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Nyheder2018juli11

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Meditation kept the Thai boys trapped in a cave astonishingly calmThai Cave Navy SEALs

The Thai boys soccer team rescued from underground caves was helped in survival by meditation practices led by its coach – a former Buddhist monk. Read More

14h

Ancient bones reveal 2 whale species lost from the Mediterranean Sea

Two thousand years ago the Mediterranean Sea was a haven for two species of whale which have since virtually disappeared from the North Atlantic, a new study analyzing ancient bones suggests.The discovery of the whale bones in the ruins of a Roman fish processing factory located at the strait of Gibraltar also hints at the possibility that the Romans may have hunted the whales.

15h

DR tvinger Facebook til at fjerne landsforræder-stempel fra borgere over hele verden

Blandt andet bar 65.000 russere ‘interesseret i landsforræderi'-stempel på Facebook. Det kan have udsat dem for fare, fortæller ruslandsekspert.

2h

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Scoping magnetic fields out for prevention

Concerns about the effects of magnetic fields on human health require careful monitoring of our exposure to them. Mandatory exposure limits have been defined for electric and hybrid vehicle architectures, in domestic and work environments, or simply to shelter sensitive devices from unintended sources of magnetic disturbance. In a new study published in EPJ Plus, physicists Jose Manuel Ferreira an

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High-fidelity quantum secret sharing prevents eavesdropping

To protect the confidentiality of a message during its transmission, people encrypt it. However, noise in the transmission channels can be a source of concern regarding how faithful the message transmission may be after it has been decrypted. This is particularly important for secrets shared using quantum scale messengers. For example, a classical secret takes the shape of a string of zeros and on

now

Centenary of cosmological constant lambda

Physicists are now celebrating the 100th anniversary of the cosmological constant. On this occasion, two papers recently published in EPJ H highlight its role in modern physics and cosmology. Although the term was first introduced when the universe was thought to be static, today the cosmological constant has become the main candidate for representing the physical essence believed to be responsibl

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The New Story of Humanity's Origins

There is a decades-old origin story for our species, in which we descended from a group of hominids who lived somewhere in Africa around 200,000 years ago. Some scientists have placed that origin in East Africa; others championed a southern birthplace. In either case, the narrative always begins in one spot. Those ancestral hominids, probably Homo heidelbergensis , slowly accumulated the characte

3min

What’s Driving Documentaries to Box-Office Success?

The surprise story at this summer’s box office hasn’t been superhero movies or franchise sequels (the ongoing success of both, of course, being no surprise). Audiences are also crowding theaters to take in a humbler genre: the documentary. Specifically, documentaries essaying one particularly magnetic celebrity personality, or a singularly gripping tale. The kinds of focused non-fiction narrative

3min

Rollercoasters are stressful and that's why you like them

Science The psychology behind your love of twists and turns. What is it about roller coasters that some love so much, and is it an experience we tend to like less as we get older?

7min

No single birthplace of mankind, say scientists

Researchers say it is time to drop the idea that modern humans originated from a single population in a single location The origins of our species have long been traced to east Africa, where the world’s oldest undisputed Homo sapiens fossils were discovered. About 300,000 years ago, the story went, a group of primitive humans there underwent a series of genetic and cultural shifts that set them o

7min

Cleaning out pollen shells (video)

As allergy season intensifies, many people are cursing pollen — the powdery substance released by plants for reproduction. However, pollen may serve a purpose beyond making new plants and triggering sneezes. In ACS Biomaterials Science & Engineering, researchers report a new method for cleaning out the insides of pollen grains so that the non-allergenic shells can be used to carry medicines or va

16min

Developmental disabilities reported in HIV-positive children in South Africa

HIV-positive children in South Africa are more likely to have developmental disabilities compared to children who are HIV negative. HIV-positive children ages 4 to 6 had nearly four times the odds of delays in sitting, standing, walking, and speaking, and more than twice the odds of a hearing disability and cognitive delay compared to HIV-negative children.

16min

Researchers identify cost-cutting option in treating nail fungus with nanotechnology

Adam Friedman, M.D., professor of dermatology at the GW School of Medicine and Health Sciences, and his team investigated the use of nanotechnology to improve efinaconazole treatment and make it more cost effective.

16min

Dodder genome sequencing sheds light on evolution of plant parasitism

To gain insight into the evolution of dodders, and provide important resources for studying the physiology and ecology of parasitic plants, the laboratory of Dr. WU Jianqiang from the Kunming Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences, combined PacBio sequencing and Illumina transcriptome sequencing technology to obtain a high-quality genome of the dodder Cuscuta australis.

16min

Unplugged holidays tipped to increase

James Cook University researchers in Australia say the phenomenon of the 'digital-detox' is on the rise and could be an important part of the tourism industry in the future.

16min

Humans evolved in partially isolated populations scattered across Africa

A scientific consortium led by Dr. Eleanor Scerri, British Academy Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Oxford and researcher at the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, has found that human ancestors were scattered across Africa, and largely kept apart by a combination of diverse habitats and shifting environmental boundaries, such as forests and deserts. Millennia of separa

19min

New study in electric fish reveals brain mechanisms for distinguishing self from other

The brain's remarkable ability to perceive the outside world relies almost entirely on its capacity to tune out noise generated by the body's own actions, according to a first-of-its-kind study in electric fish led by scientists at Columbia University.

19min

A replacement for traffic lights gets its first test

In-car signals based on vehicle-to-vehicle communication could reduce commuting time by 20 percent, say researchers.

19min

How to build synthetic DNA and send it across the internet | Dan Gibson

Biologist Dan Gibson edits and programs DNA, just like coders program a computer. But his "code" creates life, giving scientists the power to convert digital information into biological material like proteins and vaccines. Now, Gibson is on to a new project: "biological transportation," which holds the promise of beaming new medicines across the globe over the internet. Learn more about how this t

24min

Fresh Starts

Unpredictable things happen to us all the time. On this week's radio episode, we bring you two stories of loss and the change it brings. (Image credit: Courtesy of Maya Shankar)

31min

Selvkørende kamerarobot skal sætte fart på planteudviklingen

Når planteavlere skal udvikle bedre planter, er der ingen vej uden om at måle, hvordan de opfører sig på marken. Forskerne bag en ny minirobot mener, de har fundet den smarte måde at gøre dét på.

32min

Recognizing others but not yourself: New insights into the evolution of plant mating

Recognition systems have evolved to ensure that a plant mates only with a genetically different plant and not with itself, hence preventing inbreeding. Recognition systems can be found in at least 100 plant families and 40 percent of species but until now, researchers have not known how the astonishing diversity in these systems evolves. Researchers at IST Austria have made steps towards decipheri

37min

The relationship between alcohol outlets and traffic crashes

A new study by the Prevention Research Center of the Pacific Institute for Research and Evaluation examines the relationship between the number and location of alcohol outlets (such as bars or liquor stores or other places where alcohol is sold) and traffic crashes.

37min

Biochemists discover cause of genome editing failures with hyped CRISPR system

Researchers are the first to describe why CRISPR gene editing sometimes fails to work, and how the process can be made to be much more efficient.

46min

Employer preference for ‘passion’ could be unfair

The preference of American employers for jobseekers who convey certain emotions may lead to hiring bias, research shows. Job applicants who want to appear calm and collected might be at a disadvantage, according to a study in the journal Emotion , which finds that American employers are more likely to favor excited over relaxed candidates. The emotional states people value and want to feel—their

53min

Datatilsyn giver Facebook den størst mulige bøde

Cambridge Analytica-skandalen ulmer stadig. Nu får Facebook en bøde for at behandle brugeres data skødesløst.

54min

New study: LDL quality is a novel, modifiable cardiovascular risk marker

The presence of sticky, aggregation-prone LDL in circulation is an independent predictor of cardiovascular death. This novel finding indicates that in addition to LDL-cholesterol levels, the quality of the cholesterol-carrying LDL particles also needs to be considered when estimating the cardiovascular risk of a person, say the researchers from the University of Helsinki and Wihuri Research Instit

59min

The first endemic Baltic Sea fish species received its name

Researchers at the University of Helsinki discovered and named a new endemic fish species in the Baltic Sea, the 'Baltic flounder,' Platichthys solemdali.

59min

Uncovering the evolutionary history of IBD-associated colorectal cancer

A team of researchers from Queen Mary University of London have reported the genetic events involved in the early development of bowel cancer in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).

59min

Researchers couple artificial atom to acoustic resonator

Researchers from Russia and Britain have demonstrated an artificial quantum system, in which a quantum bit interacts with an acoustic resonator in the quantum regime. This allows the familiar effects of quantum optics to be studied on acoustic waves and enables an alternative approach to quantum computer design, which is based on acoustics and could make quantum computers more stable and compact.

59min

Enzyme discovery could help in fight against TB

Research by a team led by Dr. Elizabeth Fullam has revealed new findings about an enzyme found in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), the bacterium that causes TB.

59min

New research may lead to a different strategy of cycling teams in escape attempts

A new study, published in the Journal of Wind Engineering & Industrial Aerodynamics, based on wind tunnel research on a peloton of 121 cyclists may explain why so few 'breakaways' in professional cycling races, like this year's Tour de France, are successful.

59min

Centenary of cosmological constant lambda

Physicists are now celebrating the 100th anniversary of the cosmological constant. On this occasion, two papers recently published in EPJ H highlight its role in modern physics and cosmology. Before becoming widely accepted, the cosmological constant had to undergo many discussions about its necessity, its value and its physical essence. Today, there are still unresolved problems in understanding

59min

New research provides insight into why US residents seek abortion medication online

Seeking abortion medications online can be a response to clinic access barriers both in states with and without restrictive abortion laws and can occur when self-managed abortion is preferred over clinical care. Researchers found that online options either offer information about how to correctly and safely use abortion medications or sell the required medications, but not both, and lack of truste

59min

Could human cancer treatments be the key to saving sea turtles from a disfiguring tumor disease?

Sea turtles' reality is very different than the fun-loving, playful way they're depicted in popular movies such as "Finding Nemo." Far from being carefree, sea turtles across the globe are heavily burdened by debilitating soft-tissue tumors. All seven species of sea turtle found in the Earth's oceans are classified as vulnerable, endangered or critically endangered – and they're all affected by th

1h

Discovery of new type of antibiotic

A new type of antibiotic may help millions of COPD patients and children with middle ear infections. The drug is unlikely to have any side effects and has the great advantage that no resistance development can occur. Researchers from Radboud university medical center and Radboud University presented their initial results this week in Cell Chemical Biology.

1h

Poland Takes Victory in International Brain Bee

First place winner Piotr Olesky (center), second place winner Giovanni De Gannes (right) and third place winner Huai-Ying Huang. The International Brain Bee World Championship took place in Berlin, at Europe’s largest brain research conference: the Federation of European Neuroscience Societies (FENS) Forum. Twenty-five finalists, aged between 13 and 18, represented their countries after placing f

1h

A study points to new therapeutic targets for tumors associated with chronic inflammation

Scientists headed by ICREA researcher Angel R. Nebreda at the Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona) report a new mechanism that contributes to the development of inflammation-associated colon cancer and points to new therapeutic targets. The study has been published in the journal EMBO Molecular Medicine.

1h

High-fidelity quantum secret sharing prevents eavesdropping

Eavesdropping is of concern for secrets shared using quantum scale messengers. A quantum secret is akin to an unknown quantum state of two entangled particles carrying the secret. In a new study published in EPJ D, Chen-Ming Bai from Shaanxi Normal University, Xi'an, China, and colleagues calculate the degree of fidelity of the quantum secret once transmitted and explore how to avoid eavesdropping

1h

Gastrointestinal flora — the culprit for severe lung damage after blood transfusion

Knowledge that the gastrointestinal flora affects both healthy physiological processes and various disease mechanisms has increased in recent years. A study conducted at Lund University is now published in one of the leading hematology journals, Blood Advances, and reveals a previously unknown link between the bacteria in the gut and acute lung injury after blood transfusions.

1h

Scoping magnetic fields out for prevention

Concerns about the effects of magnetic fields on human health require us to limit our exposure to them. In a new study in EPJ Plus, physicists Jose Manuel Ferreira and Joaquim Anacleto from the Trás-os-Montes e Alto Douro University, Portugal, develop a method for evaluating the circulation of magnetic fields in closed loops. This can help to limit exposure in electric and hybrid vehicle architect

1h

The highly complex sugarcane genome has finally been sequenced

Sugarcane was the last major cultivated plant to have its genome sequenced. This was because of its huge complexity: the genome comprises between 10 and 12 copies of each chromosome, when the human genome has just two. It was an international team coordinated by CIRAD that achieved this milestone, as reported in Nature Communications on July 6. It will now be possible to 'modernize' the methods us

1h

How Will Our Species Survive in an Ever-Expanding Universe?

A hyper-advanced civilization might raid other galaxies for stars to keep the Milky Way glowing for trillions of years — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

Targeting semen proteins may stop Ebola spreading via sex

Protein fragments in human semen called amyloid fibrils significantly increase Ebola virus infection and protect the virus against harsh environmental conditions such as heat and dehydration, according to new research. Although Ebola is transmitted primarily through direct contact with blood and other bodily fluids from infected people, follow-up studies from the 2014 epidemic found that men can

1h

Harnessing natural gas to harvest water from the air might solve two big problems at once

One of the biggest freshwater reservoirs in the world is, literally, up in the air.

1h

Leading sustainability experts call for more efficient approach to deliver UN goals

Dozens of global sustainability experts and stakeholders have called for urgent action to exploit the connections between goals designed to end poverty, hunger and environmental destruction.

1h

A step closer to single-atom data storage

Physicists at EPFL used Scanning Tunneling Microscopy to successfully test the stability of a magnet made up of a single atom. The study is published in Physical Review Letters.

1h

Eating bone marrow played a key role in the evolution of the human hand

The strength required to access the high calorie content of bone marrow may have played a key role in the evolution of the human hand and explain why primates hands are not like ours, research at the University of Kent has found.

1h

High prevalence of restrictive lung disease in people with type 2 diabetes

Breathlessness and conditions of restrictive lung disease (RLD), such as pulmonary fibrosis, may be a late complication of type 2 diabetes. These are the key findings of a joint study undertaken by researchers from the German Center for Diabetes Research (DZD) and the German Center for Lung Research (DZL) under the leadership of the University Hospital Heidelberg. The latest results have been publ

1h

New gears in your sleep clock

Researchers find that a key circadian clock controlling kinase, CK1D — controlling the stability of PER2 — has two forms, one that stabilizes PER2 and one that destabilizes it.

1h

Men who sexually harass subordinates fear being judged as incompetent

The numerous high-profile men who have recently been accused of sexual harassment may not have been simply exercising their power. Instead their behavior could be related to feeling insecure and believing that others find them ill-suited to or undeserving of their dominant position. This is according to new research in Springer's journal Sex Roles, which was led by Leah Halper of Ohio University a

1h

Step-by-step account of systemic lupus erythematosus development revealed

Osaka University researchers elucidated the pathophysiology of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), an autoimmune disorder that causes inflammation and tissue damage. Their study used patient samples and a cell-based reporter system that enables highly sensitive measurement of serum type I interferon (IFN-I) bioactivity and IFN-I-stimulated genes (ISG)-inducing activity. IFN-I bioactivity and ISG-i

1h

Bubbles and whispers — glass bubbles boost nanoparticle detection

OIST-fabricated sensor detects tiny particles with field of bouncing light.

1h

Blood sample breakthrough good news for pregnant women

A wide range of fetal genetic abnormalities could soon be detected in early pregnancy thanks to a world-first study led by University of South Australia researchers using lab-on-a-chip, noninvasive technology.

1h

Rare meteorite recovery in Botswana can help reveal secrets of outer space

A meteorite has been recovered from a remote area of Botswana. The event is one of a kind as the meteor was identified before entering the atmosphere, and its fall and retrieval documented. It's only the second time this has happened. The Conversation Africa's Moina Spooner spoke to Fulvio Franchi and Alexander Proyer about their mission to retrieve the meteorite and why it matters.

1h

This newly-discovered wasp has a horrifying stinger—but what it uses it for is even worse

Animals That's some big stinger energy. Meet Clistopyga crassicaudata, an Amazonian wasp that’s only 9.8 millimeters long, yet armed with a hellacious-looking stinger that’s half its body length.

1h

Blood sample breakthrough good news for pregnant women

A wide range of fetal genetic abnormalities could soon be detected in early pregnancy thanks to a world-first study led by University of South Australia researchers using lab-on-a-chip, non-invasive technology.

1h

Galileo satellites viewed in smartphone app

An augmented reality view of Galileo satellites in the sky close to ESA's technical centre in the Netherlands. It comes from a Galileo-focused satnav app for Android smartphones, developed by ESA engineers.

1h

Eight ways to improve native vegetation on private land

University of Canterbury research has led to eight recommendations on how New Zealanders can help increase the benefits they reap from large-scale native restorations located on private land.

1h

Parrondo's paradox with a three-sided coin

Physicists have demonstrated that Parrondo's paradox—an apparent paradox in which two losing strategies combine to make a winning strategy—can emerge as a coin game with a single coin in the quantum realm, but only when the coin has three states (heads, tails, and a side) rather than the conventional two.

1h

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Using light for next-generation data storage

Tiny, nano-sized crystals of salt encoded with data using light from a laser could be the next data storage technology of choice, following research by Australian scientists.

1h

Taming a fatal blood cancer

Scientists at Cincinnati Children's report finding a potential therapeutic target for AML in preclinical laboratory tests on donated human cells and mice.

1h

Database analysis more reliable than animal testing for toxic chemicals

Advanced algorithms working from large chemical databases can predict a new chemical's toxicity better than standard animal tests, suggests a study led by scientists at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

1h

If you build it, the birds will come — if it meets their criteria

A study published in The Condor: Ornithological Applications presents a case study on how bird surveys can better inform conservation and vegetation restoration efforts. Previous conservation methods have emphasized plants as the key to recreating habitat preferred by a sensitive animal. However, this study shows that there's more to the coastal sagebrush habitat of California gnatcatchers than ju

1h

Rainy weather predicts bird distribution — but climate change could disrupt it

Understanding what environmental cues birds use to time their annual migrations and decide where to settle is crucial for predicting how they'll be affected by a shifting climate. A new study from The Auk: Ornithological Advances shows that for two species of flycatcher, one of the key factors is rain–the more precipitation an area receives, the more likely the birds are to be there during the no

1h

Giant, recently extinct seabird also inhabited Japan

Fossils discovered in Japan show that an extinct seabird called the spectacled cormorant, that was originally thought to be restricted to Bering Island, also resided in Japan nearly 120,000 years ago; indicating that the bird was a relict.

1h

Balancing foreign judgments against domestic policies

Judges should balance between universal norms of justice and the sovereignty of individual nations when deciding when to use the public policy doctrine, writes Mr. Kenny Chng, a legal scholar at the Singapore Management University.

1h

New approach to treating infectious diseases as an alternative to antibiotics

Osaka University-led researchers clarified how pathogenic E. coli bacteria attached to the host intestinal epithelium. They revealed that type IV pili on the surface of the bacteria were not sufficient for adherence to intestinal epithelial cells and that proteins secreted by E.coli were also necessary. It was found that this attachment mechanism might be a common feature in many enteropathogens s

1h

NASA is looking for new ways to deal with trash on deep space missions

Life aboard the International Space Station is characterized by careful work and efficiency measures. Not only do astronauts rely on an average of 12 metric tons of supplies a year – which is shipped to the station from Earth – they also produce a few metric tons of garbage. This garbage must be carefully stored so that it doesn't accumulate, and is then sent back to the surface on commercial supp

2h

On the path to new high-performance transistors

The electronics industry expects a novel high-performance transistor made of gallium nitride to offer considerable advantages over present-day high-frequency transistors. Yet many fundamental properties of the material remain unknown. Now, for the first time, researchers at the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI have observed electrons while they were flowing in this promising transistor. For that they u

2h

New research may lead to a different strategy of cycling teams in escape attempts

In the middle of a peloton, racing cyclists experience only five to ten percent of the air resistance they face when cycling alone. A new study, published in the Journal of Wind Engineering & Industrial Aerodynamics, based on wind tunnel research on a peloton of 121 cyclists may explain why so few 'breakaways' in professional cycling races, like this year's Tour de France, are successful.

2h

Warming oceans are changing Australia's fishing industry

A new United Nations report on fisheries and climate change shows that Australian marine systems are undergoing rapid environmental change, with some of the largest climate-driven changes in the Southern Hemisphere.

2h

Researchers model carbon emission fluxes in the Boston urban region

As the United States prepares to withdraw from the Paris Climate Accord, cities and states across the country have taken the lead in atmospheric CO2 reduction efforts. Therefore, accurate measures of anthropogenic and biogenic carbon emissions are imperative for tracking the progress of municipalities in achieving climate targets.

2h

Message in a Bottle | Countdown to Shark Week: The Daily Bite

Comedian and Instagram extraordinaire 'The Captain' gives advice to some sharks having trouble finding love. Also, we bring a new and an old segment back to you with "Save Our Sharks" and "What the Shark?" Shark Week 2018 starts Sunday July 22 9p! Stream The Daily Bite on Discovery GO: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/the-daily-bite/ Stream Classic Shark Week Episodes: https://www.discovery.com

2h

Advanced practice nurses boost nursing home care

Nursing homes hoping to provide the best care to their residents need to budget for hiring advance practice registered nurses (APRNs) to work full time, according to new research. The new study, which appears in the Journal of American Medical Directors Association , finds significant evidence that APRNs have a positive effect on improving outcomes for nursing home residents. “Never before have t

2h

How to 3-D Print an Entire House in a Single Day

A company from Austin, Texas is building 800-square-foot houses from concrete pumped out of a giant 3-D printer.

2h

'Extreme Meatpunks Forever' Is a Bloody, Rebellious Road Trip

The visual novel—and mech brawler—is wild, melancholy, and willing to take none of your crap.

2h

Mouser Electronics

Technology Generation Robot: Here to Serve Imagine checking into a hotel and handing your luggage to a bellhop, but not seeing another human besides other guests. That's the reality at Henn Na Hotel in Japan's…

2h

Surprising find in Gila monster study

Baby Gila monsters procrastinate till food's ready—a finding bolstered by a contractor's surprise find in the foothills outside Tucson.

2h

Shaping terahertz beams with extremely high precision via 3-D printing

Terahertz radiation can be used for a wide variety of applications and is used today for airport security checks just as much as it is for material analysis in the lab. The wavelength of this radiation is in the millimetre range, meaning that it is significantly larger than the wavelength of visible light. It also requires specialised techniques to manipulate the beams and get them into the right

2h

Researchers investigate two ultraluminous X-ray sources in the galaxy NGC 925

European researchers have investigated two ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) located in the barred spiral galaxy NGC 925. The study provides hints on the real nature of these two sources and could be helpful in improving our general understanding of ULXs. The research is detailed in a paper published June 29 on the arXiv pre-print server.

2h

Giant, recently extinct seabird also inhabited Japan

Scientists report that a large, extinct seabird called the spectacled cormorant, Phalacrocorax perspicillatus—originally thought to be restricted to Bering Island, far to the north—also resided in Japan nearly 120,000 years ago.

2h

Rainy weather predicts bird distribution—but climate change could disrupt it

Understanding what environmental cues birds use to time their annual migrations and decide where to settle is crucial for predicting how they'll be affected by a shifting climate. A new study from The Auk: Ornithological Advances shows that for two species of flycatcher, one of the key factors is rain—the more precipitation an area receives, the more likely the birds are to be there during the non

2h

If you build it, the birds will come—if it meets their criteria

A study published in The Condor: Ornithological Applications presents a case study on how bird surveys can better inform conservation and vegetation restoration efforts. Previous conservation methods have emphasized plants as the key to recreating habitat preferred by a sensitive animal. However, this study shows that there's more to the coastal sagebrush habitat of California Gnatcatchers than ju

2h

Super El Ninos: It takes two to tango

A University of Aizu team has identified two distinct Indo-Pacific processes shaping the unique features and extraordinary ferocity of super El Ninos. A systematic analysis of these processes and their interactions will improve forecasts of the elusive super El Ninos, the researchers claim.

2h

New study provides guidelines for more effective waste management

With possible issues rising from the combination of liquid and solid waste in landfills, a new study by Colorado State University researchers could lead to more effective landfill-based management of varied waste streams.

2h

Top quarks spin together more than they should, according to new ATLAS result

The top quark is a unique particle due to its phenomenally high mass. It decays in less than 10 to 24 seconds, before it has time to interact with any other particles. Therefore, many of its quantum numbers, such as its spin, are transferred to its decay particles. When created in matter-antimatter pairs, the spins of the top quark and the antitop quark are expected to be correlated to some degree

2h

Researchers couple artificial atom to acoustic resonator

Researchers from Russia and Britain have demonstrated an artificial quantum system in which a quantum bit interacts with an acoustic resonator in the quantum regime. This allows quantum optics principles to be applied in the study of acoustic waves and enables an alternative approach to quantum computer design based on acoustics. It could also make quantum computers more stable and compact. The pa

2h

Sketching out a transcription factor code—binding patterns reflect factors' gene expression roles

The sites where transcription factors bind within regulatory DNA fall into six distinct patterns that overlap with the factors' functions, Broad scientists find, helping advance a goal of regulatory genomics.

2h

Scientists discover 'ghost dunes' on Mars

Scientists have discovered hundreds of crescent-shaped pits on Mars where sand dunes the size of the U.S. Capitol stood billions of years ago. The curves of these ancient dune impressions record the direction of prevailing winds on the Red Planet, providing potential clues to Mars's past climate, and may hold evidence of ancient life, according to a new study detailing the findings in the Journal

2h

Developments in 2,3-butanediol production from biomass

Rehap has been developing 2,3-butanediol (BDO) production from two biomasses in the project, bark and poplar, and here are some of their most recent advances.

2h

Enzyme discovery could help in fight against tuberculosis

An enzyme structure discovery made by scientists at the University of Warwick could help to eradicate tuberculosis (TB).

2h

GALLERI: Når dyr omkommer i mødet med mennesket

Mennesket og naturen kolliderer til stadighed. Mange har sikkert set billedet af manden, der for nyligt blev gravet ud i Pompeji med en kæmpe stenbjælke over hovedet, Medierne konstaterede tørt, at han havde haft en 'virkelig uheldig dag' i år 79, hvor byen blev udslettet af en lavalavine fra vulkanen Vesuv. Men også mennesker og dyr kolliderer – og ofte er det dyret, der trækker det korteste strå

2h

Better boil ya billy—when Australian water goes bad

Many Australians take it for granted we can drink untreated tap water, without worrying about the health effects.

2h

New approach to treating infectious diseases as an alternative to antibiotics

Osaka University-led researchers clarified how pathogenic E. coli bacteria attached to the host intestinal epithelium. They revealed that type IV pili on the surface of the bacteria were not sufficient for adherence to intestinal epithelial cells and that proteins secreted by E.coli were also necessary. It was found that this attachment mechanism might be a common feature in many enteropathogens s

2h

During health scares, trying not to freak out can backfire

Trying to suppress worries during a health scare, such as the recent Zika outbreak, may lead to an ever-intensifying cycle of emotional suppression and fear, according to new research. “It turns out that not only is suppression ineffective at handling fear, but it’s counter-productive…” In a study of pregnant women in areas of the United States vulnerable to the Zika virus, the researchers found

2h

How to improve recovery of electrical and electronic equipment waste

Better recycled critical raw materials will be given a new life thanks to an EU project. This initiative could contribute to a circular economy, promoting the efficient use of scarce and expensive resources.

2h

Gold ‘glitter’ reveals defects in 3D printing

Researchers have developed a technique in which gold “shines” inside 3D printed parts to highlight any problems. “This is one of the first applications using gold for defect detection. We are able to inspect and detect defects that aren’t visible to the naked eye, using the optical properties of embedded gold nanoparticles,” says Cole Brubaker, civil engineering graduate student at Vanderbilt Uni

2h

Pitch of baby cries found to be predictor of vocal pitch at age five

A combined team of researchers from the University of Lyon/Saint-Etienne in France and the University of Sussex in the U.K. has found that the pitch of a baby's cries can be an indicator of voice pitch at age five. In their paper published in the journal Biology Letters, the group outlines their study and what they found.

2h

Method of making oxygen from water in zero gravity raises hope for long-distance space travel

Space agencies and private companies already have advanced plans to send humans to Mars in the next few years – ultimately colonising it. And with a growing number of discoveries of Earth-like planets around nearby stars, long-distance space travel has never seemed more exciting.

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Success of conservation efforts for important Caribbean Reef fish hinges on climate change

Marine scientists predict climate change might severely hinder efforts to protect populations of the endangered and iconic Nassau grouper by the end of this century.

3h

Can airships take scenic flights back to the future?

Massey University School of Aviation assistant lecturer Isaac Henderson has always been fascinated by airships, so he embarked on a master's thesis to find out if they could be brought back into the mainstream.

3h

Sweating for a cooler Singapore

Students from the Institute of Landscape Architecture are planning some natural ways to cool the heat-afflicted metropolis of Singapore. Their testing ground is a disused railway line reclaimed by nature and converted into a tropical recreation area.

3h

Scientists study connection between Great Plains precipitation and agricultural irrigation

Can crop irrigation affect the clouds that form high above farm fields? Indeed it can, say atmospheric scientists.

3h

What to know about breastfeeding

Health There's a lot of misinformation out there, so we cut right to the science. Despite the fact that we were all babies once, all that knowledge about how and what we ate is all but forgotten. A shame, really, because it’s shockingly hard to get…

3h

3D Printing Is the Future of Factories (for Real This Time)

A technology that for years has been good for making prototypes and tchotchkes promises to usher in a new industrial revolution.

3h

Best Wireless Headphones for Working Out (2018): Bose, Sennheiser, Beats, and More

Looking for a pair of sturdy, sweatproof, wireless buds to help you rock your inner jock? We have you covered.

3h

How a Startup Is Using the Blockchain to Protect Your Privacy

Oasis Labs is working with Uber as it aims to cure some of the ills of the internet.

3h

Has Genetic Privacy Been Strained By Trump's Recent ACA Moves?

As the Trump administration decides not to defend the Affordable Care Act's legal protections for people with pre-existing conditions, questions arise about health insurance and genetic information. (Image credit: Gary Waters/Ikon Images/Getty Images)

3h

Success of conservation efforts for important Caribbean Reef fish hinges on climate change

For more than 20 years, conservationists have been working to protect one of the most recognizable reef fish in the Caribbean, the endangered and iconic Nassau grouper, and thanks to those efforts, populations of this critical reef fish have stabilized in some areas. But in a new paper, published in the journal Diversity and Distributions, marine scientists said climate change might severely hinde

3h

The Art of Lying

Lying has gotten a bad rap. In fact, it is among the most sophisticated accomplishments of the human mind. But how can one tell if a person is fibbing? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

Image of the Day: Going Viral

Scientists have found a previously unknown virus in Myanmar.

3h

Can the Trump Administration Solve Its Own Disaster?

This week marked an inflection point in the chaos that began after the United States first started forcibly removing migrant children from their families several months ago: Tuesday was the court-ordered deadline for the government to reunite the youngest of these children, ages five and younger, with their parents. The deadline was both harder and easier to meet than the one that looms at the en

3h

Too much CO2 robs milkweed of ‘medicine’ for monarchs

Mounting levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide lessen the medicinal properties of milkweed plants that protect monarch butterflies from disease, a new study shows. Milkweed leaves contain bitter toxins that help monarchs ward off predators and parasites, and the plant is the sole food of monarch caterpillars. As reported in Ecology Letters , researchers grew four milkweed species with varying leve

3h

New chemical probes provide greater insight on cellular activity

Researchers have developed a novel set of chemical probes to improve real-time imaging of the activity that takes place inside individual cells.

3h

How the Dunning-Kruger effect explains anti-vaccine attitudes

There is a reason why anti-vaxx attitudes are hard to shake, explains a new study. Read More

3h

If High Court Reverses Roe V. Wade, 22 States Poised to Ban Abortion

Justice Kennedy had been a swing vote on the issue — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

Multivitamins and Vascular Disease

Yet another massive meta-analysis shows no health benefit to routine supplementation with vitamins or minerals.

3h

Er der liv i rummet? Planetjægere fra hele verden er samlet i Danmark

Lige nu er 160 forskere samlet i Aarhus for at diskutere, om der findes planeter ude i rummet, der ligner Jorden.

3h

Science fiction becomes science fact as researchers create liquid metal heartbeat

In a breakthrough discovery, University of Wollongong (UOW) researchers have created a "heartbeat" effect in liquid metal, causing the metal to pulse rhythmically in a manner similar to a beating heart.

4h

The West Will Survive Trump

As President Donald Trump kicks off a bruising NATO summit, transatlantic relations are said to be in the grip of an unprecedented crisis. On multiple fronts—defense spending, Iran sanctions, trade, and immigration—the United States appears to be on a collision course with its European allies. Running through these disputes is a deeper sense of division inside the West, as Trump questions the cos

4h

Brett Kavanaugh: ‘The Earth Is Warming’

It probably isn’t surprising that Judge Brett Kavanaugh—a longtime member of the conservative movement whom President Trump nominated to the Supreme Court on Monday—has written about climate change. What might be surprising is that he says it’s real. “The earth is warming. Humans are contributing,” he told a federal courtroom two years ago, during a hearing about a major Obama climate policy . “T

4h

Dear Therapist: When Is It Okay to Cut Off a Relationship With a Sibling?

Editor’s Note: Every Wednesday, Lori Gottlieb answers questions from readers about their problems, big and small. Have a question? Email her at dear.therapist@theatlantic.com . Dear Therapist, About 10 years ago, my mom announced she had left my dad. She later explained that one of the reasons (among many) was that he had sexually assaulted her (an assault that was never reported to authorities).

4h

How to Train a Polar Bear to Walk on a Treadmill

When the San Diego Zoo got a call asking if they could train a polar bear to walk on a treadmill, as Megan Owen remembers it, their first reaction was: Sure! Owen is a biologist at the zoo, and her colleagues there regularly train polar bears in, let’s say, un-polar-bear-esque tasks. Their bears have learned to reach out their paws for voluntary blood draws. One female polar bear, Chinook, learne

4h

Yet Another Way Student Debt Keeps People from Buying Homes

Tariq Habash was in the market to buy a home in 2016, and he knew there were a couple of factors that the banks would be looking at to figure out whether he would get a loan, for how much, and what the terms would be. There was his credit score, his down payment, and his assets. Then there were his liabilities: credit-card debt, car payments, and student-loan debt. But he found something troublin

4h

Coffee and conservation: Mozambique tries both on a mountain

At Mozambique's Mount Gorongosa—where farmers are being encouraged to grow coffee in the shade of hardwood trees, both to improve their own lot and to restore the forest—there is a point beyond which visitors are told not to go.

4h

Colorful celestial landscape

New observations with ESO's Very Large Telescope show the star cluster RCW 38 in all its glory. This image was taken during testing of the HAWK-I camera with the GRAAL adaptive optics system. It shows RCW 38 and its surrounding clouds of brightly glowing gas in exquisite detail, with dark tendrils of dust threading through the bright core of this young gathering of stars.

4h

Uber and Lyft's Never-Ending Quest to Crush Price Comparison AppsUber Lyft D. Khosrowshahi

Apps like Bellhop and RideGuru allow riders to find the best deal—highlighting the uncomfortable truth that price is the bottom line for ride-sharing companies

4h

Cheap, Portable Sensors Are Democratizing Air-Quality Data

A new generation of air-quality sensors is making it easier for citizen groups and residents to monitor the air around them.

4h

The Good and Bad of Ride-Sharing When It Comes to RaceUber Lyft D. Khosrowshahi

Research conducted in LA shows that Lyft reaches almost every neighborhood, regardless of race or income, but black riders still wait longer to be picked up.

4h

Inside X, the Moonshot Factory Racing to Build the Next Google

Loon and Wing, X's internet balloon and drone delivery ventures, are emerging from the super-secret incubator—and demonstrating what an ever expanding Google means for the world.

4h

4h

The 'shine' in gold particles has a new use – finding defects

That glint of gold has always captured our eyes, but now the precious metal has a new use – finding defects in 3-D printing.

4h

The US may have just pulled even with China in the race to build supercomputing’s next big thing

The two countries are vying to build an exascale computer that could lead to significant advances in many scientific fields.

4h

Bat-Killing Fungus Spreads to Two New Species and Two New States

The fungus that causes white-nose syndrome continues its deadly spread west, but a meeting of bat researchers reveals cause for hope — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

Multi-face tracking to help AI follow the action

At the recent 2018 Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition, I presented a new algorithm for multi-face tracking, an essential component in understanding video. To understand visual sequences involving people, AI systems must be able to track multiple individuals across scenes, despite changing camera angles, lighting, and appearances. The new algorithm enables AI systems to accomplis

4h

RNA strand enables trapping of uracil in the critical state

Researchers led by Regina de Vivie-Riedle, a professor of theoretical chemistry at LMU Munich, have found indications for a base-independent mechanism that can decrease the photostability of the RNA base uracil.

4h

Pliny the Elder Wasn't Crazy After All. There Were Whales in the Mediterranean.

A new archaeological finding suggests Pliny the Elder knew exactly what he was talking about.

4h

Improving disaster response through Twitter data

Twitter data could give disaster relief teams real-time information to provide aid and save lives, thanks to a new algorithm developed by an international team of researchers.

4h

Study finds shape not size matters in male mice

Male mice exposed to other male competitors have thicker penis bones according to a new study by researchers at The University of Western Australia, published today in Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences.

4h

Study unveils components of successful key account management

Dynamic capabilities play a key role in successful key account management, according to a new study by researchers from the University of Eastern Finland, Cranfield University and the University of Portsmouth. The study found that in key account management, companies should invest in market sensing, opportunity creation, continuous improvement of processes and value propositions, as well as capabi

4h

Revealing the mechanism behind animals' proprioception

An international team of researcher, led by Professor Kyuhyung Kim from Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences identified the motor mechanism of the proprioception sense that detects and controls the movement of the body.

4h

1,600-Year-Old Mosaic Shows Biblical Spies Who Scouted Promised Land

An ancient mosaic depicting two Biblical spies sent to scout the Promised Land has been unearthed at a nearly 1,600-year-old synagogue in northern Israel.

4h

From Defiled to Wild–Can a Spent Coal Mine Be Reborn as a Nature Conservation Center?

Kentucky’s first mountaintop removal coal mine is being turned into grassland to support valuable game species — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

Wetting of surfaces is surprisingly difficult to measure reliably

A group of researchers from Aalto University in Finland and Sun Yat-sen University in China provide a standardized approach to improve the accuracy and reliability of contact angle measurements of surfaces.

4h

Mapping the urban vitality of Barcelona

Researchers from the Department of Geography and the Institute for Environmental Science and Technology at the UAB (ICTA-UAB) have designed a new methodology with which to conduct a quantitative analysis and map the vital areas of a city. It is the first analysis that synthesises and applies the theories of Jane Jacobs on the configuration a modern city (dense populations, mixed uses and pedestria

4h

Baker's yeast helps biologists to understand drug resistance in fungi

MSU-based biologists have reported new understanding of fungal drug resistance mechanisms. To study them, the scientists used baker's yeast expressing fluorescent proteins fused with the membrane transporters. Fungi activate the protection mechanisms in response to accumulation of toxic compounds in their cells. The study showed that the resistance of yeast (and possibly pathogenic fungi) to antim

4h

A chaperonin protein, GroEL, has a more complex mechanism than was thought before

Proteins must fold in a specific way to function. This is often assisted by molecular chaperones—small proteins whose job is to help others fold to the right shape. Now, Japanese researchers have discovered that for one molecular chaperone at least, there's more to the process than was suspected.

4h

Peering deep into the cell to reveal essential components in cell division

The cell is the basic biological unit of all known living organisms, and the core of the cell is the nucleus, which contains the majority of the cell's genetic material. The largest structure in the nucleus of eukaryotic cells is the nucleolus. It is best known as the site of production of ribosome—the "factory" for protein production. The nucleolus also plays a role in the cell's response to stre

4h

Sensor detects nanoparticles with field of bouncing light

Technology created by researchers at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) is literally shedding light on some of the smallest particles to detect their presence – and it's made from tiny glass bubbles.

4h

Colorful celestial landscape

New observations with ESO's Very Large Telescope show the star cluster RCW 38 in all its glory. This image was taken during testing of the HAWK-I camera with the GRAAL adaptive optics system. It shows RCW 38 and its surrounding clouds of brightly glowing gas in exquisite detail, with dark tendrils of dust threading through the bright core of this young gathering of stars.

5h

India's Vistara places $3.1 bn order with Airbus, Boeing

India's newest airline Vistara said on Wednesday it had ordered 19 jets from Boeing and Airbus for a combined $3.1 billion as it prepares to launch international flights.

5h

US firm: Chinese hackers infiltrated Cambodia's politics

Last month, the daughter of a jailed Cambodian opposition party leader received an email from a well-seeming activist at a reputed Cambodian non-profit. For weeks, the sender nudged Monovithya Kem to open an attachment described as containing interview questions.

5h

Murdoch's 21st Century Fox ups Sky bid to beat rival Comcast

Media mogul Rupert Murdoch's 21st Century Fox increased Wednesday its bid to take full control of lucrative European pay TV service Sky in a prolonged battle with U.S. rival Comcast.

5h

New Togo fishing port stokes coastal erosion fears

The fishing village of Agebkope and other seaside communities along Togo's coast have long lived with the consequences of erosion from the strong winds and waves of the Atlantic Ocean.

5h

7,000 strokes prevented as GPs improve diagnosis and treatment of atrial fibrillation

Around 7,000 strokes each year are being prevented thanks to GPs more than doubling the number of patients at high risk being prescribed with drugs to prevent blood clotting, University of Birmingham researchers have found.

5h

What I Know About Kavanaugh’s Discretion

Perhaps the best way to tell something about judges is by looking at what they do when they have discretion to act. Their exercise of judgment involves two distinct decisions—when and in what circumstances they have discretion to exercise in the first place, and what they do with that discretion once they think they have it. It’s a reasonably fair generalization to say that liberal judges see mor

5h

Meet the Trumpverstehers

A few years ago, the Germans created one of the compound nouns in which their language excels. The Russlandverstehers —literally, “Russia understanders”—were those who while not openly supporting Vladimir Putin’s seizure of Crimea expressed sympathetic acceptance of it. They would never openly endorse the stealing of elections or the assassination of journalists, of course, but they understood th

5h

See this star nursery shine in a stunning new infrared image

A newly released image of star cluster RCW 38 shows the intricate details of wisps of gas and dust surrounding newborn stars.

5h

Paller og kasser importerer skadedyr

Selv om paller og trækasser skal behandles inden eksport, oplever myndighederne stadigt oftere, at træemballage medbringer skadedyr.

5h

Facebook slipper med minibøde for Cambridge Analytica-læk

Selskabet får 4,2 mill. kroner i britisk bøde, for mangel på gennemsigtighed og beskyttelse af brugeroplysninger.

5h

Skrald, sult og brunt vand: Fremtidens 10 største byer kæmper mod kaos

De største byer i verden kæmper mod ekstreme udfordringer. Om 30 år ser listen over verdens største byer helt anderledes ud end i dag. Især byer i Afrika og Asien stormer frem.

5h

Measuring the effects of drugs on cancer cells

A new approach established at the University of Zurich sheds light on the effects of anti-cancer drugs and the defense mechanisms of cancer cells. The method makes it possible to quickly test various drugs and treatment combinations at the cellular level.

5h

Most black adults have high blood pressure before age 55

Approximately 75 percent of black men and women develop high blood pressure by age 55 compared to 55 percent of white men and 40 percent of white women of the same age. Both black and white study participants who ate a DASH-style diet had a reduced risk of developing high blood pressure.

5h

Nigel Farage criticised over photo with protected shark

"Depressed over Brexit. Went fishing," he posts alongside a photo of himself holding the protected species.

6h

We need more investigations into research misconduct

Why I’m calling for watchdog to help rid research of malpractice and fraud MPs want new watchdog to monitor misconduct by researchers Last year the Guardian reported on the case of Paulo Macchiarini , an Italian surgeon working in Sweden, who was “hailed for turning the dream of regenerative medicine into a reality – until he was exposed as a con artist and false prophet”. The Swedish Central Eth

6h

Hver tredje fangede fisk går til spilde

Hele 35 procent af de fisk, som hives op af havet, bliver smidt ud, viser FN-rapport. Det er grotesk i en verden med fødevaremangel, siger NGO.

6h

Leaf-ejere: Varme batterier giver sløv sommeropladning

Gentagne hurtigopladninger kan overopvarme bilens batteri og resultere i meget langsom opladning, påpeger britiske Leaf-ejere, der beskylder Nissan for vildledende markedsføring.

7h

There is a secret to saving a World Cup penalty. Here it is | André Spicer

Left or right? In football, as in life, it’s so easy to jump the wrong way. And the reason is very simple The referee blows his whistle, the penalty taker begins to limber up, and fans tense up. The goalkeeper has a high-stakes decision to make. Where will he jump – to his right or left, or will he stay in the middle? No matter how experienced, the keeper is likely to make a common mistake: jumpi

7h

Chris becomes second hurricane of Atlantic season

Tropical Storm Chris surged Tuesday into hurricane strength as it churned away from the US East coast and became the second hurricane of the Atlantic season, forecasters said.

7h

Eight wolf cubs the star attraction at Mexico City zoo

Eight Mexican wolf cubs—a jumbo-size litter—have delighted conservationists fretting over the endangered species once common along the US-Mexico border.

7h

Departing Apple engineer stole autonomous car tech: FBI

An ex-Apple engineer on Monday was charged with stealing secrets from a hush-hush self-driving car technology project days before he quit to go to a Chinese startup.

7h

Airbus to sell 60 smaller planes to JetBlue

Airbus announced Tuesday a deal to sell US airline JetBlue 60 airplanes that were formerly part of Canadian manufacturer Bombardier's C series.

7h

Pollution controls help red spruce rebound from acid rain

The gray trunks of red spruce trees killed by acid rain once heavily scarred the mountain forests of the Northeast. Now those forests are mostly green, with the crowns of red spruce peeking out of the canopy and saplings thriving below.

7h

Ancient Romans may have killed off whale species in the Mediterranean

Two whales species absent from the Mediterranean today were common there 2,000 years ago – did Roman whalers kick-start their demise?

8h

My weekend in the desert trying to experience dream telepathy

When Rowan Hooper went to Arizona to explore the purpose of dreams, he found himself among “experts” in using dreams to talk to dead people and diagnose cancer

8h

Delivery drones can learn to see and dodge obstacles in-flight

A drone learned to navigate unexpected obstacles for itself by being manually carried around a racetrack. It could be used for future delivery drones

8h

Whoops! NASA burned best evidence for life on Mars 40 years ago

The Viking Mars landers famously failed to find any evidence of life, but now it seems a rogue chemical reaction masked the signature of organic molecules

8h

What is love? You asked Google – here’s the answer

Every day millions of people ask Google life’s most difficult questions. Our writers answer some of the commonest queries Experts say the western ideal of romantic love is constantly disappointing us . Which is a shame because our culture loves romantic love. It’s an idea that pervades pop music, novels, TV and film. Somewhere out there our perfect match is waiting to meet us, so the theory goes.

8h

Britain to fine Facebook over data breach (Update)Cambridge Facebook

Britain's data regulator said Wednesday it will fine Facebook half a million pounds for failing to protect user data, as part of its investigation into whether personal information was misused ahead of the Brexit referendum.

8h

Facebook faces Australia data breach compensation claim

Facebook could face a hefty compensation bill in Australia after a leading litigation funder lodged a complaint with the country's privacy regulator over users' personal data shared with a British political consultancy.

8h

California's cap-and-trade air quality benefits mostly go out of state

During the first three years of California's five-year-old cap-and-trade program, the bulk of greenhouse gas (GHG) reductions occurred out of state, thus forgoing in-state reductions in harmful co-pollutants, such as particulate matter, that could improve air quality for state residents, according to a new study led by San Francisco State University and University of California, Berkeley researche

8h

Ancient bones reveal forgotten history of whales

Old whale bones suggest the origins of whale hunting may go back to the days of the Roman Empire.

8h

Study raises concern about flame-retardant metabolites in bald eagles

Scientists have raised concerns for decades about toxic chemicals in the environment that accumulate in the tissues of birds, fish and other animals. New research from Indiana University that examined bald eagles suggests that's only part of the story.

8h

A new brain-inspired computer takes us one step closer to simulating brain neural networks in real-time

A computer built to mimic the brain's neural networks produces similar results to that of the best brain-simulation supercomputer software currently used for neural-signaling research, finds a new study published in the open-access journal Frontiers in Neuroscience. Tested for accuracy, speed and energy efficiency, this custom-built computer named SpiNNaker, has the potential to overcome the speed

8h

Biochemists discover cause of genome editing failures with hyped CRISPR system

Researchers from the University of Illinois at Chicago are the first to describe why CRISPR gene editing sometimes fails to work, and how the process can be made to be much more efficient.

8h

Drones survey African wildlife

A new technique developed by Swiss researchers enables fast and accurate counting of gnu, oryx and other large mammals living in wildlife reserves. Drones are used to remotely photograph wilderness areas, and the images are then analysed using object recognition software and verified by humans. The work is reported in a paper published in the journal Remote Sensing of Environment.

8h

Microsoft vil gøre dig til kvante-programmør med nyt sprog

Var det noget at programmere til en computer, der slet ikke findes, og måske aldrig kommer til det? Gevinsten kan blive stor, hvis det lykkes, mener Microsofts kvantesprogs-designer.

9h

How a Mediterranean diet could reduce osteoporosis

Eating a Mediterranean-type diet could reduce bone loss in people with osteoporosis — according to new research from the University of East Anglia. New findings published today show that sticking to a diet rich in fruit, vegetables, nuts, unrefined cereals, olive oil, and fish can reduce hip bone loss within just 12 months.

10h

Nyt karakterkrav giver færre ansøgninger til Københavns Universitet

Antallet af ansøgninger til bacheloruddannelserne på Københavns Universitet er som…

10h

På vej mod 10 milliarder: Afrikanske kvinder skal føde færre uønskede børn

For 50 år siden blev det en menneskerettighed at bestemme, hvornår man vil have børn. Men 214 millioner kvinder lever stadig uden adgang til prævention.

10h

Museum: Basal renovering af Vikingeskibsmuseet koster 100 millioner kroner

Slots- og Kulturstyrelsen prissatte en renovering af Vikingeskibsmuseet til 25 mio. kr. Niras sagde op til 65 mio. kr. Men hvis alt tælles med, vil prisen ifølge museet ende på mellem 96 og 123 mio. kr.

10h

Study raises concern about flame-retardant metabolites in bald eagles

A study finds that chemicals used in flame retardants, plasticizers and other commercial products are broken down through the process of metabolism into other compounds. Researchers say not enough is known about the dangers posed by those compounds, known as metabolites.

10h

Breakthrough in construction of computers for mimicking human brain

A computer built to mimic the brain's neural networks produces similar results to that of the best brain-simulation supercomputer software currently used for neural-signaling research. Tested for accuracy, speed and energy efficiency, this custom-built computer named SpiNNaker, has the potential to overcome the speed and power consumption problems of conventional supercomputers, with the aim of ad

10h

Drones survey African wildlife

In collaboration with a nature reserve in Namibia, researchers funded by the SNSF are developing a new approach to counting animals: combining drone flights and automated image analysis.

10h

Researchers design delivery system to treat premature infants with NEC

Researchers at Nationwide Children's Hospital have developed Lactobacillus reuteri biofilm formulations that protect against experimental necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC).

10h

Footwear habits influence child and adolescent motor skill development

Researchers show that children and adolescents who spend most of their time barefoot develop motor skills differently from those who habitually wear shoes. Published in Frontiers in Pediatrics, this is the first study to assess the relevance of growing up shod vs. barefoot on jumping, balancing and sprinting motor performance during different stages of childhood and adolescence. Results suggest th

10h

Research shows pesticides influence bee learning and memory

A large-scale study published by researchers from Royal Holloway University of London has drawn together the findings of a decade of agrochemical research to confirm that pesticides used in crop protection have a significant negative impact on the learning and memory abilities of bees.

10h

Postmenopausal smokers now have one less excuse not to quit

Smokers give lots of reasons for not quitting smoking, with fear of weight gain ranking as one of the most favored, but a new study that followed smokers from the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) confirms that even modest increases in physical activity can minimize weight gain in postmenopausal women after they have quit smoking. Results are published online today in Menopause, the journal of The N

10h

Research shows pesticides influence bee learning and memory

A large-scale study published by researchers from Royal Holloway University of London has drawn together the findings of a decade of agrochemical research to confirm that pesticides used in crop protection have a significant negative impact on the learning and memory abilities of bees. Their findings are published on 11 July in the Journal of Applied Ecology.

11h

Why Do Teeth Turn Yellow?

A number of different things can affect the color of your teeth and turn them yellow.

12h

Favorite Wine Grapes May Need Genetic Help

Wine book author Kevin Begos explains that just a few varieties of wine grapes dominate the industry, which leaves them vulnerable to potentially catastrophic disease outbreaks. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

13h

The 'Big Bang' of Alzheimer's: Scientists ID genesis of disease

Scientists have discovered a 'Big Bang' of Alzheimer's disease — the precise point at which a healthy protein becomes toxic but has not yet formed deadly tangles in the brain.

14h

Living in areas with less sun may increase your risk of OCD

Living at higher latitudes, where there is also less sunlight, could result in a higher prevalence rate of obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), according to new research.

14h

Face value: Video game trains people to better discern truth from lies — and how to spot deceptive behavior

The most adept deceivers often don't present any of those signs and, further, the average observer's tendency to rely on such visual cues impedes their ability to tell when someone is lying. But those detection skills can be improved markedly with as little as one hour of training.

14h

Ex-Apple Employee Accused of Stealing Self-Driving-Car Tech

Xiaolang Zhang allegedly took more than 40 GB of Apple intellectual property with him when he left in April to work for China’s Xpeng Motors.

14h

Suppressing negative emotions during health scare may whip up spiral of fear

Trying to suppress worries during a health scare, like the recent Zika outbreak, may lead to an ever-intensifying cycle of emotional suppression and fear, according to a team of researchers.

14h

An ATM that dispenses antioxidants

Researchers have found that a protein called ATM (short for ataxia-telangiectasia mutated) can sense the presence of reactive oxygen species and responds by sounding the alarm to trigger the production of antioxidants.

14h

Preparing for quick radiation diagnostic test in case of a nuclear disaster

Researchers are attempting to create a better diagnostic test for radiation exposure that potentially could save thousands of lives.

14h

New 'scaly' snails species group following striking discoveries from Malaysian Borneo

Researchers have found six new species of unique land snails whose shells are covered with what look like scales. The snails were discovered by a Malaysian-Dutch team of scientists, thanks to a set of modern tools, high-magnification scanning electron microscope and 3D modeling.

14h

Carbon nanotubes used to develop clothing that can double as batteries

Engineers are creating clothing that can charge your cell phone. What makes this possible are the unique properties of carbon nanotubes: a large surface area that is strong, conductive and heat-resistant.

15h

'We can build a real time machine'

Travelling in time might sound like fantasy, but some physicists think it might really be possible.

15h

Top diabetes treatments don’t work in kids and teens

Taking insulin or the most commonly used drug for type 2 diabetes, metformin, failed to either delay or effectively treat the condition in youth, according to a new study. In the study, known as the Restoring Insulin Secretion (RISE) Pediatric Medication Study, principal investigator Sonia Caprio and her coauthors investigated the effect of two interventions for pre-diabetes or diabetes in people

15h

Major sewage pollution incidents increase

Rivers overall are getting cleaner, but water firms still need to do better, the Environment Agency says.

15h

Want to be an elite weightlifter? It takes a strong pair of knees

Researchers have discovered what makes the critical difference between an elite snatch style weightlifter and a sub-elite one. In the Olympic sport of snatch style weightlifting, athletes squat, take hold of a barbell on the ground, and then lift it with outstretched arms overhead, using one continuous motion. Findings show that the success of this maneuver comes down to the strength of the knees.

15h

Unique brain 'fingerprint' can predict drug effectiveness

Personalized medicine — delivering therapies specially tailored to a patient's unique physiology — has been a goal of researchers and doctors for a long time. New research provides a way of delivering personalized treatments to patients with neurological disease.

15h

What is the role of the physician when a patient discloses intimate partner violence perpetration?

Intimate partner violence (IPV) is prevalent and has lasting impacts on the health and well-being of the entire family involved. Unfortunately, very little research and guidance about how to address perpetration of IPV in the health care setting, especially among primary care physicians who are in a role to potentially intervene has been available until now.

15h

Asian residents are exposed to 9 times more air pollution than Americans or Europeans

Asian car drivers are exposed to nine times more pollution than their European and American counterparts, a comprehensive study has found.

15h

Mapping the genetic controllers in heart disease

Researchers have developed a 3D map of the gene interactions that play a key role in cardiovascular disease.

15h

Brain metastases common and difficult to treat in ROS1 lung cancer

Brain metastases were found to be fairly common in stage IV ROS1-positive cancers and in 47 percent of ROS1 patients, the brain was the first and only site of progression.

15h

Why you shouldn’t say ‘girls are as good as boys at math’

Saying something like “girls are as good as boys at math” might come with good intentions and the intent to encourage, it can backfire, according to new paper. Although well-meaning, the statement, which parents and teachers often express, can subtly perpetuate the stereotypes they are trying to debunk, say study coauthors Eleanor Chestnut and Ellen Markman say. “Language can play a huge role in

15h

Oxygen had to fight a ‘war’ for Earth’s atmosphere

Earth’s oxygen levels rose and fell more than once hundreds of millions of years before the planet-wide success of the Great Oxidation Event about 2.4 billion years ago, according to new research. The evidence comes from a new study that indicates a second and much earlier “whiff” of oxygen in Earth’s distant past—in the atmosphere and on the surface of a large stretch of ocean—showing that the o

15h

Children with better coordination more likely to achieve at school

Young children with better eye-to-hand coordination were more likely to achieve higher scores for reading, writing and math according to new research — raising the possibility schools could provide extra support to children who are clumsy.

15h

LED lights reduce seabird death toll from fishing by 85 percent, research shows

Illuminating fishing nets with low-cost lights could reduce the terrible impact they have on seabirds and marine-dwellers by more than 85 percent, new research has shown.

15h

Primates adjust grooming to their social environment

Researcher of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, show that wild chimpanzees and sooty mangabeys, two primate species who live in complex social groups, choose their grooming partners based on a variety of criteria, including their social relationship with them and their potential partner's dominance rank. In particular, individuals of both species avoided g

15h

Do rankings punish Medicare plans for disadvantaged patients?

Federal rankings of Medicare Advantage plans may unfairly penalize those that enroll a disproportionate number of non-white, poor, and rural Americans, a new study shows. Researchers used data that the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services collected to measure the quality of care provided in Medicare Advantage plans, and adjusted performance rankings for race, neighborhood poverty level, and

16h

On board the flying lab testing UK wildfire smoke

Victoria Gill joins scientists trying to find out how wildfires affect the air we breathe.

16h

Ancient bones reveal two whale species lost from the Mediterranean Sea

Two thousand years ago the Mediterranean Sea was a haven for two species of whale which have since virtually disappeared from the North Atlantic, a new study analysing ancient bones suggests.

16h

Primates adjust grooming to their social environment

Working together and exchanging services for the benefit of everyone involved is crucial for humans and partly responsible for our success as a species. In order to achieve a goal, we need to choose the best possible cooperation partners. Yet who qualifies as the best possible partner depends on the task at hand, the abilities of all available candidates, and on our social relationships with them.

16h

MPs want new watchdog to root out research misconduct

Proposed body would monitor universities to ensure that allegations of malpractice are properly investigated A national watchdog that has the power to punish British universities for failing to tackle research misconduct is needed to ensure that sloppy practices and outright fraud are caught and dealt with fast, MPs say. The new body would rule on whether universities have properly investigated a

16h

Romans had whaling industry, archaeological excavation suggests

Ancient whale bones have been found on three Roman fish processing sites close to the Strait of Gibraltar Ancient bones found around the Strait of Gibraltar suggest that the Romans might have had a thriving whaling industry, researchers have claimed. The bones, dating to the first few centuries AD or earlier, belong to grey whales and North Atlantic right whales – coastal migratory species that a

16h

LED lights reduce seabird death toll from fishing by 85 percent, research shows

Illuminating fishing nets with low-cost lights could reduce the terrible impact they have on seabirds and marine-dwellers by more than 85 per cent, new research has shown.

16h

Bloodflowers’ risk to monarchs could multiply as climate changes

High atmospheric carbon dioxide levels can weaken the medicinal value of a milkweed that caterpillars eat, and high temperatures may make the plant toxic.

16h

‘Antifreeze’ proteins let bacteria survive cold storage

The way fish survive in some of the coldest regions on Earth has inspired a new way to “freeze” bacteria. Researchers found that adding synthetic reproductions of the natural antifreeze proteins slows ice crystal growth and stops them from destroying the bacteria cells. This method of cryopreservation has potential applications within the food industry, organ transportation, and medicine, as well

16h

UK Regulators May Fine Facebook Over Cambridge AnalyticaCambridge Facebook

Of course, $664,000—the maximum penalty under UK law—isn’t much of a punishment for a company like Facebook, which is valued at more than $584 billion.

16h

Mercedes Will Launch Self-Driving Taxis in California Next Year

Mercedes parent company Daimler has struck the partnerships it thinks it needs to keep up in the race for autonomy.

16h

Small talk might be awful, but it doesn’t hurt you

People who engage in more substantive conversations tend to be happier, according to a new study. Researchers also found that idle small talk is not necessarily negatively related to well-being, contrary to previous findings, says coauthor Matthias Mehl, a professor of psychology at the University of Arizona. The new research, which appears in the journal Psychological Science , revisits a small

16h

The Atlantic Daily: What Would Brett Kavanaugh Bring to the U.S. Supreme Court?

What We’re Following New Nominee: President Donald Trump’s choice to replace Justice Anthony Kennedy on the Supreme Court is Brett Kavanaugh, a judge in the Washington, D.C., Circuit Court of Appeals with a notable body of work related to executive power. While Kavanaugh was considered the most conventional candidate on the president’s shortlist, he’ll face an intense confirmation battle, in whic

16h

A better way to measure magnetic fields could make fetal heart problems easier to detect

Nobody had been able to build a practical device that worked at room temperature–until now.

17h

Here’s where Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh lands on big science issues

Science His rulings in six previous cases can give us some idea. Last night, President Trump announced his pick of Brett Kavanaugh to replace Justice Anthony Kennedy on the Supreme Court. Here's where Kavanaugh stands on science.

17h

Tourism to a Dying Ancient Culture

“The modern world has come for our little island,” says Heu Rapu Haoa in Max Lowe’s short documentary, Amo . Heu is one of the 800 remaining speakers of his native tongue. His home, Rapa Nui, known widely as Easter Island, is one of the most remote inhabited islands in the world. Situated more than 2,000 miles in the southeastern Pacific Ocean off the coast of Chile, Easter Island was once home t

17h

Biochemists discover cause of genome editing failures with hyped CRISPR system

Researchers from the University of Illinois at Chicago are the first to describe why CRISPR gene editing sometimes fails to work, and how the process can be made to be much more efficient.

17h

New report says individual research results should be shared with participants more often

When conducting research involving the testing of human biospecimens, investigators and their institutions should routinely consider whether and how to return individual research results on a study-specific basis through an informed decision-making process, says a new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Decisions on whether to return individual research resul

17h

Facebook Gave Russian Internet Giant Special Data Extension

Mail.ru also ran hundreds of apps on Facebook at a time when the platform’s policies allowed app developers to collect their users' friends' data.

17h

Bobtail squid coat their eggs in antifungal goo

Hawaiian bobtail squid keep their eggs fungus-free with the help of bacteria.

17h

LabQuiz: Pop (Culture) Quiz

It's time for some propagation problem-solving!

17h

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Howdy, Pardoner

-Written by Elaine Godfrey ( @elainejgodfrey ) Today in 5 Lines President Trump pardoned Dwight and Steven Hammond , two ranchers in Oregon who were sentenced to prison for arson on public lands, and whose imprisonment inspired the 41-day occupation of a wildlife refuge in 2016. Trump is reportedly preparing to impose tariffs on an additional $200 billion worth of Chinese products. Dozens of chil

17h

Disney is turning to robots to pull off dangerous aerial feats

Technology 'Stickman' was just the start. Stickman was an early iteration of fearless robotic performers.

17h

Books That Kill: 3 Poisonous Renaissance Manuscripts Discovered in School Library

These rare, Renaissance-era books were coated with Victorian-era arsenic. But why?

17h

What's Inside This Massive Egyptian Sarcophagus?

The foreboding coffin may be the largest sarcophagus known in the area. And it's never been opened.

17h

California's cap-and-trade air quality benefits mostly go out of state

California has one of the world's most progressive cap-and-trade designed to reduce greenhouse gases. Yet in disadvantaged communities, emissions of those pollutants has actually gone up.

17h

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