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Nyheder2018juli12

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Archaeologists prepare to open huge granite sarcophagus in Egypt

Untouched for millennia, tomb was found during construction work in Alexandria Archaeologists are preparing to open a large black granite sarcophagus unearthed in the Egyptian port city of Alexandria . At almost two metres high and three metres in length, the sarcophagus is the largest of its kind to be discovered intact in the ancient city. It was found alongside a large alabaster head believed

2h

More than century-old riddle resolved—a blazar is a source of high-energy neutrinos

An international team of scientists has found the first evidence of a source of high-energy cosmic neutrinos, ghostly subatomic particles that can travel unhindered for billions of light years from the most extreme environments in the universe to Earth.

47min

Ny legering kan femdoble batterikapacitet

Det norske Institut for energiteknik har udviklet en ny siliciumlegering som kan bruges i batterianoder. Det har høj energikapacitet, men holder langt bedre end anoder af rent silicium.

2h

LATEST

The Sad Reason Kangaroos Are Acting Drunk

There's a grim reason behind the unusual behavior of "drunken" kangaroos.

4min

Source of cosmic 'ghost' particle revealed

Researchers believe a galactic "monster" s a source of cosmic neutrinos detected on Earth.

5min

Neutrino that struck Antarctica traced to galaxy 3.7bn light years away

Discovery may solve 100-year-old puzzle of high-energy cosmic rays that occasionally hit Earth A mysterious, ghostly particle that slammed into Earth and lit up sensors buried deep beneath the south pole has been traced back to a distant galaxy that harbours an enormous spinning black hole. Astronomers detected the high-energy neutrino , a kind of subatomic particle, when it tore into the souther

5min

Scientists Just Identified the First Blazing Source of Ghostly Cosmic Neutrinos

An international team of astronomers have pinpointed a supermassive black hole at the center of a distant galaxy as the first known source for the ghostly particles.

11min

Brain function partly replicated by nanomaterials

Researchers have created extremely dense, random SWNT/POM network molecular neuromorphic devices, generating spontaneous spikes similar to nerve impulses of neurons. They conducted simulation calculations of the random molecular network model complexed with POM molecules, which are able to store electric charges, replicating spikes generated from the random molecular network. They also demonstrate

12min

An orange a day keeps macular degeneration away: 15-year study

A new study has shown that people who regularly eat oranges are less likely to develop macular degeneration than people who do not eat oranges. Researchers interviewed more than 2,000 Australian adults aged over 50 and followed them over a 15-year period.

12min

Mapping species range shifts under recent climatic changes

The inclusion of taxon-specific sensitivity to a shifting climate helps us understand species distributional responses to changes in climate.

12min

Moving fish farms enables seagrass meadows to thrive, study shows

Off the coast of Cyprus in the Mediterranean Sea, many fish farms have been moved into deeper waters — and on the seabeds beneath their previous locations, the meadows are flourishing once again.

12min

Science fiction enthusiasts have a positive attitude to the digitizing of the brain

The goal of a technology known as mind upload is to make it possible to create functional copies of the human brain on computers. The development of this technology, which involves scanning of the brain and detailed cell-specific emulation, is currently receiving billions in funding. Science fiction enthusiasts express a more positive attitude towards the technology compared to others.

12min

Light receptors determine the behavior of flashlight fish

Biologists have characterized new, unknown photoreceptors from the bioluminescent flashlight fish Anomalops katoptron. The photoreceptors known as opsins allow the fish to detect light with a specific wavelength. Scientists found new opsin variants, which are specialized to detect low intensity blue light in the wavelength range of bioluminescent light emitted by the fish. The blue light can be us

12min

Potential link between alcohol and death rates

Heavy drinking causes iron loading which puts strain on vital organs, research finds.

12min

Could gravitational waves reveal how fast our universe is expanding?

An MIT study finds black holes and neutron stars are key to measuring our expanding universe.

14min

Injection simulator trains doctors to keep hands steady

Researchers have created a new low-cost needle-insertion simulator that can help doctors improve their technique and dexterity. Administering needle procedures like epidurals can be difficult for even seasoned doctors. Current training methods are costly and fall short in preparing doctors for every patient and situation they might face, researchers say. The new haptic-force needle-insertion simu

28min

Chemists achieve unprecedented molecular triple jump with multi-ringed metal complexes

For decades, Texas A&M University chemist Dr. John A. Gladysz has been mixing metals and carbon to create novel molecules, from the world's longest molecular wires to microscopic gyroscopes controllable by cage size, molecular access and even progress toward unidirectional rotation via external electrical field manipulation.

28min

VERITAS supplies critical piece to neutrino discovery puzzle

The VERITAS array has confirmed the detection of high-energy gamma rays from the vicinity of a supermassive black hole located in a distant galaxy, TXS 0506+056. While these detections are relatively common for VERITAS, this blackhole is potentially the first known astrophysical source of high-energy cosmic neutrinos, a type of ghostly subatomic particle that can be made at astrophysical sources o

28min

Solved protein puzzle opens door to new design for cancer drugs

Researchers at have solved a longstanding puzzle concerning the design of molecular motors, paving the way toward new cancer therapies.

28min

Study shows biomarker panel boosts lung cancer risk assessment for smokers

A four-protein biomarker blood test improves lung cancer risk assessment over existing guidelines that rely solely upon smoking history, capturing risk for people who have ever smoked, not only for heavy smokers, an international research team reports in JAMA Oncology.

28min

Is risk for inner ear disorders higher in people with history of migraines?

A study of health insurance claims data from Taiwan suggests there may be increased risk of inner ear disorders, especially ringing in the ears, among patients with a history of migraines than those without.

28min

Study estimates eyeglass use by Medicare patients

Traditional Medicare doesn't cover eyeglasses except after cataract surgery and changing the policy has been discussed. Recent estimates of eyeglass use by Medicare beneficiaries could shed light on the implications of any policy change. A new study estimates 92 percent of Medicare beneficiaries 65 or older (an estimated 40.5 million people) reported using eyeglasses for distance or near vision co

28min

UCLA researchers discover gene that controls bone-to-fat ratio in bone marrow

UCLA researchers have found that the PGC-1α gene, previously known to control human metabolism, also controls the equilibrium of bone and fat in bone marrow and also how an adult stem cell expresses its final cell type. The findings could lead to a better understanding of the disruption of bone-to-fat ratio in bone marrow and its health consequences, and point to the gene as a therapeutic target i

28min

University of Leicester scientists involved in discovery of origins of 'ghost particles' in space

Researchers help to resolve a more than century-old riddle about what sends subatomic particles such as neutrinos and cosmic rays speeding through the universe.

28min

Blazar accelerates cosmic neutrinos to highest energies

For the first time ever, scientists have determined the cosmic origin of highest-energy neutrinos. A research group led by IceCube scientist Elisa Resconi, spokesperson of the Collaborative Research Center SFB1258 at the Technical University of Munich, provides an important piece of evidence that the particles detected by the IceCube neutrino telescope at the South Pole originate from a galaxy fou

28min

CHOP researchers develop easy-to-implement predictive screening tool for retinopathy

A multi-hospital collaboration led by researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) has found a simple method of determining which premature infants should be screened for retinopathy of prematurity (ROP).

28min

Guardian of the cell

Scientists have defined the structure and key features of a human immune-surveillance protein that guards against cancer and bacterial and viral infections.The identification of two human-specific variations in the protein closes a critical knowledge gap in immunology and cancer biology.

28min

IceCube neutrinos point to long-sought cosmic ray accelerator

An international team of scientists, with key contributions from researchers at the University of Maryland, has found the first evidence of a source of high-energy cosmic neutrinos, ghostly subatomic particles that travel to Earth unhindered for billions of light years from the most extreme environments in the universe.

28min

How gold nanoparticles could improve solar energy storage

Star-shaped gold nanoparticles, coated with a semiconductor, can produce hydrogen from water over four times more efficiently than other methods – opening the door to improved storage of solar energy and other advances that could boost renewable energy use and combat climate change, according to Rutgers University-New Brunswick researchers.

28min

The VIPs of the nervous system

Biologists at Washington University in St Louis unlocked a cure for jet lag in mice by activating a small subset of the neurons involved in setting daily rhythms.

28min

A blazar is a source of high-energy neutrinos

A celestial object known as a blazar is a source of high-energy neutrinos, report two new studies.

28min

Breakthrough in the search for cosmic particle accelerators

In a global observation campaign, scientist have for the first time located a source of high-energy cosmic neutrinos, ghostly elementary particles that travel billions of light years through the universe, flying unaffected through stars, planets and entire galaxies. The campaign was triggered by a single neutrino that had been recorded by the IceCube neutrino telescope at the South Pole. Scientist

28min

New era of space research launched by IceCube Observatory and global team of astronomers

The first-ever identification of a deep-space source of the super-energetic subatomic high-energy neutrino particles has launched a new era of space research. Detection of one such neutrino beneath the Antarctic ice sent a global team of astronomers racing to track down its origins: a flaring supermassive black hole 3.7 billion light years from Earth. A report will be published in the journal Scie

28min

University of Alabama professors help in discovery of potential cosmic ray source

Three professors at The University of Alabama are part of an international team of scientists who found evidence of the source of tiny cosmic particles, known as neutrinos, a discovery that opens the door to using these particles to observe the universe.

28min

Origin of neutrinos proved by Drexel University astrophysicist, IceCube colleagues

With nine-and-a-half years of data and a South Pole observatory, a Drexel University professor and her colleagues has shown the origin of at least some of the high-energy particles known as 'neutrinos.'

28min

Blazar accelerates cosmic neutrinos to highest energies

For the first time ever, scientists have determined the cosmic origin of highest-energy neutrinos. A research group led by IceCube scientist Elisa Resconi, spokesperson of the Collaborative Research Center SFB1258 at the Technical University of Munich (TUM), provides an important piece of evidence that the particles detected by the IceCube neutrino telescope at the South Pole originate from a gala

28min

MAGIC telescopes trace origin of a rare cosmic neutrino

For the first time, astrophysicists have localized the source of a cosmic neutrino originating outside the Milky Way. It is highly likely that the neutrino comes from a blazar in the Orion constellation. How did the scientists reach this interesting finding? They combined a neutrino signal from IceCube with measurements from other instruments, e.g. the Fermi-LAT and MAGIC telescopes. This multi-me

28min

IceCube neutrinos point to long-sought cosmic ray accelerator

An international team of scientists has found the first evidence of a source of high-energy cosmic neutrinos, ghostly subatomic particles that can travel unhindered for billions of light years from the most extreme environments in the universe to Earth.

28min

Scientists find evidence of far-distant neutrino source

An international team of scientists, including from the University of Adelaide and Curtin University, has found the first evidence of a source of high-energy particles called neutrinos: an energetic galaxy about 4 billion light years from Earth.

28min

VERITAS supplies critical piece to neutrino discovery puzzle

The VERITAS array has confirmed the detection of gamma rays from the vicinity of a supermassive black hole. While these detections are relatively common for VERITAS, this black hole is potentially the first known astrophysical source of high-energy cosmic neutrinos, a type of ghostly subatomic particle.

28min

VLA gives tantalizing clues about source of energetic cosmic neutrino

The track of an elusive, energetic neutrino points to a distant galaxy as its source and VLA observations suggest high-energy particles may be generated in superfast jets of material near the galaxy's core.

28min

Neutrino observation points to one source of high-energy cosmic rays

Observations made by researchers using a National Science Foundation (NSF) detector at the South Pole and verified by ground- and space-based telescopes have produced the first evidence of one source of high-energy cosmic neutrinos.

28min

Ghostly particle points to long-sought high-energy cosmic ray source

With the help of an icebound detector situated a mile beneath the South Pole, an international team of scientists has found the first evidence of a source of high-energy cosmic neutrinos, ghostly subatomic particles that can travel in a straight line for billions of light-years, passing unhindered through galaxies, stars and anything else nature throws in its path.

28min

Finding the proteins that unpack DNA

A new method allows researchers to systematically identify specialized proteins called 'nuclesome displacing factors' that unpack DNA inside the nucleus of a cell, making the usually dense DNA more accessible for gene expression and other functions.

28min

Turbulence allows clinical-scale platelet production for transfusions

Turbulence is a critical physical factor that promotes the large-scale production of functional platelets from human induced pluripotent stem cells, researchers in Japan report July 12 in the journal Cell. Exposure to turbulent energy in a bioreactor stimulated hiPSC-derived bone marrow cells called megakaryocytes to produce 100 billion platelets — blood cell fragments that help wounds heal and p

28min

5,300-year-old Iceman's last meal reveals remarkably high-fat diet

In 1991, German tourists discovered a human body that was later determined to be the oldest naturally preserved ice mummy, known as Otzi or the Iceman. Now, researchers reporting in Current Biology on July 12 who have conducted the first in-depth analysis of the Iceman's stomach contents offer a rare glimpse of our ancestor's ancient dietary habits. Among other things, their findings show that the

28min

Turbulence is good for the blood

Scientists at Kyoto University have used induced pluripotent stem cells to make platelets at numbers (> 100 billion) that can be used in the clinic. The ability comes from combining stem cell technology with bioreactors that incorporate turbulence. This artificial blood system is expected to replace blood donors for platelet transfusions.

28min

Here's What Ötzi the Iceman Ate Before He Was Murdered

A mere 2 hours before his grisly murder about 5,300 years ago, Ötzi the iceman chowed down on some mouthwatering morsels: wild meat from ibex and red deer, cereals from einkorn wheat and — oddly enough — poisonous fern, a new study finds.

28min

Why Are World Cup Players Spitting Their Drinks?

While it's unclear exactly why any given player may need to swig and spit, some players may be practicing what's known as "carb rinsing."

28min

We may finally know where the 'ghost particles' that surround us come fromEarth South Pole Universe

Space Neutrinos, meet IceCube. Ghost particles, AKA neutrinos, are literally everywhere—trillions of them, each with barely any mass at all, are passing through your body right now.

33min

Tiny Cosmic Particle Delivers Major Breakthrough in Astronomy

One of the fundamental particles that makes up the universe is also one of the most mysterious. Neutrinos, Italian for “little neutral one,” are everywhere. They emerged soon after the Big Bang, and, later on, from black holes, exploding stars, the nuclear reaction that fuels our sun, even from the interaction between cosmic radiation and Earth’s atmosphere. The tiny particles have very, very lit

37min

What’s the Point of NATO, Anyway?

In his repeated attacks on the Western alliance—culminating in a head-spinning morning with reports of Trump threatening to “go his own way,” followed by his declaration that “I believe in NATO ”—Donald Trump has raised an important question: What’s the point of NATO anyway? Today, even asking that question places you on the outer fringes of American foreign policy debate. But that wasn’t always

37min

Whale killing: Iceland accused of slaughtering rare whale

Campaigners say that what appears to be a rare blue whale has been killed by Icelandic whalers.

41min

Ötzi’s last supper: mummified hunter's final meal revealed

Scientists say iceman ate ‘horrible-tasting’ high-fat meal of ibex before his murder 5,300 years ago Ötzi the iceman filled his belly with fat before he set out on the ill-fated hunting trip that ended with his bloody death on a glacier in the eastern Alps 5,300 years ago, scientists say. The first in-depth analysis of the hunter’s stomach contents reveal that half of his last meal consisted of a

47min

Finding the proteins that unpack DNA

A new method allows researchers to systematically identify specialized proteins that unpack DNA inside the nucleus of a cell, making the usually dense DNA more accessible for gene expression and other functions. The method, developed by a team of researchers at Penn State, and the shared characteristics of these proteins are described in a paper that appears online on July 12th in the journal Mole

47min

How gold nanoparticles could improve solar energy storage

Star-shaped gold nanoparticles, coated with a semiconductor, can produce hydrogen from water over four times more efficiently than other methods—opening the door to improved storage of solar energy and other advances that could boost renewable energy use and combat climate change, according to Rutgers University-New Brunswick researchers.

47min

Scientists decipher the structure, key features of a critical immune-surveillance protein in humans

The human body is built for survival. Each one of its cells is closely guarded by a set of immune proteins armed with nearly foolproof radars that detect foreign or damaged DNA.

47min

VERITAS supplies critical piece to neutrino discovery puzzle

The VERITAS array has confirmed the detection of high-energy gamma rays from the vicinity of a supermassive black hole located in a distant galaxy, TXS 0506+056. While these detections are relatively common for VERITAS, this blackhole is potentially the first known astrophysical source of high-energy cosmic neutrinos, a type of ghostly subatomic particle that can be made at astrophysical sources o

47min

Solved protein puzzle opens door to new design for cancer drugs

Researchers at Oregon State University have solved a longstanding puzzle concerning the design of molecular motors, paving the way toward new cancer therapies.

47min

What's a Blazar? A Galactic Bakery for Cosmic Rays

Astrophysicists have traced the origin of some of Earth’s cosmic rays to a blazar 4 billion light years away.

47min

New perspective on tumor genome evolution

An interdisciplinary team of scientists deepens understanding of tumor genome evolution and suggests negative selection acting on cancer-essential genes plays a more important role than previously anticipated. The scientists' work also provides new insights for improving cancer immunotherapies in the future.

47min

Electrical contact to molecules in semiconductor structures established for the first time

Electrical circuits are constantly being scaled down and extended with specific functions. A new method now allows electrical contact to be established with simple molecules on a conventional silicon chip. The technique promises to bring advances in sensor technology and medicine.

47min

Invasive plants adapt to new environments

Invasive plants have the ability to adapt to new environments — and even behave like a native species, according to new research.

47min

New control of cell division discovered

When a cell divides, its constituents are usually evenly distributed among the daughter cells. Researchers have now identified an enzyme that guarantees that cell constituents that are concentrated in organelles without a membrane are properly distributed. Their discovery opens up new opportunities for the treatment of cancer, neurodegenerative diseases, aging processes and viral infections.

47min

A gene required for addictive behavior

Cocaine can have a devastating effect on people. It directly stimulates the brain's reward center, and, more importantly, induces long-term changes to the reward circuitry that are responsible for addictive behaviors. Scientists have now uncovered that a gene called Maged1 plays a crucial role in controlling these pathological changes.

47min

Polyps will let unrelated 'others' fuse to them and share tissue, scientists discover

Scientists discovered that polyps have no qualms about treating a nonrelated individual like part of the family. This goes way beyond sharing meals or even a roof. Polyps of the marine hydrozoan Ectopleura larynx allow nonrelated individuals to fuse their bodies to the familial colony and share what is essentially skin and a stomach.

47min

Genetic risk of heart failure

Heart failure is known to be more common in certain families but whether this familial transition is caused by genetic or lifestyle factors. By studying adoptees in relation to both their biological parents and adoptive parents, a new population study in Sweden has found that genetic heritage is the dominant factor when it comes to heart failure in these families.

47min

Magnetic vortices: Two independent magnetic skyrmion phases discovered in a single material

For the first time a team of researchers have discovered two different phases of magnetic skyrmions in a single material. Physicists can now better study and understand the properties of these magnetic structures, which are important for both basic research and applications.

47min

Smell receptors in the body could help sniff out disease

A review of more than 200 studies reveals that olfactory receptors — proteins that bind to odors that aid the sense of smell — perform a wide range of mostly unknown functions outside the nose. The function of extra-nasal olfactory receptors has the potential to be used in the diagnosis and treatment of health conditions such as cancer.

47min

A high-energy neutrino has been traced to its galactic birthplace

The high-energy particle was born in a blazar 4 billion light-years away, scientists report.

49min

A 4 Billion Light-Year Journey Ends At The South PoleEarth South Pole Universe

Ghostly particles called neutrinos can travel nearly unimpeded across the universe. For the first time, physicists have been able to pinpoint the origin of a powerful neutrino. (Image credit: ESA/NASA/the AVO project/Paolo Padovani)

49min

Study: Obesity alone does not increase risk of death

Researchers at York University's Faculty of Health have found that patients who have metabolic healthy obesity, but no other metabolic risk factors, do not have an increased rate of mortality. The results of this study could impact how we think about obesity and health.

49min

Mystery of the Basel papyrus solved

Since the 16th century, Basel has been home to a mysterious papyrus. With mirror writing on both sides, it has puzzled generations of researchers. A research team from the University of Basel has now discovered that it is an unknown medical document from late antiquity. The text was likely written by the famous Roman physician Galen.

49min

Chemicals associated with oxidative stress may be essential to development

Some level of molecules linked to oxidative stress may be essential to health and development, according to new animal studies.

49min

Hubble and Gaia team up to fuel cosmic conundrum

Using the power and synergy of two space telescopes, astronomers have made the most precise measurement to date of the universe's expansion rate.

49min

Neutrinos Linked With Cosmic Source for the First Time

Last September, a rare guest from far beyond the Milky Way ushered in a new era of astronomy. The visitor, an ultrahigh-energy cosmic neutrino, bumped into ice more than a mile beneath the South Pole, where detectors from the IceCube experiment were waiting to catch it. After quickly tracking the direction from where it came, physicists got lucky: Another telescope, this one orbiting Earth, spott

50min

Tracing the Source of Cosmic Rays to a Blazar Near OrionEarth South Pole Universe

Astronomers said that they had seen into the fire-spitting heart of a supermassive black hole.

50min

Horizontal Gene Transfer in Bdelloid Rotifers Questioned

A re-analysis of sequencing data from a 2016 study of these tiny metazoans reveals possible contamination, rather than an exchange of DNA among species.

53min

5,300-year-old Iceman's last meal reveals remarkably high-fat diet

In 1991, German tourists discovered, in the Eastern Italian Alps, a human body that was later determined to be the oldest naturally preserved ice mummy, known as Otzi or the Iceman. Now, researchers reporting in the journal Current Biology on July 12 who have conducted the first in-depth analysis of the Iceman's stomach contents offer a rare glimpse of our ancestor's ancient dietary habits. Among

53min

Turbulence allows clinical-scale platelet production for transfusions

Turbulence is a critical physical factor that promotes the large-scale production of functional platelets from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs), researchers in Japan report July 12 in the journal Cell. Exposure to turbulent energy in a bioreactor stimulated hiPSC-derived bone marrow cells called megakaryocytes to produce 100 billion platelets—blood cell fragments that help wounds heal

53min

General public should have more input into scientific advice

The scientific community needs to listen more to people outside academia if it wants to continue to help politicians create good evidence-based policies that will benefit the public, a conference has heard.

53min

Hubble and Gaia team up to fuel cosmic conundrum

Using the power and synergy of two space telescopes, astronomers have made the most precise measurement to date of the universe's expansion rate.

53min

Supplements for Osteoarthritis – Evaluating the Evidence

A new review evaluates the evidence for supplements to treat osteoarthris

54min

Neutrinos on Ice: Astronomers' Long Hunt for Source of Extragalactic "Ghost Particles" Pays Off

Along with gravitational waves, the find adds more options for “multimessenger” astronomy, which does not solely rely on light to gather data — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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A new way to monitor vital signs (that can see through walls) | Dina Katabi

At MIT, Dina Katabi and her team are working on a bold new way to monitor patients' vital signs in a hospital (or even at home), without wearables or bulky, beeping devices. Bonus: it can see through walls. In a mind-blowing talk and demo, Katabi previews a system that captures the reflections of signals like Wi-Fi as they bounce off people, creating a reliable record of vitals for healthcare work

56min

57min

Swarms of moon jellyfish like 'oil slick' off Ceredigion coast

Dolphin spotters on a boat trip were surrounded by thousands of jellyfish near New Quay harbour.

59min

Video: Why stinky cheeses stink

Some cheeses are infamously smelly, giving off odors akin to fetid gym socks.

59min

Facebook’s AI tourist finds its way around New York City by asking for help from another algorithm

AI algorithms can learn to navigate in the real world using language—and that might help make chatbots and voice assistants smarter.

1h

Why internal scars won't stop growing

A study has newly identified an immune trigger of some fibrotic diseases and an experimental compound to treat it. Fibrosis — a progressive scarring and hardening of internal organs — is estimated to cause 35 to 40 percent of deaths in the world.

1h

Using coal waste to create sustainable concrete

Researchers have created a sustainable alternative to traditional concrete using coal fly ash, a waste product of coal-based electricity generation.

1h

Why the left hemisphere of the brain understands language better than the right

Nerve cells in the brain region planum temporale have more synapses in the left hemisphere than in the right hemisphere — which is vital for rapid processing of auditory speech, according to new research. There has already been ample evidence of left hemisphere language dominance; however, the underlying processes on the neuroanatomical level had not yet been fully understood.

1h

Parental controls do not stop teens from seeing pornography, new research finds

The struggle to shape the experiences young people have online is now part of modern parenthood. As children and teenagers spend increasing amounts of time online, a significant share of parents and guardians now use Internet filtering tools (such as parental controls) to protect their children from accessing sexual material online. However, new research from the Oxford Internet Institute, Univers

1h

What people expect from restaurant employees

The cleanliness of restaurant employees is vital to customer perceptions of food safety, and is as equally important as a clean environment and hygienic food preparation, according to a new study. Restaurants, however, are significantly underperforming in this regard, the study suggests, identifying a clear area for improvement. “…it is important for restaurants—and employees—to remember that ute

1h

A gene required for addictive behavior

Researchers show that mice lacking the Maged1 gene are unable to acquire cocaine addiction. This gene serves as a promising new entry point into the analysis of the mechanisms underlying drug addiction.

1h

Imaging technique illuminates immune status of monkeys with HIV-like virus

Findings from an animal study suggest that a non-invasive imaging technique could, with further development, become a tool to assess immune system recovery in people receiving treatment for HIV infection. Researchers used single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and a CD4-specific imaging probe to assess immune system changes throughout the bodies of macaques infected with SIV following

1h

Treatment prevents symptoms of schizophrenia in tests with rats

Researchers carried out studies in animal model that mimics condition in children and adolescents considered at risk for development of the disease in adulthood. Young and hypertense rats displaying cognitive and social impairments as well as hyperlocomotion have reached a healthy adulthood after being treated with daily doses of sodium nitroprusside doses for 30 days.

1h

New method reveals how well cancer drugs hit their targets

Scientists have developed a method to measure how well cancer drugs reach their targets inside the body. It shows individual cancer cells in a tumor in real time, revealing which cells interact with the drug and which cells the drug fails to reach. The findings could help clinicians decide the best course and delivery of treatment for cancer patients in the future.

1h

Parental controls do not stop teens from seeing pornography, new research finds

New research from the Oxford Internet Institute, University of Oxford has found that Internet filtering tools are ineffective and in most cases, were an insignificant factor in whether young people had seen explicit sexual content.

1h

Quantum dot white LEDs achieve record efficiency

Researchers have demonstrated nanomaterial-based white-light-emitting diodes (LEDs) that exhibit a record luminous efficiency of 105 lumens per watt.

1h

Quantum dot white LEDs achieve record efficiency

Researchers have demonstrated nanomaterial-based white-light-emitting diodes (LEDs) that exhibit a record luminous efficiency of 105 lumens per watt. Luminous efficiency is a measure of how well a light source uses power to generate light. With further development, the new LEDs could reach efficiencies over 200 lumens per watt, making them a promising energy-efficient lighting source for homes, of

1h

‘Fingerprint’ system could customize Alzheimer’s treatment

New research could offer a way to deliver personalized treatments to patients with neurological disease. Personalized medicine—delivering therapies specially tailored to a patient’s unique physiology—has been a goal of researchers and doctors for a long time. Now, researchers have developed what they call a personalized Therapeutic Intervention Fingerprint (pTIF). The pTIF predicts the effectiven

1h

Patient reports suggest it’s better to avoid catheters

More than half of hospital patients who get a urinary catheter experienced a complication, in-depth interviews and chart reviews from more than 2,000 patients show. “Our findings underscore the importance of avoiding an indwelling urinary catheter unless it is absolutely necessary and removing it as soon as possible.” The new study, published in JAMA Internal Medicine , puts large-scale evidence

1h

Melting triggers melting

The melting of glaciers on one side of the globe can trigger disintegration of glaciers on the other side of the globe, as has been presented in a recent paper by a team of AWI scientists, who investigated marine microalgae preserved in glacial deposits and subsequently used their findings to perform climate simulations.

1h

NASA sees ex-Tropical Cyclone Beryl's remnants fighting for survival

Former Tropical Storm Beryl doesn't seem to want to dissipate into hurricane history. Visible data from NASA's Terra satellite captured the the remnants of Beryl lingering north of the Bahamas.

1h

New technologies for producing medical therapeutic proteins

Bacterial systems are some of the simplest and most effective platforms for the expression of recombinant proteins. They are more cost-effective compared to other methods, therefore they are of great interest not only for Lobachevsky University researchers, but also for manufacturers of therapeutically important drugs. However, in addition to the target recombinant proteins, cells also produce a l

1h

NASA's GPM satellite examined Tropical Storm Chris' power

As Tropical Storm Chris was strengthening into a short-lived hurricane, the Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite investigated the storm's rainfall and cloud heights. By July 12, Chris weakened to a tropical storm and was passing by Nova Scotia, Canada.

1h

NASA sees ex-Tropical Cyclone Beryl's remnants fighting for survival

Former Tropical Storm Beryl doesn't seem to want to dissipate into hurricane history. Visible data from NASA's Terra satellite captured the the remnants of Beryl lingering north of the Bahamas.

1h

GPM satellite examined Tropical Storm Chris' power

As Tropical Storm Chris was strengthening into a short-lived hurricane, the Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite investigated the storm's rainfall and cloud heights. By July 12, Chris weakened to a tropical storm and was passing by Nova Scotia, Canada.

1h

Polyps will let unrelated 'others' fuse to them and share tissue, scientists discover

We humans will put up with a lot from our relatives. Yet most of us are less charitable with people outside of our family circle.

1h

Voters do not always walk the talk when it comes to infidelity

Democrats, who generally have a more liberal take on sexual matters, were least likely to use an adultery dating service, while members of the conservative Libertarian party had the greatest tendency to do so. This is according to an analysis of leaked user data from Ashley Madison, a website that connects married people who want to cheat on their partner. Greens and voters not registered to any p

1h

Fahrenheit 100: could this be the summer Britain wakes up to climate change? | Michael McCarthy

I hoped 2003’s record heatwave would make people more aware. Yet they promptly forgot all about it I don’t know anybody who remembers 10 August 2003 and its significance, although the date has never faded from my mind. That was Britain’s hottest ever day, the day the current British air temperature record was set: it leapt from the old record of 37.1C , set on 3 August 1990, to the new figure of 3

1h

How blockchains can empower communities to control their own energy supply

As the cost of solar panels, wind generation and battery storage falls, individual households and consumers are increasingly generating their own electricity, becoming less reliant on the power grid. This has led to energy systems becoming increasingly decentralised, which helps shift market power from large utility companies to individual "prosumers" – consumers who produce their own electricity.

1h

Magnetic vortices: Two independent magnetic skyrmion phases discovered in a single material

For the first time a team of researchers have discovered two different phases of magnetic skyrmions in a single material. Physicists of the Technical Universities of Munich and Dresden and the University of Cologne can now better study and understand the properties of these magnetic structures, which are important for both basic research and applications.

1h

Voters do not always walk the talk when it comes to infidelity

Democrats, who generally have a more liberal take on sexual matters, were least likely to use an adultery dating service, while members of the conservative Libertarian party had the greatest tendency to do so. This is according to an analysis of leaked user data from Ashley Madison, a website that connects married people who want to cheat on their partner.

1h

More studies needed to determine impact of air pollution on gynecologic health

While initial studies suggest a potential relationship between air pollution and both infertility and menstrual irregularity, researchers from Boston University School of Medicine believe more studies are needed to validate these findings in other populations.

1h

Polyps will let unrelated 'others' fuse to them and share tissue, scientists discover

University of Kansas scientists discovered that polyps have no qualms about treating a nonrelated individual like part of the family. This goes way beyond sharing meals or even a roof. Polyps of the marine hydrozoan Ectopleura larynx allow nonrelated individuals to fuse their bodies to the familial colony and share what is essentially skin and a stomach. The findings appeared yesterday in the jour

1h

Study highlights genetic risk of heart failure

Heart failure is known to be more common in certain families but whether this familial transition is caused by genetic or lifestyle factors. By studying adoptees in relation to both their biological parents and adoptive parents, a new population study in Sweden has found that genetic heritage is the dominant factor when it comes to heart failure in these families.

1h

Intensive care patients' muscles unable to use fats for energy

The muscles of people in intensive care are less able to use fats for energy, contributing to extensive loss of muscle mass, finds a new study co-led by UCL, King's College London and Guy's and St. Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust.

1h

A gene required for addictive behavior

Cocaine can have a devastating effect on people. It directly stimulates the brain's reward center, and, more importantly, induces long-term changes to the reward circuitry that are responsible for addictive behaviors. Alban de Kerchove d'Exaerde from the Université Libre de Bruxelles, Belgium, and his colleagues have now uncovered that a gene called Maged1 plays a crucial role in controlling these

1h

New control of cell division discovered

When a cell divides, its constituents are usually evenly distributed among the daughter cells. UZH researchers have now identified an enzyme that guarantees that cell constituents that are concentrated in organelles without a membrane are properly distributed. Their discovery opens up new opportunities for the treatment of cancer, neurodegenerative diseases, aging processes and viral infections.

1h

Invasive plants adapt to new environments, study finds

Invasive plants have the ability to adapt to new environments — and even behave like a native species, according to University of Stirling research.

1h

It's Time to Stop Investing in New Oil and Gas Pipelines

We can't trust the administration to do the right thing, so we need to convince investors to take their money elsewhere — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

UK clears way for 21st Century Fox to buy Sky

Britain on Thursday cleared the way for Rupert Murdoch's 21st Century Fox to take full control of pan-European TV giant Sky after Fox agreed to address media plurality concerns.

1h

Why we're hardwired to ignore safety advice during a heatwave

Contrary to all British summertime norms, the country has basked in seemingly endless sunshine for a while now. 18m pints of beer were drunk last weekend alone, as fans celebrated England beating Sweden in the World Cup quarter finals and temperatures hit 30°C.

2h

First-ever colour X-ray on a human

New Zealand scientists have performed the first-ever 3-D, colour X-ray on a human, using a technique that promises to improve the field of medical diagnostics, said Europe's CERN physics lab which contributed imaging technology.

2h

Electrical contact to molecules in semiconductor structures established for the first time

Electrical circuits are constantly being scaled down and extended with specific functions. A new method now allows electrical contact to be established with simple molecules on a conventional silicon chip. The technique promises to bring advances in sensor technology and medicine, as reported in the journal Nature by chemists from the University of Basel and researchers from IBM Research-Zurich in

2h

New perspective on tumor genome evolution

An interdisciplinary team of scientists at the Centre for Genomic Regulation in Barcelona, Spain, deepens understanding of tumor genome evolution and suggests negative selection acting on cancer-essential genes plays a more important role than previously anticipated. Their work, published in Genome Biology, also provides new insights for improving cancer immunotherapies in the future.

2h

Study finds potential link between alcohol and death rates

Heavy drinking causes iron loading which puts strain on vital organs, research finds.

2h

Putting gas under pressure

Understanding gas flames' response to acoustic perturbations at high pressure should make next-generation turbines safer and more efficient.

2h

An orange a day keeps macular degeneration away: 15-year study

A new study has shown that people who regularly eat oranges are less likely to develop macular degeneration than people who do not eat oranges.Researchers at the Westmead Institute for Medical Research interviewed more than 2,000 Australian adults aged over 50 and followed them over a 15-year period.

2h

Brain function partly replicated by nanomaterials

Osaka University-centered researchers created extremely dense, random SWNT/POM network molecular neuromorphic devices, generating spontaneous spikes similar to nerve impulses of neurons. They conducted simulation calculations of the random molecular network model complexed with POM molecules, which are able to store electric charges, replicating spikes generated from the random molecular network.

2h

Controlling the manufacture of stable aerogels

Kyoto University researchers have developed a new approach to control the fabrication of soft, porous materials, overcoming a primary challenge in materials science.

2h

WSU researchers use coal waste to create sustainable concrete

Washington State University researchers have created a sustainable alternative to traditional concrete using coal fly ash, a waste product of coal-based electricity generation.

2h

Optimizing pulsed electric fields to target cancer with calcium ions

When applied to cells, pulsed electric fields increase membrane permeability. Researchers have used this effect to force the diffusion of extracellular calcium into cells. Cell death occurs more easily in cancer cells since they are particularly sensitive to high amounts of calcium. Researchers from Kumamoto University in Japan have optimized pulsed electric field settings in an effort to attack c

2h

Three tips on how to distinguish an edible mushroom from a poisonous one

Served fresh or fried, lots of wild mushrooms go from forest to the table—but know which ones are safe when harvesting this summertime delicacy.

2h

Researchers discover heaviest known calcium atom; eight new rare isotopes discovered in total

Researchers from Michigan State University and the RIKEN Nishina Center in Japan discovered eight new rare isotopes of the elements phosphorus, sulfur, chlorine, argon, potassium, scandium and, most importantly, calcium.

2h

How to get the best deals this Amazon Prime Day

DIY Don't miss out. Once a year, Amazon offers its Prime subscribers an extravaganza of special deals. We have the strategies and tools you need to find the best prices this Prime Day.

2h

In 30 years, the Antarctic Treaty becomes modifiable, and the fate of a continent could hang in the balance

Three decades from now, several crucial elements of the Antarctic Treaty will come up for possible renewal, plunging the future of the continent into uncertainty.

2h

All wildfires are not alike, but the US is fighting them that way

So far, the 2018 fire season has produced a handful of big fires in California, Nevada, New Mexico and Colorado; conflagrations in Oklahoma and Kansas; and a fire bust in Alaska, along with garden-variety wildfires from Florida to Oregon. Some of those fires are in rural areas, some are in wildlands, and a few are in exurbs.

2h

New control of cell division discovered

When a cell divides, its constituents are usually evenly distributed among the daughter cells. University of Zurich researchers have now identified an enzyme that guarantees that cell constituents that are concentrated in organelles without a membrane are properly distributed. Their discovery opens up new opportunities for the treatment of cancer, neurodegenerative diseases, aging processes and vi

2h

It's not business as usual for vegan businesses

In contrast to growing apprehension about trade wars, a rapidly expanding sector of the economy is offering a more hopeful picture: vegan businesses. Scarcely a week goes by without news of a new vegan business.

2h

Graphene smart membranes can control water

Researchers at The University of Manchester's National Graphene Institute (NGI) have achieved a long-sought-after objective of electrically controlling water flow through membranes, as reported in Nature.

2h

Robots are coming to the seafood industry. Here's why

New England is known for being an excellent source of lobster and other seafood. But while fishing is done locally, much of the processing is outsourced to other countries. A lack of local manpower means scallops caught off the coast of Massachusetts might travel to China or India for processing before they appear on your plate at a restaurant in Boston.

2h

Scientists create nano-size packets of genetic code aimed at brain cancer 'seed' cells

In a "proof of concept" study, scientists at Johns Hopkins Medicine say they have successfully delivered nano-size packets of genetic code called microRNAs to treat human brain tumors implanted in mice. The contents of the super-small containers were designed to target cancer stem cells, a kind of cellular "seed" that produces countless progeny and is a relentless barrier to ridding the brain of m

2h

New level of precision achieved in combined measurements of Higgs boson couplings

The Higgs boson, discovered at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in 2012, has a singular role in the Standard Model of particle physics. Most notable is the Higgs boson's affinity to mass, which can be likened to the electric charge for an electric field: the larger the mass of a fundamental particle, the larger the strength of its interaction, or "coupling," with the Higgs boson. Deviations from th

2h

Light receptors determine the behavior of flashlight fish

Biologists at the Ruhr-Universität Bochum characterized new, unknown photoreceptors from the bioluminescent flashlight fish Anomalops katoptron. The photoreceptors known as opsins allow the fish to detect light with a specific wavelength. As published on the July 11, 2018, in PLOS ONE the scientists found new opsin variants, which are specialized to detect low intensity blue light in the wavelengt

2h

Science fiction enthusiasts have a positive attitude to the digitizing of the brain

The goal of a technology known as mind upload is to make it possible to create functional copies of the human brain on computers. The development of this technology, which involves scanning of the brain and detailed cell-specific emulation, is currently receiving billions in funding. Science fiction enthusiasts express a more positive attitude towards the technology compared to others.

2h

Why the left hemisphere of the brain understands language better than the right

Nerve cells in the brain region planum temporale have more synapses in the left hemisphere than in the right hemisphere — which is vital for rapid processing of auditory speech, according to the report published by researchers from Ruhr-Universität Bochum and Technische Universität Dresden in the journal Science Advances. There has already been ample evidence of left hemisphere language dominance

2h

Moving fish farms enables seagrass meadows to thrive, study shows

Off the coast of Cyprus in the Mediterranean Sea, many fish farms have been moved into deeper waters — and on the seabeds beneath their previous locations, the meadows are flourishing once again.

2h

Mapping species range shifts under recent climatic changes

The inclusion of taxon-specific sensitivity to a shifting climate helps us understand species distributional responses to changes in climate.

2h

Why internal scars won't stop growing

A study has newly identified an immune trigger of some fibrotic diseases and an experimental compound to treat it. Fibrosis — a progressive scarring and hardening of internal organs — is estimated to cause 35 to 40 percent of deaths in the world.

2h

Why baby's sex may influence risk of pregnancy-related complicatations

The sex of a baby controls the level of small molecules known as metabolites in the pregnant mother's blood, which may explain why risks of some diseases in pregnancy vary depending whether the mother is carrying a boy or a girl, according to new research from the University of Cambridge.

2h

Allergic reactions to foods are milder in infants

Majority of infants with food-induced anaphylaxis present with hives and vomiting, suggesting there is less concern for life-threatening response to early food introduction.

2h

Practice imperfect: repeated cognitive testing can obscure early signs of dementia

Alzheimer's disease is a progressive, neurodegenerative condition that often begins with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), making early and repeated assessments of cognitive change crucial to diagnosis and treatment. In a paper in Alzheimer's & Dementia: Diagnosis, Assessment & Disease Monitoring, researchers led by scientists at the University of California San Diego School of Medicine found that

2h

MSU researchers lead team that discovers heaviest known calcium atom

Researchers from Michigan State University and the RIKEN Nishina Center in Japan discovered eight new rare isotopes of the elements phosphorus, sulfur, chlorine, argon, potassium, scandium and, most importantly, calcium. These are the heaviest isotopes of these elements ever found.

2h

Invasive plants adapt to new environments, study finds

Invasive plants have the ability to adapt to new environments – and even behave like a native species, according to University of Stirling research.

2h

Light receptors determine the behaviour of flashlight fish

Biologists at the Ruhr-Universität Bochum characterized new, unknown photoreceptors from the bioluminescent flashlight fish Anomalops katoptron. The photoreceptors known as opsins allow the fish to detect light with a specific wavelength. As published on the 11th July 2018 in Plos One the scientists found new opsin variants, which are specialized to detect low intensity blue light in the wavelengt

2h

The Coming Split in NATO

One of President Donald Trump’s chief complaints about America’s European allies is that they don’t spend nearly enough on defense; he has again raised the issue on Wednesday at the NATO summit. Granted, Trump is hardly the first American president to point to miserly military spending on the part of fellow NATO member states. This has been a sore spot in transatlantic relations since at least th

2h

Not all marine fish eat plastics

The Gulf Stream, which curves along the southern shore of Newfoundland, is saturated with plastics. Fish that feed from the surface waters, where plastics tend to accumulate, are in an ideal position to ingest plastics.

2h

Shark IQ | Countdown to Shark Week: The Daily Bite

How much has Shark Week taught you over the past 30 years? Jordan Carlos and legends of the past test your shark IQ while we revisit some of the best badass breaches ever. Shark Week 2018 starts Sunday July 22 9p! Stream The Daily Bite on Discovery GO: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/the-daily-bite/ Stream Classic Shark Week Episodes: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/shark-week/ Subscribe to

2h

Gene cluster identification made easy through data mining

An updated web server will improve analysis of genetic material. This will help researchers optimise bacteria for the industrial production of novel antibiotics, vitamins and food-related compounds.

2h

Scientists of SibFU proposed to use Siberian plants for treatment of serious diseases

Scientists of Siberian Federal University found possible sources of medicinal and antimicrobial drugs. The results of the study of unique medicinal properties of the microorganisms living within the plant — endosymbionts, are published in the scientific journal Frontiers of Biology.

2h

New study highlights Alzheimer's herpes link, experts say

A new commentary by scientists at the Universities of Manchester and Edinburgh on a study by Taiwanese epidemiologists supports the viability of a potential way to reduce the risk of Alzheimer's disease.

2h

Organ regeneration is no longer a distant dream

Researchers at Osaka University used live imaging of the Drosophila embryonic hindgut and computer simulations to clarify that a novel cellular behavior called 'cell sliding' was important for the LR asymmetric morphogenesis of the organ.

2h

'Ideological masculinity' that drives violence against women is a form of violent extremism

Verbal and physical violence shapes the daily experiences of girls and women in cities. A recent analysis showed that women in Melbourne face habitual sexual harassment in public space and feel unsafe, particularly in the evenings.

2h

A statistical study of the hot streak

An international team of researchers has conducted a statistical analysis of hot streaks to learn more about this mysterious facet of human nature. In their paper published in the journal Nature, the group describes how they conducted their study and what they found.

2h

Mapping species range shifts under recent climatic changes

Marine species in the eastern Bering Sea are not shifting their distribution ranges fast enough to keep track of current changes in climate, according to a study led by researchers at Hokkaido University.

2h

Coral reefs are at risk from rats that have invaded nearby islands

Elegant science can arise from ugly facts. This is the thought that springs first to mind as we read a new study in Nature about how a single invasive species – the black rat Rattus rattus – can deeply impact not just the landscape it overruns, but fundamentally alter the wider marine realm that surrounds it.

2h

Hot nanoparticles produce giant and explosive bubbles

When gold nano particles in water are illuminated by a laser, they get very hot: well above the boiling point of water. The formation of vapour bubbles caused by this, is well-known. New experiments, however, using a very high speed camera, now show that before this, a bubble is formed that is much larger and, subsequently, explodes violently. For energy conversion of the particles to the liquid t

2h

Beckman Coulter Life Sciences: CRISPR 101

How CRISPR plays an important role in immunotherapy

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3h

Airbnb doesn’t boost business in black or Hispanic areas

Tourism activity in areas with a rise in Airbnb rentals could mean increased activity at other businesses like restaurants—unless those neighborhoods are predominantly black or Hispanic, a new study suggests. “Airbnb has made repeated claims that it helps the local economy in black neighborhoods, especially in New York City,” says Mohammad Rahman, an associate professor of management at Purdue Un

3h

Evidence for a new nuclear phase transition could rewrite physics textbooks

Physics textbooks might have to be updated now that an international research team has found evidence of an unexpected transition in the structure of atomic nuclei.

3h

4 barriers to moving beyond intimate partner violence

The effects of intimate partner violence are profound, painfully enduring, and should command as much attention as providing victims with the help necessary to leave those relationships, according to a new study. Violence that occurs between intimate partners doesn’t end with the relationship’s conclusion, yet few resources exist to help survivors move beyond the betrayal of abusive relationships

3h

Rethinking Homo sapiens? The story of our origins gets dizzyingly complicated

You might say it's the ultimate prize of science, to discover when, where and why humans evolved.

3h

Smallest-ever magnetic vortexes mark step toward new digital memory

By twisting magnetism into record-small spirals, University of Nebraska-Lincoln physicists are speeding efforts to turn the digital equivalent of memory lane into a memory racetrack that could save energy and space in next-generation electronics.

3h

Apple MacBook Pro 2018: Price, Specs, Release DateMacBook Pro Apple Intel

Apple leans in on the high end of the laptop market, rather than going light and cheap.

3h

Heatwave uncovers submerged history

Weeks of dry weather cause water levels at Spelga Dam to drop, exposing a hidden history.

3h

Smart polymers transform electrical energy into mechanical work

CTsystems, a spin-off of Empa, and Daetwyler, the Swiss specialist for sealing solutions, partner up to market and industrialize polymer transducer technology. CTsystems has already presented the first prototype of electromechanical polymer converters in stack construction: As an actuator, this converts electrical energy into mechanical work with an "integrated" sensor function. Thanks to the coop

3h

Humankind's odyssey from Africa began more than two million years ago

Can you imagine walking 14,000km? Trekking across wide savannas, down creek beds, along mountain chains in terrain that is new and home to foreign types of plants and animals? Can I eat this? What is that?

3h

Safer airport approaches with 3-D satellite-based navigation

As air traffic grows in Europe's skies, so does the challenge to ensure that its airports are safely accessible at all times. BLUEGNSS, a project supported by the EU, has been developing global satellite navigation applications in selected European airports to increase safety and airport accessibility.

3h

Ticketmasterskandalen del af kæmpe kreditkort-svindelnummer

Bagmændene er velkendte og er blevet markant mere målrettede de seneste år.

3h

Scientists create nano-size packets of genetic code aimed at brain cancer 'seed' cells

In a 'proof of concept' study, scientists at Johns Hopkins Medicine say they have successfully delivered nano-size packets of genetic code called microRNAs to treat human brain tumors implanted in mice. The contents of the super-small containers were designed to target cancer stem cells, a kind of cellular 'seed' that produces countless progeny and is a relentless barrier to ridding the brain of m

3h

Artificial intelligence helps design an ultra-aerodynamic bike

Thanks to software developed by Neural Concept, an EPFL spin-off, bicycle engineers can quickly calculate the most aerodynamic shape for a bike. The software – which is being presented in Stockholm today at the International Conference on Machine Learning – applies artificial intelligence to a set of user-defined specifications. Engineers have already used the program to design a bike that they ho

3h

Indigo, vermillion, and other ancient colors that have decorated the world for millennia

Science Humans have been searching for newer, better colors since, well, forever. Few colors can compete with the origin story of the recently discovered sahara pink, but the idea of natural pigments isn’t so strange.

3h

The High-Water Mark of the Trump Presidency

The good news for Donald Trump is that the period from December through early July has been the most productive stretch of his presidency so far. The bad news for Trump is it seems likely to end up as the peak of productivity for his presidency. From the passage of a package of tax cuts, to his summit with Kim Jong Un, to a second vacancy on the Supreme Court, the president has collected a series

3h

Putting gas under pressure

Understanding gas flames' response to acoustic perturbations at high pressure should make next-generation turbines safer and more efficient.

3h

Investigations of prey patterns fail to explain why whale sharks aggregate off the coast of Saudi Arabia

The availability of tiny prey near a coral reef in the eastern Red Sea seems not to be the reason that whale sharks aggregate there every spring.

3h

Scientists take to the skies to measure emissions from Yorkshire moor fires

Scientists flew through the plumes of smoke rising from the Yorkshire moor fires to sample pollution levels.

3h

Organ regeneration is no longer a distant dream

Many organs arise from simple sheets and tubes of cells. During development, these sheets bend and deform into the more complex final shape of the organ. This can be seen, for example, in the hindgut of fruit flies (Drosophila), which is an organ equivalent to our intestines.

3h

Image of the Day: Uncovered

Researchers discover cells in the early life stage of the Schistosoma mansoni parasite that contribute to adults' reproductive systems.

3h

Research shows decline in biodiversity of suburban ecosystems

Worried about your lawn drying up in the summer heat? A bigger threat may lie next door, in your neighbor's—and his or her neighbor's—lawns. They all look alike, and that may not be a good thing.

3h

New study finds low-income students do not benefit from private schooling

A new study from the University of Virginia's Curry School of Education finds that low-income children or children enrolled in urban schools do not benefit more from enrolling in private school between kindergarten and ninth grade.

3h

Moving fish farms enables seagrass meadows to thrive, study shows

Commercial fish farms should be moved away from seagrass meadows in order for both to thrive in the future, according to new research.

4h

Decision making on the spot

The scientific study of penalty taking suggests that there are unexploited opportunities for footballers.

4h

The future of electronics is chemical

We can't cram any more processing power into silicon-based computer chips. But a paper published in Nature overnight reveals how we can make electronic devices 10 times smaller, and use molecules to build electronic circuits instead.

4h

Cinnamon oil could be key in preventing superbugs

As antibiotics become less effective against superbugs, a Swinburne researcher has been focusing on traditional agents to modify the behaviour of bacteria rather than killing bacteria.

4h

Superior seismic imaging for better drilling

Software could transform underground imaging of fossil fuel reserves by providing unprecedented detail in record time.

4h

NASA's TESS spacecraft continues testing prior to first observations

After a successful launch on April 18, 2018, NASA's newest planet hunter, the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite, is currently undergoing a series of commissioning tests before it begins searching for planets. The TESS team has reported that the spacecraft and cameras are in good health, and the spacecraft has successfully reached its final science orbit. The team continues to conduct tests in

4h

Why Did People Panic When the Moon Changed Color?

The longest total lunar eclipse of the century is coming up in a couple weeks. We know it's coming, but did ancient people?

4h

2 Lemon-Yellow Bat Species Discovered in Africa. And They're Adorable Fuzz Balls.

Two species of bats that were recently discovered in Kenya are fuzzy golden charmers.

4h

16th-Century Shipwreck Off Florida Coast Is Worth Millions. But It Belongs to France, not US.

A 16th-century shipwreck that may be all that's left of one of the first European voyages to America holds treasures worth millions of dollars.

4h

Researchers identify sequence leading to release of malaria parasites from red blood cells

The vacuole, a compartment inside human red blood cells in which malaria parasites reproduce and develop, takes on a distinct spherical shape just minutes before its membrane ruptures, leading to the release of parasites into the blood stream, according to researchers at the National Institutes of Health and other institutions. Their study appears in Cellular Microbiology.

4h

Smartphone platform helps to streamline classroom communication, improve learning and reduce cheating

A Purdue University-affiliated startup has created a digital learning platform to improve communication between students and teachers and provide real-time feedback on student comprehension and participation.

4h

More than a hobby—how volunteers support science

Whether it's watching birds, sharing gardening lore or monitoring the night sky, amateur science attracts dedicated people. Some science hobbyists join citizen science projects that involve collecting data and sharing knowledge with others, such as counting birds for an Audubon Society survey, teaching others about horticulture as master gardener volunteers, or gathering information about light po

4h

Green energy is the future, according to new report

The UK should seize a 'golden opportunity' to move away from fossil fuels, towards cheaper, greener energy sources, according to a new report, published by the National Infrastructure Commission.

4h

CRISPR Makes Cancer Cells Turncoats that Attack Their Tumor

The experimental approach showed promise across three types of malignancies in mice — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

Brain function partly replicated by nanomaterials

The brain requires surprisingly little energy to adapt to the environment to learn, make ambiguous recognitions, have high recognition ability and intelligence, and perform complex information processing.

4h

Smell receptors in the body could help sniff out disease

A review of more than 200 studies reveals that olfactory receptors — proteins that bind to odors that aid the sense of smell — perform a wide range of mostly unknown functions outside the nose. The function of extra-nasal olfactory receptors has the potential to be used in the diagnosis and treatment of health conditions such as cancer. The article is published in the July issue of Physiological

4h

Researchers detail plant self-recognition system that prevents self-fertilization

Self-fertilization is a problem, as it leads to inbreeding. Recognition systems that prevent self-fertilization have evolved to ensure that a plant mates only with a genetically different plant and not with itself. The recognition systems underlying self-incompatibility are found all around us in nature, and can be found in at least 100 plant families and 40 percent of species. Until now, however,

4h

Can ultrashort electron flashes help harvest nuclear energy?

The group led by Fabrizio Carbone at EPFL and international colleagues have used ultrafast transmission electron microscopy to take attosecond energy-momentum resolved snapshots (1 attosecond = 10-18 or quintillionths of a second) of a free-electron wave function. Though unprecedented in itself, the scientists also used their experimental success to develop a theory of how to create electron flash

4h

What Democrats Can Learn From Yogi Berra

As Democrats prepare to pitch themselves to midterm voters—in a potentially historic election that may determine whether Donald Trump can be checked and balanced—they appear poised to heed the wisdom of Yogi Berra: “When you come to a fork in the road, take it.” But that advice might actually work, because if the latest poll showing a 12-point Democratic lead in congressional battleground distric

4h

Brett Kavanaugh Is the Antidote to Corporate America's Worries About Trump

For all the uncertainty about Brett Kavanaugh’s views on abortion, the real key to his legal—and political—impact on the Supreme Court could eventually be his demonstrated resistance to the federal regulation of business. Kavanaugh’s repeated votes as an appellate-court judge to overturn federal regulatory actions point toward a Court even more adamantly tilted than it is today against environmen

4h

The Rise and Fall of the Family-Vacation Road Trip

The writer Richard Ratay was on the beach in Mexico several years ago, watching his kids play in the surf, when he started thinking about just how different vacations were for his kids than they had been for him when he was their age. Why? Chiefly because, unlike the vacations he’d taken as a kid growing up in Wisconsin, this vacation hadn’t required its participants to spend multiple days squeez

4h

‘Find Your Passion’ Is Awful Advice

Carol Dweck, a psychology professor at Stanford University, remembers asking an undergraduate seminar recently, “How many of you are waiting to find your passion?” “Almost all of them raised their hand and got dreamy looks in their eyes,” she told me. They talked about it “like a tidal wave would sweep over them,” he said. Sploosh. Huzzah! It’s accounting! Would they have unlimited motivation for

4h

Even More Evidence for the Link Between Alzheimer’s and Herpes

In 1907, the German psychiatrist Alois Alzheimer published a description of a 50-year-old woman who suffered from memory problems, hallucinations, and delusions. In the woman’s brain, Alzheimer noticed unusual lumps, or “plaques,” which “were caused by the deposition of an unusual substance.” Eight decades later, the mystery substance was finally identified as a protein called amyloid beta. Thoug

4h

Trump vs. NATO: It's Not Just About the Money

On Thursday, the president of the United States threw into crisis mode the military alliance America has led since the aftermath of World War II, reportedly threatening his fellow NATO leaders in an emergency meeting that if each country didn’t start spending at least 2 percent of its gross domestic product on defense by January, he would “do his own thing.” “What good is NATO,” Donald Trump had

4h

The Man Who Could Change British Politics

LONDON — The man is so connected that he can boast of ringing up Hugh Grant (a chum from Oxford), or lunching with London villains known for extracting obedience with pliers. A 57-year-old journalist, Geordie Greig is a slight fellow, his reddish coloring hinting at Scottish ancestry, eyebrows arching quizzically, thin lips with a propensity to hang apart, exposing bulldog lower teeth. He is also

4h

Copernicus Sentinel-5P releases first data

Following months of tests and careful evaluation, the first data on air pollutants from the Copernicus Sentinel-5P satellite have been released. These first maps show a range of trace gases that affect air quality such as carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide and ozone.

4h

Rhino sperm from the cold

A new mixture of cryoprotectives allows for an unprecedented high motility of frozen rhinoceros sperm after thawing, report scientists from the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) in Berlin, Germany. These new cryoprotectives can increase the prospects of utilising assisted reproduction techniques for many endangered wildlife species. The study, based on three rhinoceros

4h

Dodder genome sequencing sheds light on evolution of plant parasitism

Most plants absorb sunlight and CO2 with their leaves, take up water and minerals from the soil through roots, and are fully autotrophic. However, parasitic plants are a special class of plants that extract water and nutrients from other plants. The origin and evolution of plant parasitism as well as the specific physiology and ecology of parasitic plants are very interesting topics and much remai

4h

The first endemic Baltic Sea fish species received its name

The Baltic flounder Platichthys solemdali is the first fish species shown to be native only to the Baltic Sea, i.e., the first endemic fish described from the area and one of the only two known endemic species when considering any organism. The fact that a new vertebrate species is found and described from European waters, and especially from the species-poor Baltic Sea still after more than a cen

4h

New computational method for drug discovery

HITS researchers developed tauRAMD, a tool to predict drug-target residence times from short simulations. The method is illustrated on the cover page of July 2018 issue of the Journal of Chemical Theory and Computation, software is freely available.

4h

Olfactory cells found throughout the body may help or harm depending on location

A review of more than 200 studies reveals that olfactory receptors—proteins that bind to odors that aid the sense of smell—perform a wide range of mostly unknown functions outside the nose. The function of extra-nasal olfactory receptors has the potential to be used in the diagnosis and treatment of health conditions such as cancer. The article is published in the July issue of Physiological Revie

4h

Data correlation helps recognize pickpockets

In the fight against mobile banditry, the police, together with Eindhoven University of Technology, are going to do a trial with data correlation. By cleverly combining data from, for example, number plates, camera images and messages on social media, the deviating behavior of, for example, pickpockets can be detected more quickly. The cooperation between the two parties will start officially on W

4h

5 things to know about Tesla's China plans

Electric vehicle producer Tesla Inc. says it will build its first factory outside the United States in Shanghai.

4h

The ecosystem that controls a galaxy’s future is coming into focus

An invisible cloak called the circumgalactic medium controls a galaxy’s life and death.

4h

Inside the Test Chamber for NASA's Astronaut Vehicle Double

In Denver, engineers have built an architecturally identical twin for Orion, NASA’s next next launch vehicle—and they're putting it through its paces.

4h

BlackBerry Key2 Review: A Comfy Keyboard and Long Battery Life

This keyboard-packing smartphone is the best kind of throwback. Our full review.

4h

Diversity and Inclusion in Medical Schools: The Reality

More students are coming from marginalized groups, but when they arrive they’re often told to hide what makes them different — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

The highly complex sugarcane genome has finally been sequenced

Sugarcane was the last major cultivated plant to have its genome sequenced. This was because of its huge complexity: The genome comprises between 10 and 12 copies of each chromosome, while the human genome has just two. It was an international team coordinated by CIRAD that achieved this milestone, as reported in Nature Communications on July 6. It will now be possible to modernize the methods use

4h

Ny type strålekanon sætter håndværkerne på overarbejde

På Herlev Hospital fjerner man jernarmeringen i gulvet og bygger et kobberrum, der holder radiobølger ude. For en revolutionerende ny behandlingsform kræver særlige forhold.

5h

Scientists Pick Up the Genetic Scent of Stinkbug Invaders

New method that tests for insect DNA on farm produce could “revolutionize” agricultural pest surveillance — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

: Not Your Average Autograph Collection

From Victoria’s neat cursive to Rasputin’s illegible scrawl, a Morgan Library & Museum show celebrates the quirky traces left by the hands of notable historical figures.

5h

French carmaker PSA sales speed up on Opel takeover

French carmaker PSA on Thursday said its global car sales jumped in the first half by over 38 percent, driven by its takeover last year of Opel and Vauxhall.

5h

Africa's iconic baobab trees dying off at alarming rate

Africa's ancient baobab, with its distinctive swollen trunk and known as the "tree of life," is under a new and mysterious threat, with some of the largest and oldest dying abruptly in recent years.

5h

Win a Game Show, Pay Off Your Student Debt

Picture the scene: a stage and three podiums at which three contestants line up to face a studio audience. A charismatic host materializes from backstage and asks the guests to share the typical autobiographical facts: first name, college, outstanding student-loan burden. The crowd greets each precise figure (“$8,480 in debt … $12,583 in debt … $28,587 in debt”) with an ohhh pitched halfway betwe

5h

A Winning Message for Democrats on Immigration

Immigration policy will loom large in the 2018 elections. Democrats hope Americans will punish Republicans for the Trump administration’s decision to snatch little boys and girls away from their parents—to separate families in the hope that the primal pain of the ordeal discourages future migrants from crossing the border with children. Meanwhile, some on the Democratic Party’s left flank are dem

5h

Blog: Mælkevejens gas kan komme fra dværg- galakserne

Astrofysiker og ing.dk-blogger Sarah Pearson kommer i en ny forskningsartikel lidt nærmere en forklaring på, hvad der er sket i det tidlige univers.

6h

NASA Needs Backup Plan To Maintain U.S. Presence At Space Station, Watchdog Says

The Government Accountability Office released a report warning NASA that further delays in the space agency's commercial crew program could keep American astronauts from reaching the space station. (Image credit: Sciepro/Getty Images/Science Photo Library RF)

6h

A New Look At An Old Way To Store Energy

Solar power is growing fast, but there need to be ways to store that power for use at night. The biggest energy storage technology involves pumping water up a mountain.

6h

Can ultrashort electron flashes help harvest nuclear energy?

EPFL physicists have now demonstrated experimentally the ability to coherently manipulate the wave function of a free electron down to the attosecond timescale (10-18 of a second). The team also developed a theory for creating zeptosecond (10-21 of a second) electron pulses, which could also be used to increase the energy yield of nuclear reactions.

6h

Safety-net clinics adapt integrated systems' best practices to manage blood pressure

A new study led by UC San Francisco researchers, partnering with clinical leaders in the San Francisco Department of Public Health, shows that a simplified intervention can significantly improve rates of blood pressure control in the city's safety net clinics.

6h

Geological records reveal sea-level rise threatens UK salt marshes, study says

Sea-level rise will endanger valuable salt marshes across the United Kingdom by 2100 if greenhouse gas emissions continue unabated, according to an international study co-authored by a Rutgers University-New Brunswick professor. Moreover, salt marshes in southern and eastern England face a high risk of loss by 2040, according to the study, to be published in Nature Communications.

6h

Blood biomarker can help predict disease progression in patients with COPD

Some patients with COPD demonstrate signs of accelerated aging. In a new study published in the journal CHEST® researchers report that measuring blood telomeres, a marker of aging of cells, can be used to predict future risk of the disease worsening or death. Further, they have determined that the drug azithromycin may help patients with short telomeres, an indicator of more rapid biological aging

6h

Canada Has Its Own Ways of Keeping Out Unwanted Immigrants

If you want to understand why Canada’s immigration system works, and why its immigration rate has generated so little political backlash despite being so much higher than America’s, take a look at the surprising nuances of Canada’s immigration policy. That policy may be softer-hearted than America’s, but it’s also harder-headed. Surrounding the Canadian welcome mat is a bed of nails. Canada’s imm

6h

Geological records reveal sea-level rise threatens UK salt marshes, study says

Sea-level rise will endanger valuable salt marshes across the United Kingdom by 2100 if greenhouse gas emissions continue unabated, according to an international study co-authored by a Rutgers University-New Brunswick professor.

6h

3 danske opfindelser, der kan redde fremtidens megabyer

Affaldsrobotter, vandabsorberende fortov og beton der renser luften. Tre danske teknologier forsøger at løse nogle af megabyernes allerstørste problemer.

6h

Marinekorps må skrotte det første eksemplar af F-35B

Det amerikanske marinekorps har opgivet at reparere korpsets første F-35, som brød i brand under en flyvning. Ulykken skyldtes en kendt defekt, som udviklerne bag F-35 ifølge marinekorpset burde have kategoriseret som en alvorlig sikkerhedsrisiko.

7h

Ear implant lets deaf gerbils sense sound from light signals

A pioneering treatment has allowed deaf gerbils to perceive light as sound, raising hope for sophisticated optogenetic implants to relieve hearing loss

7h

We now know why horses snort – because they’re happy

It has long been thought that horses snort to improve their personal hygiene – but it might indicate positive emotions instead

7h

Is it too late to stop fake-news bots from taking over the world?

Lawmakers want to clamp down on automated social media accounts before they affect elections, but innocent and benign bots could get caught in the crossfire

7h

Elon Musk’s submarine plan to rescue Thai cave boys deserves respect

It's easy to mock Elon Musk's very public brand of techno-utopianism but the world needs engineering icons like him, says Mark Harris

7h

Facebook’s AI tourist learns to navigate New York by asking directions

Facebook is training its AI to learn to understand the world by asking questions in English – and can now navigate its way around New York

7h

Prolific ‘M25 serial killer’ beheading cats is an old feline foe

Time to end the scare over hundreds of headless pets that sparked a police inquiry and much anguish among cat owners, says Stephen Harris

7h

How our bodies are rapidly colonised by bacteria when we’re born

We’ve had the best look yet at the microbes that make themselves at home in our bodies in the months following birth, including many mystery species

7h

Record temperatures mean ancient forts become visible in fields

When the ground is baked by days of sun, markings that indicate the location of ancient settlements begin to emerge in the parched terrain

7h

Facebook faces £500,000 fine from Cambridge Analytica scandal

Facebook faces a £500,000 fine from the UK's data watchdog – the maximum possible under relevant data protection laws. Cambridge Analytica will also face criminal action

7h

Tornadoes on the sun could blast hot plasma towards Earth

Huge tornadoes erupting with magnetic energy on the sun may result in plasma shooting towards Earth, which can interfere with communications and electrical grids

7h

Einride's T-log Is a Self-Driving Truck Made for the Forest

The Swedish robo-truck ditches the engine for batteries, the human for software, and the container for a big pile of logs.

7h

Forskere finder første vaccine i 100 år mod tuberkulose

Ny vaccine mod tuberkulose, en af verdens mest dødelige sygdomme, vækker begejstring hos forskere bag.

7h

Herlev Hospital bygger et kobberrum i rummet

Hospitalet har indkøbt en helt ny type strålekanon med indbygget MR-scanner til strålebehandling af kræftpatienter. Maskinen gør det muligt at se med, mens man bestråler meget bevægelige kræftknuder, så man ikke rammer raskt væv. Det er dog en omstændelig sag at installere den, for man skal både fjerne ferromagnetisk materiale i rummet og holde radiobølger ude. Det betyder blandt andet, at man byg

8h

ZTE shares surge 22% as US sanctions lift moves step closer

Shares in Chinese telecoms equipment maker ZTE surged more than 20 percent in Hong Kong on Thursday after the company moved a step closer to having a painful US purchase ban lifted.

8h

Wimbledon 'Stat Pack' help explain the point

In subterranean bunkers at the All England Club, statisticians are churning out millions of data nuggets during the Wimbledon championships, gobbled up by tennis nerds, players—and, increasingly, everyday fans.

8h

Broadcom buys business software firm CA for $18.9 bn

Semi-conductor giant Broadcom, which recently failed in a bid to buy US rival Qualcomm, on Wednesday announced a cash deal to buy software and services firm CA Technologies for $18.9 billion.

8h

How a Macedonian town became a 'fake news' epicentre

Jovan got a pair of Nike sneakers and went on holiday to Greece, his reward for having helped turn the small Macedonian town of Veles into an epicentre of "fake news" during the 2016 US presidential race.

8h

Trash piles up in US as China closes door to recycling

For months, a major recycling facility for the greater Baltimore-Washington area has been facing a big problem: it has to pay to get rid of huge amounts of paper and plastic it would normally sell to China.

8h

German court to rule on parents' access to dead daughter's Facebook

German judges will rule Thursday on Facebook users' "digital legacy", or the fate of their private data after they die, in a case pitting the Silicon Valley giant against the grieving parents of a teenage girl.

9h

The online battle for the truth

False information is saturating political debate worldwide and undermining an already weak level of trust in the media and institutions, spreading further than ever on powerful social networks.

9h

Comcast, Fox both raise bids as they reach for Sky

The battle for European pay TV service Sky escalated Wednesday as U.S. rivals Comcast and 21st Century Fox took turns upping the ante in their quest to expand their media empires.

9h

California meets greenhouse gas reduction goal years early

California greenhouse gas emissions fell below 1990 levels, meeting an early target years ahead of schedule and putting the state well on its way toward reaching long-term goals to fight climate change, officials said Wednesday.

9h

Before Trump, the long history of fake news

In capital letters and with an exclamation mark, "FAKE NEWS!" may have been popularised by Donald Trump in hundreds of his tweets but the concept has existed for centuries.

9h

Quake damage reveals older structure inside Mexico pyramid

Archaeologists say damage to a pre-Hispanic pyramid in central Mexico from the Sept. 19 earthquake has revealed an older structure that was covered by later building.

9h

Mapping climate corridors

The corridors of land vital for many wildlife species in the face of climate change often are unprotected. Now, a recently published study from a University of Montana ecology professor and other researchers has tracked these shifting North American habitats.

9h

The more you smoke, the greater your risk of a heart rhythm disorder

The more you smoke, the greater your risk of a heart rhythm disorder called atrial fibrillation. That's the finding of a study published today in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, a European Society of Cardiology journal.

9h

Study finds room for improvement in South Korea's polluted river basin

A new Portland State University study shows that even though water quality has improved in South Korea's Han River basin since the 1990s, there are still higher-than-acceptable levels of pollutants in some of the more urbanized regions in and around the capital Seoul.

9h

The real reason the sound of your own voice makes you cringe

Does the sound of your own voice make you want to cover your ears? You are not alone Most of us have shuddered on hearing the sound of our own voice. In fact, not liking the sound of your own voice is so common that there’s a term for it: voice confrontation. But why is voice confrontation so frequent, while barely a thought is given to the voices of others? Continue reading…

9h

It’s time to burst the biomedical bubble in UK research

A new study calls for a rebalancing of research and innovation funding to better meet the UK’s economic, social and health needs The political turmoil over recent days has meant that a speech last week by Sam Gyimah , minister for universities and science, hasn’t received the attention it deserves. Opening the Schrödinger Building in Oxford, Gyimah set out in the most comprehensive terms yet why

9h

Using roads to make power and toilet paper

Can we use roads to generate power, make toilet paper and help increase the bee population?

10h

Nyt landspatientregister udskudt i fire måneder – presset af Sundhedsplatformen

De danske regioner arbejder på højtryk for at blive klar til at bruge den nye version af landspatientregisteret. Nu bliver projektet forsinket i fire måneder, viser internt dokument.

11h

Country diary: soft sounds of sparrow seduction

Sandy, Bedfordshire: The house sparrows are busy caring for their young, but can still find time to mate dozens of times a day Lolling in the shade under a hazel bush, I had become the inadvertent eavesdropper on a private conversation. Out of the canopy came a whispered “brrr” whirr of wings and then the soft sounds of sparrow seduction, a love song of tenderness that was scarcely imaginable fro

11h

VIDEO Se hvilke lande, der bliver de folkerigeste i 2050

En række lande fordobler deres indbyggertal frem mod 2050, og det får store konsekvenser for sundheden og måden, vi bor på.

11h

Study finds room for improvement in South Korea's polluted river basin

A new Portland State University study shows that even though water quality has improved in South Korea's Han River basin since the 1990s, there are still higher-than-acceptable levels of pollutants in some of the more urbanized regions in and around the capital Seoul.

11h

About half of parents use cell phones while driving with young children in the car

A new study from a team of researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing found that in the previous three months, about half of parents talked on a cell phone while driving when their children between the ages of 4 and 10 were in the car, while one in three read text messages and one in seven used social media.

11h

Immunotherapy doubles survival rates for patients with melanoma brain metastases

A new study evaluates data from more than 1,500 cancer programs across the country to determine the effectiveness of checkpoint blockade immunotherapies, finding that these therapies provided significant improvements in overall survival for patients with melanoma brain metastases.

11h

The psychological ‘secret weapon’ behind England in the 2018 World Cup

In the 2018 World Cup, England's team was aided by an unconventional team member: a psychologist who equipped players with tools to navigate the mental and emotional sides of the game. Read More

11h

Fuzzy yellow bats reveal evolutionary relationships in Kenya

DNA analysis of fuzzy yellow bats in Kenya revealed at least two new species unknown to science. It's important because Africa's biodiversity is often under-studied and poorly understood, even though bats play a crucial role in agriculture and public health.

12h

Kombineret MR-scanner og strålekanon bliver paradigmeskift for kræftbehandlingen

Om få måneder kan tre danske hospitaler kigge live med under strålebehandling. Det betyder mere effektive stråledoser fordelt på færre behandlinger.

12h

Fuzzy yellow bats reveal evolutionary relationships in Kenya

After Halloween, people tend to forget about bats. But, for farmers, residents of Kenya, and scientists, bats are a part of everyday life. While North America has 44 species, Kenya, a country the size of Texas, has 110 bat species. Many of these species also contain subspecies and further divisions that can make the bat family tree look like a tangled mess. Researchers set out to cut the clutter b

12h

High intensity exercise in teenagers could ward off heart disease

Research published in Experimental Physiology has indicated potential differences in heart health benefits of exercise intensity in teenagers. Teenage years are an important stage of life, with research suggesting it is a time during which heart diseases start to develop. This indicates that teenagers who participate in high intensity exercise have lower blood pressure. This may lead to a lower ri

14h

FCC Retracts a Plan to Discourage Consumer Complaints

A proposal that critics said would have forced consumers to file formal complaints, at a cost of $255, appears to have been dropped from Thursday's agenda.

15h

Banned in other cities, these Bird electric scooters have arrived in Kansas City

About a hundred Birds flocked to Kansas City. But these Birds don't fly. They scoot.

15h

Hominins Left Africa for Asia Much Earlier Than Thought

The dating of stone tools in China puts members of the Homo genus there more than 2 million years ago.

15h

Stone tools found in China could be oldest evidence of human life outside Africa

Discovery of simple stone tools suggests human ancestors were in Asia as early as 2.1m years ago The remains of crudely fashioned stone tools unearthed in China suggest human ancestors were in Asia 2.1m years ago, more than 200,000 years earlier than previously thought, scientists said on Wednesday. If correctly dated, the find means that hominins – the group of humans and our extinct forefather

15h

The Untested Drugs at the Heart of Nevada's Execution Controversy

A sedative, an opioid, and a paralytic sit at the core of legal and ethical debates over the state-sanctioned killing of death row prisoner Scott Dozier.

15h

Killing rats could save coral reefs

Threatened reefs can be protected by eradicating destructive rats on tropical islands, scientists say.

15h

Survey: Half of young people want electric cars

Young drivers increasingly want to buy electric cars – but myths are still deterring older drivers, survey shows.

15h

How evolution guides animals to pick the right mates

New research maps an unexpected path by which evolution arranged for animals to choose the right partners. Working with fruit flies, the scientists probed how males manage to pick out members of their own species from the multitude of flies crowding around an overripe fruit. The research, which appears in the journal Nature , upends long-held beliefs about how evolution works to ensure animals pe

16h

Live on ESPN: Will the Overwatch League Usher in Esports’ Crossover Moment?

Thanks to a new agreement, ESPN will be broadcasting esports live in primetime for the first time.

16h

People trust scientific experts more than the government even when the evidence is outlandish

Members of the public in the UK and US have far greater trust in scientific experts than the government, according to a new study by Queen Mary University of London.

16h

Healthy diet reduces asthma symptoms

People who eat a healthy diet experience fewer asthma symptoms and better control of their condition, according to a new study published in the European Respiratory Journal. Diets with better asthma outcomes are characterized by being healthier, with greater consumption of fruits, vegetables and whole grain cereals. Unhealthy diets, with high consumption of meat, salt and sugar, have the poorest o

16h

People trust scientific experts more than the government even when the evidence is outlandish

Members of the public in the UK and US have far greater trust in scientific experts than the government, according to a new study by Queen Mary University of London.

16h

7,000 strokes prevented as GPs improve diagnosis and treatment of atrial fibrillation

Around 7,000 strokes each year are being prevented thanks to GPs more than doubling the number of patients at high risk being prescribed with blood thinning drugs, University of Birmingham researchers have found.

16h

Marriage equality improved gay men’s health access

Making marriage available to same-sex couples has improved access to health care among gay men, a working paper shows. It is one of the first studies to examine the effect legal marriage has on the health of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender individuals. “This is an important question to study, since recent research has shown that LGBT individuals often face barriers to accessing health ser

16h

A.I. predicts side effects for millions of drug combos

Researchers have created an artificial intelligence system for predicting, not simply tracking, potential side effects from drug combinations. Last month alone, 23 percent of Americans took two or more prescription drugs, according to one CDC estimate. Furthermore, 39 percent over age 65 take five or more, a number that’s increased three-fold in the last several decades. And if that isn’t surpris

16h

NASA surveys hurricane damage to Puerto Rico's forests

On Sept. 20, 2017, Hurricane Maria barreled across Puerto Rico with winds of up to 155 miles per hour and battering rain that flooded towns, knocked out communications networks and destroyed the power grid. In the rugged central mountains and the lush northeast, Maria unleashed its fury as fierce winds completely defoliated the tropical forests and broke and uprooted trees. Heavy rainfall triggere

16h

Do we really buy 'top-rated' deals online? New research may surprise you

Anyone who shops online is familiar with those 'top-rated' products or services that rise to the top of their search on e-commerce intermediary sites like Amazon or Expedia. So, do those rankings really help those products or services get sold? According to a new study, the answer is, 'yes' and 'no.'

16h

Things aren’t looking good for the Amazon rainforest

The Amazon is likely to face continued warming in addition to possible multiyear droughts, according to a new study. The research suggests that primary ecosystem services—biodiversity, water cycling, carbon capture, and others—are at greater risk than anticipated. Adaptive management strategies may be required to safeguard these key benefits of the rainforest. Prior research has shown that backgr

16h

The Greatest World Cup Fairy Tale of All Time

England is the birthplace of both soccer and dramatic irony. For several decades, the two native traditions merged. As if scripted by Charles Dickens or Henry Fielding, the fate awaiting English soccer was visible to everyone—except the nation itself. Deluded by its triumph in the 1966 World Cup, the country set itself expectations that it could never possibly fulfill—and it didn’t. Inevitable de

16h

Supportive coworkers are key to pumping at work

The more support women receive from their colleagues, the more successful they are in believing they can continue breastfeeding, report researchers. While support from family or friends is important, surprisingly, coworker support has a stronger effect. The study, published in the journal Health Communication , is the first to focus specifically on the effect female coworkers have on colleagues w

16h

Big data beats animal testing for finding toxic chemicals

Scientists may be able to better predict the toxicity of new chemicals through data analysis than with standard tests on animals, according to a new study. The researchers say they developed a large database of known chemicals and then used it to map the toxic properties of different chemical structures. They then showed they could predict the toxic properties of a new chemical compound with stru

16h

Extreme heat and reduced cognitive performance in adults in non-air-conditioned buildings

Students in dormitories without air conditioning performed worse on cognitive tests during a heat wave compared with students living in air-conditioned dorms. This is the first field study to show the detrimental cognitive effects of a heat wave in a group of young healthy individuals.

17h

Study analyzes opioid overdose risk during and after pregnancy among Massachusetts women

A new study found that opioid overdose events decreased during pregnancy, reaching their lowest level during the third trimester, but then increased during the postpartum period, becoming significantly higher during the second six months after delivery.

17h

New compounds to treat RSV, Zika virus

A new and promising class of chemical compounds has major potential for treating Zika virus and respiratory syncytial virus, or RSV, according to a new study.

17h

New research could banish guilty feeling for consuming whole dairy products

Enjoying full-fat milk, yogurt, cheese and butter is unlikely to send people to an early grave, according to new research.

17h

Scientists discover Earth's youngest banded iron formation in western China

The discovery of Earth's youngest-ever banded iron formation is changing how scientists understand the evolution of complex life.

17h

Mapping climate corridors

The corridors of land vital for many wildlife species in the face of climate change often are unprotected. Now, a recent study has tracked these shifting North American habitats.

17h

The Lancet Psychiatry: Automated virtual reality-based psychological therapy may help reduce fear of heights

Peer-reviewed / Randomised Controlled Trial / PeoplePsychological therapy delivered by a virtual reality coach can help people with a clinically diagnosed fear of heights overcome their fear, according to a randomised controlled trial of 100 people published in The Lancet Psychiatry journal.

17h

Study finds no increased risk of womb or breast cancer after fertility treatment

Researchers report no increased risk of womb cancer or invasive breast cancer after assisted reproduction in a study of over 250,000 British women published by The BMJ today.

17h

New guidelines label millions more people as having high blood pressure

Adopting new guidelines for high blood pressure (hypertension) would dramatically increase the number of people labeled as having the condition and being recommended for drug treatment, finds a study published by The BMJ today.

17h

Jet stream discovery may lead to better weather predictions

New research reveals a physical link between the speed and location of the jet stream and the strength of the polar vortex, a swirl of air that usually hovers over the Arctic. If you can predict the path of the jet stream, the upper atmosphere’s undulating river of wind, then you can predict weather—not just for a week or two, but for an entire season. The new study moves toward that level of for

17h

Automated virtual reality therapy helps people overcome phobia of heights

Scientists hope computer programme which requires no human therapist could be used to treat other mental health problems Daniel and Jason Freeman: Don’t dismiss tech solutions to mental health problems A fear of heights could be overcome with the help of a virtual therapist, new research suggests, with experts saying the findings boost hopes virtual reality could play a key role in tackling other

17h

Don't dismiss tech solutions to mental health problems

There is a desperate shortage of skilled clinicians to treat mental health disorders. Our study shows how virtual reality could fill the gap The words “mental health” and “crisis” now appear to be yoked together. About a quarter of us will suffer from a clinical psychological disorder over the next year , but most people will receive no help at all . The question is no longer about whether we hav

17h

The world has never seen a Category 6 hurricane, but the day may be coming

As a ferocious hurricane bears down on South Florida, water managers desperately lower canals in anticipation of 4 feet of rain.

17h

The Atlantic Daily: A Continual Bubble of Incident

What We’re Following NATO Summit: President Donald Trump, who has long argued that America’s fellow members in NATO don’t pull their weight, called for member countries to increase their defense spending to 4 percent of their GDP— but that’s not what NATO needs, Peter Beinart argues. While Trump’s meeting with NATO comes at a precarious time in U.S.–European relations, the alliance may have been

17h

The Engineering Behind Elon Musk's Bid to Save Thailand's Cave Boys

The SpaceX and Tesla CEO's work to help the rescue operation captivated the internet and reinforced the most flattering image of Musk, as a brilliant engineer with a nose for unexpected solutions to pressing problems.

17h

Living in greener neighborhoods is associated with slower cognitive decline in elderly

Contact with greenspace is known to have beneficial effects for mental health. A new study by the Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal) suggests that it may also play a positive role against cognitive decline in elderly. In particular, this research published in Environmental Health Perspectives shows that the loss in cognitive functions expected as part of the aging process is slightly

17h

17h

Pesticides are making bees dumber

Animals Even if they survive, they might not thrive. Levels of pesticides currently considered safe to use may still have a big effect on bee colony survival.

17h

Senators Fear Meltdown and Spectre Disclosure Gave China an Edge

By not informing the US government of two industry-wide hardware flaws, Intel may have inadvertently given ammo to China's hackers.

17h

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Torn NATO

-Written by Elaine Godfrey ( @elainejgodfrey ) Today in 5 Lines President Trump joined 28 other leaders in signing the NATO declaration, reflecting months of negotiation. Earlier in the day, Trump accused Germany of being a “captive to Russia” because of an energy agreement with the country and urged allies to increase their military spending. When asked about Trump’s criticism of NATO, House Spe

18h

Aston Martin used 3D scanning and modern manufacturing to recreate its DB4 GT race car

Cars The British automaker worked out some of the kinks when it reissued its classic coupe. In the early 1960s, Aston Martin built just 75 of its dapper DB4GT racecars. In recreating it, the British automaker worked out some of the kinks of its classic coupe.

18h

Google's human-like speaking AI will soon start booking restaurant, hair salon reservations

After generating buzz and controversy with its unveiling, Google's human-like speaking assistant Duplex will be released to select users and businesses this summer, the company announced recently.

18h

NEJM publishes final results from phase two study showing vaccines can reduce rate of sustained TB infections

Aeras, a nonprofit organization dedicated to developing vaccines against tuberculosis (TB), today announced the publication of the full results from a Phase 2, randomized, controlled clinical trial of two TB vaccines– the currently available BCG vaccine and an investigational vaccine, H4:IC31–in the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM).

18h

Study analyzes opioid overdose risk during and after pregnancy among Massachusetts women

A study from a research team consisting of investigators from the Mass. Department of Public Health and several academic medical centers, led by a MassGeneral Hospital for Children physician, found that opioid overdose events decreased during pregnancy, reaching their lowest level during the third trimester, but then increased during the postpartum period, becoming significantly higher during the

18h

A Woman Had Strange Feelings in Her Legs. Doctors Found Parasites in Her Spine

When the 35-year-old woman arrived at a hospital in France, she told doctors it felt like electric shocks were running down her legs.

18h

18h

We estimate China only makes $8.46 from an iPhone – and that’s why Trump’s trade war is futile

A close look at the fabrication costs and value of an iPhone reveals that China gets a lot of (low-paid) jobs, while the profits flow to other countries. This puts the China vs. Trump trade war in perspective. Read More

19h

At 3 years old, she knew she wanted to go to Mars. Now 17, she’s training with NASA.

When asked if she'll be ready for the 2033 mission, she replied, "Definitely." Read More

19h

America 2018: Drunk all day

Infographics chart the growing acceptance of drinking during the day, compiled and created by Family Center for Recovery. Read More

19h

University of Montana ecology professor helps map climate corridors

The corridors of land vital for many wildlife species in the face of climate change often are unprotected. Now, a recently published study from a University of Montana ecology professor and other researchers has tracked these shifting North American habitats.

19h

$16 per month streaming service Philo expands to Amazon Fire and Apple TV

One of the newest broadband TV services, Philo, is expanding its reach.

19h

Ancient Humans Lived in China 2.1 Million Years Ago

For hundreds of thousands of years, small bands of ancient humans ranged across a sandy, hilly grassland. They survived on the mammals around them—perhaps hunting them, perhaps scavenging for their carcasses—and their tools were rudimentary, razor-sharp blades formed from chipped stone. They lived in fear of the big cats and large predators that stalked their children. And they were isolated. The

19h

Researchers identify new compounds to treat RSV, Zika virus

A new and promising class of chemical compounds has major potential for treating Zika virus and respiratory syncytial virus, or RSV, according to a new study by University of Alberta scientists. The next step is to develop a drug.

19h

The secret life of lobster (trade): Could we be in hot water?

In a paper published in Frontiers in Marine Science, researchers, including lead author Joshua Stoll of the University of Maine School of Marine Sciences and the Mitchell Center for Sustainability Solutions, map the global trade routes for lobster and quantify the effect they have on obscuring the relation between those who catch the valuable crustacean and those who ultimately eat it.

19h

Could gravitational waves reveal how fast our universe is expanding?

Since it first exploded into existence 13.8 billion years ago, the universe has been expanding, dragging along with it hundreds of billions of galaxies and stars, much like raisins in a rapidly rising dough.

19h

Scientists discover Earth's youngest banded iron formation in western China

The discovery of Earth's youngest-ever banded iron formation is changing how scientists understand the evolution of complex life, according to a study by University of Alberta geologists.

19h

Soccer headers may be linked to balance problems

Soccer players who head the ball more often may be more likely to have balance problems than players who do not head the ball as often, according to a preliminary study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's Sports Concussion Conference in Indianapolis July 20-22, 2018.

19h

Higher blood pressure may be linked to brain disease, Alzheimer's

Older people who have higher blood pressure may have more signs of brain disease, specifically brain lesions, according to a study published in the July 11, 2018, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. Researchers also found a link between higher blood pressure and more markers of Alzheimer's disease, tangles in the brain.

19h

Friday the 13th Eclipse Visible to Lucky Few

A solar eclipse is scheduled for Friday the 13th, but most skywatchers will be unlucky without doing a bit of traveling.

19h

ACP says genetic testing to reunite separated families should meet ethical principles

In a new policy issued today, the American College of Physicians (ACP) stated that immigrant families who have been separated at the border should be reunited as expeditiously as possible. If genetic testing is considered appropriate, it should be done in the least intrusive manner, with safeguards and attention to medical ethics.

19h

Scientists discover Earth's youngest banded iron formation in western China

The discovery of Earth's youngest-ever banded iron formation is changing how scientists understand the evolution of complex life, according to a study by University of Alberta geologists.

19h

New research could banish guilty feeling for consuming whole dairy products

Enjoying full-fat milk, yogurt, cheese and butter is unlikely to send people to an early grave, according to new research by The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth).

19h

Researchers identify new compounds to treat RSV, Zika virus

A new and promising class of chemical compounds has major potential for treating Zika virus and respiratory syncytial virus, or RSV, according to a new study by University of Alberta scientists. The next step is to develop a drug.

19h

The secret life of lobster (trade): Could we be in hot water?

In today's hyper-connected world, a growing number of nations are acting as 'middlemen' in the seafood supply chain. This makes it increasingly difficult to trace where seafood goes and difficult to anticipate changes in market demand.

19h

Tools from China are Oldest Hint of Human Lineage Outside Africa

2.1-million-year-old stone tools suggest hominins reached East Asia much earlier than thought — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

19h

Deep in the fly brain, a clue to how evolution changes minds

A new study sheds light on the mystery of how evolution tweaks the brain to shape behavior. It started with a close look at two Drosophila species and their mating maneuvers.

19h

Why are neuron axons long and spindly? Study shows they're optimizing signaling efficiency

A team of bioengineers has answered a question that has long puzzled neuroscientists, and may hold a key to better understanding the complexities of neurological disorders: Why are neuron axons designed the way they are? The answer — that they're designed to balance the speed that information flows into the neuron relative to the time it takes the neuron to process that information — seems intui

19h

15-minutes of exercise creates optimal brain state for mastering new motor skills

A recent study demonstrates that exercise performed immediately after practicing a new motor skill improves its long-term retention. More specifically, the research shows, for the first time, that as little as a single fifteen-minute bout of cardiovascular exercise increases brain connectivity and efficiency. It's a discovery that could, in principle, accelerate recovery of motor skills in patient

19h

Simpler interferometer can fine tune even the quickest pulses of light

A super compact interferometer will give scientists an unprecedented ability to fine tune even the quickest pulses of light for a host of applications, and could render traditional instruments for measuring light beams obsolete.

19h

Burnt out: heatwaves can lead to poor decisions and thinking, studies say

A new study by Harvard researchers found students without air conditioning showed 13% longer reaction times on tests If you feel like having to work during a heatwave should be banned, you may have a point. A new study conducted by the Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health suggests that hot weather can make your thinking 13% slower. The study, published on Tuesday in the journal PLOS Medicine,

19h

Young women get earlier cancer diagnoses under Obamacare

Young women with gynecologic cancers are getting earlier diagnoses under the Affordable Care Act, the federal health care reform law, according to a new study. Researchers looked at nationwide trends in gynecologic cancer diagnosis in women—particularly those under 26, who were guaranteed coverage under their parents’ health plans after the law’s implementation in 2010. “We were pleased to see th

20h

Dogs spread across the Americas alongside humans. Then they got eaten.

Animals Little genetic legacy remains from these pups. When people traversed across the land bridge connecting Siberia to North America, dogs trotted by their sides. Canines and their human companions spread throughout the…

20h

Study: Airbnb benefits white neighborhoods; not so for black and Hispanic areas

Tourism activity in areas with a rise in Airbnb rentals could spill over into complementary industries, such as the restaurant business, unless those neighborhoods are predominantly black or Hispanic, a new study suggests.

20h

Researchers clarify role of mutations in glioblastoma

Researchers investigated whether the location of the mutation within the sequence of the PIK3CA gene affected the mutation's ability to help drive growth of glioblastoma tumors. They also evaluated whether the location of the mutation would affect the cancer's response to certain treatments.

20h

New informatics tool makes the most of genomic data

The rise of genomics, the shift from considering genes singly to collectively, is adding a new dimension to medical care; biomedical researchers hope to use the information contained in human genomes to make better predictions about individual health, including responses to therapeutic drugs. A new computational tool developed through a collaboration between the University of Illinois and the Mayo

20h

Airbnb benefits white neighborhoods; not so for black and Hispanic areas

Tourism activity in areas with a rise in Airbnb rentals could spill over into complementary industries, such as the restaurant business, unless those neighborhoods are predominantly black or Hispanic, a new study suggests.

20h

He Sues to Discredit Climate Scientists. Now He’s Being Sued by His Allies.

David Schnare’s conservative legal group seeks to expose science fraud. But it appears to be imploding amid allegations of financial mismanagement, attempted extortion and faked documents.

20h

Google’s Parent Births New Businesses: Balloons and Drones

The lab at Alphabet, Google’s parent company, has graduated two projects — one to build delivery drones and another making internet-beaming balloons — into independent businesses.

20h

Eyewire Cup Final

It’s the event we’ve all been waiting for! The Final match of the Eyewire Cup. Two epic teams have made it this far, but only one can reign as Eyewire Cup champion! Egypt vs Antarctica: Egypt faces Antarctica for the title of Eyewire Cup Champion! The competition lasts 24 hours – Thursday, July 12 at noon ET – Friday, July 13 at noon If your team lost in the Semifinals or you didn’t play the Semi

20h

Simpler interferometer can fine tune even the quickest pulses of light

If you want to get the greatest benefit from a beam of light—whether to detect a distant planet or remedy an aberration in the human eye—you need to be able to measure its beam front information.

20h

Do iPhones and Androids eavesdrop on us? Lawmakers want to know

Lawmakers are asking Apple CEO Tim Cook and Alphabet CEO Larry Page how our smartphones may be tracking us without our knowledge.

20h

DNA marks in adults tracked back to changes in earliest days of life

Scientists have gained a glimpse of how marks on our genes that could be linked to adverse health outcomes in later life behave differently in the first few days after conception, according to new research.

20h

3-D structure of 1918 influenza virus-like particles created

Virus-like particles (VLPs) are protein-based structures that mimic viruses and bind to antibodies. Because VLPs aren't infectious, they show promise as vaccine platforms for many viral diseases, including influenza. Since details about influenza VLPs are scant, a team of researchers developed a 3-D model based on the 1918 H1 pandemic influenza virus.

20h

The Hunt for Earth’s Deep Hidden Oceans

A couple hundred pebble-size diamonds, plucked from Brazilian mud, sit inside a safe at Northwestern University. To some, they might be worthless. “They’re battered,” said Steve Jacobsen , a mineralogist at Northwestern. “They look like they’ve been through a washing machine.” Many are dark or yellow, far from the pristine gems of jewelers’ dreams. Yet, for researchers like Jacobsen, these fragme

20h

Simpler interferometer can fine tune even the quickest pulses of light

A super compact interferometer developed by the lab of Chunlei Guo, professor of optics at the University of Rochester, will give scientists an unprecedented ability to fine tune even the quickest pulses of light for a host of applications, and could render traditional instruments for measuring light beams obsolete.

20h

Fifteen minutes of exercise creates optimal brain state for mastering new motor skills

A recent study in NeuroImage demonstrates that exercise performed immediately after practicing a new motor skill improves its long-term retention. More specifically, the research shows, for the first time, that as little as a single fifteen-minute bout of cardiovascular exercise increases brain connectivity and efficiency. It's a discovery that could, in principle, accelerate recovery of motor ski

20h

Here's why it's important to support your breastfeeding co-workers

Support from female co-workers may be even more important to new moms who are breastfeeding than getting encouragement from their significant others, close friends and relatives, says a new study.

20h

Shark Week Meets Great Clips

Great Clips and Shark Week are teaming up with Oceana to support hammerhead shark conservation. During the month of July for each download of the Great Clips app, Great Clips will pledge $1 to Oceana. ** July 1, 2018- July 31, 2018, maximum $10,000 ** For more information, go to https://www.greatclips.com/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.f

20h

Report: NASA needs backup plan as US crew launches slip (Update)

NASA needs a backup plan for getting astronauts to space, given additional delays on the horizon for new commercial crew capsules, the U.S. Government Accountability Office recommended Wednesday.

20h

Hurricane Chris's eye stares at NASA's Aqua satellite

When NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the U.S. Eastern seaboard, it captured an infrared image of Hurricane Chris that showed an eye staring back at the satellite. Chris is expected to continue generating heavy ocean swells along the U.S. East Coast and bring heavy rainfall to Newfoundland, Canada.

20h

Deep in the fly brain, a clue to how evolution changes minds

For lovers throughout the animal kingdom, finding a suitable mate requires the right chemistry. Now, scientists at The Rockefeller University have been able to map an unexpected path in which evolution arranged for animals to choose the correct partner.

20h

NASA sees Typhoon Maria make landfall in China

The Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite analyzed Typhoon Maria in 3-D as it made landfall in southeastern China.

20h

NASA's GPM finds Beryl's remnants raining on the Bahamas

The remnant thunderstorms from former Tropical Storm Beryl were bringing some areas of heavy rain to the Bahamas when the GPM satellite passed overhead.

20h

Colors Bloom Across the Great Plain of Castelluccio, Italy

In central Italy’s Umbria region, the small village of Castelluccio sits atop a hill overlooking a broad, flat basin surrounded by the Sibillini Mountains. In October 2016, a significant earthquake struck the area, badly damaging the village and roads—but farming still takes place in the Piano Grande below, where fields of lentils and poppies bloom every year, carpeting the landscape with a color

20h

How Did the Massive 'Salty' Crocodile Captured in Australia Get So Freaking Big?

Australian parks and wildlife rangers captured a 15-foot 5-inch-long, 1,300-lb. crocodile Monday (July 9). Experts told us how the animal got so big.

20h

How physics makes your brain light up

fMRIs reveal that physics causes activity in some surprising areas of the brain. Read More

20h

The master and slave moralities: what Nietzsche really meant

Nietzsche had some harsh things to say about the worldview of the masses, but what did he really think? Read More

20h

These glasses eliminate motion sickness, are guaranteed to get you a whole row to yourself

The only downside is they make you look like "Harry Potter in Space". Read More

20h

New study suggests nearby exoplanet Ross 128 b could support life

A new study published in the Astrophysical Journal Letters provides even more reason to think Ross 128 b, the second closest exoplanet to Earth, could harbor life. Read More

20h

UK Politicians Propose New Research Integrity Watchdog

A report recommends the creation of a national committee to oversee universities' handling of misconduct investigations.

20h

NASA sees Typhoon Maria make landfall in China

The Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite analyzed Typhoon Maria in 3D as it made landfall in southeastern China.After striking the Ryukyu Islands of Japan and grazing Taiwan with torrential rains, Typhoon Maria made landfall just north of the populous city of Fuzhou, China with sustained winds of 95 knots and a broad shield of precipitation.

20h

Why are neuron axons long and spindly? Study shows they're optimizing signaling efficiency

A team of bioengineers at UC San Diego has answered a question that has long puzzled neuroscientists, and may hold a key to better understanding the complexities of neurological disorders: why are neuron axons designed the way they are? The answer — that they're designed to balance the speed that information flows into the neuron relative to the time it takes the neuron to process that informatio

20h

Hurricane Chris's eye stares at NASA's Aqua satellite

When NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the US Eastern seaboard, it captured an infrared image of Hurricane Chris that showed an eye staring back at the satellite. Chris is expected to continue generating heavy ocean swells along the US East Coast and bring heavy rainfall to Newfoundland, Canada.

20h

NASA's GPM finds Beryl's remnants raining on the Bahamas

The remnant thunderstorms from former Tropical Storm Beryl were bringing some areas of heavy rain to the Bahamas when the GPM satellite passed overhead.

20h

Deep in the fly brain, a clue to how evolution changes minds

A new study sheds light on the mystery of how evolution tweaks the brain to shape behavior. It started with a close look at two Drosophila species and their mating maneuvers.

20h

Colorful Circuit Cities Built From Motherboards, Processors, and Microchips

Photographer Heiko Hellwig envisions a world made of silicon.

21h

The weirdest things we learned this week: Cruise ships full of poop, deadly wallpaper, and the sport where women beat men

Science Our editors scrounged up some truly bizarre facts. What’s the weirdest thing you learned this week? Well, whatever it is, we promise you’ll have an even weirder answer if you listen to PopSci’s newest podcast.

21h

Salamanders show more resistance to global warming than previously believed

The southern Appalachian Mountains are home to 10 percent of global salamander diversity. But current predictions indicate that 70 to 85 percent of this habitat will become unsuitable for salamanders by 2080 due to rising temperatures caused by climate change. Scientists shows that this extinction risk might be overestimated, because previous research largely ignored the salamanders' abilities to

21h

Engineered cancer cells can fight primary and metastatic cancer

A new study leverages the power of gene editing, capitalizing on cancer cells' self-homing ability to take a critical step toward using cancer cells to kill cancer.

21h

Intimate partner violence doesn't end with the relationship

Violence that occurs between intimate partners does not end with the relationship's conclusion, yet few resources exist to help survivors move beyond the betrayal of abusive relationships in order to begin new, healthy relationships. The effects of intimate partner violence (IPV) are profound, painfully enduring and should command as much attention as providing victims with the help necessary to l

21h

Rhino sperm from the cold

A new mixture of cryoprotectives allows for an unprecedented high motility of frozen rhinoceros sperm after thawing, report scientists. These new cryoprotectives can increase the prospects of utilizing assisted reproduction techniques for many endangered wildlife species.

21h

Rise of the clones

Researchers discover new clues about a recently identified blood cell condition known as clonal hematopoiesis, implicated in hematologic cancers, cardiovascular illness. Surprisingly, the study reveals that inherited genetic variants can drive the condition by fueling additional mutations later in life. The findings can help inform ways to gauge disease risk based on specific mutations, develop st

21h

Kidney podocytes, all grown up

Unlike other human stem cells, Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS cells) can be produced directly from adult cells. Now, researchers have shown that human kidney podocytes produced from iPS cells via a highly efficient, previously described protocol exhibit transcriptomic and protein expression profiles that match those of mature podocytes — a feat that no other method has so far been able to ac

21h

T cell engineering breakthrough sidesteps need for viruses in gene-editing

In an achievement that has significant implications for research, medicine, and industry, scientists have genetically reprogrammed the human immune cells known as T cells without using viruses to insert DNA. The researchers said they expect their technique — a rapid, versatile, and economical approach employing CRISPR gene-editing technology — to be widely adopted in the burgeoning field of cell

21h

Fern's sequenced genome holds environmental promise

A tiny fern — with each leaf the size of a gnat — may provide global impact for sinking atmospheric carbon dioxide, fixing nitrogen in agriculture and shooing pesky insects from crops. The fern's full genome has now been sequenced.

21h

The perfect terahertz beam — thanks to the 3-D printer

Terahertz radiation can be used for a wide variety of applications and is used today for airport security checks just as much as it is for material analysis in the lab. It also requires specialised techniques to manipulate the beams and get them into the right shape. Shaping terahertz beams is now possible with the help of a precisely calculated plastic screen produced on the 3-D printer.

21h

Researchers clarify role of mutations in glioblastoma

Researchers from the UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center investigated whether the location of the mutation within the sequence of the PIK3CA gene affected the mutation's ability to help drive growth of glioblastoma tumors. They also evaluated whether the location of the mutation would affect the cancer's response to certain treatments.

21h

NIAID dcientists create 3D structure of 1918 influenza virus-like particles

Virus-like particles (VLPs) are protein-based structures that mimic viruses and bind to antibodies. Because VLPs aren't infectious, they show promise as vaccine platforms for many viral diseases, including influenza. Since details about influenza VLPs are scant, a team of researchers developed a 3D model based on the 1918 H1 pandemic influenza virus. The research, conducted by NIAID scientists, co

21h

Legalizing same-sex marriage increased health care access for gay men: Vanderbilt study

One of the first studies to examine the health impacts of marriage for LGBT individuals shows that legalizing same-sex marriage improved health care access for gay men.

21h

New evidence of two subspecies of American pikas in Rocky Mountain National Park

Rocky Mountain National Park provides habitat for not one, but two subspecies of the American pika, a species thought to be closely connected with climate change, according to a new study.

21h

Scientists race to create more resilient coral to survive in warming oceans

In a hurricane-proof lab miles down the Florida Keys, scientists coddle tiny pieces of coral from the moment they are spawned until they are just hearty enough to be separated into specimens equipped to survive in the wild.

21h

Snorts indicate positive emotions in horses

New evidence that horses reliably produce more snorts in favorable situations could improve animal welfare practices.

21h

Worker bees select royal (sub)family members, not their own supersisters, to be new queens

When honey bees need a new emergency queen, they forego the chance to promote members of their own worker subfamilies, opting instead to nurture larvae of 'royal' subfamilies, according to a new study.

21h

Robotic surgery as effective as open surgery for bladder cancer

Robotic surgery is as effective as traditional open surgery in treating bladder cancer, according to a new study.

21h

Why randomized trials for proton therapy are difficult to complete (and what we can do about it)

Commercial insurance medical policies that do not cover treatment with proton therapy can make it difficult for patients to participate in randomized clinical trials.

21h

Eradicate rats to bolster coral reefs

New research has confirmed that invasive rats decimate seabird populations, with previously unrecognized consequences for the extensive coral reefs that encircle and protect these islands. Invasive predators such as rats — which feed on bird eggs, chicks, and even adults birds — are estimated to have decimated seabird populations within 90 percent of the world's temperate and tropical island gro

21h

Stress affects people with schizophrenia differently

Stressful situations affect the brain and body differently in people with schizophrenia compared to people without the mental illness or individuals at high risk for developing psychosis, a new study shows. The relationship between two chemicals released when people experienced stress — one released in the brain and the other in saliva — differs in people with schizophrenia. The discovery may pr

21h

Healthier hearts equal healthier guts

Heart health and gut health may be linked. A new study finds that people with better cardiovascular fitness have more of a certain type of bacteria in their gut.

21h

Three-quarters of U.S. lawmakers don't look to university scientists for behavioral health research

A study designed to demystify the way research gets into legislators' hands found that the majority don't look to universities to inform their behavioral health policies.

21h

Cost-cutting option in treating nail fungus with nanotechnology

Researchers have investigated the use of nanotechnology to improve efinaconazole treatment and make it more cost effective.

21h

Amazon will give you $10 to spend if you shop at Whole Foods before Prime Day

Amazon will give you $10 if you're a Prime member and go shopping at Whole Foods starting Wednesday, one of the many deals it's offering in the lead up to its Prime Day sale, which starts Monday.

21h

Rhino sperm from the cold

A new mixture of cryoprotectives allows for an unprecedented high motility of frozen rhinoceros sperm after thawing, report scientists from the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) in Berlin, Germany. These new cryoprotectives can increase the prospects of utilizing assisted reproduction techniques for many endangered wildlife species. The study, based on three rhinoceros

21h

Hepatitis C vaccine could dramatically reduce transmission in people who inject drugs

Among the most serious consequences of the opioid epidemic is the spread of hepatitis C among injecting drug users. A study published in Science Translational Medicine shows that if a hepatitis C vaccine were successfully developed, it would dramatically reduce transmission of hepatitis C among drug users — even though it's unlikely such a vaccine would provide complete immunity.

21h

DNA marks in adults tracked back to changes in earliest days of life

Scientists have gained a glimpse of how marks on our genes that could be linked to adverse health outcomes in later life behave differently in the first few days after conception, according to new research published in Science Advances.

21h

Distinctive projectile point technology sheds light on peopling of the Americas

In the lowest layer of the Area 15 archaeological grounds at the Gault Site in Central Texas, researchers have unearthed a projectile point technology never previously seen in North America, which they date to be at least 16,000 years old, or a time before Clovis.

21h

Autism spectrum disorder linked to shape of brain's cerebellum

Structural differences in the cerebellum may be linked to some aspects of autism spectrum disorder, according to a neuroimaging study from Columbia University Irving Medical Center (CUIMC).

21h

Combination treatment fortifies the aging immune system

Scientists have found that a combination treatment safely enhances the ability of the immune system to fight infections in the elderly.

21h

Salamanders show more resistance to global warming than previously believed

The southern Appalachian Mountains are home to 10 percent of global salamander diversity. But current predictions indicate that 70 to 85 percent of this habitat will become unsuitable for salamanders by 2080 due to rising temperatures caused by climate change. Clemson University scientists shows that this extinction risk might be overestimated, because previous research largely ignored the salaman

21h

Engineered cancer cells can fight primary and metastatic cancer

A new study leverages the power of gene editing, capitalizing on cancer cells' self-homing ability to take a critical step toward using cancer cells to kill cancer.

21h

Worker bees select royal (sub)family members, not their own supersisters, to be new queens

When honey bees need a new emergency queen, they forego the chance to promote members of their own worker subfamilies, opting instead to nurture larvae of 'royal' subfamilies, according to a study published July 11 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by James Withrow and David Tarpy of North Carolina State University in Raleigh.

21h

Snorts indicate positive emotions in horses

New evidence that horses reliably produce more snorts in favorable situations could improve animal welfare practices, according to a study published July 11 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Mathilde Stomp of the Université de Rennes, France, and colleagues.

21h

Did humans leave Africa earlier than previously thought?

Ancient tools and bones discovered in China by archaeologists suggest early humans left Africa and arrived in Asia earlier than previously thought.

21h

Novel synaptic architecture for brain inspired computing

Researchers have demonstrated a novel synaptic architecture that could lead to a new class of information processing systems inspired by the brain.

21h

Ebola survivors suffer from severe neurological problems

Researchers have shed new light on the psychiatric and neurological problems that Ebola survivors can suffer from, and call for more specialist support for the most severely affected patients.

21h

Reining in soil's nitrogen chemistry

The compound urea is currently the most popular nitrogen soil fertilizer. It's a way to get plants the nitrogen they need to grow. There's just one problem with urease: it works too well! New research suggests farmers may have a choice in how they slow the release of nitrogen, depending on their soil's acidity.

21h

Why US residents seek abortion medication online

Seeking abortion medications online can be a response to clinic access barriers both in states with and without restrictive abortion laws and can occur when self-managed abortion is preferred over clinical care. Researchers found that online options either offer information about how to correctly and safely use abortion medications or sell the required medications, but not both, and lack of truste

21h

Humans did not stem from a single ancestral population in one region of Africa

A scientific consortium has found that human ancestors were scattered across Africa, and largely kept apart by a combination of diverse habitats and shifting environmental boundaries, such as forests and deserts. Millennia of separation gave rise to a staggering diversity of human forms, whose mixing ultimately shaped our species.

21h

Reaching for tissues at the symphony? It's probably solo time

A new study helps illuminate the ways in which a composer might intentionally impart sadness into the lines of an orchestral piece. Here's a clue: It doesn't take much. The solo player proves to be an important element of the kind of songs that tighten our throats and leave us searching for a tissue mid-performance, found a new study.

21h

High prevalence of restrictive lung disease in people with type 2 diabetes

Breathlessness and conditions of restrictive lung disease (RLD), such as pulmonary fibrosis, may be a late complication of type 2 diabetes.

21h

The highly complex sugarcane genome has finally been sequenced

Sugarcane was the last major cultivated plant to have its genome sequenced. This was because of its huge complexity: the genome comprises between 10 and 12 copies of each chromosome, when the human genome has just two. It will now be possible to 'modernize' the methods used to breed sugarcane varieties. This will be a real boon to the sugar and biomass industry.

21h

Dutch city to unveil world's first 3D-printed housing complex

The southern Dutch city of Eindhoven plans to unveil the world's first 3-D-printed housing complex next year, which its inventors believe could revolutionise the building industry by speeding up and customising construction.

21h

Trilobites: New Clues to How the Biggest Dinosaurs Got So Big

A fossil found in Argentina that is more than 200 million years old suggests the most giant of dinosaurs existed earlier than paleontologists believed.

21h

Trilobites: Is Your Horse in a Good Mood? See if It Snorts.

A new study suggests that a horse’s exhalations may signal contentment or pleasure, rather than a simple clearing of the animal’s nasal passages.

21h

Texas toolmakers add to the debate over who the first Americans were

Stone toolmakers inhabited Texas more than 16,000 years ago, before Clovis hunters arrived.

21h

Trial of anti-ageing drugs that rejuvenate immune system hailed a success

Most middle aged adults could benefit from a short term treatment to revitalise the immune system and organs that deteriorate with age, say researchers Scientists have hailed the success of a clinical trial which found that experimental anti-ageing drugs may protect older people from potentially fatal respiratory infections by rejuvenating their immune systems. In a trial involving people aged 65

21h

Twitter sweeps 'locked' accounts from follower tally

Twitter said Wednesday users are likely to see "follower" numbers drop as the service stops adding in potentially dubious or fraudulent accounts.

21h

Disney to put live 'Overwatch' eSports matches on TV

Fans of the "Overwatch" video game will soon be able to watch competitions on television under a deal announced Wednesday by Activision Blizzard and Walt Disney Co.

21h

China's latest quantum radar could help detect stealth planes, missiles

Eastern Arsenal Next Stop Stratosphere China's quantum radar makes more progress, and China plans to put it high up in the stratosphere, to spy on ballistic missiles and stealth aircraft.

21h

Traitorous Tumor Cells Kill Their Own Kind

Researchers plan to turn cancer cells into defectors, engineering them to kill the tumors from whence they came, and have tested the approach in mice.

21h

Intimate partner violence doesn't end with the relationship

Violence that occurs between intimate partners does not end with the relationship's conclusion, yet few resources exist to help survivors move beyond the betrayal of abusive relationships in order to begin new, healthy relationships.The effects of intimate partner violence (IPV) are profound, painfully enduring and should command as much attention as providing victims with the help necessary to le

21h

Cancer cells engineered with CRISPR slay their own kin

Scientists can program the stealth cells to die before creating new tumors.

21h

Worker bees select royal (sub)family members, not their own supersisters, to be new queens

When honey bees need a new emergency queen, they forego the chance to promote members of their own worker subfamilies, opting instead to nurture larvae of "royal" subfamilies, according to a study published July 11 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by James Withrow and David Tarpy of North Carolina State University in Raleigh.

21h

Salamanders show more resistance to global warming than previously believed

The plethora of salamanders living in the southern Appalachian Mountains might be in less danger from the effects of global warming than previously believed, according to new research published Wednesday in Science Advances.

21h

Snorts indicate positive emotions in horses

New evidence that horses reliably produce more snorts in favorable situations could improve animal welfare practices, according to a study published July 11 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Mathilde Stomp of the Université de Rennes, France, and colleagues.

21h

Earliest Evidence of Our Human Ancestors Outside of Africa Found

A new discovery suggests that human ancestors left Africa roughly 10,000 generations earlier than experts thought.

21h

VIDEO Stort isbjerg brækker af grønlandsk gletsjer

Optagelsen af isbjerget hjælper nu forskere med bedre at forstå, hvor meget verdenshavene stiger.

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Mass Spectrometry For Advanced Proteomics: A Revolution In Biological Research

In this eBook, learn more about proteins through advanced proteomics, via crosslinking, glycomics, ultra high-res spectrometry, and more!

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Gastrointestinal flora: the culprit for severe lung damage after blood transfusion

Knowledge that the gastrointestinal flora affects both healthy physiological processes and various disease mechanisms has increased in recent years. A new study reveals a previously unknown link between the bacteria in the gut and acute lung injury after blood transfusions.

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High-fidelity quantum secret sharing prevents eavesdropping

Eavesdropping is of concern for secrets shared using quantum scale messengers. A quantum secret is akin to an unknown quantum state of two entangled particles carrying the secret. In a new study scientists calculate the degree of fidelity of the quantum secret once transmitted and explore how to avoid eavesdropping.

22h

A study points to new therapeutic targets for tumors associated with chronic inflammation

Scientists report a new mechanism that contributes to the development of inflammation-associated colon cancer and points to new therapeutic targets.

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Centenary of cosmological constant lambda

Physicists are now celebrating the 100th anniversary of the cosmological constant. On this occasion, two recent articles highlight its role in modern physics and cosmology. Before becoming widely accepted, the cosmological constant had to undergo many discussions about its necessity, its value and its physical essence. Today, there are still unresolved problems in understanding the deep physical n

22h

Enzyme discovery could help in fight against TB

Research has revealed new findings about an enzyme found in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), the bacterium that causes TB.

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Uncovering the evolutionary history of IBD-associated colorectal cancer

A team of researchers have reported the genetic events involved in the early development of bowel cancer in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).

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The first endemic Baltic Sea fish species received its name

Researchers have discovered and named a new endemic fish species in the Baltic Sea, the 'Baltic flounder,' Platichthys solemdali.

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Recognizing others but not yourself: New insights into the evolution of plant mating

Recognition systems have evolved to ensure that a plant mates only with a genetically different plant and not with itself, hence preventing inbreeding. Recognition systems can be found in at least 100 plant families and 40 percent of species but until now, researchers have not known how the astonishing diversity in these systems evolves. Researchers have made steps towards deciphering how new mati

22h

Different strategy of cycling teams in escape attempts

A new study based on wind tunnel research on a peloton of 121 cyclists may explain why so few 'breakaways' in professional cycling races, like this year's Tour de France, are successful.

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Children with better coordination more likely to achieve at school

Young children with better eye-to-hand coordination were more likely to achieve higher scores for reading, writing and math according to new research — raising the possibility schools could provide extra support to children who are clumsy.

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The audiovisual integration of material information in preverbal infants

Researchers have revealed that infants aged 4- to 5-months already hold a primary cerebral representation of audiovisual integration of material information in their right hemisphere, and the number of types of material which can be processed by infants' brain increases with the experience of the materials. This finding may lead to understand the trajectory of acquiring general knowledge about obj

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LED lights reduce seabird death toll from fishing by 85 percent

Illuminating fishing nets with low-cost lights could reduce the terrible impact they have on seabirds and marine-dwellers by more than 85 percent, new research has shown.

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A better way to administer probiotics?

Researchers have developed Lactobacillus reuteri biofilm formulations that protect against experimental necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). A new iteration of the technology may help further reduce the incidence of NEC — a devastating problem for premature infants.

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Why randomized trials for proton therapy are difficult to complete (and what we can do about it)

Commercial insurance medical policies that do not cover treatment with proton therapy can make it difficult for patients to participate in randomized clinical trials funded by the NCI, part of the National Institutes of Health, that are evaluating the therapy.

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Stone tools put early hominids in China 2.1 million years ago

Newly discovered stone tools in China suggest hominids left Africa 250,000 years earlier than we thought.

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Primates adjust grooming to their social environment

Researcher show that wild chimpanzees and sooty mangabeys, two primate species who live in complex social groups, choose their grooming partners based on a variety of criteria, including their social relationship with them and their potential partner's dominance rank. In particular, individuals of both species avoided grooming group mates whose friends were among the bystanders, as grooming might

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If you build it, the birds will come — if it meets their criteria

A new study presents a case study on how bird surveys can better inform conservation and vegetation restoration efforts. Previous conservation methods have emphasized plants as the key to recreating habitat preferred by a sensitive animal. However, this study shows that there's more to the coastal sagebrush habitat of California gnatcatchers than just having the right plants present.

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Most black adults have high blood pressure before age 55

Approximately 75 percent of black men and women develop high blood pressure by age 55 compared to 55 percent of white men and 40 percent of white women of the same age. Both black and white study participants who ate a DASH-style diet had a reduced risk of developing high blood pressure.

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Database analysis more reliable than animal testing for toxic chemicals

Advanced algorithms working from large chemical databases can predict a new chemical's toxicity better than standard animal tests, suggests a new study.

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Stone Tools Unearthed in China Rewrite Human Migration Timeline

Stone Tools Unearthed in China Rewrite Human Migration Timeline Artifacts suggest that an extinct human species left Africa about 250,000 years earlier than previously thought. StoneTool_topNteaser.jpg Picture taken at the site of the discovery of ancient tools in China. Image credits: Prof. Zhaoyu Zhu Culture Wednesday, July 11, 2018 – 13:00 Charles Q. Choi, Contributor (Inside Science) — Stone

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Healthier hearts equal healthier guts

Heart health and gut health may be linked. A new study by San Francisco State University researchers finds that people with better cardiovascular fitness have more of a certain type of bacteria in their gut.

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Study charts the landscape of mosaic chromosomal alterations in blood cells

A study by investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard and the Broad Institute developed a new technique for detecting a type of clonal hematopoiesis known as mosaic chromosomal alterations, which involve mutations that affect large chunks of chromosomes. The team compiled an atlas of 8,342 mosaic chromosomal alterations, an order of magnitude larger than any previous study.

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Rise of the clones

Researchers discover new clues about a recently identified blood cell condition known as clonal hematopoiesis, implicated in hematologic cancers, cardiovascular illness.Surprisingly, the study reveals that inherited genetic variants can drive the condition by fueling additional mutations later in life.The findings can help inform ways to gauge disease risk based on specific mutations, develop stra

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Discovery of ancient tools in China suggests humans left Africa earlier than previously thought

Ancient tools and bones discovered in China by archaeologists suggest early humans left Africa and arrived in Asia earlier than previously thought.

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Eradicate rats to bolster coral reefs

New research has confirmed that invasive rats decimate seabird populations, with previously unrecognized consequences for the extensive coral reefs that encircle and protect these islands. Invasive predators such as rats — which feed on bird eggs, chicks, and even adults birds — are estimated to have decimated seabird populations within 90 percent of the world's temperate and tropical island gro

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T cell engineering breakthrough sidesteps need for viruses in gene-editing

In an achievement that has significant implications for research, medicine, and industry, UC San Francisco scientists have genetically reprogrammed the human immune cells known as T cells without using viruses to insert DNA. The researchers said they expect their technique — a rapid, versatile, and economical approach employing CRISPR gene-editing technology — to be widely adopted in the burgeon

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Earliest evidence of humans outside Africa

Scientists say they've probably found the earliest evidence of a human presence outside Africa.

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The multiculturalism of World Cup teams

The fans supporting their teams at the World Cup in Russia are overwhelmingly white. Their teams – not so much. Read More

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Study: People who embody Albert Einstein in VR perform better on cognitive tasks

A new study on virtual embodiment explores the “surprising plasticity of the brain’s body representation,” and suggests that virtual reality representations can improve cognition. Read More

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Harvard study: Heat slows down the brain by 13%

As temperatures rise, your brain's processing power declines. Read More

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National Ignition Facility sets new laser energy record

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser system has set a new record, firing 2.15 megajoules (MJ) of energy to its target chamber—a 15 percent improvement over NIF's design specification of 1.8 MJ, and more than 10 percent higher than the previous 1.9 MJ energy record set in March 2012.

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How Rats Remake Coral Reefs

In the middle of the Indian Ocean, on a small island in the Chagos Archipelago, black rats scurry about in search of food. Meanwhile, 250 meters offshore, in the coral reef that circles the island, jewel damselfish graze on patches of algae. These two creatures will never meet, but their lives are nonetheless connected. Through a complicated chain of events, the rats are suppressing the growth of

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Enzyme discovery could lead to new drugs for TB

The discovery of an enzyme structure in Mycobacterium tuberculosis , the bacterium that causes tuberculosis, could help eradicate the disease. TB currently causes more deaths than any other infectious disease, including HIV and malaria. In 2016 there were 10.4 million new cases of TB and 1.7 million people died. The rise in cases of tuberculosis that are resistant to current therapies means that

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Rats! Coral Reefs Aren't Getting the Bird Poop They Need

Rat invasions ripple across an island ecosystem into places you’d never expect—including all the way into surrounding coral reefs.

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Stress affects people with schizophrenia differently, CAMH study shows

Stressful situations affect the brain and body differently in people with schizophrenia compared to people without the mental illness or individuals at high risk for developing psychosis, a new CAMH study shows. The relationship between two chemicals released when people experienced stress — one released in the brain and the other in saliva — differs in people with schizophrenia. The discovery,

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Bird poop helps keep coral reefs healthy, but rats are messing that up

Eradicating invasive rats from islands may help boost numbers of seabirds, whose droppings provide nutrients to nearby coral reefs.

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Matter: Archaeologists in China Discover the Oldest Stone Tools Outside Africa

Chipped rocks found in western China indicate that human ancestors ventured from Africa earlier than previously believed.

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Charles Gimingham obituary

Leading expert on heather and moorland landscapes who was a dedicated environmentalist Travel north through the uplands of Britain in August and you enter the world heartland of the purple, heather-quilted landscape known as moorland. Its principal plant, ling heather, known scientifically as Calluna vulgaris , and the fire and grazing management that governs its growth and distinctive appeal, was

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T cell engineering breakthrough sidesteps need for viruses in gene-editing

In an achievement that has significant implications for research, medicine, and industry, UC San Francisco scientists have genetically reprogrammed the human immune cells known as T cells without using viruses to insert DNA. The researchers said they expect their technique—a rapid, versatile, and economical approach employing CRISPR gene-editing technology—to be widely adopted in the burgeoning fi

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Discovery of ancient tools in China suggests humans left Africa earlier than previously thought

Ancient tools and bones discovered in China by archaeologists suggest early humans left Africa and arrived in Asia earlier than previously thought.

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Eradicate rats to bolster coral reefs

Rat control should be considered an urgent conservation priority on many remote tropical islands to protect vulnerable coral reefs, according to an international team of scientists.

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A fish that subtracts its own electric signals to better 'see' through its murky habitat

The elephant-nose fish Gnathonemus petersii relies on electricity to find food and navigate through the obstacles riddling its native murky African rivers. Researchers have presented evidence that the fish's ability to accurately 'see' an 'electrical image' of its surroundings requires it to filter out its own electrical interference.

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Robotic surgery as effective as open surgery for bladder cancer

Robotic surgery is as effective as traditional open surgery in treating bladder cancer, according to a landmark study published in the journal Lancet. Three Loyola Medicine urologists are co-authors of the study.

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Sir David Attenborough: Getting UK polar ship ready for big day

Watch the 10,000-tonne hull of Britain's new polar ship being moved into position for launch.

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Roland Nardone, Advocate for Cell-Line Authentication, Dies

The Catholic University of America professor was also known for his summer workshops on the latest techniques.

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Measuring the effects of drugs on cancer cells

A new approach sheds light on the effects of anti-cancer drugs and the defense mechanisms of cancer cells. The method makes it possible to quickly test various drugs and treatment combinations at the cellular level.

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Taming a fatal blood cancer

Scientists report finding a potential therapeutic target for AML in preclinical laboratory tests on donated human cells and mice.

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Drones survey African wildlife

In collaboration with a nature reserve in Namibia, researchers are developing a new approach to counting animals: combining drone flights and automated image analysis.

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Using light for next-generation data storage

Tiny, nano-sized crystals of salt encoded with data using light from a laser could be the next data storage technology of choice, following new research.

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Blood sample breakthrough good news for pregnant women

A wide range of fetal genetic abnormalities could soon be detected in early pregnancy thanks to a world-first study using lab-on-a-chip, noninvasive technology.

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Hereditary and the Monstrousness of Creative Moms

This story contains spoilers for the film Hereditary. As a mother and a cinephile, I’m always on the lookout for films about women who have children but also retain some separate sense of self. Hereditary , the horror movie that has been lauded as a modern masterpiece of the genre, is an interesting case. Ari Aster’s debut feature follows Annie Graham (Toni Collette) and her family as they cope w

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NATO Doesn’t Need More Defense Spending

Donald Trump makes everyone else look mature. So it’s easy to forget that, sometimes, he’s not the only one who’s wrong. His establishment critics are, too. Take NATO , whose annual summit Trump threatened to derail because he publicly upbraided America’s allies for supposedly not spending enough on their militaries. (After first berating America’s allies for not spending 2 percent of GDP on defe

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Most US lawmakers don't look to universities for behavioral health research

When trying to inform their decisions on behavioral health policy, almost three-quarters of state legislators choose not to use universities, where most research is undertaken, as a primary source.

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Watch a Rocket's Sound Waves Rip a Rainbow to Bits

Watch a rocket launch rip a rainbow to shreds, thanks to the incredibly loud sound it produces.

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Reining in soil's nitrogen chemistry

Take a trip down into the soil beneath a field of crops. You won't find just dirt, water, and creepy-crawlies. You'll also find reactions that remind you of high school chemistry lab.

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Google parent 'graduates' moonshot projects Loon, Wing

Google parent Alphabet announced Tuesday it was raising the profile of two "moonshot" projects—one for drone delivery and the other for global internet connectivity with balloons.

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Study finds solos twice as common in sad songs

Music can transport a spirit from sullen to joyful. It can bring a concertgoer to unexpected tears. But the details of just how that connection between performance and emotion works remain largely mysterious.

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NASA surveys hurricane damage to Puerto Rico's forests

On Sept. 20, 2017, Hurricane Maria barreled across Puerto Rico with winds of up to 155 miles per hour and battering rain that flooded towns, knocked out communications networks and destroyed the power grid. In the rugged central mountains and the lush northeast, Maria unleashed its fury as fierce winds completely defoliated the tropical forests and broke and uprooted trees. Heavy rainfall triggere

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Do we really buy those 'Top-Rated' deals when we shop online? New study says rankings matter but how so may surprise you

Anyone who shops online is familiar with those 'top-rated' products or services that rise to the top of their search on e-commerce intermediary sites like Amazon or Expedia. So, do those rankings really help those products or services get sold?

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Reining in soil's nitrogen chemistry

The compound urea is currently the most popular nitrogen soil fertilizer. It's a way to get plants the nitrogen they need to grow. There's just one problem with urease: it works too well! New research suggests farmers may have a choice in how they slow the release of nitrogen, depending on their soil's acidity.

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Most US lawmakers don't look to universities for behavioral health research

A study designed to demystify the way research gets into legislators' hands found that the majority don't look to universities to inform their behavioral health policies.

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The perfect terahertz beam — thanks to the 3D printer

Terahertz radiation can be used for a wide variety of applications and is used today for airport security checks just as much as it is for material analysis in the lab. It also requires specialised techniques to manipulate the beams and get them into the right shape. At TU Wien, shaping terahertz beams is now possible with the help of a precisely calculated plastic screen produced on the 3D printe

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Tiny fern holds big environmental promise

A tiny fern — with each leaf the size of a gnat — may provide global impact for sinking atmospheric carbon dioxide, fixing nitrogen in agriculture and shooing pesky insects from crops. The fern's full genome has been sequenced by a Cornell University and Boyce Thompson Institute (BTI) scientist and his colleagues around the world, as reported in the journal Nature Plants.

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Ebola survivors suffer from severe neurological problems

Researchers have shed new light on the psychiatric and neurological problems that Ebola survivors can suffer from, and call for more specialist support for the most severely affected patients.

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Scoping magnetic fields out for prevention

Concerns about the effects of magnetic fields on human health require us to limit our exposure to them. Physicists have now developed a method for evaluating the circulation of magnetic fields in closed loops. This can help to limit exposure in electric and hybrid vehicle architectures, and in domestic and work environments.

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Bubbles and whispers — glass bubbles boost nanoparticle detection

Sensor detects tiny particles with field of bouncing light.

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California's cap-and-trade air quality benefits mostly go out of state

California has one of the world's most progressive cap-and-trade designed to reduce greenhouse gases. Yet in disadvantaged communities, emissions of those pollutants has actually gone up.

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Challenging the conventional wisdom on calculus

Contrary to widely-held opinion, taking high school calculus isn't necessary for success later in college calculus — what's more important is mastering the prerequisites, algebra, geometry, and trigonometry — that lead to calculus. That's according to a study of more than 6,000 college freshmen at 133 colleges.

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Researchers prevent, reverse renal injury by inhibiting immune-regulating molecule

Scientists overturn conventional wisdom about kidney disease.

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CRISPR's growing pains

In the six years since its inception, CRISPR gene editing has experienced ups and downs, from giddy excitement over the technology's potential to cure genetic diseases to patent disputes, ethical considerations and cancer scares. Despite recent setbacks, companies developing CRISPR therapies are forging ahead, reports an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly news magazine of th

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Social Science One set to release massive trove of Facebook data for research purposes

It seems Christmas is coming early this year for social scientists.

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ICE Is a Godsend for One Small Town in Texas

RAYMONDVILLE, Texas—The immigrant jail outside this remote South Texas town erupted in a riot in 2015, after years of alleged sexual abuse, vermin infestation, and overcrowding had made it one of the most notorious lockups in the country. Advocates hailed the prison’s closure shortly after the riot, but the loss of hundreds of jobs in such a small town was a major blow. Now, amid President Trump’

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What ‘Abolish ICE’ Actually Means

Updated July 11 at 12:32 p.m. ET While it began as little more than a hashtag on the fringe left, “Abolish ICE ” has unfurled, almost overnight, into a small movement. A growing number of Democratic candidates and lawmakers have come to view U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement as representative of all that’s wrong with the Trump administration’s immigration practices, but it’s not at all cle

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Transatlantic tales of Morris Minors | Brief letters

Graham Kelly on football psychology | A Minor marriage | Morris Minus | Jeremy Hunt | Puffins Although a respected sports scientist accompanied England manager Bobby Robson to Italia 90, the Football Association was not so attuned then to the psychology of winning matches at this level ( Get your head in the game , G2, 11 July). When Robson’s successor, Graham Taylor, recruited a sports psychologi

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James Webb Space Telescope to inspect atmospheres of gas giant exoplanets

In April 2018, NASA launched the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS). Its main goal is to locate Earth-sized planets and larger "super-Earths" orbiting nearby stars for further study. One of the most powerful tools that will examine the atmospheres of some planets that TESS discovers will be NASA's James Webb Space Telescope. Since observing small exoplanets with thin atmospheres like Ear

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Unplugged holidays tipped to increase

James Cook University researchers in Australia say the phenomenon of the 'digital-detox' is on the rise and could be an important part of the tourism industry in the future.

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Twitter Will Hide ‘Locked’ Profiles From Follower Counts

After purging millions of fake or suspicious accounts in recent months, Twitter announced a new policy around locked profiles.

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Trilobites: This Snail Goes Through Metamorphosis. Then It Never Has to Eat Again.

The transformation of a deep sea mollusk is comparable to an average person growing as much as 60 feet tall with a giant sac of bacteria filling its guts.

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ACA credited with earlier diagnosis of gynecologic cancers in young women

The gains in insurance coverage with the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) have already translated into improved health for young women with gynecologic cancers, who are getting diagnosed at earlier stages of their disease because of ACA benefits. That's the conclusion of a new study by researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine, who looked at nationwide trends in gynecologic cancer diag

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Do we really buy 'top-rated' deals online? New research may surprise you

Anyone who shops online is familiar with those 'top-rated' products or services that rise to the top of their search on e-commerce intermediary sites like Amazon or Expedia. So, do those rankings really help those products or services get sold? According to a new study, the answer is, 'yes' and 'no.'

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NASA surveys hurricane damage to Puerto Rico's forests

On Sept. 20, 2017, Hurricane Maria barreled across Puerto Rico with winds of up to 155 miles per hour and battering rain that flooded towns, knocked out communications networks and destroyed the power grid. In the rugged central mountains and the lush northeast, Maria unleashed its fury as fierce winds completely defoliated the tropical forests and broke and uprooted trees. Heavy rainfall triggere

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Reaching for tissues at the symphony? It's probably solo time

A new study helps illuminate the ways in which a composer might intentionally impart sadness into the lines of an orchestral piece. Here's a clue: It doesn't take much. The solo player proves to be an important element of the kind of songs that tighten our throats and leave us searching for a tissue mid-performance, found a study led by Niels Chr. Hansen of The Ohio State University.

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A Maddening Season Finale for The Handmaid’s Tale

This article contains spoilers through the second season of The Handmaid’s Tale. Watching the second season of The Handmaid’s Tale over the last three months hasn’t been an experience anyone would describe as cathartic, or gratifying, or even intermittently escapist. Starting in the first episode, when June (Elisabeth Moss) and her fellow handmaids were muzzled, slung into the back of a truck lik

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Youth report improved wellbeing as result of tailored mental health services

In a new study, researchers in London, Ontario, partnered with youth receiving care at the First Episode Mood and Anxiety Program at London Health Sciences Centre to better understand personal perspectives on care and treatment outcomes. The study found that patients experienced lasting improvements in managing their symptoms and improvements in academics, work performance and relationships, and t

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If You Spray Your Clothes With Permethrin, Be Careful Around The Cat

Cat lovers were very concerned about our story on permethrin. How risky is the pesticide for Kitty? By minimizing their pet's exposure, cat owners can use the chemical safely, veterinarians say. (Image credit: Manuel Breva Colmeiro/Getty Images)

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Unplugged holidays tipped to increase

Researchers say the phenomenon of the 'digital-detox' is on the rise and could be an important part of the tourism industry in the future.

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Eating bone marrow played a key role in the evolution of the human hand

The strength required to access the high calorie content of bone marrow may have played a key role in the evolution of the human hand and explain why primates hands are not like ours, research has found.

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Ancient bones reveal 2 whale species lost from the Mediterranean Sea

Two thousand years ago the Mediterranean Sea was a haven for two species of whale which have since virtually disappeared from the North Atlantic, a new study analyzing ancient bones suggests. The discovery of the whale bones in the ruins of a Roman fish processing factory located at the strait of Gibraltar also hints at the possibility that the Romans may have hunted the whales.

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New gears in your sleep clock

Researchers find that a key circadian clock controlling kinase, CK1D — controlling the stability of PER2 — has two forms, one that stabilizes PER2 and one that destabilizes it.

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New approach to treating infectious diseases as an alternative to antibiotics

Researchers have clarified how pathogenic E. coli bacteria attached to the host intestinal epithelium. They revealed that type IV pili on the surface of the bacteria were not sufficient for adherence to intestinal epithelial cells and that proteins secreted by E.coli were also necessary. It was found that this attachment mechanism might be a common feature in many enteropathogens such as Vibrio ch

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Giant, recently extinct seabird also inhabited Japan

Fossils discovered in Japan show that an extinct seabird called the spectacled cormorant, that was originally thought to be restricted to Bering Island, also resided in Japan nearly 120,000 years ago; indicating that the bird was a relict.

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Footwear habits influence child and adolescent motor skill development

Researchers show that children and adolescents who spend most of their time barefoot develop motor skills differently from those who habitually wear shoes. Published in Frontiers in Pediatrics, this is the first study to assess the relevance of growing up shod vs. barefoot on jumping, balancing and sprinting motor performance during different stages of childhood and adolescence. Results suggest th

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As Hurricane Season Ramps Up, Flood Insurance Program Set to Expire

Efforts in Congress to reform the program have stalled, leaving property owners vulnerable — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Elaine Fuchs (Rockefeller, HHMI) 3: Cancer: Hijacking the Wound Repair Mechanisms Used by Stem Cells

Skin stem cells have great potential for the treatment of burns and corneal injuries. As Elaine Fuchs explains, understanding skin stem cell biology is also key to understanding cancers such as squamous cell carcinoma. https://www.ibiology.org/development-and-stem-cells/skin-stem-cells Talk Overview: Dr. Fuchs begins her talk with a brief history of stem cells including the discovery in the 1970s

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Elaine Fuchs (Rockefeller, HHMI) 1: Skin Stem Cells: Biology and Promise for Regenerative Medicine

Skin stem cells have great potential for the treatment of burns and corneal injuries. As Elaine Fuchs explains, understanding skin stem cell biology is also key to understanding cancers such as squamous cell carcinoma. https://www.ibiology.org/development-and-stem-cells/skin-stem-cells Talk Overview: Dr. Fuchs begins her talk with a brief history of stem cells including the discovery in the 1970s

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Elaine Fuchs (Rockefeller, HHMI) 2: Tapping the Potential of Adult Skin Stem Cells

Skin stem cells have great potential for the treatment of burns and corneal injuries. As Elaine Fuchs explains, understanding skin stem cell biology is also key to understanding cancers such as squamous cell carcinoma. https://www.ibiology.org/development-and-stem-cells/skin-stem-cells Talk Overview: Dr. Fuchs begins her talk with a brief history of stem cells including the discovery in the 1970s

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Facebook Opens Its Private Servers to Scientists Studying Fake News

Social Science One, an independent research commission, will give social scientists unprecedented access to Facebook's data.

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The Rise and Fall of Uber HR Chief Liane Hornsey

Her departure is a sign the company’s system is beginning to work. It’s also a crisis.

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Why It’s Hard to Protect Domestic-Violence Survivors Online

In 1994, the National Center for State Courts conducted a study of 285 women in three cities—Denver, Colorado; Washington, D.C.; and Wilmington, Delaware—who had obtained temporary or permanent orders of protection against their abusive male partners. More than half said that, in advance of the restraining order, they had been beaten or choked; a sizable majority reported being slapped, grabbed,

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Success of conservation efforts for important Caribbean Reef fish hinges on climate change

Marine scientists predict climate change might severely hinder efforts to protect populations of the endangered and iconic Nassau grouper by the end of this century.

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Colorful celestial landscape

New observations show the star cluster RCW 38 in all its glory. This image was taken during testing of the HAWK-I camera with the GRAAL adaptive optics system. It shows RCW 38 and its surrounding clouds of brightly glowing gas in exquisite detail, with dark tendrils of dust threading through the bright core of this young gathering of stars.

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How a Mediterranean diet could reduce bone loss in osteoporosis

Eating a Mediterranean-type diet could reduce bone loss in people with osteoporosis — according to new research. New findings show that sticking to a diet rich in fruit, vegetables, nuts, unrefined cereals, olive oil, and fish can reduce hip bone loss within just 12 months.

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Pesticides influence bee learning and memory

A large-scale study has drawn together the findings of a decade of agrochemical research to confirm that pesticides used in crop protection have a significant negative impact on the learning and memory abilities of bees.

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Breakthrough in construction of computers for mimicking human brain

A computer built to mimic the brain's neural networks produces similar results to that of the best brain-simulation supercomputer software currently used for neural-signaling research. Tested for accuracy, speed and energy efficiency, this custom-built computer named SpiNNaker, has the potential to overcome the speed and power consumption problems of conventional supercomputers, with the aim of ad

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Eating bone marrow played a key role in the evolution of the human hand

The strength required to access the high calorie content of bone marrow may have played a key role in the evolution of the human hand and explain why primates hands are not like ours, research at the University of Kent has found.

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Cleaning out pollen shells

As allergy season intensifies, many people are cursing pollen—the powdery substance released by plants for reproduction. However, pollen may serve a purpose beyond making new plants and triggering sneezes. In ACS Biomaterials Science & Engineering, researchers report a new method for cleaning out the insides of pollen grains so that the non-allergenic shells can be used to carry medicines or vacci

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Leading sustainability experts call for more efficient approach to deliver UN goals

Dozens of global sustainability experts and stakeholders have called for urgent action to exploit the connections between goals designed to end poverty, hunger and environmental destruction to deliver significant savings off the final bill of securing global peace and prosperity.

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What is the association between asthma and atrial fibrillation risk?

Researchers report moderately increased risks for atrial fibrillation (AF), an irregular and often rapid heart rate, in adults with asthma and a lack of asthma control in a study that included about 54,000 individuals in Norway, although underlying causes for the association still need to be understood.

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Study examines emergency department suicide prevention intervention

Patients who are suicidal often seek care at a hospital emergency department (ED). This comparison study of about 1,600 patients at nine Veterans Health Administration hospital EDs (five delivered the intervention and four delivered usual care for comparison) examined suicidal behavior and behavioral health outpatient services from medical records in the six months after ED discharge.

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Undergraduate research makes for better science

The BioScience Talks podcast (http://bioscience.libsyn.com) features discussions of topical issues related to the biological sciences.

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Preoperative opioid use by patients having surgery

Nearly 1 in 4 patients undergoing surgery at an academic medical center reported preoperative opioid use in a study of about 34,000 patients who underwent surgery from 2010-2016. Age, tobacco use, illicit drug use, higher pain severity, depression, lower life satisfaction and more coexisting medical conditions were associated with preoperative opioid use by patients before surgery.

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Here's why it's important to support your breastfeeding co-workers

Support from female co-workers may be even more important to new moms who are breastfeeding than getting encouragement from their significant others, close friends and relatives, says a new study.

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Kidney podocytes, all grown up

Unlike other human stem cells, Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS cells) can be produced directly from adult cells. Now, Wyss researchers have shown that human kidney podocytes produced from iPS cells via a highly efficient, previously described protocol exhibit transcriptomic and protein expression profiles that match those of mature podocytes — a feat that no other method has so far been able

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Humans evolved in partially isolated populations scattered across Africa

The textbook narrative of human evolution casts Homo sapiens as evolving from a single ancestral population in one region of Africa around 300,000 years ago. However, in a commentary published July 11 in the journal Trends in Ecology & Evolution, an interdisciplinary group of researchers concludes that early humans comprised a subdivided, shifting, pan-African meta-population with physical and cul

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Our fractured African roots

A scientific consortium led by Dr. Eleanor Scerri, British Academy Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Oxford and researcher at the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, has found that human ancestors were scattered across Africa, and largely kept apart by a combination of diverse habitats and shifting environmental boundaries, such as forests and deserts. Millennia of separa

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A fish that subtracts its own electric signals to better 'see' through its murky habitat

The elephant-nose fish Gnathonemus petersii relies on electricity to find food and navigate through the obstacles riddling its native murky African rivers. On July 12 in the journal Neuron, Columbia University researchers present evidence that the fish's ability to accurately 'see' an 'electrical image' of its surroundings requires it to filter out its own electrical interference.

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New study in electric fish reveals brain mechanisms for distinguishing self from other

The brain's remarkable ability to perceive the outside world relies almost entirely on its capacity to tune out noise generated by the body's own actions, according to a first-of-its-kind study in electric fish led by scientists at Columbia University.

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