS). ICESat-2 is scheduled to launch from Vandenberg on Sept. 12, 2018.

8h

 

Kulturminderne forsvinder med permafrosten

Fortidens levn er truet i Arktis, fordi det mildere klima får tidslommen til at briste. Det viser et internationalt forskningsprojekt med blandt andet dansk deltagelse.

8h

 

Lab studies the social interaction of yeast

Yeast don't have much of a social life; they're single-celled fungi, after all. But yeast are, indeed, social.

8h

 

Polar oceans are hot spots for new fish species

The fastest rates of species formation have occurred at the highest latitudes and in the coldest ocean waters, according to a new analysis of the evolutionary relationships between more than 30,000 fish species. Tropical oceans teem with the dazzle and flash of colorful reef fishes and contain far more species than the cold ocean waters found at high latitudes. This well-known “latitudinal divers

8h

 

Seal serum offers protection from inflammation

Seal lungs can take a terrible pounding when one of the mammals leaves the surface. When the lungs collapse during deep descents in order to protect the animal, the delicate tissues incur damage as they are crushed, then suffer blood and oxygen flooding back when the animals return to the surface. In addition, the fragile tissues could suffer inflammation, which is usually triggered to heal any da

8h

 

Genetic study suggests there are variants that can increase chances of success in life

A team of researchers from the U.S., the U.K. and New Zealand has found genetic variants that appear to confer success in life. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes their study and what they found.

8h

 

'Sir David Attenborough' ready for big splash

The UK's new £200m polar research ship is on the slipway ready to go in the River Mersey.

8h

 

No Vision, No Problem for This 'Blind' Cheetah Robot

Stumbling blocks don't deter this persistent — and blind — four-legged robot.

8h

 

Research update: Cellular 'garbage disposal' has another job

Johns Hopkins researchers have found that the cellular 'garbage disposal,' known to scientists as proteasomes, may not only be responsible for the removal of cellular waste, but actually work on some of the most important proteins to neuronal development.

8h

 

What separates the strong from weak among connections in the brain

Some synapses are much stronger than most of their neighbors. A new study imaged individual 'active zones' to discern what specific components make them that way and how they develop.

8h

 

Isolation and characterization of key enzyme for ephedrine production

Epimeron, Inc., a world-class provider of gene discovery and biosynthetic pathway optimization, today announced the isolation and characterization of an enzyme from Ephedra sinica catalyzing an essential step in the formation of the important drugs ephedrine and pseudoephedrine. Deploying the gene encoding the newly discovered enzyme in microbes allows the production of ephedrine and pseudoephedri

8h

 

Amazon outlook—continued warming, multiyear droughts

The Amazon is likely to face continued warming in addition to possible multiyear droughts, a new study finds.

9h

 

Reesearchers confine mature cells to turn them into stem cells

Stem cells are the blank slate on which all specialised cells in our bodies are built and they are the foundation for every organ and tissue in the body.

9h

 

Electrons slowing down at critical moments

In a new study, researchers from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory have determined that electrons in some oxides can experience an "unconventional slowing down" of their response to a light pulse.

9h

 

A step closer to single-atom data storage

Despite the rise of solid-state drives, magnetic storage devices such as conventional hard drives and magnetic tapes are still very common. But as our data-storage needs are increasing at a rate of almost 15 million gigabytes per day, scientists are turning to alternative storage devices.

9h

 

Researchers design a super catalyst to produce plastics and fuels without crude oil

Ghent University researchers used computer simulations to discover a new material that efficiently produces chemical building blocks for fuels and plastics without using crude oil.The reaction takes place in a material with pores on the nanoscale.

9h

 

Evolution does repeat itself after all

For every two species of mammal there is one species of cichlid fish, which goes to show that biodiversity is distributed rather unevenly among animals. But why? And to what extent can evolution be predicted? A variety of "internal" as well as ecological factors play a role. One decisive factor could be ecological conditions, i.e. the number of different habitats and the similarity of ecological n

9h

 

Scientists flip molecular switches on building blocks of life

A team of researchers at Yale is expanding our understanding of how bacteria continue to evolve and adapt at the molecular level.

9h

 

Psychologists are trying to figure out why we don’t go to sleep (even when we want to)

Health Self-control and your body clock both have their place in bedtime procrastination. Turning in on time is surprisingly complicated.

9h

 

Researchers improve conductive property of graphene, advancing promise of solar technology

In 2010, the Nobel Prize in Physics went to the discoverers of graphene. A single layer of carbon atoms, graphene possesses properties that are ideal for a host of applications. Among researchers, graphene has been the hottest material for a decade. In 2017 alone, more than 30,000 research papers on graphene were published worldwide.

9h

 

The Worst Thing You Can Do Is Panic

“Rescues are actually pretty rare.” What Robert Laird, the co-founder of International Underwater Cave Rescue and Recovery , means is this: When cave divers get in serious trouble, they usually die. There is no one to rescue, just a body to recover. In Thailand, an extraordinary rescue effort played out this week for 12 boys and their soccer coach, who managed to find high ground when floodwater

9h

 

Image: A closer view of the moon

Posted to Twitter by @Astro_Alex, European Space Agency astronaut Alexander Gerst, this image shows our planet's Moon as seen from the International Space Station. As he said in the tweet, "By orbiting the Earth almost 16 times per day, the #ISS crew travel the distance to the Moon and back – every day. #Horizons"

9h

 

Researcher pulling from past to shape future of glass research

Glass has been a part of society for thousands of years, so it is easy for this material to become invisible and overlooked, but a Penn State materials scientist has laid out a plan to map the glass genome and advance the future of glass.

9h

 

Towards winning the war on feral wild rabbits

New research shows how two biological control agents have been effective in reducing the numbers of feral rabbits in Australia. Using data from the largest wild rabbit study in the world, scientists have examined the long-term interaction of myxoma and rabbit haemorrhagic disease viruses.

9h

 

New research study could improve dog welfare

Academics from the University of Bristol's School of Veterinary Sciences are asking for dog owners to take part in a new research study that could help to improve dog welfare.

9h

 

The Race to Get Tourists to Suborbital Space Is Heating Up

Blue Origin and Virgin Galactic are quietly competing to see who will be the first to ferry tourists into space.

9h

 

How Microsoft’s AI Could Help Prevent Natural Disasters

The Chesapeake Bay project uses AI to go beyond flood warnings and create more detailed maps that can help with land-use planning and emergency response.

9h

 

Could a Text-Based Dating App Change Selfie-Swiping Culture?

@_personals_ started as an Instagram account for posting old-school looking-for-love ads—but it's poised to be so much more.

9h

 

Image of the Day: Birds of a Feather

Despite containing similar chemical pigments, red and yellow parrot feathers display distinct hues.

9h

 

The Floor Is (Usually) Not Lava

We tend to imagine that below the crust, Earth is a seething pool of molten rock—but it’s not — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9h

 

Sound of electromagnetic energy moving between Saturn, Enceladus

New research from NASA's Cassini spacecraft's up-close Grand Finale orbits shows a surprisingly powerful and dynamic interaction of plasma waves moving from Saturn to its rings and its moon Enceladus. The observations show for the first time that the waves travel on magnetic field lines connecting Saturn directly to Enceladus. The field lines are like an electrical circuit between the two bodies,

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High climate variability and increasing aridity brought an end to an early hominid species

Africa plays a prominent role in human evolution, and is considered by researchers to be the cradle of humanity. In the mid-20th century anthropologists found fossils of Paranthropus robustus in South Africa, which belongs to an evolutionary side branch of Homo sapiens. Paranthropus robustus lived around two million years ago but eventually died out. Possible reasons for the extinction have now be

9h

 

Driving Without a Smartphone

Updated on July 10, 2018 Last week, for the first time in years, I stopped my car at a red light and didn’t bide the time by fondling my smartphone. This isn’t a proud admission, but it is an honest one: Pretty much every time I stop my car at a traffic signal, I pick up my phone and do something with it. I’m not even sure what. I “check my phone,” as people say. Checking your phone doesn’t reall

9h

 

Stop Taking Multivitamins to Help Your Heart. Researchers Say They Don't Work.

Multivitamins are popular, but they don't appear to boost your heart health, according to a new study.

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The World’s Worst Industrial Disaster Is Still Unfolding

I n old Bhopal , not far from the small Indian city’s glitzy new shops and gorgeous lakes, is the abandoned Union Carbide factory. Here, in one ramshackle building, are hundreds of broken brown bottles crusted with the white residue of unknown chemicals. Below the corroding skeleton of another, drops of mercury glitter in the sun. In the far corner of the site is the company’s toxic-waste dump, s

9h

 

Full steam ahead for Aeolus launch

Having set sail from France on 15 June—Global Wind Day, ESA's Aeolus wind satellite has arrived safe and sound at the launch site in French Guiana.

10h

 

The Precedent That Democrats Want Brett Kavanaugh to Break

Democrats want to know, Judge Kavanaugh: How will you rule? For at least 25 years, it’s been the closest thing to an off-limits question at any Supreme Court confirmation hearing. Knowing a presidential nominee will never answer, senators almost never explicitly ask how he or she would decide a specific case that could come before the high court. But as President Trump’s pick, Judge Brett Kavanau

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Sorry to Bother You Has an Eerily Familiar Villain

This article contains light spoilers for the plot of Sorry to Bother You. “I just remember I heard the key words of, like, coke-fueled orgy, kind of a maniac ,” Armie Hammer told IndieWire Studio of his decision to star in the rapper Boots Riley’s directorial debut, Sorry to Bother You . “And I was like, ‘Yeah, I’m in, that sounds good!’” The larger-than-life satire Hammer was describing follows

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America’s Moment of Truth With North Korea Is Coming

One eight-word assumption underlies American and South Korean negotiations with Kim Jong Un: “North Korea will give up its nuclear weapons.” That’s what the analyst Cheon Seong Whun told me ahead of Secretary of State Mike Pompeo’s trip to Pyongyang this past weekend. For his part, Cheon, a security adviser in the conservative administration of former South Korean President Park Geun Hye, sees no

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Why Did the Human Cross the Road? To Confuse the Self-Driving Car

Human drivers struggle to figure out something as simple as whether someone will cross the road. Just imagine how robocars feel.

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Sex, Beer, and Coding: Inside Facebook’s Wild Early Days in Palo Alto

When the young Mark Zuckerberg moved to Palo Alto in 2004, he and his buddies built a corporate proto-culture that continues to influence the company today.

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Bulgaria's First New Plane in Decades Is a Freakishly Strong Drone

Brothers Svilen and Konstantin Rangelov are working on a drone they say will someday haul 800 pounds up to 1,550 miles.

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Freed From Thai Cave, Boys May Still Face Health Problems

Those rescued from Tham Luang Cave are being closely examined by doctors and are not yet allowed to have contact with their families.

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Image: The integrated Cheops satellite

The Cheops satellite in the cleanroom of Airbus Defence and Space Spain in Madrid.

10h

 

As Electricity Returns to Puerto Rico, Its People Want More Power

The island has long-term plans to make its main public electrical grid smarter as residents turn to solar power and microgrids for faster relief — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

10h

 

Fitness-app afslører hemmelige oplysninger om soldater

Journalister har fundet navne og adresser på soldater og spioner ved hjælp af offentlige data fra løbe-appen Polar.

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Brazil's Forest Code can balance the needs of agriculture and the environment

If fully implemented, Brazil's Forest Code, an environmental law designed to protect the country's native vegetation and regulate land use, will not prevent growth in Brazilian agriculture, according to new IIASA-led research.

10h

 

The Human Eye Could Help Test Quantum Mechanics

Experiments to confirm we can see single photons offer new ways to probe our understanding of quantum reality — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

10h

 

Uncovering the lost world of New Zealand from fossil bone DNA

Curtin University researchers have used DNA from fossil bones to reconstruct the past biodiversity of New Zealand, revealing a history of extinctions and biodiversity decline since human arrival there about 750 years ago.

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Higgs boson observed decaying to b quarks

On 9 July, at the 2018 International Conference on High Energy Physics (ICHEP) in Seoul (South Korea), the ATLAS experiment reported a preliminary result establishing the observation of the Higgs boson decaying into pairs of b quarks, furthermore at a rate consistent with the Standard Model prediction.

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Transmission of NDM bacteria between dogs and humans established

In 2015, a New Delhi-metallo-beta-lactamase (NDM) Escherichia coli bacteria was discovered in two Finnish dogs. An article recently published in the journal Eurosurveillance reveals that the dogs' owner also carried the bacterium. This is presumably the first time that the transmission of NDM-bacteria between a dog and a human has been reported.

10h

 

Printing a house from a novel peat material

Scientists from the University of Tartu and the Estonian University of Life Sciences have created a construction material consisting primarily of peat and oil shale ash that could reduce the construction costs of a private house nearly tenfold. The aim was to create a self-supporting construction material based on local natural resources and waste that could be used to 3-D print houses up to two-s

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Discovery of a new on/off switch affecting cell-to-cell communications

Cellular functions rely on several communications networks that allow cells to respond to signals affecting the organism. A new study published in Molecular Cell has revealed a mechanism that shuts down a major cell-to-cell communications pathway implicated in a number of diseases. INRS professor Nicolas Doucet and his research team contributed to the discovery of this new molecular switch, sheddi

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Therapeutic antibodies vary depending on production system

Differences in production methods for therapeutic antibodies can lead to variations in their structure, depending on the recombinant procedure selected. The distinctions, which are based on a number of glycosylations, even impact antibodies' stability. This was the result of a high-precision comparison of the structural properties of antibody isotopes that were manufactured in cell cultures or pla

10h

 

Keeping up with lipids on the move—a new molecular tracking method

In one of the older Star Wars movies, Jedi master Yoda instructs his apprentice, Luke, on the ways of the Force in a series of now-iconic scenes. The Force, Yoda says, is an energy field that penetrates us, that surrounds us, that binds us.

10h

 

Why gold-palladium alloys are better than palladium for hydrogen storage

Materials that absorb hydrogen are used for hydrogen storage and purification, thus serving as clean energy carriers. The best-known hydrogen absorber, palladium, can be improved by alloying it with gold.

10h

 

How cells build different antennae to sense their surroundings

Cells communicate with each other and with the environment using tiny antennae, called cilia, that emit and receive signals, including sound, smell and light information. Some of these antennae can also move, and are altered in several diseases leading to infertility, loss of vision, obesity, and other symptoms. Interestingly, some patients may have all of these symptoms, while others may have onl

10h

 

Sleeping sickness parasites camouflage themselves with sugar

It has long been known that the pathogens causing sleeping sickness evade the immune system by exchanging their surface proteins. But now scientists at the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) have found an additional parasite strategy to escape the immune system: They confuse the defense system with sugar. The sugar chains on the coat protein prevent the binding of protective antibodies and thus

10h

 

The surprising cellular diversity of the sea anemone

Despite its apparent simplicity, a tube-like body topped with tentacles, the sea anemone is actually a highly complex creature. Scientists from the Institut Pasteur, in collaboration with the CNRS, have just discovered over 100 cell types in this small marine invertebrate as well as incredible neuronal diversity. This surprising complexity was revealed when the researchers built a real cell atlas

10h

 

New chemical compounds make catalysts more efficient

A team from the Chair of Inorganic Chemistry II at Ruhr-Universität Bochum has developed new chemical compounds that make catalysts more efficient. With their electronic and spatial properties, the new class of what are known as phosphine ligands ensures that catalysts are more active and more stable. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, researchers led by Prof Dr. Viktoria Däschlein-Gessner describe

10h

 

Qubits as valves: Controlling quantum heat engines

Researchers from Aalto University are designing nano-sized quantum heat engines to explore whether they may be able to outperform classical heat engines in terms of power and efficiency.

10h

 

Charcoal: Major missing piece in the global carbon cycle

Most of the carbon resulting from wildfires and fossil fuel combustion is rapidly released into the atmosphere as carbon dioxide. Researchers at the University of Zurich have now shown that the leftover residue, so-called black carbon, can age for millennia on land and in rivers en route to the ocean, and thus constitutes a major long-term reservoir of organic carbon. The study adds a major missin

11h

 

Realization of color filter-free image sensors

A South Korean research team has developed an image sensor that captures vivid colors without color filters. The Korea Research Foundation announced that Professor Dae Sung Chung (Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology, DGIST)'s research team has developed an organic image sensor with high color selection using a bonding technique between organic semiconductors and transparent electro

11h

 

The best radiocarbon-dated site in all recent Iberian prehistory

Members of the department of Prehistory and Archaeology of the University of Seville have published a study that includes 130 radiocarbon datings of the archaeological site in Valencina de la Concepción (Seville).

11h

 

The mechanisms of genetic diversification in Candida albicans

Candida albicans is one of the most formidable fungal species infecting humans. Investigating the structure and reproduction methods of pathogenic populations can reveal how they emerge and spread. A team of scientists has sequenced and analyzed the genomes of 182 strains of C. albicans from around the world. They confirmed the clonal reproduction of this C. albicans, and also showed that parasexu

11h

 

Meningococcal bacterial aggregates form a thick honey-like liquid that flows through blood vessels

The Inserm team led by Guillaume Duménil at the Institut Pasteur, in collaboration with several teams of physicists, has unraveled a key stage in infection by Neisseria meningitidis, a human pathogen responsible for meningitis in infants and young adults. Bacterial aggregates in blood vessels appear to facilitate the progression of the disease. Even if treatment is administered rapidly, the mortal

11h

 

Scientists develop unique trap for light

Based at the National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Russia), a research team led by Prof. Yuri Rakovich has developed a tunable micro-resonator for hybrid energy states between light and matter using light to control the chemical and biological properties of molecules. The results have been published in the Review of Scientific Instruments.

11h

 

Israel plans first lunar space mission in December

An Israeli organisation announced plans Tuesday to launch the country's first spacecraft to the moon in December, with hopes of burnishing Israel's reputation as a small nation with otherworldly high-tech ambitions.

11h

 

BMW to make electric MINIs in China with Great Wall Motor

BMW Group and China's biggest SUV brand, Great Wall Motor, have announced a partnership to produce electric MINI vehicles in China.

11h

 

Australian rangers trap big crocodile near tourist gorge

Wildlife rangers said Tuesday that they had trapped a 4.7-meter (15-foot) saltwater crocodile, the largest they had ever caught in the northern Australian Katherine River and in an upstream region popular with tourists that is thought relatively safe from the killer predators.

11h

 

Google kan se frem til Vestager-bøde i milliardklassen og forbud mod tvungen Android

Google kan se frem til ny EU-bøde samt ordre om at stoppe konkurrencefordrejende aftaler med producenterne.

11h

 

The Anticlimax of Trump’s Supreme Court Announcement

It’s been a summer of anticlimax on the courts. In June, after riveting, hard-fought playoffs, the Golden State Warriors rolled over the Cleveland Cavaliers on the basketball court, in a snoozer of an NBA Finals. Monday night, something analogous happened for the highest court in the land. After a lengthy lead-up, into which Donald Trump injected as much drama as he possibly could, the president

11h

 

The Other Side of Janus

Might the decline of public-sector unions spur the revitalization of the public sector? One of the longstanding complaints about public-sector unions, a complaint one hears mostly though not exclusively on the right, is that by assiduously serving the interests of their members, they wind up shortchanging the public. This is not out of a desire to fleece taxpayers. Rather, it reflects the fact th

11h

 

The Struggle Over the Meaning of the 14th Amendment Continues

The Fourteenth Amendment to the Constitution—the linchpin of the current constitutional system—was ratified 150 years ago Monday, on July 9, 1868. July 9 marked the date on which the legislatures of South Carolina and Louisiana approved the amendment, bringing the total number of state approvals to the required 28 and inscribing the amendment in the Constitution for good. Or, wait, hold that thou

11h

 

World Trade Center response crews may face higher heart attack, stroke risk

Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) may increase the risk for stroke and heart attack in both male and female city workers and volunteers who cleaned debris in the aftermath of the World Trade Center plane attack on Sept. 11, 2001. The study sheds light on long-term consequences of PTSD 11-15 years after the event occurred in a general population.

12h

 

Multivitamins do not promote cardiovascular health

Multivitamins and mineral supplements do not prevent heart attacks, strokes or cardiovascular death. Data pooled from multiple studies show no health benefit of multivitamins.

12h

 

12h

 

Singapore's Temasek reports record $235 bn portfolio

Singapore investment giant Temasek Holdings said Tuesday the value of its global portfolio reached a record high last year but will temper investments this year owing to brewing trade and geopolitical tensions.

12h

 

Nissan indrømmer omfattende miljøsvindel

Den japanske bilproducent har både snydt i brændstoftest og forfalsket bilernes testresultater.

12h

 

Hydrogenmolekylets dissociationsenergi stemmer ikke

Mere nøjagtige beregninger og bedre eksperimenter viser, at der er noget, der ikke hænger sammen omkring den energi, der skal til for at bryde bindingen i hydrogenmolekylet.

12h

 

WhatsApp offers tips to spot fake news after India murdersWhatsApp India Facebook

WhatsApp took out full-page advertisements in Indian newspapers Tuesday offering "easy tips" to identify fact from fiction after a slew of recent murders spurred by hoaxes shared on its platform.

13h

 

How Apple's app store changed our world

A decade ago, Apple opened a store peddling iPhone apps, unlocking the creativity of software developers and letting users truly make their mobile devices their own.

13h

 

Aloe Vera

Many claims are made for the health benefits of aloe vera, used both topically and orally. The scientific evidence is lacking.

14h

 

Concrete weighs heavily on the Mediterranean coast

Across the Mediterranean, from an illegally-built hotel in a Spanish nature park to a holiday complex encroaching on Lebanon's salt flats, a tourism boom is threatening precious coastal ecosystems.

14h

 

Russian cargo ship docks at ISS in record time

A Russian cargo vessel took just three hours and 40 minutes to reach the International Space Station on Tuesday, Roscosmos space agency said, smashing the record flight time by two hours.

14h

 

Giant dinosaur bones get archeologists rethinking Triassic period

Giant dinosaurs lived on Earth much earlier than previously thought, according to a team of excavators in Argentina who discovered the remains of a 200-million-year old species.

14h

 

As trial opens, man dying of cancer blames Monsanto's Roundup

A lawyer for a California groundskeeper dying of cancer took aim at Monsanto Monday as a jury began hearing the lawsuit accusing the chemical giant of ignoring health risks of its top-selling weed killer Roundup.

14h

 

Win for wildlife as krill fishing restricted in Antarctica

Five major krill fishing firms Tuesday agreed to halt operations across huge swathes of the Antarctic to help protect wildlife in a move hailed as "bold and progressive" by conservationists.

14h

 

the healing edge: Dying Organs Restored to Life in Novel Experiments

An unusual transplant may revive tissues thought to be hopelessly damaged, including the heart and brain.

14h

 

Death toll in Canada heatwave hits 70

A heatwave in Quebec in eastern Canada has now been blamed for 70 deaths, officials said Monday.

14h

 

Elon Musk says in Thailand with mini-subElon Musk Thai Cave

American space entrepreneur Elon Musk tweeted that he was in Thailand on Tuesday with a prototype mini-sub, at the flooded cave where five members of a youth football team remained trapped.

14h

 

Cyprus clifftop villas raise fears for endangered seals

In a string of caves along the coast of Cyprus, a colony of monk seals—the most endangered mammals in the Mediterranean—has found refuge.

14h

 

SoftBank raises stake in Yahoo Japan in purchase from Altaba

Japanese internet company SoftBank Corp. is investing about $2 billion to raise its stake in Yahoo Japan through an acquisition from U.S. investment company Altaba Inc.

14h

 

Management shift begins at US nuclear weapons lab

The U.S. government on Monday cleared the way for a new management team to begin taking over one of the nation's top nuclear weapons laboratories as it looks to rebuild its reputation.

14h

 

YouTube aims to crack down on fake news, support journalismYouTube Google Incognito

Google's YouTube says it is taking several steps to ensure the veracity of news on its service by cracking down on misinformation and supporting news organizations.

14h

 

Stop antibiotics before resistance 'tipping point'

Treatments using antibiotics should stop as soon as possible to prevent patients passing the "tipping point" of becoming resistant to their effects, new research has shown.

14h

 

New 'scaly' snails species group following striking discoveries from Malaysian Borneo

Six new species of unique land snails whose shells are covered with what look like scales have been described from the biodiversity hotspot of Malaysian Borneo by scientists Mohd Zacaery Khalik, Universiti Malaysia Sarawak, Kasper Hendriks, University of Groningen, Jaap Vermeulen, JK Art & Science, and Prof Menno Schilthuizen, Naturalis Biodiversity Center. Their paper is published in the open acc

15h

 

Finding a weak link in the frightful parasite Schistosoma

The parasitic disease schistosomiasis is one of the developing world's worst public health scourges, affecting hundreds of millions of people, yet only a single, limited treatment exists to combat the disease.

15h

 

Rising carbon dioxide levels pose a previously unrecognized threat to monarch butterflies

A new study conducted at the University of Michigan reveals a previously unrecognized threat to monarch butterflies: Mounting levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide reduce the medicinal properties of milkweed plants that protect the iconic insects from disease.

15h

 

Ban plastic to save the heritage of world's oldest and largest inhabited river island

A Queen's University Belfast researcher is working with an Indian community to transform the world's largest and oldest inhabited river island into a plastic-free zone, in a bid to save its heritage.

15h

 

Artificial intelligence helps researchers predict drug combinations' side effects

Last month alone, 23 percent of Americans took two or more prescription drugs, according to one CDC estimate, and 39 percent over age 65 take five or more, a number that's increased three-fold in the last several decades. And if that isn't surprising enough, try this one: in many cases, doctors have no idea what side effects might arise from adding another drug to a patient's personal pharmacy.

15h

 

Study sheds light on composition of dust carried by rainwater across Texas

A collaboration between professors from The University of Texas at El Paso and the University of North Texas is leading to a better understanding of the composition of dust carried by rain across the state, and how that dust can affect the places where it ends up.

15h

 

Professor om Sundhedsplatformen: »Region H undervurderer fuldstændig, hvor mange ressourcer det kræver«

Dansk professor mener ikke, at Region Hs ledelse har indset, hvor meget der skal til for at få Sundhedsplatformen til at fungere optimalt.

15h

 

Teen crash risk highest during first three months after getting driver's license

Teenage drivers are eight times more likely to be involved in a collision or near miss during the first three months after getting a driver's license, compared to the previous three months on a learner's permit, suggests a study led by the National Institutes of Health.

15h

 

Will criminalising misogyny be the end of the world as we know it? I hope so | Suzanne Moore

Making misogynistic behaviour a criminal offence is unworkable, but highlighting it – as a trial in the Midlands has done – will cause attitudes to shift We are going to have to start building more prisons. Huge ones for all the men who are going to be banged up for wolf-whistling. (God knows who is going to build them.) The knee-patters will have to be put away. The blokes who say: “Nice legs, w

16h

 

Innovavations from the Energy and Environmental Sustainability Solutions for Megacities Program

Researchers at Shanghai Jiao Tong University, in China, and the National University of Singapore have tackled the issue of managing food waste and other urban problems — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

16h

 

Hul i ozonlaget: Kina har udledt tonsvis af forbudte gasser

Forskere undrede sig over massiv stigning af ozon-dræbende gasser i atmosfæren. Ny rapport skyder skylden på kinesiske fabrikker.

16h

 

Færre søger naturvidenskab: Københavns Universitet trækker ansøgertallet ned

Mens de andre universiteter har flere ansøgere eller lige så mange ansøgere som tidligere år, falder KU’s ansøgertal i år med 11 procent på naturvidenskab. Dermed kan hele det nationale fald tilskrives universitetet. Faldet er helt naturligt og ventet på grund af nye optagelsesregler, siger fakul…

16h

 

Artificial intelligence helps Stanford researchers predict drug combinations' side effects

Millions of people take upwards of five medications a day, but testing the side effects of such combinations is impractical. Now, Stanford computer scientists have figured out how to predict side effects using artificial intelligence.

16h

 

Finding a weak link in the frightful parasite Schistosoma

Researchers at the Morgridge Institute for Research shed light on the complex life cycle of Schistosoma, a parasite responsible for sickening hundreds of millions of people in the developing world.

16h

 

New 'scaly' snails species group following striking discoveries from Malaysian Borneo

Six new species of unique land snails whose shells are covered with what look like scales are described from the biodiversity hotspot of Malaysian Borneo in the open-access journal ZooKeys. The snails were discovered by a Malaysian-Dutch team of scientists, thanks to a set of modern tools, high-magnification scanning electron microscope and 3D modeling. All species are named after their original l

16h

 

Stop antibiotics before resistance 'tipping point'

Treatments using antibiotics should stop as soon as possible to prevent patients passing the 'tipping point' of becoming resistant to their effects, new research has shown.

16h

 

Rising carbon dioxide levels pose a previously unrecognized threat to monarch butterflies

A new study conducted at the University of Michigan reveals a previously unrecognized threat to monarch butterflies: Mounting levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide reduce the medicinal properties of milkweed plants that protect the iconic insects from disease.

16h

 

Survey paints mixed view of New Yorkers' health

New Yorkers are getting heavier. And, like people across the country, many have difficulty sleeping and are suffering from depression. Diabetes rates in NYC remain high and racial and ethnic disparities persist.

16h

 

EPA Stalls Release of Carcinogen Report

An investigation by Politico finds the agency has been sitting on an assessment of formaldehyde's cancer risks for a year and a half.

18h

 

Brett Kavanaugh Is Devoted to the Presidency

Not since Warren Harding in 1921 nominated former President William Howard Taft to be chief justice has the country been presented with a high court nominee so completely shaped by the needs and mores of the executive branch as Brett Kavanaugh, unveiled Monday night as President Donald Trump’s nominee to replace Justice Anthony Kennedy. Though Kavanaugh served as Kennedy’s law clerk during the Oc

18h

 

Monsanto 'bullied scientists' and hid weedkiller cancer risk, lawyer tells court

As ill California man’s landmark case begins, attorney attacks Roundup maker’s response to researchers’ findings Monsanto has long worked to “bully scientists” and suppress evidence of the cancer risks of its popular weedkiller, a lawyer argued on Monday in a landmark lawsuit against the global chemical corporation. “Monsanto has specifically gone out of its way to bully … and to fight independen

18h

 

Apple peel drug makes mice live longer by targeting a cause of ageing

We’re beginning to understand the causes of ageing and how to reverse it – thanks to an extract from apple peel that helps improves strength in elderly mice

19h

 

New dinosaur fossil explains how Diplodocus evolved to be so massive

A new fossil uncovered in Argentina shows a dinosaur adapting to life as a giant, rewriting our understanding of how giant sauropods like Diplodocus evolved

19h

 

Quantum dots in brain could treat Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s diseases

Tiny particles seem to stop misfolded proteins from forming toxic clumps in the brains of mice, improving their performance on physical tests

19h

 

Six pollution policies gutted by Scott Pruitt – and what happens next

Scott Pruitt resigned from the US Environmental Protection Agency, and his successor is likely to continue gutting regulations that limit air and water pollution

19h

 

Watch a ‘heart’ made from liquid gallium beat in an electric field

Inspired by the liquid metal robot T-1000 in Terminator 2, researchers have made gallium droplets that beat likes hearts and could be used to power artificial muscles

19h

 

Detecting Synapse Location and Connectivity by Signed Proximity Estimation and Pruning with Deep Nets

Synaptic connectivity detection is a critical task for neural reconstruction from Electron Microscopy (EM) data. Most of the existing algorithms for synapse detection do not identify the cleft location and direction of connectivity simultaneously. The few methods that computes direction along with contact location have only been demonstrated to work on either dyadic (most common in vertebrate brai

19h

 

'Not the same science': Longman LNP candidate on climate change – video

In a video recorded on Saturday, the Liberal National party candidate for Longman, Trevor Ruthenberg, is shown talking to members of the Australian Youth Climate Coalition, who were campaigning in Longman before the 26 July 'super Saturday' byelection . When asked if he rejects the science of climate change , Ruthenberg tells the AYCC campaigner 'your understanding of science … and my understandi

19h

 

Brett Kavanaugh Has GOP Bona Fides, But a Surprising Record

President Trump has nominated Brett Kavanaugh to be the next U.S. Supreme Court justice. In a televised announcement on Monday night, he said that Kavanaugh is “a judge’s judge,” with “impeccable credentials, unsurpassed qualifications, and a proven commitment to equal justice under the law.” “What matters is not a judge’s political views,” Trump said, “but whether they can set aside those views

19h

 

Babies introduced to solids early slept longer and woke less frequently, study finds

A study has found that babies introduced to solid foods early, slept longer, woke less frequently at night and suffered fewer serious sleep problems, than those exclusively breastfed.

20h

 

Bale monkeys living in different areas have very different DNA

Bale monkeys that live in continuous bamboo forests have different mitochondrial DNA to Bale monkeys living in fragmented forests, according to a new study.

20h

 

Longer hours on social media may increase teens' risk of cyberbullying

Cyberbullying may be linked to higher use of social network sites by school children aged 14-17 years, rather than to simply having a social network profile, according to a new study that examined data from several European countries.

20h

 

Rare pediatric skin conditions often get expensive, inconsistent care

New research shows that death and recurrence are rare in children with Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis, but children who experience these skin conditions have high rates of complications that treatment strategies varied among health care providers.

20h

 

Dust carried by rainwater across Texas: Study sheds light on composition

Across the US Southwest, severe drought and land?use change are projected to increase in the future, contributing to more frequent and intense dust storms and eventually dry dust fallout and dust washout from the atmosphere with rain. How will Dust Bowl-like conditions affect raining dust events?

20h

 

Deadly form of advanced prostate cancer is common, calls for distinct treatment

A new study of prostate cancer in 202 men, whose cancers had spread and were resistant to standard treatment, found that a surprisingly large number of these cancers — about 17 percent — belong to a deadlier subtype of metastatic prostate cancer.

20h

 

New pediatric asthma yardstick has treatment guidance for children of every age

The Pediatric Asthma Yardstick, a new guideline from the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI), offers a user-friendly 'operational document'. It helps health care professionals understand which controller treatments are right for which age groups and identifies when a step up is needed.

20h

 

Surface Go Is Microsoft’s Big Bet on a Tiny-Computer Future

The latest Surface is Microsoft's smallest—and least expensive.

20h

 

Fluorescent fish genes light path to neuroblastoma

A neurodevelopmental biologist has a new tool in the search for the origins of neuroblastoma, the third-most common pediatric cancer in the United States.

20h

 

Crystal structure reveals how curcumin impairs cancer

Through x-ray crystallography and kinase-inhibitor specificity profiling, researchers reveal that curcumin, a natural occurring chemical compound found in the spice turmeric, binds to the kinase enzyme dual-specificity tyrosine-regulated kinase 2 (DYRK2) at the atomic level. This previously unreported biochemical interaction of curcumin leads to inhibition of DYRK2 that impairs cell proliferation

20h

 

Oxygen levels on early Earth rose, fell several times before great oxidation even

Earth's oxygen levels rose and fell more than once hundreds of millions of years before the planetwide success of the Great Oxidation Event about 2.4 billion years ago, new research shows.

20h

 

'Star in a jar': World record for stellarators set

When Germany's Wendelstein 7-X fusion facility set a world record for stellarators recently, a finely tuned instrument proved the achievement. The record strongly suggests that the design of the stellarator can be developed to capture on Earth the fusion that drives the sun and stars.

20h

 

How antifreeze proteins stop ice cold

The existence of antifreeze proteins (AFPs) has been known for decades, but the mechanisms governing this unique survival technique have proven difficult to determine. A new study shows how AFPs function while also providing a direction for future research.

20h

 

Atomic imaging exposes how malaria invades our blood cells

New research reveals, at an atomic level, how a major form of malaria, P. vivax, invades our red blood cells. The mosquito-borne malaria parasite is an ancient killer, predating the emergence of humans. It has stalked us our entire history, possibly killing Alexander the Great and even being implicated in the fall of Rome. Today it still kills over 400,000 people every year, mostly children under

20h

 

Link between river outflow and coastal sea level

Sea levels in coastal areas can be affected by a number of factors: tides, winds, waves, and even barometric pressure all play a role in the ebb and flow of the ocean. For the first time, however, a new study has shown that river outflow could play a role in sea level change as well.

21h

 

Bale monkeys living in different areas have very different DNA

Bale monkey's that live in continuous bamboo forests have different mitochondrial DNA to Bale monkeys living in fragmented forests, according to a study published in the open access journal, BMC Evolutionary Biology.

21h

 

Grasslands more reliable carbon sink than trees

Forests have long served as a critical carbon sink, consuming about a quarter of the carbon dioxide pollution produced by humans worldwide. But decades of fire suppression, warming temperatures and drought have increased wildfire risks—turning California's forests from carbon sinks to carbon sources.

21h

 

A Time-Lapsed Glacier Collapse Is the Saddest Science Lesson

Time-lapse footage of a calving Glacier in Greenland could help researchers anticipate catastrophic sea-level rise.

21h

 

Fossil of 'first giant' dinosaur discovered in Argentina

Discovery of "first giant" shows how and when dinosaurs grew to such massive proportions.

21h

 

Steve Ditko Was More Than Just the Guy Behind Spider-Man

The comics artist co-created many iconic characters—but that's not the only reason he should be remembered.

21h

 

Salisbury poisoning: What is Novichok?

Laura Foster explains how the Novichok nerve agent works and what to do if you think you've been exposed to it.

21h

 

Poll: Immigration and money split U.S. voters

A new poll of voters across the US reveals evidence that Americans distrust the government, feel unable to manage major or long-term expenses, and think that the level of overall safety and security is stagnant or worsening. As the country’s midterm elections approach in November 2018, Democrats have a 9 percentage-point advantage over Republicans overall on a generic congressional ballot, the po

21h

 

Legal EU ivory sales 'condemn elephants'

Campaigners find many legally sold antique ivory trinkets in Europe come from recently killed elephants.

22h

 

Nanolaser uses chameleon trick to change colors

A new nanolaser changes colors using the same mechanism that chameleons use. The work could open the door for advances in flexible optical displays in smartphones and televisions, wearable photonic devices, and ultra-sensitive sensors that measure strain. “Chameleons can easily change their colors by controlling the spacing among the nanocrystals on their skin, which determines the color we obser

22h

 

Simple as a Selfie: One-Button Scientific Imaging

Learn how to use different visualization techniques for different experiments, ranging from chemiluminescent antibodies for protein assays to laser-guided live animal whole-body fluorescent imaging!

22h

 

Trump Stance on Breast-Feeding and Formula Criticized by Medical Experts

Global health experts say breast milk is especially important for babies in poor countries, where unsafe water supplies can make powdered infant formula dangerous.

22h

 

Report: Small banks discriminate against people of color

Small banks punish African American and Latinos with higher balance requirements and fee structures, report researchers. These discriminatory practices—captured in national headlines and alleged against large banks—are more common at small community banks, researchers says. It’s cheaper to maintain a checking account opened in a white neighborhood. “Small and community banks’ practices sometimes

22h

 

Orangutans aren’t as leery of us as we thought

While scientists have long viewed orangutans as an ecologically sensitive species, they can, and do, inhabit areas humans have altered, according to a new synthesis of existing evidence. The findings may be good news for the survival of the species. Orangutans are a critically endangered, formally protected species. Researchers estimate their current population is less than 1 percent of what it w

22h

 

The Atlantic Daily: On the Spot

What We’re Following Brexiter’s Exit: U.K. Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson and Brexit Secretary David Davis have resigned over what they see as weakness in Prime Minister Theresa May’s proposal for Britain’s departure from the European Union. While Johnson’s tenure was marked by diplomatic gaffes and friction with May, his position as one of the key proponents of Brexit may have helped to protect

22h

 

Krill companies limit Antarctic fishing

The overwhelming majority of krill companies are to stop fishing in vast areas of the Antarctic Peninsula.

22h

 

It's time to take a more holistic view of coral reef health

Environment One researcher argues we need to figure out how they stay well. A new paper from a coral expert suggests that researchers need to pay more attention to what keeps corals healthy—not just what makes them sick.

23h

 

Rescued from the Cave, Thai Soccer Team Gets Quarantined: Here's Why

Caves are petri-dishes for viruses and bacteria

23h

 

Stop Live-Tweeting Strangers Flirting

Last week, the Twitter user Rosey Blair and her boyfriend, Houston Hardaway, made headlines for their viral live commentary on the supposed “meet-cute” between the two strangers sitting in front of them on a plane ride from New York to Dallas. Neither the woman in front of them (whose name was later revealed to be Helen), nor her handsome seatmate, Euan Holden , a former pro soccer player turned

23h

 

Mitochondrial DNA in exosomes is the alarm that initiates the antiviral response

Researchers demonstrate that exosomes transferred from T lymphocytes to dendritic cells contain mitochondrial DNA. Their study explains how the distinct cellular components of the immune response communicate to mount an effective response to pathogens.

23h

 

Change health messaging to focus on potential impact to help stop the next pandemic

Changing public health messaging to focus on the impact of our actions — for example, the potentially harmful impact of infecting a colleague with a cold, rather than whether we will infect them if we go into work in the first place — could have significant implications for how we deal with global threats, according to a new study.

23h

 

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: America’s Next Top Magistrate

-Written by Elaine Godfrey ( @elainejgodfrey ) Today in 5 Lines President Trump is expected to announce his nominee to replace retiring Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy at 9 p.m. ET. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo made an unannounced visit to Afghanistan, where he met with Afghan President Ashraf Ghani and reiterated the U.S. commitment to the country. Four more members of a youth soccer tea

23h

 

UTEP, UNT study sheds light on composition of dust carried by rainwater across Texas

Across the US Southwest, severe drought and land?use change are projected to increase in the future, contributing to more frequent and intense dust storms and eventually dry dust fallout and dust washout from the atmosphere with rain. How will Dust Bowl?like conditions affect raining dust events? We examined rainwater samples at two Texas sites (one arid, Guadalupe Mountains; one humid, Gulf coast

23h

 

Using hepatitis C-infected donor kidneys could reduce time on dialysis for transplant patients with HCV

Transplanting hepatitis C-infected dialysis patients with HCV-positive donor organs and then treating the infection later is more effective, cheaper and shortens organ wait time.

23h

 

Federal lab declassifies 250+ never-before-seen nuclear test videos from Cold War era

The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has been working for years to preserve the estimated 10,000 videos of nuclear bomb tests made by the U.S. government during the Cold War. Read More

1d

 

Why the time for diversity in tech is now

In 2016, Facebook employees were just 33% female and 2% black; YouTube employees were 30% women and 2% black; Apple employees were 32% women and 9% black; Google employees were 31% women and 2% black. Read More

1d

 

Why do kids lie, and is it normal?

From a developmental perspective, lying in young children is rarely cause for concern. In fact, lying is often one of the first signs a young child has developed a “theory of mind.” Read More

1d

 

YouTube Debuts Plan to Promote and Fund 'Authoritative' News

The video platform is less focused on getting rid of conspiracy theorists than on trying to elevate journalism it considers valuable.

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Air pollution is triggering diabetes in 3.2 million people each year

A new study quantifies the link between smoggy air and diabetes.

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Appeals court backs $10B Volkswagen emissions cheating deal

A U.S. appeals court on Monday approved a $10 billion settlement between Volkswagen and car owners caught up in the company's emissions cheating scandal.

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How Phoenix Is Trying To Keep People Cool As Temperatures Rise

As the climate warms, temperatures are spiking and heat waves are more frequent. Phoenix — one of the country's hottest cities — aims to be a model in figuring out how to keep people cool.

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NASA's Kepler Telescope almost out of fuel, forced to nap

NASA's Kepler Space Telescope is almost out of fuel and has been forced to take a nap.

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Parasite Outbreak Tied to Del Monte Vegetables Sickens More Than 200 People

An outbreak of parasitic infections tied to Del Monte vegetable trays has sickened more than 200 people in four U.S. states.

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North American automakers call for NAFTA talks to resume

US, Canadian and Mexican auto industry groups on Monday urged their governments to resume stalled efforts to overhaul the North American Free Trade Agreement.

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Twitter shares fall on worries about user base

Twitter shares tumbled Monday on concerns the social media's efforts to crack down on fake accounts would affect its user base, and potentially its finances.

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Ludwig-developed candidate drug may be effective against broader class of brain cancers

A Ludwig Cancer Research study explains why a particular mutation in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), a cell surface protein, results in more aggressive tumors and poorer overall survival of patients diagnosed with the brain cancer glioblastoma multiforme (GBM).

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From corn to flake: Health-promoting phenolic acids lost during food processing

For many Americans, highly processed foods are on the menu for breakfast, lunch, and dinner. Even when the raw materials — grains, for example — are high in vitamins and health-promoting phenolic compounds, processing can rob the final product of these nutrients. In a set of recent studies, University of Illinois scientists reveal what happens to cancer-fighting phenolic acids in corn when it is

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Neuron naming resumes next week

When we announced the neuron naming associated with the Cell publication, there was also a calendar included. According to that calendar, we should be midway through naming a second neuron type as discovered in the Cell publication. So why aren’t we? I ended up spending more time than expected on the cup, which has put a few items behind, including neuron naming. Future rounds of neuron naming an

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Uber joins scooter wars with Lime investment

Uber made a move into electric scooters Monday, as the ride-service giant agreed to a strategic partnership with Lime, one of the major players in the fast-growing segment.

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From corn to flake: Health-promoting phenolic acids lost during food processing

For many Americans, highly processed foods are on the menu for breakfast, lunch, and dinner. Even when the raw materials—grains, for example—are high in vitamins and health-promoting phenolic compounds, processing can rob the final product of these nutrients. In a set of recent studies, University of Illinois scientists reveal what happens to cancer-fighting phenolic acids in corn when it is proce

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Scientists show how energy landscape algorithm details DNA's interphase dynamics

The nuclei of cells are never static, even when the chromosomes they contain appear to be at rest. Theorists at Rice University have detailed the combination of forces that drive their constant motion.

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Fluorescent fish genes light path to neuroblastoma

A new type of zebrafish that produces fluorescent tags in migratory embryonic nerve precursor cells could help a Rice University neurobiologist and cancer researcher find the origins of the third-most common pediatric cancer in the U.S.

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Oxygen levels on early Earth rose, fell several times before great oxidation even

Earth's oxygen levels rose and fell more than once hundreds of millions of years before the planetwide success of the Great Oxidation Event about 2.4 billion years ago, new research from the University of Washington shows.

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Crystal structure reveals how curcumin impairs cancer

Through X-ray crystallography and kinase-inhibitor specificity profiling, University of California San Diego School of Medicine researchers, in collaboration with researchers at Peking University and Zhejiang University, reveal that curcumin, a natural occurring chemical compound found in the spice turmeric, binds to the kinase enzyme dual-specificity tyrosine-regulated kinase 2 (DYRK2) at the ato

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NASA sees a well-organized typhoon Maria

Maria appeared as a well-organized storm on infrared NASA satellite imagery on July 9. Maria has fluctuated between typhoon and super typhoon strength and was a typhoon when NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead.

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Human rights in a changing sociopolitical climate

The number of people seeking asylum in the United States is drastically lower this year than last. With a growing national debate over policies and limited understanding of the resettlement process, the United States is on track to admit the fewest number of refugees since creation of the resettlement program.

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The largest dinosaurs got huge way earlier than we thought

Science They lived on Pangea more than 200 million years ago. While the Blue Whale remains the heavyweight champ, those sauropod giants were the largest creatures to ever walk on land.

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Oceanographers uncover the relationship between size and productivity in one of the world's most complex ecosystems

They exist all over the world, are among the most productive ecosystems on Earth and are home to a diverse array of wildlife. They also are essential to the global economy. They are estuaries—coastal embayments where fresh river water and salty ocean water meet.

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In responding to predation risk, secondhand experience can be as good as new

Throughout the living world, parents have many ways of gifting their offspring with information they will need to help them survive. A new study in Nature Ecology and Evolution examining the effects of exposure to predators across two generations of stickleback fish yielded a surprising insight into how such transgenerational information is used.

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Stormwater ponds not a major source of greenhouse gas emissions

Stormwater retention ponds, a ubiquitous feature in developed landscapes worldwide, are not a significant source of climate-warming nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions, a new Duke University-led study finds.

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The End of the Brexit Illusion

Two British cabinet ministers have resigned within the past 24 hours, an upheaval not seen since at least 1982, according to the BBC politics desk . Both resigned for the same reason: to protest Prime Minister Theresa May’s plan to preserve some of the benefits of EU membership for Britain in a post-Brexit world. That plan is not a very realistic or workable plan. But that’s not why the two minis

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New patch boosts brightness in medical diagnostic tests

Fluorescence-based biosensing and bioimaging technologies are widely used in research and clinical settings to detect and image various biological species of interest. While fluorescence-based detection and imaging techniques are convenient to use, they suffer from poor sensitivity. For example, when a patient carries low levels of antigens in the blood or urine, the fluorescent signal can be feeb

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Rare pediatric skin conditions often get expensive, inconsistent care

New research shows that death and recurrence are rare in children with Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis, but children who experience these skin conditions have high rates of complications that treatment strategies varied among health care providers.

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Genome's gyrations fit right into Rice University model

Computer models developed at Rice University show that energy landscape theory can predict not only the form of DNA contained in a cell's nucleus during interphase, but also its dynamic behavior. The model also revealed DADs — chromatin domains that behave coherently.

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PPPL diagnostic is key to world record of German fusion experiment

Article describes measurement by PPPL spectrometer that contributed to W7-X world record fusion product for a stellarator.

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Medicare Advantage rankings penalize plans serving disadvantaged populations, study finds

A new study from Brown University shows that Medicare Advantage plans suffer in quality rankings when they serve more non-white, poor and rural Americans.

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New way to regenerate hearts after a heart attack

New research from the University of Oxford has revealed that an injection of a protein called VEGF-C can repair damaged hearts in mice, after a heart attack — treated mice regained almost all of their heart function while untreated lost nearly half.

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Insurance gaps linked to five-fold rise in hospital stays for adults with type 1 diabetes

A new study finds that one in four working-age adults with type 1 diabetes had at least one gap of at least 30 days in their private health insurance, within an average of a three-year period. A temporary loss of coverage had a sizable impact on the patients' use of health care once they got insurance again.

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Pay less, take more: Success in getting patients to take their medicine

New evidence shows the power of a method aimed at changing the longstanding problem of encouraging patients with chronic diseases to take their medicine faithfully: insurance plans that charge patients less for the medicines that could help them most. Some plans even make some of the medicines free to the patients with certain conditions.

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Biosensor chip detects single nucleotide polymorphism wirelessly, with higher sensitivity

A team led by the University of California San Diego has developed a chip that can detect a type of genetic mutation known as a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and send the results in real time to a smartphone, computer, or other electronic device. The chip is at least 1,000 times more sensitive at detecting an SNP than current technology.

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Electrochemically-produced ammonia could revolutionize food production

Steven McIntosh wants to transform the way ammonia is produced. He hopes to create a viable alternative to the conventional method, which uses massive amounts of energy and emits harmful carbon dioxide. He's exploring a sustainable electrochemical method to efficiently drive the chemical reaction that produces ammonia.

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In responding to predation risk, secondhand experience can be as good as new

Throughout the living world, parents have many ways of gifting their offspring with information they will need to help them survive. A new study examining the effects of exposure to predators across two generations of stickleback fish yielded a surprising insight into how such transgenerational information is used.

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Stormwater ponds not a major source of greenhouse gas emissions

Stormwater retention ponds, a ubiquitous feature in urban landscapes, are not a significant source of climate-warming nitrous oxide emissions, a new study finds. Nitrous oxide is a potent greenhouse gas that contributes to global warming and destroys stratospheric ozone. Previous studies suggested stormwater ponds might be a problematic source of the gas, since they produce it as a by-product of t

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Oxygen levels on early Earth rose, fell several times before great oxidation event

Earth's oxygen levels rose and fell more than once hundreds of millions of years before the planetwide success of the Great Oxidation Event about 2.4 billion years ago, new research from the University of Washington shows.

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Crystal structure reveals how curcumin impairs cancer

Through x-ray crystallography and kinase-inhibitor specificity profiling, University of California San Diego School of Medicine researchers, in collaboration with researchers at Peking University and Zhejiang University, reveal that curcumin, a natural occurring chemical compound found in the spice turmeric, binds to the kinase enzyme dual-specificity tyrosine-regulated kinase 2 (DYRK2) at the ato

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Scientists discover the world's oldest colors

Scientists have discovered the oldest colors in the geological record, 1.1-billion-year-old bright pink pigments extracted from rocks deep beneath the Sahara desert in Africa.

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Llama-derived nanobody can be potential therapy for hard-to-treat diseases

Researchers have found a nanobody that holds promise to advance targeted therapies for a number of neurological diseases and cancer.

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Discovery of a new on/off switch affecting cell-to-cell communications

Biologists have discovered a key high-speed control mechanism for cell signalling.

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Can fasting improve MS symptoms?

People with multiple sclerosis (MS) can find an abundance of conflicting advice suggesting that special diets will ease their symptoms. But the evidence is scanty. A new trial evaluates whether drastically cutting calories twice a week can change the body's immune environment and the gut microbiome, and potentially change the course of the disease.

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Alarming trend shows first-time smoking among young adults

Millennials living more dangerously and settling down later could be creating a new generation of addicted smokers and e-cigarette users, according to the surprising new results.

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Biosensor chip detects single nucleotide polymorphism wirelessly, with higher sensitivity

Scientists have developed a chip that can detect a type of genetic mutation known as a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and send the results in real time to an electronic device. The chip is at least 1,000 times more sensitive at detecting an SNP than current technology. The advance could lead to cheaper, faster and portable biosensors for early detection of genetic markers for diseases such a

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The Brexiteers Are Defeating Brexit

While it is common for politicians to idolize Winston Churchill, Boris Johnson has gone further than most, writing a lengthy biography of the former prime minister—whose position Johnson clearly hopes to someday occupy. Where Churchill urged fighting on beaches, landing grounds, fields, streets, and hills, never surrendering, however, Johnson has distinguished himself recently by his eagerness to

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Fluorescent fish genes light path to neuroblastoma

Neurodevelopmental biologist Rosa Uribe, a CPRIT Scholar who was recruited to Rice University in 2017 with a grant from the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas, has a new tool in the search for the origins of neuroblastoma, the third-most common pediatric cancer in the United States.

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New pediatric asthma yardstick has treatment guidance for children of every age

The Pediatric Asthma Yardstick, a new guideline from the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI), offers a user-friendly 'operational document'. It helps health care professionals understand which controller treatments are right for which age groups and identifies when a step up is needed.

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Mosaics provide clues on life in an ancient Galilean Jewish village

Recent discoveries at Huqoq in Israel's Galilee shed new light on the life and culture of an ancient Jewish village. The discoveries indicate villagers flourished under early fifth century Christian rule, contradicting a widespread view that Jewish settlement in the region declined during that period.

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Teenagers can thank their parents' positive attitude for avoiding obesity

Teenagers are less likely to be overweight if their mum or dad had a positive attitude during pregnancy, a new study finds.

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Physician burnout in small practices is dramatically lower than national average

Physicians who work in small, independent primary care practices — also known as SIPs — report dramatically lower levels of burnout than the national average, according to a recent study.

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Researchers discover llama-derived nanobody can be potential therapy for hard-to-treat diseases

Researchers from Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine have found a nanobody that holds promise to advance targeted therapies for a number of neurological diseases and cancer.

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The Guardian view on climate change: a global heatwave | Editorial

The weather in Britain is only a small part of a global pattern and as the Arctic warms, it will make extreme events into the new, and dangerous, normal The British are parochial about weather. It is our cherished grievance, not to be shared with foreigners. Perhaps it is the fact that our weather tends to come from the west, across the Atlantic, and not from our neighbours in Europe (unless it’s

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NASA gets infrared view of Carolina Chris, the tropical storm

Tropical Storm Chris was strengthening when NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the U.S. Eastern Seaboard on July 9. Aqua analyzed Tropical Storm Chris in infrared light.

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AT&T’s Troubling Plan to Change HBO

This past February, HBO added the most U.S. subscribers in its history, boosting its user base by 11 percent (the company has some 142 million global subscribers). The steady growth of the premium-cable and streaming service to $6.3 billion in revenue last year helped power its parent company, Time Warner, to $31.3 billion in revenue—a 7-percent overall jump despite dips in other divisions. Since

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Here’s What You Need to Know About Wet Bathing Suits and Yeast Infections

Doctors and certain studies do disagree a bit on whether wet bathing suits could increase the risk of yeast infections. But you don't need to worry.

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New airline AURA offers private jet travel for economy prices

Aura will attempt to become a frequent flyer's go-to airline. Read More

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Starbucks is going strawless in 2020

By 2020, recyclable lids that look like sippy-cups will be de rigueur. Read More

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Can fasting improve MS symptoms?

People with multiple sclerosis (MS) can find an abundance of conflicting advice suggesting that special diets will ease their symptoms. But the evidence is scanty. Laura Piccio, M.D., an associate professor of neurology at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis has launched a trial to evaluate whether drastically cutting calories twice a week can change the body's immune environment

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New insight into Huntington's disease may open door to drug development

McMaster University researchers have developed a new theory on Huntington's disease which is being welcomed for showing promise to open new avenues of drug development for the condition.

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Study finds link between river outflow and coastal sea level

Sea levels in coastal areas can be affected by a number of factors: tides, winds, waves, and even barometric pressure all play a role in the ebb and flow of the ocean. For the first time, however, a new study led by the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) has shown that river outflow could play a role in sea level change as well.

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ANU scientists discover the world's oldest colors

Scientists from the Australian National University and overseas have discovered the oldest colors in the geological record, 1.1-billion-year-old bright pink pigments extracted from rocks deep beneath the Sahara desert in Africa.

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Why gold-palladium alloys are better than palladium for hydrogen storage

A research team led by The University of Tokyo investigated why alloying with gold improves hydrogen storage in palladium. The hydrogen concentration in sub-surface palladium was maximized when 0.4 monolayers of gold atoms were alloyed in the surface. DFT calculations and photoemission spectroscopy showed that gold destabilized the surface-chemisorbed hydrogen atoms, hastening their diffusion from

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How antifreeze proteins stop ice cold

How do insects survive harsh northern winters? Unlike mammals, they don't have thick coats of fur to keep warm. But they do have antifreeze. Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) prevent ice from forming and spreading inside their bodies.The existence of these AFPs has been known for decades, but the mechanisms governing this unique survival technique have proven difficult to determine. The existence of thes

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Nightshifts disrupt rhythm between brain and gut, study shows

Blood tests on participants show profound impact work pattern has on hormones Working night shifts can mess up the body’s natural rhythms so much that the brain and digestive system end up completely out of kilter with one another, scientists say. Three night shifts in a row had little impact on the body’s master clock in the brain, researchers found, but it played havoc with gut function, throwi

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Scientists discover world's oldest colour – bright pink

Pigments found in 1.1bn-year-old rocks beneath the Sahara desert shed light on ‘major puzzle’ about early life Scientists have discovered what they say are the world’s oldest colours – and they are bright pink. The pigments were discovered after researchers crushed 1.1bn-year-old rocks found in a marine shale deposit, beneath the Sahara desert, in the Taoudeni basin in Mauritania, west Africa. Co

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Manipulating single atoms with an electron beam

The same electrons that form images of atomic structures can also be used to move atoms in materials. This technique of single-atom manipulation is now able to achieve nearly perfect control over the movement of individual silicon impurity atoms within the lattice of graphene, the two-dimensional sheet of carbon.

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New chemical compounds make catalysts more efficient

A team has developed new chemical compounds that make catalysts more efficient. With their electronic and spatial properties, the new class of what are known as phosphine ligands ensures that catalysts are more active and more stable. They have now described how the new ligands act on gold catalysts. The group assumes that the results can be transferred to other catalysts and that the already pate

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Vaginal microbes in mice transfer stress to their pups

During birth, microbes from a stressed mouse mother can carry some aspects of stress to her offspring.

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How antifreeze proteins stop ice cold

How do insects survive harsh northern winters? Unlike mammals, they don't have thick coats of fur to keep warm. But they do have antifreeze. Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) prevent ice from forming and spreading inside their bodies.

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Study finds link between river outflow and coastal sea level

Sea levels in coastal areas can be affected by a number of factors: tides, winds, waves, and even barometric pressure all play a role in the ebb and flow of the ocean. For the first time, however, a new study led by the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) has shown that river outflow could play a role in sea level change as well.

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Scientists discover the world's oldest colors

Scientists from The Australian National University (ANU) and overseas have discovered the oldest colours in the geological record, 1.1 billion-year-old bright pink pigments extracted from rocks deep beneath the Sahara desert in Africa.

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Last week in tech: Rumors, answers, and an excuse to quit running

Technology Catch up on last week's biggest tech stories and check out the latest episode of our podcast. We take on the big tech rumors, answer some reader questions, and get you caught up on everything you missed over the holiday week.

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Discovery of a new on/off switch affecting cell-to-cell communications

INRS Prof. Nicolas Doucet's research team was involved in the discovery of a key high-speed control mechanism for cell signalling.

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How a Renegade 'Sausage Galaxy' Gave the Milky Way Its Bulge

Astronomers looked deep into the Milky Way and found … a sausage

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Why Didn't Boris Johnson Get Fired Before He Quit?

For a while, it seemed nothing could bring down Boris Johnson. Despite a long history of challenging U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May’s authority—and an even longer history of diplomatic gaffes—the British foreign secretary proved himself seemingly immune to dismissal. That is, until he decided to dismiss himself. Citing disagreements over Brexit, Johnson resigned from his post on Monday, followin

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Whooping cough vaccine: The power of first impressions

In their latest study, researchers report that individuals who had been inoculated with the newer pertussis vaccine as part of their initial series of shots, mount a weaker recall response when receiving booster shots later on.

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Researchers discover llama-derived nanobody can be potential therapy for hard-to-treat diseases

Researchers from Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine have found a nanobody that holds promise to advance targeted therapies for a number of neurological diseases and cancer.

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Alarming trend shows first-time smoking among young adults

Millennials living more dangerously and settling down later could be creating a new generation of addicted smokers and e-cigarette users, according to the surprising results of research by The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth).

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Native Bees And Alfalfa Farmers — A Seedy Love Story

Northwest farmers produce a quarter of the country's alfalfa seeds, but they get help from millions of alkali bees, thanks to one of the most unique agricultural partnerships in the country. (Image credit: Aaron Scott/Oregon Public Broadcasting)

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Algae Bloom in Florida Prompts Fears About Harm to Health and Economy

An algae bloom in Lake Okeechobee in Florida has grown rapidly and widely, alarming businesses and residents. Other states have also seen such blooms.

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Can we get the immune system to tolerate organ transplants?

Currently, people receiving organ transplants must take drugs to suppress the inflammatory immune response that leads to rejection. Even so, almost all recipients eventually lose their transplant. A new approach, which maintains a population of immune cells that naturally temper immune responses, known as Tregs, could greatly enhance people's long-term tolerance for transplants.

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Altitude sickness drug appears to slow progression of glioblastoma

A drug used to treat altitude sickness may help patients with glioblastoma, according to a new study.

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New patch boosts brightness in medical diagnostic tests

A multidisciplinary team has developed a high-tech fix that brings some medical diagnostic tests out of the dark and into the light.

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Amazon Wasp with Enormous Stinger May Just Haunt Your Nightmares

She may be small, but check out that stinger!

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Whooping cough vaccine: The power of first impressions

In their latest study, researchers at La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology (LJI) report that individuals who had been inoculated with the newer pertussis vaccine as part of their initial series of shots, mount a weaker recall response when receiving booster shots later on.

1d

 

Stormwater ponds not a major source of greenhouse gas emissions

Stormwater retention ponds, a ubiquitous feature in urban landscapes, are not a significant source of climate-warming nitrous oxide emissions, a new Duke-led study finds. Nitrous oxide is a potent greenhouse gas that contributes to global warming and destroys stratospheric ozone. Previous studies suggested stormwater ponds might be a problematic source of the gas, since they produce it as a by-pro

1d

 

In responding to predation risk, secondhand experience can be as good as new

Throughout the living world, parents have many ways of gifting their offspring with information they will need to help them survive. A new study from University of Illinois in Nature Ecology and Evolution examining the effects of exposure to predators across two generations of stickleback fish yielded a surprising insight into how such transgenerational information is used.

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Research brief: Human rights in a changing sociopolitical climate

In a new study to understand the current sociopolitical climate, particularly as it relates to Syrians, researchers from the University of Minnesota conducted a comprehensive needs and readiness assessment of the United States Refugee Resettlement Program.

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Long-term survival worse for black survivors of in-hospital cardiac arrest

Blacks who survived cardiac arrest while hospitalized have more than 10 percent lower rate of long-term survival after discharge than white survivors.

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Forest ecology shapes Lyme disease risk in the eastern US

In the eastern US, risk of contracting Lyme disease is higher in fragmented forests with high rodent densities and low numbers of resident fox, opossum, and raccoons. These are among the findings from an analysis of 19 years of data on the ecology of tick-borne disease in a forested landscape.

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Visual perceptual skills are updated by process similar to memory reconsolidation, study finds

A new study shows that updating visual perceptual skills — which humans rely on to recognize what they see, including potential threats, and ignore unimportant background — is an active process with many similarities to the way they stabilize memories.

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Human clinical trial reveals verapamil as an effective type 1 diabetes therapy

Researchers have discovered a safe and effective novel therapy to reduce insulin requirements and hypoglycemic episodes in adult subjects with recent onset type 1 diabetes by promoting the patient's own beta cell function and insulin production — the first such discovery to target diabetes in this manner.

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Size and productivity in one of the world's most complex ecosystems

Oceanographer uncovers the relationship between size and productivity in one of the world's most complex ecosystems.

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Pucker up, baby! Lips take center stage in infants' brains

Researchers used brain imaging to gauge how the hand, foot and lips are represented in the brains of 2-month-olds — a much younger age than has been studied previously. It is believed to be the first to reveal the greater neurological activity associated with the lips than with other body parts represented in the infant brain. It also indicates how soon infants' brains begin to make sense of thei

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What natural greenhouse gases from wetlands and permafrosts mean for Paris Agreement goals

Global fossil fuel emissions would have to be reduced by as much as 20 percent more than previous estimates to achieve the Paris Agreement targets, because of natural greenhouse gas emissions from wetlands and permafrost, new research has found. The additional reductions are equivalent to five to six years of carbon emissions from human activities.

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Insights from metabolites get us closer to a test for chronic fatigue syndrome

A study has identified a constellation of metabolites related to myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome. Combining this data with data from an earlier microbiome study, the researchers now report they can predict whether or not someone has the disorder with a confidence of 84 percent.

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Certain antibodies against a sugar are associated with malaria protection

Certain type of antibodies against alpha-Gal- a carbohydrate expressed by many organisms including the malaria parasite- could protect against malaria, according to a new study. The resultsindicate that a-Gal is an interesting candidate to include in future vaccines against malaria and other infectious diseases.

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Biosensor chip detects single nucleotide polymorphism wirelessly, with higher sensitivity

A team led by the University of California San Diego has developed a chip that can detect a type of genetic mutation known as a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and send the results in real time to an electronic device. The chip is at least 1,000 times more sensitive at detecting an SNP than current technology. The advance could lead to cheaper, faster and portable biosensors for early detecti

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