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Nyheder2018juli13

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A Very British Protest

LONDON—The first protestors began assembling on Portland Place, just outside the BBC’s London headquarters, on Friday morning. They carried signs. “FEED HIM TO THE CORGIS,” said one. “TANGERINE TYRANT,” read another. “BOLLOCKS TO TRUMP.” “IKEA HAS BETTER CABINETS.” “TRUMP IS A TOSSER.” “I HAD TO FIX MY PRINTER FOR THIS.” The people gathering to march in protest of President Trump’s U.K. visit had

2h

South Africa unveils super radio telescope

South Africa on Friday unveiled a super radio telescope, a first phase of what will be the world's largest telescope in a project to try to unravel the secrets of the universe.

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Amerikansk luftkæmpe fylder 50

Den 30. juni i år var det 50 år siden, det enorme transportfly Lockheed C-5 Galaxy fløj for første gang.

12h

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Why the FDA Just Approved a Drug for Smallpox, Nearly 40 Years After the Disease Was Eradicated

Yes, smallpox, the disease that was eradicated from the world in 1980.

10min

A Giant Iceberg Parked Offshore. It’s Stunning, but Villagers Hit the Road.

Dozens have moved inland from a village in Greenland, fearing that a huge iceberg could break apart and send a flood wave over the settlement.

13min

First global maps of Pluto and Charon show the worlds’ highs and lows

New charts of Pluto and its moon Charon, compiled using New Horizons’ data, reveal high peaks, deep depressions and strange ridges.

22min

By sending tests in the mail, researchers boost colorectal cancer screening

UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers report that mailing colorectal cancer screening tests to patients insured by Medicaid increased screening rates for this population. Patients who received a screening kit in the mail were more likely to be screened than patients who received a reminder, a finding that suggests this method could serve as a model to improve screening on a larger

31min

Study finds deep subterranean connection between two Japan volcanoes

Scientists have confirmed for the first time that radical changes of one volcano in southern Japan was the direct result of an erupting volcano 22 kilometers (13.7 miles) away. The observations from the two volcanos — Aira caldera and Kirishima — show that the two were connected through a common subterranean magma source in the months leading up to the 2011 eruption of Kirishima.

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Routine, coordinated treatment of opioid abuse can stem national epidemic

To help stem the nationwide opioid epidemic and related increases in HIV, hepatitis C and other infections, health care providers should routinely screen and treat patients for opioid abuse when they come to clinics and hospitals seeking other services. That's one of five recommendationsin a paper published in the Annals of Internal Medicine that supplements a document that outlines the proceeding

31min

Products of omega-3 fatty acid metabolism may have anticancer effects, study shows

A class of molecules formed when the body metabolizes omega-3 fatty acids could inhibit cancer's growth and spread, University of Illinois researchers report in a new study in mice. In mice with tumors of osteosarcoma – a bone cancer that is notoriously painful and difficult to treat — endocannabinoids slowed the growth of tumors and blood vessels, inhibited the cancer cells from migrating and ca

31min

Early Humans Probably Didn't Evolve from a Single Population in Africa

Did humans evolve from one population in Africa? Probably not.

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The Coincidence at the Heart of the Russia Hacking Scandal

The broad outlines of Friday’s indictment by Special Counsel Robert Mueller, charging 12 Russians with conspiracy, identity theft, and money laundering in connection with hacking during the 2016 presidential election, are not surprising. The hacking of the Democratic National Committee has been public knowledge since July 2016 , and even then, the authorities publicly stated that the perpetrators

31min

Higher Blood Pressure Has Links to Brain Lesions in Older Adults

In a longitudinal study, researchers find that elderly people with higher pressure were more likely to show signs of Alzheimer’s disease in brain tissue.

33min

America's secret Cold War nuclear test films released

Scientists declassify films showing atmospheric nuclear tests conducted during the Cold War.

34min

Summer Dead Zones in the Chesapeake Break Up Earlier

Summer Dead Zones in the Chesapeake Break Up Earlier Low oxygen areas are disappearing almost a month earlier than they did 30 years ago. ChesapeakeWetland.jpg Image credits: USEPA Environmental-Protection-Agency via Flickr Earth Friday, July 13, 2018 – 16:00 Joel Shurkin, Contributor (Inside Science) — Scientists studying the Chesapeake Bay have found that the dead zones, where a seasonal lack

36min

Pennsylvania reveals cyber intrusion in birth, death records

Pennsylvania officials have revealed they had to shut down the state's online system for birth and death records for about a week after someone with apparent inside knowledge made unauthorized changes.

52min

The secret sulfate code that lets the bad Tau in

Vampires can turn humans into vampires, but to enter a human's house, they must be invited in. Researchers at the UT Southwestern Medical Center, writing in the Journal of Biological Chemistry, have uncovered details of how cells invite inside corrupted proteins that can turn normal proteins corrupt, leading to neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. Understanding

52min

Researchers discover natural product that could lead to new class of commercial herbicide

A garden can be a competitive environment. Plants and unseen microorganisms in the soil all need precious space to grow. And to gain that space, a microbe might produce and use chemicals that kill its plant competitors. But the microbe also needs immunity from its own poisons.

52min

What it takes to stand up to authority

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55min

Taxing American wars creates accountability, prevents lengthy conflict

Democratic nations are supposed to fight shorter, smarter wars. So why have the U.S.-led wars in Iraq and Afghanistan lasted for more than 15 years?

58min

How fast can acute stroke treatment become to still be reliable?

Every day roughly three new stroke suspects are rushed by ambulance to Helsinki University Hospital Emergency Department to be considered for urgent clot-busting thrombolytic therapy or thrombectomy to prevent permanent stroke caused by acute cerebral ischemia. But perilously, out of one hundred such 'thrombolysis candidates' only half is actually caused by this condition and the rest have other k

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Trump's Jabs at Theresa May Could Actually Help Her

When Donald Trump and Theresa May walked into a joint press conference together on Friday at the British prime minister’s country home in Chequers, they did so hand in hand. They sported a matching vibrant red (a tie for him, a blazer for her). And when they spoke, they praised the durability of their countries’ long-standing—and special—relationship. “I give our relationship, in terms of grade,

1h

New X-ray technology produces striking 3D images in full color

A new medical imaging device uses technology developed by particle physicists to produce full-color, 3D images of the human body. Read More

1h

Robots Can't Hold Stuff Very Well. But You Can Help

A new online sim computes how and where a robot should grip objects like vases and turbine housings. You can even upload designs of your own objects.

1h

Exosomes in Blood Indicate Mild TBI: Study

Levels of tau, amyloid-β 42, and IL-10 extracted from extracellular vesicles that started out in the brain were higher in military personal suffering head injuries compared with healthy soldiers.

1h

Scientists on Twitter: Preaching to the choir or singing from the rooftops?

Who follows scientists on Twitter? Researchers found that scientists with fewer than 1,000 followers primarily reach other scientists. However, scientists with more than 1,000 followers have more types of followers, including those in the "outreach" category.

1h

Target for novel malaria vaccine identified

Researchers have created a vaccine that protects against malaria infection in mouse models, paving the way for the development of a human vaccine that works by targeting the specific protein that parasites use to evade the immune system.

1h

Capacity of North American forests to sequester carbon

Researchers have calculated the capacity of North American forests to sequester carbon in a detailed analysis that for the first time integrates natural processes and climate changes that are likely to alter growth over the next 60 years.

1h

Whole genome sequencing reveals cluster of resistant bacteria in returning travelers

Thirteen patients with OXA-48-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae ST392 have been reported by Sweden and Norway between January and April 2018 — all returning travelers with prior hospital admission in Gran Canaria. Whole genome sequencing showed tight clustering between the bacterial isolates from the cases.

1h

Massive genome havoc in breast cancer is revealed

Researchers using long-read DNA sequencing have made one of the most detailed maps ever of structural variations in a cancer cell's genome. The map reveals about 20,000 structural variations, few of which have been noted before, in just one cell type associated with one form of breast cancer.

1h

Researchers discover natural product that could lead to new class of commercial herbicide

A team of UCLA engineers and scientists discovered a new and potentially highly effective type of weed killer. This finding could lead to the first new class of commercial herbicides in more than 30 years, an important outcome as weeds continue to develop resistance to current herbicide regimens.

1h

The secret sulfate code that lets the bad Tau in

Researchers at the UT Southwestern Medical Center have uncovered details of how cells invite inside corrupted proteins that can turn normal proteins corrupt, leading to neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. Understanding the molecular details of how these proteins spread from cell to cell could lead to therapies to halt disease progression.

1h

1st Color X-Rays of Human Body Are Bloody Amazing

You'll be thinking about these images, made with advanced CERN technology, all day.

1h

Turning water into oxygen in zero gravity could mean easier trips to Mars

Space A real breath of fresh air. One of the main challenges with long-distance space flight is transporting enough oxygen for astronauts to breathe and enough fuel to power complex electronics.

1h

Fuzzy yellow bats reveal evolutionary relationships in Kenya

DNA analysis of fuzzy yellow bats in Kenya revealed at least two new species unknown to science. It's important because Africa's biodiversity is often under-studied and poorly understood, even though bats play a crucial role in agriculture and public health.

1h

Developed and developing: An outdated classification for countries?

Countries have traditionally been divided into two broad categories according to their capacity to innovate. Now, researchers say these categories are overly simplistic and leave out the key roles that a group of Innovative Developing Countries (IDCs) play in the public health arena.

1h

Robert Mueller's Indictment Today of 12 Russian Hackers Could Be His Biggest Move YetRobert Mueller Russian

The special counsel has unleashed an international, geopolitical bombshell.

2h

Testosterone research brings new hope for cancer patients

Approximately 20 percent of cancer related deaths are attributed to the syndrome of cachexia. Dr. Melinda Sheffield-Moore, professor and head of the Department of Health and Kinesiology, along with researchers at University of Texas Medical Branch, recently published research in the Journal of Cachexia, Sarcopenia and Muscle showing that the hormone testosterone is effective at combatting cachexia

2h

The Journey From Features To Compound Identification In Metabolomics: When Will We Get There?

In this eBook, learn about advancements in untargeted metabolomic workflow, including improved standards, guidelines, databases, and more!

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PTSD rate among prison employees equals that of war veterans

Prison employees experience PTSD on par with Iraq and Afghanistan war veterans, a new study from a Washington State University College of Nursing researcher found.

2h

Donald Trump Meets the Press in Britain—and the Press Is Very Puzzled

LONDON —“It was like watching a news conference by Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde,” John Rentoul , the chief political commentator for The Independent , told the BBC, standing on the broadcaster’s balcony while anti-Trump demonstrators streamed by below. He was talking about President Donald Trump’s press conference on Friday afternoon with Prime Minister Theresa May, in which Trump at turns read talkin

2h

Who got bit? By mailing in 16,000 ticks, citizen scientists help track disease exposures

A bite from a disease-carrying tick can transmit a serious, potentially fatal infection, such as Lyme disease. But many ticks go unnoticed and unreported. Now, with the help of citizen scientists, ecologists are offering better insight into people's and animals' potential exposure to tick-borne diseases — not just the disease reporting and prevalence that's only tracked when people get sick.

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Parental chromosomes kept apart during embryo's first division

It was long thought that during an embryo's first cell division, one spindle is responsible for segregating the embryo's chromosomes into two cells. Scientists now show that there are actually two spindles, one for each set of parental chromosomes, meaning that the genetic information from each parent is kept apart throughout the first division.

2h

Gene controls bone-to-fat ratio in bone marrow

In an unexpected discovery, researchers have found that a gene previously known to control human metabolism also controls the equilibrium of bone and fat in bone marrow as well as how an adult stem cell expresses its final cell type. The findings could lead to a better understanding of the disruption of bone-to-fat ratio in bone marrow as well as its health consequences, and also point to the gene

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Rice plants evolve to adapt to flooding

Although water is essential for plant growth, excessive amounts can waterlog and kill a plant. In South and Southeast Asia, where periodic flooding occurs during the rainy season, the water depth can reach several meters for many months.

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Scientists ID protein exploited by virus ravaging West Africa

New research has uncovered a protein enabling the replication of arenaviruses, pathogens now widespread in West Africa that are carried by rodents and can infect humans with lethal fevers. The research identified DDX3 as a key factor promoting arenavirus multiplication through its unexpected ability to promote viral RNA synthesis and dismantle normal human immune system defenses. The study may pav

2h

Growth rates of loblolly pine trees

Researchers used ecological forecasting to predict how changes in temperature, water, and concentrations of carbon in the atmosphere in the Southeastern United States may affect the future growth rates of trees.

2h

Machine learning helps to predict the treatment outcomes of schizophrenia

Researchers have used artificial intelligence to help identify patients suffering from schizophrenia and to ascertain if they would respond to treatment.

2h

Climate change-induced march of treelines halted by unsuitable soils

Researchers have discovered unsuitable soil at higher altitudes may be halting the advancement of treelines. This finding dispels the commonly held assumption that climate change is enabling trees to move farther uphill and northward. The researchers looked at plant growth at higher altitudes in the Canadian Rockies, grew spruce and fir seedlings at varying elevations and collected soil samples fr

2h

How to know if an online discussion is going to get nasty

Researchers have created a model to predict which civil online conversations might take a turn and derail. After analyzing hundreds of exchanges between Wikipedia editors, the researchers developed a computer program that scans for warning signs in participants’ language at the start of a conversation—such as repeated, direct questioning or use of the word “you”—to predict which initially civil c

2h

Tuning into quantum: Scientists unlock signal frequency control of precision atom qubits

Australian scientists have achieved a new milestone in their approach to creating a quantum computer chip in silicon, demonstrating the ability to tune the control frequency of a qubit by engineering its atomic configuration. The work has been published in Science Advances.

2h

Scientists discover source of cosmic rays, opening new era of ‘multi-messenger astronomy’

A team of international scientists have, for the first time, pinpointed the cosmic source of a ghostly subatomic particle called a neutrino, marking the beginning of a new era in astronomy. Read More

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Way to go! The U. K. has passed 1000 hours of coal-free power in 2018.

One of the leading countries in the world in getting off coal and ramping up renewables. Read More

3h

McDonald’s Salads Linked to Intestinal Parasite Outbreak in Midwest

Iowa and Illinois have recorded more than 100 cases of cyclosporiasis, which causes nausea and fatigue. McDonald’s has stopped selling salads at about 3,000 locations.

3h

Radical Acceptance

Filmmaker Austin Meyer was in Zambia on assignment for National Geographic when his project was unexpectedly postponed. He decided to take his camera and tour the country, looking for a story to tell in the interim. That’s how he wound up at the children’s hospital in Lusaka. “I saw this little workshop out back,” Meyer told The Atlantic . “I walked over and the first person I saw was David Miti,

3h

The Russians Who Hacked the 2016 Election

A grand jury in Washington, D.C., on Friday indicted 12 Russian intelligence officers, charging them with hacking intended to interfere with the 2016 presidential election. The indictment , sought by Special Counsel Robert Mueller, charge the defendants with hacking into computers and email systems of the Democratic National Committee, the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee, and Hillary

3h

The love lives of fruit flies

New study reveals that a male fruit fly's decision to court or ignore a female stems from the convergence of motivation, perception and chance. The triad affects the balance of excitatory versus inhibitory signals in the brain to influence decision making. Findings may yield insights about addiction disorders, depression.

3h

Tuning into quantum: Scientists unlock signal frequency control of precision atom qubits

Australian scientists have achieved a new milestone in their approach to creating a quantum computer chip in silicon, demonstrating the ability to tune the control frequency of a qubit by engineering its atomic configuration. The work has been published in Science Advances.

3h

This Company Wants Your Fertility Data

Celmatix sells a genetic test for reproductive health, and it's looking to expand.

3h

To combat extreme heat, cover your roof in hungry, sweaty plants

Technology Green roofs and white paints are a heat-buster's best friends. Roadways are melting and the elderly are dying in spades. Here’s how humans are trying to manage extreme heat.

3h

The Downsides of America’s Hyper-Competitive Youth-Soccer Industry

In the late 1970s, when he was 10, Rob Nissen played for the only soccer team available to kids in his middle-class, New Jersey town. “It cost $20 to join, and you got a T-shirt and you played,” said Nissen, who today is a book publicist, still in New Jersey. On Saturdays, he would put on his white canvas Keds and head over to the one park in town that was big enough to accommodate an actual game

3h

Is surgery the best option for penetrating kidney trauma?

SLU surgeon Sameer A. Siddiqui, M.D., and his research team examined patient records to study the best approach for renal trauma injuries.

3h

Better methods improve measurements of recreational water quality

The concentration of enterococci, bacteria that thrive in feces, has long been the federal standard for determining water quality. Researchers have now shown that the greatest influences on that concentration are the quantity of mammalian feces in the water, and the numbers of enterococci that glom onto floating particulate matter. The research is published Friday, July 13 in Applied and Environme

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Eyewire Cup: Awards

Wow, what an awesome competition and congratulations to the science penguins! Team Antarctica takes home the Eyewire Cup! 263 competitors participated in this one, thanks for showing your team spirit and your dedication to science. Now we’d like to take a moment to celebrate all those who participated in the Eyewire Cup. You can also view a more precise breakdown of the points and bonuses won her

3h

Better methods improve measurements of recreational water quality

The concentration of enterococci, bacteria that thrive in feces, has long been the federal standard for determining water quality. Researchers have now shown that the greatest influences on that concentration are the quantity of mammalian feces in the water, and the numbers of enterococci that glom onto floating particulate matter.

3h

Software-Based Chemical Screen Could Minimize Animal Testing

Researchers develop a machine-learning tool for toxicity analyses that is more consistent in predicting chemical hazards than assays on animals.

4h

BRIEF: Thanks to Wildfires, Some Streams Are Flowing More Smoothly

BRIEF: Thanks to Wildfires, Some Streams Are Flowing More Smoothly Researchers find that wildfires are responsible for up to 20 percent of water flowing in some Western U.S. streams. ForestFire.jpg Image credits: yelantsevv/ Shutterstock Earth Friday, July 13, 2018 – 12:45 Jennifer Leman, Contributor (Inside Science) — Understanding the impacts of wildfire on regional waterways can be a murky en

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Mindre fup: Stor indsats lukker 3000 falske webbutikker

Ny indsats bekæmper fupbutikker. Nu kan du handle mere sikkert på hjemmesider med .dk-domæner.

4h

US lifts export ban on suppliers to China's ZTEUS CD China ZTE Ban

The United States on Friday formally lifted a crippling ban on exports to China's ZTE, rescuing the smartphone maker from the brink of collapse after it was denied key components.

4h

Steve Bannon’s British Sideshow

When President Trump made his first visit abroad last year, Steve Bannon was still at the heart of everything. A year later, Bannon is no longer by the president’s side as Trump visits the United Kingdom, after a precipitous political fall from grace earlier this year. But he’s still shown up on the edges of the trip, camping out in the U.K. and supporting Trump through media appearances as an un

4h

Study uses changes in Hudson River may offer insight into how glaciers grew

Think of it like a geological mystery story: For decades, scientists have known that some 25,000 years ago, a massive ice sheet stretched to cover most of Canada and a large section of the northeastern United States, but what's been trickier to pin down is how—and especially how quickly—did it reach its ultimate size.

4h

NASA finds fragmented remnants of Beryl, located west of Bermuda

The remnants of former Tropical Storm Beryl are being battered by upper level winds, and that's fragmenting them even more. NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the northwestern Atlantic Ocean and found some of those scattered thunderstorms were strong.

4h

Theorists publish highest-precision prediction of muon magnetic anomaly

Theoretical physicists at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Brookhaven National Laboratory and their collaborators have just released the most precise prediction of how subatomic particles called muons—heavy cousins of electrons—"wobble" off their path in a powerful magnetic field. The calculations take into account how muons interact with all other known particles through three of nature's

4h

Could Brain Stimulation Slow Cancer?

Activating the reward system boosts anti-tumor immunity in mice — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Journalists view co-workers as more ethical than peers, study finds

American media is grappling with an image problem. Accusations of "fake news," foreign companies meddling in Facebook's data and a further polarization of how the Fourth Estate should operate in the digital age have turned journalistic ethics into a common talking point on the evening news.

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Sunk cost fallacy in mice, rats and humans

New research has shown that mice, rats, and humans all commit the sunk cost fallacy.

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New study reveals Ulsan, South Korea, is exposed to yearlong toxic fine dust

A new study offers decisive proof that South Korea's Ulsan city is affected by toxic substances contained in fine dust particles, regardless of the season.

4h

How might dark matter interact with ordinary matter?

Scientists have imposed conditions on how dark matter may interact with ordinary matter. In the search for direct detection of dark matter, the experimental focus has been on WIMPs, or weakly interacting massive particles, the hypothetical particles thought to make up dark matter. But the research team invokes a different theory to challenge the WIMP paradigm: the self-interacting dark matter mode

4h

One step closer to finding a cure for brain diseases

Researchers have identified a mechanism for signaling brain nerve cells through excitatory synaptic binding proteins. The finding provides important clues to understanding the principles of synaptic nerve transmission and thus can be used to analyze the fundamental causes of brain diseases and treat them.

4h

Unidentified Plane-Bae Woman’s Statement Confirms the Worst

Last week, an unsuspecting woman boarded a plane from New York to Dallas and switched seats with a woman named Rosey Blair, who had asked to sit next to her boyfriend. The woman ended up with a new seatmate, Euan Holden, a former professional soccer player turned model, and chatted with him throughout the flight. What she didn’t know was that Blair, seated behind her, was surreptitiously photogra

4h

NASA finds fragmented remnants of Beryl, located west of Bermuda

The remnants of former Tropical Storm Beryl are being battered by upper level winds, and that's fragmenting them even more. NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the northwestern Atlantic Ocean and found some of those scattered thunderstorms were strong.

4h

The Guardian view on alien life: what if it’s not there? | Editorial

The universe is so big and full of stars that it seems obvious some must have evolved intelligent life. But it turns out we know so little we can’t know what’s obvious. Quite likely we are alone Are we alone in the universe? Of all the billions of stars out there, is there none around which intelligent life has arisen, no other conscious beings who have looked at their sky and asked themselves whe

4h

Allergy potential of strawberries and tomatoes depends on the variety

Strawberries and tomatoes are among the most widely consumed fruits and vegetables worldwide. However, many people are allergic to them, especially if they have been diagnosed with birch pollen allergy. A team has investigated which strawberry or tomato varieties contain fewer allergens than others and to what extent cultivation or preparation methods are involved.

5h

Growing a dinosaur's dinner

Scientists have measured the nutritional value of herbivore dinosaurs' diet by growing their food in atmospheric conditions similar to those found roughly 150 million years ago.

5h

How looking at the big picture can lead to better decisions

New research suggests how distancing yourself from a decision may help you make the choice that produces the most benefit for you and others affected.

5h

Theorists publish highest-precision prediction of muon magnetic anomaly

Latest calculation based on how subatomic muons interact with all known particles comes out just in time for comparison with precision measurements at new 'Muon g-2' experiment.

5h

Study finds 84 highly endangered Amur leopards remain in China and Russia

Scientists estimate there are only 84 remaining highly endangered Amur leopards (Panthera pardus orientalis) remaining in the wild across its current range along the southernmost border of Primorskii Province in Russia and Jilin Province of China.

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Oceanic Whitetip Sharks Officially Gain Protected Status | Shark News

After facing a 70-80% decline in population, the U.S. government has listed the oceanic whitetip as "threatened" under the Endangered Species Act. Shark Week 2018 starts Sunday July 22 9p! Stream Classic Shark Week Episodes: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/shark-week/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery https://www.fa

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Photos of the Week: Atomic Art, Moon Pool, Giant Iceberg

The Royal Air Force celebrates its centennial in London, World Cup emotions run high in Russia and around the world, a chili pepper eating contest takes place in China, the Running of the Bulls begins in Spain, a leopard gets a check-up in the Netherlands, Tour de France riders pass through stage six, flamingos stride through a lake in Turkey, and much more.

5h

Yale Law Fails the Kavanaugh Test

Each Supreme Court vacancy renews the perennial debate about the best way forward for constitutional law. Law-school graduates have a special obligation to inform that discussion. This week, as Americans confronted Brett Kavanaugh’s nomination to the Supreme Court, Yale’s legal community twice failed to responsibly discharge its civic duty. A statement published by Yale Law School was strike one.

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L.A.'s Not Just Sizzling, It's Sultry: Why California's July Heat Wave Is So Weird

An unusually early—and humid—heat wave has set all-time records — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

Radio Atlantic: The Future of Europe

As President Trump meets with other western leaders in Europe, the spirit of democratic cooperation we’re used to in NATO summits is gone. But it’s not just Trump. Populist movements around Europe are agitating against the cooperation that has bound the continent since World War II. Where is the West headed? Is this a short-term fever brought on by unique stresses? Or does it herald a re-fracturi

5h

84 highly endangered amur leopards remain in China and Russia

Scientists estimate there are only 84 remaining highly endangered Amur leopards (Panthera pardus orientalis) remaining in the wild across its current range along the southernmost border of Primorskii Province in Russia and Jilin Province of China.

5h

Residential segregation associated with black-white disparity in firearm homicide rates

Residential segregation is linked to many racial disparities in health, including cancer, high blood pressure, and diabetes. Now, a new study led by Boston University School of Public Health researchers suggests the likelihood of dying from gun violence can be added to the list of adverse health outcomes associated with structural racism in the US.

5h

Reading rivers

In a new study, Harvard researchers say they may be able to estimate how glaciers moved by examining how the weight of the ice sheet altered topography and led to changes in the course of the river. The study is described in a July 2018 paper published in Geology.

5h

Growing a dinosaur's dinner

Scientists have measured the nutritional value of herbivore dinosaurs' diet by growing their food in atmospheric conditions similar to those found roughly 150 million years ago.

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Novel therapy delays muscle atrophy in Lou Gehrig's disease model

Supplementing a single protein found in the spinal cord could help prevent symptoms of Lou Gehrig's disease, according to a new study. Researchers found high levels of the protein — called mitofusion 2 or Mfn2 — prevented nerve degeneration, muscle atrophy, and paralysis in a mouse model of the disease. Since Mfn2 is often depleted during Lou Gehrig's, the new study suggests supplementing it cou

5h

Turn exercise into a game and see encouraging results

A team of researchers built a web-based app called MapTrek. When synced with a Fitbit, MapTrek allows users to go on virtual walking tours of locations such as the Grand Canyon or Appalachian trail while competing against other users. A study showed MapTrek and Fitbit users averaged 2,200 more steps per day than a control group that used only Fitbits.

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Scientists on Twitter: Preaching to the choir or singing from the rooftops?

Isabelle Côté is an SFU professor of marine ecology and conservation and an active science communicator whose prime social media platform is Twitter.

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A Trump Oil Boom Could Transform This Rocky Mountain Landscape

Emails reveal administration officials want to shelve environmental policies to speed oil and gas development — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The genius behind some of the world's most famous buildings | Renzo Piano

Legendary architect Renzo Piano — the mind behind such indelible buildings as The Shard in London, the Centre Pompidou in Paris and the new Whitney Museum of Art in New York City — takes us on a stunning tour through his life's work. With the aid of gorgeous imagery, Piano makes an eloquent case for architecture as the answer to our dreams, aspirations and desire for beauty. "Universal beauty is

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Researchers suggest uncertainty may be key in battlefield decision making

Army researchers have discovered that being initially uncertain when faced with making critical mission-related decisions based on various forms of information may lead to better overall results in the end.

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Reducing Australia's cancer death rate

New research has revealed for the first time what impact cutting back on drinking and smoking as a population would have on Australia's cancer death rate.

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Study examines prenatal depression in 2 generations of pregnant mothers

A study of two generations of women in England examined how common depression during pregnancy (prenatal depression) is in young mothers now compared with their mothers' generation. Depressed mood was measured using self-reported surveys in both generations and analysis of the data suggests depression in young pregnant women may be higher now than among their mothers' generation in the 1990s. Rese

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Paddleboarders highlight plastic pollution on Mallorca trip

Catherine Friend and Valerie Bisbal are the first people to circumnavigate Mallorca on paddleboards.

5h

Army researchers teaching robots to be more reliable teammates for soldiers

Researchers at the U.S. Army Research Laboratory and the Robotics Institute at Carnegie Mellon University developed a new technique to quickly teach robots novel traversal behaviors with minimal human oversight.

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Researchers interpret new experimental data aimed at showing dark matter interacts with ordinary matter

An international team of scientists that includes University of California, Riverside, physicist Hai-Bo Yu has imposed conditions on how dark matter may interact with ordinary matter—constraints that can help identify the elusive dark matter particle and detect it on Earth.

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New evidence of two subspecies of American pikas in Rocky Mountain National Park

Rocky Mountain National Park provides habitat for not one, but two subspecies of the American pika.

5h

The Science Behind Your (Irrational) Fear of Friday the 13th

Friday the 13th is what you make it, and it's OK if you think it's unlucky.

6h

Sticking with the wrong choice

The behavior of people who remain committed to a choice, even when it is clear that an alternate choice would be a better option, has been a perplexing phenomenon to psychologists and economists. For example, people will continue to wait in the slow line at a grocery store, stick out an unhealthy relationship, or refuse to abandon an expensive, wasteful project—all because such individuals have al

6h

What was hot before 1976? A trip down British weather's memory lane

As clouds and the odd shower break the spell of the recent heat wave, it's a good time to reflect on our fascination with hot and sunny weather in the UK. A lot of comparisons have been made between this year's heat and 1976, when Abba were in the charts, flares were in fashion and Britain had its hottest summer for 350 years.

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Greek court rules to extradite cybercrime suspect to FranceR. Mueller Russian US DNC

A Greek court agreed Friday to extradite to France a Russian cybercrime suspect who also is wanted on criminal charges in the United States and Russia.

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Reopening the Emmett Till Case Is a Cynical Play

JACKSON, Miss.—If there is a fight to be had for the future of America, it will be waged in the Delta. The great alluvial plain to the west and north of here, stretching from Vicksburg on up to Memphis, and expanding out like a fan from the mighty Mississippi River, is a storied home to movement, and is the proving ground of the laws and legends that make the country what it is today. Past the so

6h

Microsoft Calls For Federal Regulation of Facial RecognitionMicrosoft Recognition

“Facial recognition will require the public and private sectors alike to step up—and to act,” says Brad Smith, the company’s president.

6h

Pregnancy depression is on the rise, a survey suggests

Women today may be at greater risk of depression during pregnancy than previous generations.

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Sticking with the wrong choice

New research from the University of Minnesota published in the journal Science discovered that mice, rats, and humans all commit the sunk cost fallacy.

6h

Study: Journalists view co-workers as more ethical than peers

The University of Texas at Dallas' Dr. Angela Lee explored journalists' opinions about one another — both their co-workers and their peers. As it turns out, they act much like the general public by trusting the actions of professionals working with them more than journalists at other outlets. The research was published online May 30 in the journal Journalism.

6h

Energy-making gold specks may boost solar storage

Star-shaped gold nanoparticles, coated with a semiconductor, can produce hydrogen from water over four times more efficiently than other methods—and could lead to better ways to store solar energy, a new study shows. The discovery could also lead to other advances that could boost renewable energy use and fight climate change, researchers say. “Instead of using ultraviolet light, which is the sta

6h

Do drones deserve their dire reputation? Depends who is flying them

Whether they are dropping drugs into prison yards, narrowly avoiding passenger aircraft or invading the privacy of unsuspecting homeowners, drones have been hitting the headlines for all the wrong reasons.

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Evolution got us here, but we can change where we're going

History is not necessarily destiny, especially when it comes to how we treat one another. Read More

6h

Theorists publish highest-precision prediction of muon magnetic anomaly

Latest calculation based on how subatomic muons interact with all known particles comes out just in time for comparison with precision measurements at new 'Muon g-2' experiment.

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Study describes enzyme's key role in immune response to Chagas disease parasite

A study shows that the expression of PI3Kγ protein increases during infection by T. cruzi, an essential response in avoiding excessive inflammation and controlling parasitemia. Heart tissue analyses involving human patients who developed cardiopathy in the disease's chronic stage also provided results. The next challenge is to devise treatment for Chagas using molecules capable of modulating the c

6h

National Academies target opioid abuse and infectious disease consequences

The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine today released proceedings of a March 12 workshop exploring the rise in infectious diseases accompanying opioid abuse, and possible strategies for reducing both epidemics.

6h

Why Nudists Love Twitter

Since Martin Belcher, a 50-year-old customer-services adviser based in the U.K., joined Twitter in 2012, he’s tweeted out thousands of naked photos of himself hiking, gardening, reading, eating, and watering his lawn. His nearly 3,000 followers respond by favoriting, retweeting, and frequently sharing nude photos of their own. Belcher isn’t a porn star or spam account sharing unsolicited photogra

6h

Algae have land genes

The genome of the algae species Chara braunii has been decoded. It already contains the first genetic characteristics that enabled the water plants' evolutionary transition to land.

6h

Scared of heights? This new VR therapy could help

Virtual reality may be good training ground for facing your fears in real life.

6h

Physician burnout is a big factor in medical errors

Physician burnout is at least equally responsible for medical errors as unsafe medical workplace conditions, if not more so, according to a new study. “If we are trying to maximize the safety and quality of medical care, we must address the factors in the work environment that lead to burnout among our health care providers,” says Tait Shanafelt, director of the WellMD Center at Stanford Universi

6h

The Farcical Battle Over What to Call Lab-Grown Meat

On Thursday, in a small but packed auditorium, the FDA convened a public meeting about lab-grown meat—but you wouldn’t have known that if you were listening for those words. According to the FDA, it was actually about “foods produced using animal-cell culture technology.” And according to the meeting’s various speakers, it was “clean meat,” or “artificial meat,” or “in vitro meat,” or “cell-cultu

6h

The ‘To Be Sure’ Conservatives

Donald Trump’s brazen violation of principles American conservatives were once thought to cherish—from free trade to family values to a hard line against America’s foes—has split right-leaning pundits into three camps. At one extreme are the pure sycophants. For them, conservatism is whatever Trump says it is. Many, like Sebastian Gorka, were unknown until Trump’s presidency, which means they can

6h

First machine learning method capable of accurate extrapolation

Understanding how a robot will react under different conditions is essential to guaranteeing its safe operation. But how do you know what will break a robot without actually damaging it? A new machine learning method can use observations made under safe conditions to make accurate predictions for all possible conditions governed by the same physical dynamics.

6h

Wearable device can predict older adults' risk of falling

Every year, more than one in three individuals aged 65 and older will experience a fall. Treatment and awareness of falling usually happens after a fall has already occurred. Researchers wanted to see if they could predict an individual's risk of falling so that preventative measures could be taken to reduce this risk.

6h

How looking at the big picture can lead to better decisions

New research suggests how distancing yourself from a decision may help you make the choice that produces the most benefit for you and others affected.

6h

An MSU-based researcher developed an algorithm to improve information security tools

A scientist from MSU developed an algorithm increasing the speed of calculation of cryptographic transformations based on elliptical curves that requires little computational power. An algorithm like that may be used as a security feature on the Internet of things and blockchain platforms. The results of the study were published in the Applied Mathematics and Computation magazine.

6h

Growing a dinosaur's dinner

Scientists have measured the nutritional value of herbivore dinosaurs' diet by growing their food in atmospheric conditions similar to those found roughly 150 million years ago.

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Study finds 84 highly endangered Amur leopards remain in China and Russia

Scientists estimate there are only 84 remaining highly endangered Amur leopards (Panthera pardus orientalis) remaining in the wild across its current range along the southernmost border of Primorskii Province in Russia and Jilin Province of China.

6h

New method identifies the proteins that unpack DNA

A new method makes it possible to systematically identify specialized proteins that unpack DNA inside the nucleus of a cell, making the usually dense DNA more accessible for gene expression and other functions. The method, and the shared characteristics of these proteins, appear in the journal Molecular Cell . “Our genome is very compact, which means there is an accessibility issue,” says Lu Bai,

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Allergy potential of strawberries and tomatoes depends on the variety

Strawberries and tomatoes are among the most widely consumed fruits and vegetables worldwide. However, many people are allergic to them, especially if they have been diagnosed with birch pollen allergy. A team from the Technical University of Munich has investigated which strawberry or tomato varieties contain fewer allergens than others and to what extent cultivation or preparation methods are in

7h

Mice study implicates fat as obesity cause

Scientists at the Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology found that only eating high levels of dietary fat makes you fat. They have performed the largest study of its kind to resolve what components of the diet cause mice to put on body fat.

7h

Nano-kirigami: 'Paper-cut' provides model for 3D intelligent nanofabrication

Dr. LI Jiafang, from the Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, has recently formed an international team to apply kirigami techniques to advanced 3D nanofabrication.

7h

Barium ruthenate: A high-yield, easy-to-handle perovskite catalyst for the oxidation of sulfides

Researchers at Tokyo Institute of Technology have developed a ruthenium-based perovskite catalyst that shows strong activity even at low temperatures (down to 313 K). The reusable catalyst does not require additives, meaning that it can prevent the formation of toxic by-products. The oxidation of sulfides is a commercially important process with broad applications ranging from chemicals production

7h

Synapse-specific plasticity governs the identity of overlapping memory traces

Each memory is stored in a specific population of neurons called engram cells. When a memory is linked with another to generate an associative memory, two memory traces overlap. At the same time, individual memories maintain their own identities. Using two overlapping fear memories in mice, researchers show that synapse-specific plasticity guarantees both storage and identity of individual memorie

7h

The Best Nintendo Switch Games: Single Player, Multiplayer, and Co-op

From 'Celeste' to 'Zelda', these are our absolute favorite games on Switch.

7h

Determining the bioaccumulation of 9 metals in aquatic invertebrates in mining areas

A study conducted by the UPV/EHU's Animal Ecotoxicity and Biodiversity Group in collaboration with the University of Vigo has proposed an ecological threshold concentration of 9 metals for 10 taxa of aquatic macroinvertebrates from clean sites in the Nalón river basin (Asturias). This is the first step toward incorporating into river management plans quality criteria relating to the bioaccumulatio

7h

Regioner overvejer at udskyde ny version af Sundhedsplatformen

Region H og Sjælland overvejer at udskyde den nye version af Sundhedsplatformen, efter at det nye landspatientregister er blevet forsinket. De to systemer skulle være gået live samtidig.

7h

How to leave the sand behind on your next beach trip

DIY Clean up sneaky grains of silica. Tired of sand clinging stubbornly to your skin and getting wedged in your rugs? We have a few tricks to keep the grains at the beach where they belong.

7h

What can other cities learn about water shortages from Day Zero?

Cape Town was set to run dry on April 12, 2018, leaving its 3.7 million residents without tap water.

7h

How to break up with plastics (using behavioural science)

Australia is responsible for over 13 thousand tonnes of plastic litter per year. At the end of June 2018, the Australian government released an inquiry report on the waste and recycling industry in Australia. One of the recommendations was that we should phase out petroleum-based single-use plastics by 2023.

7h

Native state is fortunate trap in the journey of protein to its destination, fibril state

Arranging into well-organized fibrillar aggregate, commonly known as amyloid fibril is an inherent property of any polypeptide chain. Amyloid fibrils are associated with a number of severe human pathologies like the Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, type 2 diabetes and many more. This review article includes the recent studies of identification and characterization of possible conformation

7h

Nosocomial neonatal meningitis with Acinetobacter baumannii on myelomeningocele

In this article, together with a review of the literature, we report two cases of imipenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii neonatal meningitis following ruptured myelomeningocele, treated with intravenous colistin with favorable results.

7h

New study reveals Ulsan is exposed to yearlong toxic fine dust

A new study, affiliated with South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) offers decisive proof that South Korea's Ulsan city is affected by toxic substances contained in fine dust particles, regardless of the season.

7h

Tree shrew tolerance for spicy foods unlocked by researchers

Researchers accidentally observed tree shrews directly and actively consuming chili peppers, despite the deep geographic isolation between the animal and the food. To understand this tolerance for spicy food, they performed genomic and functional analyses on the tree shrew and its TRPV1.

7h

How fast can acute stroke treatment become to still be reliable?

Neurologists around the world are aware that the delivery of thrombolytic treatment for stroke in Helsinki University Hospital, Finland, is freaking fast — but is it too fast? A new study published on July 11 in the journal Neurology clarified whether the team of neurologists in Helsinki actually have enough time to diagnose stroke correctly before it is treated.

7h

Breast cancer follow-up imaging varies widely, study finds

Follow-up imaging for women with non-metastatic breast cancer varies widely across the country, according to a new study led by researchers at UC San Francisco. Some patients go without the annual mammograms that experts recommend, while others with the same cancer diagnosis receive full-body scans that expose them to significant amounts of radiation and are not recommended by experts.

7h

One step closer to finding a cure for brain diseases

Korean researchers identified a mechanism for signaling brain nerve cells through excitatory synaptic binding proteins. The finding provides important clues to understanding the principles of synaptic nerve transmission and thus can be used to analyze the fundamental causes of brain diseases and treat them.

7h

Forget about VR in the living room; this summer it’s on waterslides and in arcades

VR technology hasn’t been a hit with consumers, so companies are taking it everywhere from specially built arenas to airports.

7h

India's Infosys reports 3.7 percent profit rise, misses estimates

Infosys on Friday reported a 3.7 percent rise in quarterly profits, well below expectations for the Indian software giant.

7h

Smart window controls light and heat, kills microorganisms

A new smart window offers more than just a nice view—it also controls the transmittance of sunlight, heats the interiors of buildings by converting solar radiation into heat, and virtually eliminates E. coli bacteria living on the glass. In the future, such sterile smart windows may be used in airplanes, hospitals, public transportation, and other areas.

7h

Adding an inert polymer to plastic solar cells enables high efficiency and easy production

Polymer plastic solar cells remain an industry priority because of their light weight, flexibility and cost-effectiveness. Now scientists from Stony Brook University and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) have demonstrated that these types of solar cells can be more efficient and have more stability based on new research findings.

7h

Boreplatforme og havvindmøller skal streame data til skyen

Force Technology vil med en ny løsning streame sen­sordata fra de kritiske komponenter på boreplatforme og havvindmøller, hvilket vil gøre det lettere at lave forebyggende vedligehold på udstyret.

7h

Expert panel compares opioid epidemic to early days of HIV epidemic

Experts are drawing on lessons learned from the early days of the HIV epidemic to address the current opioid epidemic. As a result of widespread opioid abuse, new epidemics of hepatitis C virus (HCV) and HIV infection have arisen and hospitalizations for related infections have increased. An expert panel convened by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (NASEM) recommends f

7h

Subaru Telescope helps pinpoint origin of ultra-high energy neutrino

For the first time, the source object which produced an ultra-high energy neutrino has been identified. This discovery was made possible by collaboration between the IceCube experiment in Antarctica and telescopes worldwide, including NAOJ's Subaru Telescope in Hawai'i.

7h

LGBQ teens more likely than peers to use dangerous drugs

Lesbian, gay, bisexual or questioning (LGBQ) teens are at substantially higher risk of substance use than their heterosexual peers, according to a new study led by San Diego State University researchers and published in the American Journal of Public Health.

7h

Scientists on Twitter: Preaching to the choir or singing from the rooftops?

SFU professor Isabelle Cote published a paper today in FACETS on Twitter use for scientists. They wanted to know whether whether Twitter allows scientists to promote their findings primarily to other scientists ('inreach'), or whether it can help them reach broader, non-scientific audiences ('outreach'). They show that reaching a broad audience on Twitter is a non-linear process that requires a su

7h

In search of dark matter

An international team of scientists that includes UC Riverside physicist Hai-Bo Yu has imposed conditions on how dark matter may interact with ordinary matter. In the search for direct detection of dark matter, the experimental focus has been on WIMPs, or weakly interacting massive particles, the hypothetical particles thought to make up dark matter. But the research team invokes a different theor

7h

Army researchers suggest uncertainty may be key in battlefield decision making

Army researchers have discovered that being initially uncertain when faced with making critical mission-related decisions based on various forms of information may lead to better overall results in the end.

7h

Army researchers teaching robots to be more reliable teammates for soldiers

Researchers at the US Army Research Laboratory and the Robotics Institute at Carnegie Mellon University developed a new technique to quickly teach robots novel traversal behaviors with minimal human oversight.

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‘Value-based’ insurance gets people to take their medicine

When insurance plans charge patients less for the medicines that help them most, patients are more likely to take them, according to a new article. Taking a medicine every day in the hopes that it will prevent some long-range potential health catastrophe—like a heart attack or kidney failure—isn’t easy. Many people skip doses, or don’t refill their prescriptions on time, or at all. And plenty of

8h

Researchers isolate parvovirus from ancient human remains

Airborne and bloodborne human parvovirus B19 causes a number of illnesses, including the childhood rash known as fifth disease, chronic anemia in AIDS patients, arthritis in elderly people, aplastic crisis in people with bone marrow-related illness, and hydrops fetalis in pregnant women. A single-stranded DNA virus, it has no vaccine or cure, and treatment generally consists of managing symptoms u

8h

Brown's student satellite to be deployed from ISS into orbit

Friday, July 13, will mark a major milestone for current and former members of Brown Space Engineering, a student group that has spent the past seven years designing and building a small satellite.

8h

Shark Sex: Courtship | Countdown to Shark Week: The Daily Bite

The Captain breaks down the complicated world of shark courtship in this episode's edition of Shark Sex 101. Later, we meet some friends with some serious pancake skills and we learn some conservation tips from the New York Aquarium. Shark Week 2018 starts Sunday July 22 9p! Stream The Daily Bite on Discovery GO: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/the-daily-bite/ Stream Classic Shark Week Episode

8h

Skattekister, glade farver og holdånd: Derfor spiller du Fortnite hele natten

Se ti ting i computerspillet, der gør, at du altid har lyst til at spille igen og igen og igen og igen.

8h

Climate Change Will Force the Poor From Their Homes

A new study investigates the intersection of climate change and real estate, and finds that higher elevations bring higher values.

8h

Dell G7 15 Review: Mucho Muscle for Your Money

A budget gaming laptop with a few flaws, but gobs of brawn.

8h

'Fortnite' Season 5 Is Here, and the Rest of the Week in Games

It's been a busy week in gaming. Let's catch up.

8h

Slippery when dry

Anyone who has ever taken their car in for an oil change recognizes the importance of reducing the friction that arises when steel touches steel.

8h

Prehistoric people started to spread domesticated bananas across the world 6,000 years ago

In a globalised world, we routinely move enormous quantities of food around the planet in trade and for aid. Many countries, including the UK, would struggle to feed their populations without food imports. Most people are used to being able to buy a wide range of produce which domestic farmers would struggle – or find impossible – to grow. A typical example is the banana, once a prized exotic nove

8h

"The Last Serenade" | Lili Haydn

In a stirring, emotional performance, violinist Lili Haydn plays a selection from her musical "The Last Serenade."

8h

Smaller summer harmful algal bloom forecast for western Lake Erie

University of Michigan researchers and their partners predict that western Lake Erie will experience a harmful algal bloom of cyanobacteria this summer that is smaller than in 2017 but larger than the mild bloom in 2016.

8h

Study shows virtual reality could hold the key to GPs spotting child abuse

A three-year research project led by a University of Birmingham academic, working with colleagues from Goldsmiths and University College London, has indicated that virtual reality (VR) could become a vital tool for training General Practitioners (GPs) to look out for hard-to-detect signs of child abuse.

8h

'X'-ploring the Eagle Nebula and 'Pillars of Creation'

The Eagle Nebula, also known as Messier 16, contains the young star cluster NGC 6611. It also the site of the spectacular star-forming region known as the Pillars of Creation, which is located in the southern portion of the Eagle Nebula.

8h

Study sheds new light on forests' response to atmospheric pollution

How forests respond to elevated nitrogen levels from atmospheric pollution is not always the same. While a forest is filtering nitrogen as expected, a higher percentage than previously seen is leaving the system again as the potent greenhouse gas nitrous oxide, say researchers.

8h

Storytelling may make political ads powerful persuaders

The persuasive potential of using stories in political ads may make them powerful tools for politicians and should become a focus for future research, according to a team of researchers.

8h

When to trust (and not to trust) peer reviewed science

The words "published in a peer reviewed journal" are sometimes considered as the gold standard in science. But any professional scientist will tell you that the fact an article has undergone peer review is a long way from an ironclad guarantee of quality.

8h

When teachers think differently about themselves as math learners, students benefit

Study shows improvement in students' attitudes and test scores after teachers change their own mindset—and instruction—around math.

8h

A way to make cleaner metal-free perovskites at low cost

A team of researchers at Southeast University in China has found a way to make metal-free perovskites in a useable form. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes their technique and how well it worked. Wei Li and Li-Jun Ji with Nankai University and Huazhong University respectively, offer a Perspective piece on the materials made by the team and explain why it is import

8h

Plasma jets inside the sun foretell unequal activity of its two hemispheres

The sun's activity waxes and wanes periodically and holds sway over our space environment. Sunspots, strongly magnetized blotches on the solar surface, sometimes release fierce storms in space that severely impact our satellite based communication and navigational systems and occasionally, render satellites useless. However, a complete understanding of all aspects of the sunspot activity cycle rem

8h

Observatories team up to reveal rare double asteroid

New observations by three of the world's largest radio telescopes have revealed that an asteroid discovered last year is actually two objects, each about 3,000 feet (900 meters) in size, orbiting each other.

8h

Researcher discusses IceCube neutrino sensor array

Dozens of scientists and engineers across multiple divisions at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) played a role in the design, development, and deployment of the IceCube neutrino sensor array at the South Pole. They pioneered the ice-embedded digital optical modules (DOMs) and circuitry that are IceCube's key enabling technologies. Berkeley Lab researc

8h

Nanotech patch makes light-up medical tests 100x brighter

Researchers have developed a high-tech fix that uses metal nanostructures to increase the fluorescence intensity by 100 times in diagnostic tests. It’s a cheap and easy solution to a vexing diagnostic problem. Fluorescence-based biosensing and bioimaging technologies are common in research and clinical settings to detect and image various biological species of interest. While fluorescence-based d

8h

Mystery of the Basel papyrus solved

Since the 16th century, Basel has been home to a mysterious papyrus. With mirror writing on both sides, it has puzzled generations of researchers. A research team from the University of Basel has now discovered that it is an unknown medical document from late antiquity. The text was likely written by the famous Roman physician Galen.

9h

Ancient hunter-gatherers didn’t all eat paleo

Health Ötzi is a good reminder that there's no one ancient, natural diet for us to return to. There’s been quite a lot of controversy surrounding ancient diets, but one thing is clear: hunter-gatherers eat whatever it is most efficient to hunt and gather.

9h

9 Emmy-Nominated Shows You Can Binge to Escape Reality

The best Emmy nominated shows to binge watch to relax, from 'Killing Eve' to 'The Good Place.'

9h

Image of the Day: Fat Friendly

The oldest-known ice mummy consumed high amounts of fat.

9h

First machine learning method capable of accurate extrapolation

Understanding how a robot will react under different conditions is essential to guaranteeing its safe operation. But how do you know what will break a robot without actually damaging it? A new method developed by scientists at the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (IST Austria) and the Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems (MPI for Intelligent Systems) is the first machine learnin

9h

The Psychology of Roller Coasters

Perhaps the draw of roller coasters is the enjoyment of the visceral sensation of fear itself, much like watching a horror movie — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Crescent moon and Venus pair closely on Sunday, July 15th

Soon after the Sun dips below the western horizon on Sunday, July 15th, anyone looking in that direction will see a dramatic sight: a pretty crescent Moon paired closely with the dazzling planet Venus, the "Evening Star."

9h

Researchers develop first-of-its-kind optic isolator

Researchers at the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology have constructed a first-of-its-kind optic isolator based on resonance of light waves on a rapidly rotating glass sphere. This is the first photonic device in which light advancing in opposite directions moves at different speeds.

9h

1 Trick To Improve YOUR Communication (Harvard Psychologist)

submitted by /u/Puzzleheaded_Mind [link] [comments]

9h

New technologies for producing medical therapeutic proteins

Bacterial systems are some of the simplest and most effective platforms for the expression of recombinant proteins. They are more cost-effective compared to other methods, and are therefore of great interest not only for Lobachevsky University researchers, but also for manufacturers of therapeutically important drugs.

9h

Upsurge in sleeping problems due to UK's longest heatwave in 40 years

People left tired, irritable and less productive at work after nights of poor shuteye Britain’s longest heatwave since 1976 has led to a upsurge in sleeping problems, with people left tired, irritable and less productive at work after sweaty nights of poor-quality shuteye. Record temperatures of up to 32.4C (90.3F) have been stopping many people getting a proper rest as they struggle to get to sl

9h

Seven rhinos die after move to a new park in Kenya

Seven out of 14 critically endangered black rhinos died after being moved to a new reserve in southern Kenya, wildlife officials admitted on Friday.

9h

'Grandmother' Cells in the Brain Could Help the Body Shake Off Jet Lag

Heavy eyes, snappish words, bitter feelings? You can thank your cells for making you feel this way.

9h

What are the pros and cons of longer solar contracts?

The world's first 35-year day or night solar contract (ACWA Power's with DEWA in Dubai) also had a record-low price for solar with storage – of just 7.3 cents per kWh.

9h

Based on a new model, researchers report alarming polar melting phenomenon

The melting of glaciers on one side of the globe can trigger disintegration of glaciers on the other side of the globe, as has been presented in a recent paper by a team of AWI scientists, who investigated marine microalgae preserved in glacial deposits and subsequently used their findings to perform climate simulations. The study highlights a process with alarming consequences for modern ice shee

9h

Iceberg 4 miles wide breaks off from Greenland glacier

An iceberg four miles (six kilometers) wide has broken off from a glacier in eastern Greenland and scientists have captured the dramatic event on video.

9h

Embattled bike-sharing firm told to refund customer deposits

Embattled bike-sharing firm oBike must refund customers' $4.6 million deposits, authorities have warned, after the company quit operating in Singapore last month leaving some 14,000 bicycles strewn across the city.

9h

Controlling the manufacture of stable aerogels

Kyoto University researchers have developed a new approach to control the fabrication of soft, porous materials, overcoming a primary challenge in materials science.

9h

Science fiction enthusiasts have a positive attitude brain uploading

Mind uploading is a prospective method to create functional copies of the human brain on computers. The development of this technology, which involves scanning the brain and detailed cell-specific emulation, is currently receiving billions in funding. Science fiction enthusiasts express a more positive attitude toward the technology compared to others.

9h

Deforestation Ticks Up in Brazil's Savanna

The Cerrado is the most threatened biome in Brazil, environmentalists proclaim — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9h

Svinepest: EU vil have styr på Europas vildsvin

Et nyt seksårigt projekt skal samle information og øge dialogen landende imellem om risikoen for afrikansk svinepest spreder sig gennem vildsvin.

9h

Possible Oldest Fragment of Homer's 'Odyssey' Discovered in Greece

In an ancient heap of Roman rubble, archaeologists in Greece discovered a clay tablet engraved with 13 lines of Homer's epic poem.

9h

Home From the Honeymoon, the Self-Driving Car Industry Faces Reality

In the post-Uber crash era, self-driving car developers are struggling with how to present their technology to an increasingly wary public.

10h

The Strange and Curious Case of the Deadly Superbug Yeast

By the normal standards of outbreak, Candida auris signals a mind-bending shift—and it’s forcing researchers draw on some of medicine’s oldest practices.

10h

Malaysia’s pig-tail macaques eat rats, head first

Pig-tail macaques are seen as a menace on Malaysian palm oil plantations, but may be helping to reduce rodent populations.

10h

Sorry to Bother You Is a Dystopian Send-Up of Dystopias

Speculative fiction must speculate. It’s in the name, of course. While idyllic utopias have had their place under the sun in science-fiction and fantasy media, it’s dystopias that are having their day, with their central premise imagining that sociopolitical currents today will lead to disaster tomorrow. In an age that sees people shaped by anxiety about annihilation (among other things), the dys

10h

Trump's EPA Puts Our Health at Risk

The agency’s proposed new rule would allow it to ignore the best available science — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

10h

Late Snowpack Signals a Lost Summer for Greenland's Shorebirds

Sanderlings, red knots and ruddy turnstones failed to breed this year along the Arctic island’s east coast due to record snow cover — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

10h

How the US Government Planted 'Spy Phones' on Suspects

In at least one instance, DEA agents sold an encrypted BlackBerry to a suspected drug smuggler—and kept the encryption key.

11h

Don't Let Trump Go to War With Iran

The decision of the United States to wage war against Iraq in 2003 was one of the worst mistakes our country has ever made. Was Saddam Hussein a brutal dictator? Yes, but he didn’t have weapons of mass destruction, and toppling his regime had profound consequences—bringing the deaths of thousands of Americans and hundreds of thousands of Iraqis, promoting deep instability in the region, inflictin

11h

UMBC researchers develop nanoparticles to reduce internal bleeding caused by blast trauma

Currently, there are no treatments available to address internal bleeding in the field but early intervention is key or survival and better outcomes. UMBC researchers and collaborators investigated the role of nanoparticles they developed to stop internal bleeding on the damage inflicted by blast trauma.

11h

Fragile X: New drug strategy corrects behavior/biochemical measures in mouse model

Research in mice shows that a pharmacological strategy can alleviate multiple behavioral and cellular deficiencies in a mouse model of fragile X syndrome, the most common inherited form of intellectual disability.

11h

Researchers trace Parkinson's damage in the heart

A new way to examine stress and inflammation in the heart will help Parkinson's researchers test new therapies and explore an unappreciated way the disease puts people at risk of falls and hospitalization.

11h

New research calculates capacity of North American forests to sequester carbon

Researchers have calculated the capacity of North American forests to sequester carbon in a detailed analysis that for the first time integrates natural processes and climate changes that are likely to alter growth over the next 60 years.

11h

Yale researchers identify target for novel malaria vaccine

A Yale-led team of researchers have created a vaccine that protects against malaria infection in mouse models, paving the way for the development of a human vaccine that works by targeting the specific protein that parasites use to evade the immune system. The study was published by Nature Communications.

11h

5 skøre løsninger på overbefolkning du nok aldrig har hørt om før

Radiospil, sæddræbende vira og p-piller til mænd. Her er femskøre ideer til at løse verdens befolkningsproblemer.

12h

Toiletvand, robotbier og skyskraber-landbrug: Sådan skaffer vi mad i fremtiden

Hvis befolkningen i fremtidens megabyer skal brødfødes, skal der nye metoder i brug, vurderer forskere.

12h

Women Making Science Videos on YouTube Face Hostile Comments

After studying 23,005 comments left on videos about science and related topics, a researcher says, “I could see why people would not want to be on YouTube.”

12h

New research calculates capacity of North American forests to sequester carbon

Researchers have calculated the capacity of North American forests to sequester carbon in a detailed analysis that for the first time integrates the effects of two key factors: the natural process of forest growth and regeneration, and climate changes that are likely to alter the growth process over the next 60 years.

12h

Borger.dk-undersøgelse hacket: Hackere har downloadet borgeres oplysninger

En brugertilfredshedsundersøgelse fra Digitaliseringsstyrelsen er blevet hacket. Gerningsmændene har downloadet borgernes email-adresser og besvarelser.

12h

Latin America's largest solar park turns Mexican desert green

Driving through the endless dunes and cacti of the Chihuahuan desert in northern Mexico, a shimmering blue field suddenly appears on the horizon—not a mirage, but the largest solar park in Latin America.

12h

US appeals judge's order allowing AT&T to buy Time Warner

The US Justice Department on Thursday appealed last month's ruling from a federal judge allowing AT&T to buy Time Warner in a mega-deal that could reshape the media-entertainment landscape.

12h

Climate change wreaking havoc with Colombia's glaciers: government

Climate change has helped melt nearly a fifth of Colombia's mountaintop glacier cover in just seven years, the government said Thursday.

12h

US hedge fund demands $770m from S. Korea over Samsung merger

A US hedge fund is demanding almost $800 million from South Korea at an international tribunal over the controversial merger of two units of the giant Samsung conglomerate, officials said Friday.

12h

Medicare proposes to pay docs for analyzing texted photos

Medicare says it wants to pay doctors for analyzing photos texted by patients, one of several steps to keep up with how technology is changing health care.

12h

Boeing, SpaceX unlikely to make manned flights to ISS in 2019

Boeing and SpaceX are unlikely to be able to send astronauts to the International Space Station (ISS) next year, according to a US government audit report, resulting in a possible gap in the US presence on the spacecraft.

12h

Astrofysikere jubler over løsning af 100 år gammel gåde

Et storstilet forskningsprojekt, huset under Sydpolens is, løser 100 år gammel gåde…

12h

How worried should you be about a new ‘superbug’ STI?

You’ve probably never heard of Mycoplasma genitalium, even though it’s one of the most prevalent. Here’s what you need to know

12h

Violent black holes spit neutrinos at Earth and we finally caught one

For the first time, we have traced a high-energy neutrino back to its origin – a black hole 4 billion light years away – and solved an old cosmic mystery

12h

Today's deals: rechargeable batteries, wireless chargers, air mattresses

Gadgets To get people excited for Prime Day, Amazon is offering exclusive Prime-member discounts. PopSci is always on the lookout for today's best deals. Our lists will be updated throughout the day, so check back to see if stumbled upon any awesome new discounts.

13h

Brazil fighting fake news in the classroom

Brazil has taken a stand against the explosion of "fake news" stories swamping the internet by making media analysis studies compulsory for schoolchildren.

13h

First space tourist flights could come in 2019

The two companies leading the pack in the pursuit of space tourism say they are just months away from their first out-of-this-world passenger flights—though neither has set a firm date.

13h

Apple launches $300 mn 'green' fund for China suppliers

Apple said on Friday it has established a fund to invest nearly $300 million over the next four years to connect its Chinese suppliers to renewable energy as Beijing pushes an anti-pollution drive.

13h

New species may arise from rapid mitochondrial evolution

Genetic research at Oregon State University has shed new light on how isolated populations of the same species evolve toward reproductive incompatibility and thus become separate species.

13h

Børn finder ny potentielt invasiv myreart

Skolebørn har fundet en hidtil ukendt myreart i Danmark, det fastslår en DNA-analyse af…

13h

Fake news: the media industry strikes back

The viral spread of hoaxes and misinformation ahead of the US election and Brexit referendum two years ago was a wake-up call for many established news media, who have gone on the offensive to shore up their credibility and help filter out fake news.

13h

Global PC market grows for first time in 6 years: survey

The global personal computer market grew for the first time in six years in the second quarter of 2018, driven by upgrades in the business segment, a market tracker said Thursday.

13h

Fighting 'fake news' with the law

Some countries are bringing in legislation to fight "fake news", a particular menace during election campaigning, but critics warn of the danger to freedom of expression and the media.

13h

From Ebola to Nipah: are we ready for the next epidemic? – Science Weekly podcast

The 2014 Ebola outbreak killed over 10,000 people before it was eventually brought under control. As new infectious diseases appear around the world, what can we learn from past outbreaks to better prepare ourselves? Subscribe and review on Acast , Apple Podcasts , Soundcloud , Audioboom and Mixcloud . Join the discussion on Facebook and Twitter Somewhere in the world there’s a bat, a monkey or a

13h

What’s the Truth behind The Truth About Pet Cancer?

The Truth About Pet Cancer ( TAPC ) is a slick bit of propaganda. Although it contains some interesting, even promising ideas, these are unfortunately served with a heavy seasoning of misinformation and fear-mongering. Hypotheses and opinions are presented as established facts, and anyone who disagrees is suggested to be ignorant at best, venal and corrupt at worst.

14h

Københavns Universitet mørklægger kuldsejlet it-projekt efter fem år: »Det er fortroligt«

Københavns Universitet besluttede for nylig at droppe et nyt personalesystem efter fem års udvikling. Men det er hemmeligt, hvad der gået galt.

15h

From Ebola to Nipah: are we ready for the next epidemic? – Science Weekly podcast

The 2014 Ebola outbreak killed over 10,000 people before it was eventually brought under control. As new infectious diseases appear around the world, what can we learn from past outbreaks to better prepare ourselves?

16h

Did Flawed Data Lead Track Astray on Testosterone in Women?

A new challenge has emerged to the I.A.A.F. rules that could require some runners to undergo medical treatment to lower their hormone levels.

16h

Danske skolebørn opdager ukendt myreart

Forskere frygter, at myren kan blive en pestilens, der stikker mennesker og angriber køkkenhaver.

16h

DNA-skader i sædceller kan forhindre graviditet

Ufrivilligt barnløse bør få undersøgt DNA'en i mandens sæd, lyder det fra professor.

16h

Looking at the urine and blood may be best in diagnosing myeloma

When it comes to diagnosing a condition in which the plasma cells that normally make antibodies to protect us instead become cancerous, it may be better to look at the urine as well as the serum of our blood for answers, pathologists say.

16h

Svinepest: Danmark klager til EU over beskidte svinetransporter

Transportører har ikke styr på rengøringen, og det øger risikoen for, at Danmark bliver ramt af afrikansk svinepest. Fødevarestyrelsen håber, at andre EU-lande følger Danmarks eksempel med at kontrollere svinetransporter.

17h

Solved protein puzzle opens door to new design for cancer drugs

Researchers at have solved a longstanding puzzle concerning the design of molecular motors, paving the way toward new cancer therapies.

18h

Turbulence allows clinical-scale platelet production for transfusions

Turbulence is a critical physical factor that promotes the large-scale production of functional platelets from human induced pluripotent stem cells, researchers reportl. Exposure to turbulent energy in a bioreactor stimulated hiPSC-derived bone marrow cells called megakaryocytes to produce 100 billion platelets — blood cell fragments that help wounds heal and prevent bleeding by forming blood clo

18h

A tiny population of neurons holds a master key to body's clock

Biologists unlocked a cure for jet lag in mice by activating a small subset of the neurons involved in setting daily rhythms.

18h

Structure and key features of critical immune-surveillance protein in humans

Scientists have defined the structure and key features of a human immune-surveillance protein that guards against cancer and bacterial and viral infections. The identification of two human-specific variations in the protein closes a critical knowledge gap in immunology and cancer biology.

18h

New method reveals how well cancer drugs hit their targets

Scientists have developed a method to measure how well cancer drugs reach their targets inside the body. It shows individual cancer cells in a tumor in real time, revealing which cells interact with the drug and which cells the drug fails to reach. The findings could help clinicians decide the best course and delivery of treatment for cancer patients in the future.

18h

Imaging technique illuminates immune status of monkeys with HIV-like virus

Findings from an animal study suggest that a non-invasive imaging technique could, with further development, become a tool to assess immune system recovery in people receiving treatment for HIV infection. Researchers used single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and a CD4-specific imaging probe to assess immune system changes throughout the bodies of macaques infected with SIV following

18h

Hubble and Gaia team up to fuel cosmic conundrum

Using the power and synergy of two space telescopes, astronomers have made the most precise measurement to date of the universe's expansion rate.

18h

Mystery of the Basel papyrus solved

Since the 16th century, Basel has been home to a mysterious papyrus. With mirror writing on both sides, it has puzzled generations of researchers. A research team has now discovered that it is an unknown medical document from late antiquity. The text was likely written by the famous Roman physician Galen.

18h

The more you smoke, the greater your risk of a heart rhythm disorder

The more you smoke, the greater your risk of a heart rhythm disorder called atrial fibrillation.

18h

Ant soldiers don't need big brains

Army ant (Eciton) soldiers are bigger but do not have larger brains than other workers within the same colony that fulfill more complex tasks, according to a study published in the open-access journal BMC Zoology. A collaborative team of researchers led by Drexel University in Philadelphia, US, and German colleagues suggests that because the very specific and limited tasks soldiers fulfill place l

20h

More attractive women get bigger engagement rings, and more unattractive men buy them

Psychologists figure out how men and women view engagement rings in light of how hot they think they are. Read More

20h

Smart Mouth Guard Senses Muscle Fatigue

A prototype flexible electronic mouth guard can measure lactate levels in an athlete’s saliva, tracking muscle fatigue during training and performance. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

21h

Ant soldiers don't need big brains

Army ant (Eciton) soldiers are bigger but do not have larger brains than other workers within the same colony that fulfill more complex tasks, according to a study published in the open access journal BMC Zoology. A collaborative team of researchers led by Drexel University in Philadelphia, US and German colleagues suggests that because the very specific and limited tasks soldiers fulfill place li

21h

Mystery solved: ‘Ghostly’ neutrinos come from a blazar

Scientists have found the first evidence of a source of high-energy cosmic neutrinos, ghostly subatomic particles that can travel unhindered for billions of light years from the most extreme environments in the universe to Earth. “For years, we’ve had a long list of potential sources for high-energy neutrinos. Now we have a specific source—blazars—that we can look at very carefully.” The observat

21h

Brexit 'could damage UK environment'

MPs demand legislation to ensure the government delivers on post-Brexit air pollution promises

21h

Iceman's last meal was high-fat, high-calorie feast

Mountain goat, red deer, cereal grains and a toxic fern: What our ancestors ate 5,000 years ago.

21h

FBI Investigator Rejects Accusations of Anti-Trump Bias

Republicans hammered FBI Agent Peter Strzok over several hours of testimony Thursday, seeking to discredit the long-running federal investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election, and to portray Strzok as a symbol of an agency hopelessly tainted by bias against President Donald Trump. The hearing quickly descended into a partisan spectacle that Strzok warned would be “another victor

21h

7 signs your child’s snoring warrants seeing the doctor

Many children may snore at some point in their lives, especially during bouts of colds or when their allergies are acting up. It’s often a passing phase, but how do parents know if it’s an issue requiring treatment? The answer often lies in what happens when a child isn’t sleeping, says pediatric sleep specialist Fauziya Hassan of C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital, part of the University of Michigan

21h

VIP neurons may be key to ending jet lag sooner

Biologists have unlocked a way to curb jet lag in mice by activating a small subset of the neurons involved in setting daily rhythms, according to a new study. All essential body functions are highly synchronized with local time by the body’s daily, or circadian, clock. A small spot at the very bottom of the brain, close to the roof of the mouth, reminds us to wake up and go to sleep at a regular

21h

Speaking up for patient safety

In a new study, a team led by clinician-researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) surveyed family members and patients with recent ICU experiences about their willingness to speak up about care concerns to medical providers.

21h

Graphene could be key to controlling water evaporation

Graphene coatings may offer the ability to control the water evaporation process from various surfaces, according to new research.The study, carried out by a team from the Chinese Academy of Sciences and the Collaborative Innovation Center of Quantum Matter (Beijing), looked at the interactions of water molecules with various graphene-covered surfaces.

21h

'No evidence' grammar schools can promote social mobility, study suggests

Expanding the number of grammar schools is unlikely to promote social mobility by providing more opportunities for disadvantaged pupils, a new study published in Educational Review finds.

21h

Insurance ‘churn’ poses serious risks for diabetes patients

One in four working-age adults with type 1 diabetes had at least one gap of at least 30 days in their private health insurance, within an average of a three-year period, according to a new study. For a million American adults, living with type 1 diabetes means a constant need for insulin medication, blood sugar testing supplies, and specialized care, to keep them healthy and prevent a crisis that

22h

Understanding the social dynamics that cause cooperation to thrive, or fail

Biologists address the question of how an evolving social network influences the likelihood of cooperation in a theoretical social group. They find that, although networks where connected individuals are closely related are more likely to cooperate, such groups can trigger a feedback loop that alters the structure of the network and leads to cooperation's collapse.

22h

New molecular structures in boron-based nanoclusters

Researchers have shown that clusters of boron and lanthanide atoms form interesting 'inverse sandwich' structures that could be useful as molecular magnets.

22h

Antioxidant benefits of sleep

Scientists found that short-sleeping fruit fly mutants shared the common defect of sensitivity to acute oxidative stress, and thus that sleep supports antioxidant processes.

22h

Gammaherpesviruses linked to tumors in macaques with simian immunodeficiency virus

Viruses known as gammaherpesviruses may raise the risk of cancer in macaques infected with Simian Immunodeficiency Virus or Simian Human Immunodeficiency Virus (SIV/SHIV), according to new research.

22h

Listen: Could a daily pill one day treat ALS?

More breakthroughs in the basic biology of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS or Lou Gehrig’s disease) are on the way and a cure is possible, says Robert Kalb, director of the Les Turner ALS Center at Northwestern University Medicine. In this episode of the Breakthroughs podcast, Kalb explains how ALS diagnosis works and how patients go about getting treatment. Listen to the episode here: ( Episo

22h

Graphene could be key to controlling water evaporation

Graphene coatings may offer the ability to control the water evaporation process from various surfaces, according to new research.

22h

'No evidence' grammar schools can promote social mobility, study suggests

Expanding the number of grammar schools is unlikely to promote social mobility by providing more opportunities for disadvantaged pupils, a new study published in Educational Review finds.

22h

The Atlantic Daily: Force and Ingenuity

What We’re Following Foreign Relations: On the heels of a NATO summit at which he demonstrated his skepticism of alliances, President Donald Trump traveled to Britain for an official visit that’s expected to be overshadowed by protests. Though Trump supported the country’s withdrawal from the European Union during his campaign, he hasn’t stepped in as president to ease the messy transition, makin

22h

You've Probably Never Heard of This STD. It Could Become the Next Superbug.

Doctors in the United Kingdom are warning that a sexually transmitted infection called Mycoplasma genitalium could become a "superbug."

22h

Rising sea levels could risk UK salt marshes by 2100

If greenhouse gas emissions continue unabated, sea-level rise will risk valuable salt marshes in the United Kingdom as early as 2100, a new study warns. Further, salt marshes in southern and eastern England will face a high risk of loss by 2040. The study, which appears in Nature Communications , is the first to estimate salt-marsh vulnerability using the geological record of past losses in respo

22h

The Lancet: UK-US post-Brexit trade deal risks increased drug prices, and may threaten the NHS

A trade deal between the UK and USA could risk increasing drug prices in the UK, which could diminish the affordability and accessibility of the NHS, according to a Viewpoint published in The Lancet.

22h

New study finds 93 million people vulnerable to death from snakebites

A new scientific study finds 93 people live in remote areas with venomous snakes and, if bitten, face a greater likelihood of dying than those in urban settings because of poor access to anti-venom medications.

22h

Thai Navy May Put Elon Musk’s Mini-Submarine to Use. One Day.

The military may use the tiny submarine for future rescues, though it was deemed too large and impractical to save the soccer team in the cave.

22h

Elon Musk's Flint Water Plan Misses the Point

As Elon Musk proposes water filters for Flint, the city's mayor and others outline what would actually help.

22h

New model quantifies communities' vulnerability to the spread of fire

Disaster-mitigation experts wanted to bring attention to the complexity of the so-called wildland-urban interface of fires. They've developed a model that attempts to quantify the vulnerability of a community of homes to the spread of a fire. They hope their model could add to the strategic toolbox that protects lives and livelihoods from destructive fires.

23h

Bioengineers create pathway to personalized medicine

New work could provide sustainable ways to make chemicals, medicines and biomaterials.

23h

Practice imperfect: Repeated cognitive testing can obscure early signs of dementia

Alzheimer's disease is a progressive, neurodegenerative condition that often begins with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), making early and repeated assessments of cognitive change crucial to diagnosis and treatment. Researchers have now found that repeated testing of middle-age men produced a 'practice effect' which obscured true cognitive decline and delayed detection of MCI.

23h

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Strzok in the Middle

-Written by Elaine Godfrey ( @elainejgodfrey ) Today in 5 Lines During a contentious hearing before the House Judiciary and Oversight Committees, embattled FBI agent Peter Strzok denied accusations that his private political views influenced his official duties overseeing the Russia investigation. President Trump released a letter he received from North Korean leader Kim Jong Un in which Kim prai

23h

Headers may cause balance issues

Soccer players who head the ball may be more likely to experience short-term balance problems, suggesting that repetitive head impacts could have the potential to cause subtle neurological deficits not previously known, according to a preliminary study.

23h

New species may arise from rapid mitochondrial evolution

Genetic research at has shed new light on how isolated populations of the same species evolve toward reproductive incompatibility and thus become separate species.

23h

Rats trail behind shrews, monkeys, and humans in visual problem solving

Rats take a fundamentally different approach toward solving a simple visual discrimination task than tree shrews, monkeys, and humans, according to a comparative study of the four mammal species. The work could have important implications for the translation of research in animal models to humans.

23h

Optimizing pulsed electric fields to target cancer with calcium ions

When applied to cells, pulsed electric fields increase membrane permeability. Researchers have used this effect to force the diffusion of extracellular calcium into cells. Cell death occurs more easily in cancer cells since they are particularly sensitive to high amounts of calcium. Researchers have optimized pulsed electric field settings in an effort to attack cancer but leave healthy cells inta

23h

About half of parents use cell phones while driving with young children in the car

A new study found that in the previous three months, about half of parents talked on a cell phone while driving when their children between the ages of 4 and 10 were in the car, while one in three read text messages and one in seven used social media.

23h

Geological records reveal sea-level rise threatens UK salt marshes, study says

Sea-level rise will endanger valuable salt marshes across the United Kingdom by 2100 if greenhouse gas emissions continue unabated, according to an international study. Moreover, salt marshes in southern and eastern England face a high risk of loss by 2040, according to the study.

23h

Why baby's sex may influence risk of pregnancy-related complicatations

The sex of a baby controls the level of small molecules known as metabolites in the pregnant mother's blood, which may explain why risks of some diseases in pregnancy vary depending whether the mother is carrying a boy or a girl, according to new research.

23h

Can ultrashort electron flashes help harvest nuclear energy?

Physicists have now demonstrated experimentally the ability to coherently manipulate the wave function of a free electron down to the attosecond timescale (10-18 of a second). The team also developed a theory for creating zeptosecond (10-21 of a second) electron pulses, which could also be used to increase the energy yield of nuclear reactions.

23h

Nike put its energy-returning foam into a shoe you can train in

Technology Feel fast everyday. Nike's new Pegasus Turbo shoe is designed to be a fast training shoe that feels almost as fast as a racing shoe.

23h

The Meaning of the Western Alliance

Even before he left for Europe, Donald Trump had started with the demands and acrimony he brought with him to this week’s NATO summit. So right beforehand, Donald Tusk, the president of the European Council, pushed back. He urged America to appreciate its allies, pointing out that America didn’t have that many. Trump’s tone at the summit indicated he was more interested in hectoring them about mi

23h

NASA Discovered Evidence of Life on Mars 40 Years Ago, Then Set It On Fire

The Viking landers that touched down on Martian soil in the 1970s may have set all the evidence for carbon-based life-forms on fire, a new study suggests.

23h

The Ultimate Carbon-Saving Tip? Travel by Cargo Ship

Container ships sometimes have a handful of passenger cabins—the peak of carbon emissions frugality.

1d

Rats trail behind shrews, monkeys, and humans in visual problem solving

Rats take a fundamentally different approach toward solving a simple visual discrimination task than tree shrews, monkeys, and humans, according to a comparative study of the four mammal species published in eNeuro. The work could have important implications for the translation of research in animal models to humans.

1d

New species may arise from rapid mitochondrial evolution

Genetic research at has shed new light on how isolated populations of the same species evolve toward reproductive incompatibility and thus become separate species.

1d

New neurons archive old memories

The ability to obtain new memories in adulthood may depend on neurogenesis — the generation of new neurons in the hippocampus — to clear out old memories that have been safely stored in the cortex, according to research in male rats published in JNeurosci.

1d

England’s marshes may start to retreat and disappear in just 20 years

Marshlands in the south east of England could start to disappear in a little over 20 years due to rapid rises in sea levels, scientists have warned

1d

High blood pressure in older people linked to Alzheimer’s disease

For the first time, high blood pressure later in life has been linked to Alzheimer’s disease, a finding that might help us better understand the condition

1d

The Terrible Timing of Tesla's Expiring $7,500 Tax Credit

Now that Elon Musk's car company is finally putting out the more affordable Model 3, it could be a problem.

1d

Could gravitational waves reveal how fast our universe is expanding?

Signals from rare black hole-neutron star pairs could pinpoint rate at which universe is growing, researchers say. Read More

1d

50 years ago, neutrinos ghosted scientists

In the last half-century, neutrino detectors have spotted particles cast out by the sun, supernova 1987A and a supermassive black hole.

1d

Headers may cause balance issues

Soccer players who head the ball may be more likely to experience short-term balance problems, suggesting that repetitive head impacts could have the potential to cause subtle neurological deficits not previously known, according to a preliminary study by University of Delaware researchers.

1d

Hawaii telescopes help unravel long-standing cosmic mystery

In a paper published this week in the journal Science, scientists have, for the first time, provided evidence for a known blazar, designated TXS 0506+056, as a source of high-energy neutrinos. At 8:54 p.m. on Sept. 22, 2017, the National Science Foundation-supported IceCube neutrino observatory at the South Pole detected a high energy neutrino from a direction near the constellation Orion. Just 44

1d

Bridging the gap between human memory and perception

The hippocampus may relay predictions about what we expect to see based on past experience to the visual cortex, suggests a human neuroimaging published in JNeurosci. The study is among the first to examine the interaction between these two aspects of cognition.

1d

Is Kylie Jenner really a ‘self-made’ billionaire as Forbes deemed her?

Forbes recently claimed Kylie Jenner is “set to be the youngest-ever self-made billionaire.” But some questioned whether “self-made” is an accurate description of her fortune. Read More

1d

Game of Pwned: Netflix surpasses HBO with 112 Emmy nominations

"Hold the door!" — HBO to Netflix, probably Read More

1d

Spacewatch: Martian rocks on Earth a step nearer as UK builds red planet rover

Airbus lands £3.9m contract from space agency to design spacecraft to bring back samples from Mars in the 2020s The European Space Agency has awarded a £3.9m contract to Airbus, in Britain, to design a new rover, in a project with Nasa, that will visit Mars to retrieve samples for bringing back to Earth for the first time. Continue reading…

1d

Childish Gambino's 'Summer Pack' and the Search for the Summer Anthem

The prize isn’t a charting single; it’s becoming the soundtrack to a nation’s memories.

1d

The Shadow of Boris Johnson

It’s not hard to discern the similarities between President Donald Trump, who is visiting the U.K. this week following the NATO summit, and Boris Johnson, who resigned as the U.K. foreign secretary on Monday. The two share an affinity for offensive language and alienating their colleagues, and a casual disregard for the facts, among other traits. They also appear to share a mutual affection—Johns

1d

Electric Shock Allows for CRISPR Gene Editing Without a Viral Vector

Brief electroporation appears to make T cells more receptive to new genetic material, which could speed the development of immunotherapies.

1d

Report: SEC probes Facebook privacy issuesFacebook InfoWars Jones

A report says the Securities and Exchange Commission is investigating whether Facebook adequately warned its investors about privacy lapses involving the data mining firm Cambridge Analytica.

1d

With 112 Emmy Nominations, Netflix Officially Rules Television

For the first time in 18 years, HBO isn't at the top of the Television Academy heap.

1d

Concussion may bring greater risks for athletes with ADHD

Athletes who have attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may be at greater risk for experiencing persistent anxiety and depression after a concussion than people who do not have ADHD, according to a preliminary study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's Sports Concussion Conference in Indianapolis, July 20-22, 2018. ADHD is a brain disorder that aff

1d

Team finds many of mobile applications are open to web API hijacking

Smartphones, tablets, iPads—mobile devices have become invaluable to the everyday consumer. But few consider the security issues that occur when using these devices.

1d

What Is Green Exercise?

Being outdoors can lower our levels of stress, our pulse rate, and even our blood pressure. But what happens when we exercise in a green space? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

An honest look at the personal finance crisis | Elizabeth White

Millions of baby boomers are moving into their senior years with empty pockets and declining choices to earn a living. And right behind them is a younger generation facing the same challenges. In this deeply personal talk, author Elizabeth White opens up an honest conversation about financial trouble and offers practical advice for how to live a richly textured life on a limited income.

1d

Massive genome havoc in breast cancer is revealed

Researchers using long-read DNA sequencing have made one of the most detailed maps ever of structural variations in a cancer cell's genome. The map reveals about 20,000 structural variations, few of which have been noted before, in just one cell type associated with one form of breast cancer.

1d

Longer contracts leverage the free fuel in solar power at little O&M cost

Solar contracts are usually only for 20 years. But ACWA Power's contract with DEWA in Dubai will run until 2055 — the world's first 35 year solar contract. Did the length of the contract enable its record-low price for this kind of round-the-clock solar?

1d

Ancient and Modern Meet in These Photographs of the Holy Land

Photographer Rogers Grasas spent seven years traveling the Middle East to capture these stunning images.

1d

Capturing this incredible star cluster required lasers and a bendable mirror

Space The Very Large Telescope got new adaptive optics technology. Even for a powerful camera like HAWK-I, there are limitations to being a ground-based telescope. Namely, the sky. Sure, we like having an atmosphere because it lets us…

1d

Researchers Study Thousands Of Ticks Collected By The People They Bit

Researchers invited the public to help them study the geographic spread of ticks that carry pathogens that can sicken humans. People were eager to oblige by sending in the pesky bugs that bit them. (Image credit: Ascent/PKS Media Inc. via Getty Images)

1d

Whole genome sequencing reveals cluster of resistant bacterium in returning travelers

Thirteen patients with OXA-48-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae ST392 have been reported by Sweden and Norway between January and April 2018 — all returning travelers with prior hospital admission in Gran Canaria. Whole genome sequencing showed tight clustering between the bacterial isolates from the cases.

1d

New research: Financial incentives create critical waterbird habitat in extreme drought

New research from scientists at Point Blue Conservation Science and The Nature Conservancy shows how financial incentive programs can create vital habitat for waterbirds, filling a critical need in drought years. Researchers used satellite images to evaluate two issues: 1) the impact of the 2013-2015 drought on waterbird habitat in the Central Valley; and, 2) the amount of habitat created by incen

1d

Potential new surgical options for women with multiple ipsilateral breast cancer

Initial results of a new national clinical trial show that the majority of women with breast cancer who have two to three sites of disease in a single breast at the time of diagnosis are able to successfully complete breast-conserving surgery without conversion to mastectomy. This is the first prospective study to assess this possibility, and its findings improve the surgical choices available to

1d

How to Raise a Generous Child

“We want every kid to be generous,” says Dr. Laura Markham, author of Peaceful Parent, Happy Kids. But, according to Markham, if we force kids to share, they’re less likely to do so again. How, then, can a parent raise a generous child? In the latest episode of Home School , The Atlantic ’s animated video series about parenting, Markham reveals the surprising childrearing method that promotes not

1d

What’s Missing From Kim Jong Un’s ‘Very Nice Note’ to Trump

Donald Trump called it “a very nice note.” And it is super-nice! In the letter that the president published on Twitter on Thursday, Kim Jong Un refers to Trump as “Your Excellency” and writes glowingly of the “meaningful journey” he and the U.S. president have embarked on since last month’s summit in Singapore. He notes the “epochal progress” they’re pursuing in improving U.S.-North Korea relatio

1d

1d

Why It's So Hard to Junk Bad Decisions–Edging Closer to Understanding "Sunk Cost"

Humans, rats and mice all exhibit the decision-making phenomenon, but new research suggests not all choices are equally vulnerable to it — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Two Experimental Drugs Reduce Infections in the Elderly

Despite the treatment being given for only six weeks, the positive effects lasted for a year.

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Hospitals may take too much of the blame for unplanned readmissions

A new study out of Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center reveals that the preventability of readmissions changes over time: readmissions within the first week after discharge are often preventable by the hospital, whereas readmissions later are often related to patients' difficultly accessing outpatient clinics.

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Petition Asks AAAS to Remove Fellows With Sexual Harassment Records

The request is similar to one made of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Understanding the social dynamics that cause cooperation to thrive, or fail

Examples of cooperation abound in nature, from honeybee hives to human families. Yet it's also easy enough to find examples of selfishness and conflict. Studying the conditions that give rise to cooperation has occupied researchers for generations, with implications for understanding the forces that drive workplace dynamics, charitable giving, animal behavior, even international relations.

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Watch Your Mouth

This week on the Hidden Brain radio show, we explore how the constantly evolving nature of languages can give us different ways of understanding ourselves as well as the world we live in. (Image credit: DrAfter123/Getty Images)

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Research finds new molecular structures in boron-based nanoclusters

Brown University researchers and collaborators from Tsinghua University in China have shown that nanoclusters made from boron and lanthanide elements form highly stable and symmetric structures with interesting magnetic properties.

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Open-and-Shut Case

The climate is changing, there are fingerprints all over the scene, and we know, beyond any reasonable doubt, that humans are mostly responsible — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Obesity alone does not increase risk of death

Researchers have found that patients who have metabolic healthy obesity, but no other metabolic risk factors, do not have an increased rate of mortality. The results of this study could impact how we think about obesity and health.

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Chemists achieve unprecedented molecular triple jump with multi-ringed metal complexes

For decades, chemists have been mixing metals and carbon to create novel molecules, from the world's longest molecular wires to microscopic gyroscopes controllable by cage size, molecular access and even progress toward unidirectional rotation via external electrical field manipulation.

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The secret life of lobster (trade): Could we be in hot water?

In today's hyper-connected world, a growing number of nations are acting as 'middlemen' in the seafood supply chain. This makes it increasingly difficult to trace where seafood goes and difficult to anticipate changes in market demand.

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Heaviest known calcium atom discovered

Researchers have discovered eight new rare isotopes of the elements phosphorus, sulfur, chlorine, argon, potassium, scandium and, most importantly, calcium. These are the heaviest isotopes of these elements ever found.

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Allergic reactions to foods are milder in infants, study suggests

Majority of infants with food-induced anaphylaxis present with hives and vomiting, suggesting there is less concern for life-threatening response to early food introduction, new study suggests.

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Organ regeneration is no longer a distant dream

Researchers used live imaging of the Drosophila embryonic hindgut and computer simulations to clarify that a novel cellular behavior called 'cell sliding' was important for the LR asymmetric morphogenesis of the organ.

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New guidelines mean almost 800,000 more U.S. kids have high blood pressure

(HealthDay)—There's good news and bad news from a new report when it comes to high blood pressure among America's children.

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Elon Musk pledges to give every home in Flint, MI clean drinking water

“Please consider this a commitment that I will fund fixing the water in any house in Flint that has water contamination,” Musk tweeted. Read More

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Coral reefs face yet another threat: island rats depleting their poop supply

Environment Invading rodents are mucking up the food chain. A single invasive species can not just deeply impact the landscape it overruns, but fundamentally alter the wider marine realm that surrounds it.

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Research finds new molecular structures in boron-based nanoclusters

Researchers have shown that clusters of boron and lanthanide atoms form interesting 'inverse sandwich' structures that could be useful as molecular magnets.

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It Just Got Easier for the FCC to Ignore Your Complaints

Under the new rule, critics say the agency will not review informal complaints about telecom companies, and steer consumers to a formal process that carries a $225 fee.

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Free weights or machines?

(HealthDay)—Resistance or strength training isn't just for bodybuilders—it's for everyone, and it's essential to combat the natural tendency to lose muscle mass with age.

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Controlling Ribonuclease (RNase) With High Irradiance UV LED Light Engines

This white paper suggests that light engines can thoroughly clean RNase from equipment, preserving the integrity of the RNA sequence.

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Emmy Nominations 2018: Netflix Takes Over

For the last 17 years, HBO has received more Emmy nominations annually than any other network, cable provider, or streaming service. That streak ended on Thursday, when the nominations for the 70th Emmy Awards were announced in Los Angeles. This time it was Netflix, with 112 total nominations to HBO’s 108, that topped the list. On the one hand, it’s a tangible awards victory for Netflix’s flood-t

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BRIEF: People Mailed 16,000 Ticks to Track Lyme Disease and Other Illnesses

BRIEF: People Mailed 16,000 Ticks to Track Lyme Disease and Other Illnesses A citizen science initiative reveals new insights about the spread of tick-borne infections. Tick.jpg Blacklegged tick Image credits: CDC / James Gathany; William L. Nicholson, Ph.D. Rights information: Public Domain Human Thursday, July 12, 2018 – 14:00 Tracy Staedter, Contributor (Inside Science) — Few scientists antic

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BRIEF: How Rice Plants Grow Tall to Survive Floods

BRIEF: How Rice Plants Grow Tall to Survive Floods Scientists identified the key gene that helps certain rice varieties keep their heads above water. ricechild.jpg Child walks in deep-water field of wild rice species in Bangladesh. Image credits: International Rice Research Institute Rights information: CC BY-SA 2.0 Earth Thursday, July 12, 2018 – 14:00 Yuen Yiu, Staff Writer (Inside Science) —

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Meet Oasis Labs, the blockchain startup Silicon Valley is buzzing about

Combining software with something the company calls “trusted hardware” will vastly expand what smart contracts can do.

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Could gravitational waves reveal how fast our universe is expanding?

An new study finds black holes and neutron stars are key to measuring our expanding universe.

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Scientists create nano-size packets of genetic code aimed at brain cancer 'seed' cells

In a 'proof of concept' study, scientists say they have successfully delivered nano-size packets of genetic code called microRNAs to treat human brain tumors implanted in mice. The contents of the super-small containers were designed to target cancer stem cells, a kind of cellular 'seed' that produces countless progeny and is a relentless barrier to ridding the brain of malignant cells.

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Understanding the social dynamics that cause cooperation to thrive, or fail

In a new report in the journal Nature Communications, Erol Akçay, a biologist at the University of Pennsylvania, addresses the question of how an evolving social network influences the likelihood of cooperation in a theoretical social group. He finds that, although networks where connected individuals are closely related are more likely to cooperate, such groups can trigger a feedback loop that al

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Study reveals opioid patients face multiple barriers to treatment

In areas of the country disproportionately affected by the opioid crisis, treatment programs are less likely to accept patients paying through insurance of any type or accept pregnant women, a new Vanderbilt study found.

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Study forecasts growth rates of loblolly pine trees

Researchers used ecological forecasting to predict how changes in temperature, water, and concentrations of carbon in the atmosphere in the Southeastern United States may affect the future growth rates of trees.

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Scientists ID protein exploited by virus ravaging West Africa

New research has uncovered a protein enabling the replication of arenaviruses, pathogens now widespread in West Africa that are carried by rodents and can infect humans with lethal fevers. The research identified DDX3 as a key factor promoting arenavirus multiplication through its unexpected ability to promote viral RNA synthesis and dismantle normal human immune system defenses. The study may pav

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Rice plants evolve to adapt to flooding

Although water is essential for plant growth, excessive amounts can waterlog and kill a plant. In South and Southeast Asia, where periodic flooding occurs during the rainy season, the water depth can reach several meters for many months.

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Tree shrews can tolerate hot peppers: Mutation in pain receptor makes peppery plant palatable

Almost all mammals avoid eating chili peppers and other 'hot' foods, because of the pain they induce. But not the tree shrew, according to a study publishing July 12 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by Yalan Han of the Kunming Institute of Zoology in China, and colleagues. The researchers found that this close relative of primates is unaffected by the active ingredient in chili peppers due

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Genetic adaptation allows rice to survive long-term flooding

When floodwaters rise, some rice varieties rapidly grow taller to keep from drowning.

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Time invested in the past dictates our willingness to wait for future rewards

The longer an individual waits for a reward, the less willing they will be to give up pursuit of the reward, a new study in mice, rats and humans reports.

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Ferroelectric perovskites go organic

Engineers have created 23 all-organic perovskites, one of which offers ferroelectric properties comparable to the widely used inorganic perovskite ferroelectrics BaTiO3 (BTO), a new study reports.

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Parental chromosomes kept apart during embryo's first division

It was long thought that during an embryo's first cell division, one spindle is responsible for segregating the embryo's chromosomes into two cells. EMBL scientists now show that there are actually two spindles, one for each set of parental chromosomes, meaning that the genetic information from each parent is kept apart throughout the first division. Science publishes the results — bound to chang

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Photos: Death Toll Reaches 200 in Devastating Japan Floods

Over the weekend, sustained heavy rainfall hit parts of western and central Japan, causing flash flooding, setting off landslides, submerging floodplains, and forcing more than 2 million residents to evacuate. Today, Japan’s National Police Agency announced at least 200 people had died, and dozens were still missing, in the worst weather-related disaster to hit Japan in more than 30 years. More t

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Bioengineers create pathway to personalized medicine

Engineering cellular biology, minus the actual cell, is a growing area of interest in biotechnology and synthetic biology. It's known as cell-free protein synthesis, or CFPS, and it has potential to provide sustainable ways to make chemicals, medicines and biomaterials.

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South Korea's polluted river basin

A new study shows that even though water quality has improved in South Korea's Han River basin since the 1990s, there are still higher-than-acceptable levels of pollutants in some of the more urbanized regions in and around the capital Seoul.

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Herpes linked to Alzheimer's: Antivirals may help

A new commentary on a study by epidemiologists supports the viability of a potential way to reduce the risk of Alzheimer's disease. When the authors looked at subjects who suffered severe herpes infection and who were treated aggressively with antiviral drugs, the relative risk of dementia was reduced by a factor of 10.

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Retinal isomerization in bacteriorhodopsin captured by a femtosecond x-ray laser

Ultrafast isomerization of retinal is the primary step in photoresponsive biological functions including vision in humans and ion transport across bacterial membranes. We used an x-ray laser to study the subpicosecond structural dynamics of retinal isomerization in the light-driven proton pump bacteriorhodopsin. A series of structural snapshots with near-atomic spatial resolution and temporal res

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Spain's good news

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News at a glance

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Liquid sunshine

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To be a bee

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A leaky endeavor

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It takes two to tango

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The rise of oxygen

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Look fast

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Help wanted

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Neutrino emission from the direction of the blazar TXS 0506+056 prior to the IceCube-170922A alert

A high-energy neutrino event detected by IceCube on 22 September 2017 was coincident in direction and time with a gamma-ray flare from the blazar TXS 0506+056. Prompted by this association, we investigated 9.5 years of IceCube neutrino observations to search for excess emission at the position of the blazar. We found an excess of high-energy neutrino events, with respect to atmospheric background

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Metal-free three-dimensional perovskite ferroelectrics

Inorganic perovskite ferroelectrics are widely used in nonvolatile memory elements, capacitors, and sensors because of their excellent ferroelectric and other properties. Organic ferroelectrics are desirable for their mechanical flexibility, low weight, environmentally friendly processing, and low processing temperatures. Although almost a century has passed since the first ferroelectric, Rochell

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Programming self-organizing multicellular structures with synthetic cell-cell signaling

A common theme in the self-organization of multicellular tissues is the use of cell-cell signaling networks to induce morphological changes. We used the modular synNotch juxtacrine signaling platform to engineer artificial genetic programs in which specific cell-cell contacts induced changes in cadherin cell adhesion. Despite their simplicity, these minimal intercellular programs were sufficient

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Phase transitions in a programmable quantum spin glass simulator

Understanding magnetic phases in quantum mechanical systems is one of the essential goals in condensed matter physics, and the advent of prototype quantum simulation hardware has provided new tools for experimentally probing such systems. We report on the experimental realization of a quantum simulation of interacting Ising spins on three-dimensional cubic lattices up to dimensions 8 x 8 x 8 on a

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The rise, collapse, and compaction of Mt. Mantap from the 3 September 2017 North Korean nuclear test

Surveillance of clandestine nuclear tests relies on a global seismic network, but the potential of spaceborne monitoring has been underexploited. We used satellite radar imagery to determine the complete surface displacement field of up to 3.5 meters of divergent horizontal motion with 0.5 meters of subsidence associated with North Korea’s largest underground nuclear test. Combining insight from

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Deconstructive fluorination of cyclic amines by carbon-carbon cleavage

Deconstructive functionalizations involving scission of carbon-carbon double bonds are well established. In contrast, unstrained C(sp 3 )–C(sp 3 ) bond cleavage and functionalization have less precedent. Here we report the use of deconstructive fluorination to access mono- and difluorinated amine derivatives by C(sp 3 )–C(sp 3 ) bond cleavage in saturated nitrogen heterocycles such as piperidines

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Late inception of a resiliently oxygenated upper ocean

Rising oceanic and atmospheric oxygen levels through time have been crucial to enhanced habitability of surface Earth environments. Few redox proxies can track secular variations in dissolved oxygen concentrations around threshold levels for metazoan survival in the upper ocean. We present an extensive compilation of iodine-to-calcium ratios (I/Ca) in marine carbonates. Our record supports a majo

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Sensitivity to "sunk costs" in mice, rats, and humans

Sunk costs are irrecoverable investments that should not influence decisions, because decisions should be made on the basis of expected future consequences. Both human and nonhuman animals can show sensitivity to sunk costs, but reports from across species are inconsistent. In a temporal context, a sensitivity to sunk costs arises when an individual resists ending an activity, even if it seems un

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Ethylene-gibberellin signaling underlies adaptation of rice to periodic flooding

Most plants do poorly when flooded. Certain rice varieties, known as deepwater rice, survive periodic flooding and consequent oxygen deficiency by activating internode growth of stems to keep above the water. Here, we identify the gibberellin biosynthesis gene, SD1 ( SEMIDWARF1 ), whose loss-of-function allele catapulted the rice Green Revolution, as being responsible for submergence-induced inte

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Assessment of methane emissions from the U.S. oil and gas supply chain

Methane emissions from the U.S. oil and natural gas supply chain were estimated by using ground-based, facility-scale measurements and validated with aircraft observations in areas accounting for ~30% of U.S. gas production. When scaled up nationally, our facility-based estimate of 2015 supply chain emissions is 13 ± 2 teragrams per year, equivalent to 2.3% of gross U.S. gas production. This valu

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Dual-spindle formation in zygotes keeps parental genomes apart in early mammalian embryos

At the beginning of mammalian life, the genetic material from each parent meets when the fertilized egg divides. It was previously thought that a single microtubule spindle is responsible for spatially combining the two genomes and then segregating them to create the two-cell embryo. We used light-sheet microscopy to show that two bipolar spindles form in the zygote and then independently congres

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New Products

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Comment on "Designing river flows to improve food security futures in the Lower Mekong Basin"

Sabo et al . (Research Articles, 8 December 2017, p. 1270) use sophisticated analyses of flow and fishery data from the Lower Mekong Basin to design a "good" hydrograph that, if implemented by planned hydropower dams, would increase the catch by a factor of 3.7. However, the hydrograph is not implementable, and, if it were, it would devastate the fishery. Further, the analyses are questionable.

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Multimessenger observations of a flaring blazar coincident with high-energy neutrino IceCube-170922A

Previous detections of individual astrophysical sources of neutrinos are limited to the Sun and the supernova 1987A, whereas the origins of the diffuse flux of high-energy cosmic neutrinos remain unidentified. On 22 September 2017, we detected a high-energy neutrino, IceCube-170922A, with an energy of ~290 tera–electron volts. Its arrival direction was consistent with the location of a known -ray

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Response to Comments on "Designing river flows to improve food security futures in the Lower Mekong Basin"

Sabo et al . presented an empirically derived algorithm defining the socioecological response of the Tonle Sap Dai fishery in the Cambodian Mekong to basin-scale variation in hydrologic flow regime. Williams suggests that the analysis leading to the algorithm is flawed because of the large distance between the gauge used to measure water levels (hydrology) and the site of harvest for the fishery.

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Phylogenomics reveals multiple losses of nitrogen-fixing root nodule symbiosis

The root nodule symbiosis of plants with nitrogen-fixing bacteria affects global nitrogen cycles and food production but is restricted to a subset of genera within a single clade of flowering plants. To explore the genetic basis for this scattered occurrence, we sequenced the genomes of 10 plant species covering the diversity of nodule morphotypes, bacterial symbionts, and infection strategies. I

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Comment on "Designing river flows to improve food security futures in the Lower Mekong Basin"

The designer flow regime proposed by Sabo et al . (Research Articles, 8 December 2017, p. 1270) to support fisheries in the Lower Mekong Basin fails to account for important ecological, political, and economic dimensions. In doing so, they indicate that dam impacts can be easily mitigated. Such an action would serve to increase risks to food and livelihood futures in the basin.

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This Towering Iceberg That Broke Free of Antarctica Last Year Doesn't Want to Leave

An entire year has passed since a Delaware-size iceberg broke away, in dramatic fashion, from the Larsen C Ice Shelf in Antarctica. But it hasn't traveled far.

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Mice Don’t Know When to Let It Go, Either

Animals, like humans, are reluctant to give up on pursuits they’ve invested in, psychologists report.

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Bioengineers create pathway to personalized medicine

Matthew DeLisa, the William L. Lewis Professor of Engineering in the Smith School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at Cornell University, and Michael Jewett, associate professor of chemical and biological engineering at Northwestern University, have teamed up on work that could provide sustainable ways to make chemicals, medicines and biomaterials.

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New model quantifies communities' vulnerability to the spread of fire

Disaster-mitigation experts in Colorado State University's Walter Scott, Jr. College of Engineering wanted to bring attention to the complexity of the so-called wildland-urban interface of fires. They've developed a model that attempts to quantify the vulnerability of a community of homes to the spread of a fire. They hope their model could add to the strategic toolbox that protects lives and live

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Study forecasts growth rates of loblolly pine trees

The ability to predict weather patterns has helped us make clothing choices and travel plans, and even saved lives. Now, researchers in Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment are using similar predictive methods to forecast the growth of trees.

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Tree shrews can tolerate hot peppers: Mutation in pain receptor makes peppery plant palatable

Almost all mammals avoid eating chili peppers and other "hot" foods, because of the pain they induce. But not the tree shrew, according to a study publishing July 12 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by Yalan Han of the Kunming Institute of Zoology in China, and colleagues. The researchers found that this close relative of primates is unaffected by the active ingredient in chili peppers due

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Rice plants evolve to adapt to flooding

Although water is essential for plant growth, excessive amounts can waterlog and kill a plant. In South and Southeast Asia, where periodic flooding occurs during the rainy season, the water depth can reach several meters for many months.

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Parental chromosomes kept apart during embryo's first division

It was long thought that during an embryo's first cell division, one spindle is responsible for segregating the embryo's chromosomes into two cells. EMBL scientists now show that there are actually two spindles, one for each set of parental chromosomes, meaning that the genetic information from each parent is kept apart throughout the first division. Science publishes the results—bound to change b

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Trump’s Betrayal of Britain

In the 1980s, a group of anti-Communist student activists in Poland popularized the slogan “Smile! Tomorrow will be worse.” Those words apply well to Donald Trump’s diplomacy. On Thursday, Trump brought chaos to a NATO summit. Friday will be his day to apply his special touch to the U.S.–U.K. relationship. This is a moment when America’s closest security partner badly needs American help. In 2016

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The dusky gopher frog will be the next Supreme Court's first environmental test

Environment New cases, shifting strategies, and the uncertainty of a reshuffled bench On October 1, Weyerhaeuser vs. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will be the first environmental-protection case of a new Supreme Court bench. The July retirement of…

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California’s plan to integrate the West Coast grid is a great idea—that could easily backfire

The state leading the clean-energy charge could wind up importing coal power from Wyoming.

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Immunotherapy associated with improved survival for patients with melanoma brain metastases

Among patients with cutaneous melanoma who had brain metastases (MBM), first-line treatment with a checkpoint inhibitor was associated with a 1.4-fold increase in median overall survival, according to results from a national cohort.

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In Medicaid patients, high opioid doses and concurrent sedative use are risk factors for fatal opioid overdose

Among Medicaid recipients taking prescription opioids, high opioid doses and concurrent treatment with benzodiazepine sedatives are among the key, potentially modifiable risk factors for fatal overdose, reports a study in the August issue of Medical Care. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

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Rare skull of elephant ancestor unveiled in France

A French farmer kept quiet for years after stumbling across the skull of an extinct ancestor of the elephant near the Pyrenees mountains, the Natural History Museum of Toulouse has told AFP.

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$7,500 federal tax credit for Tesla buyers to end Dec. 31

Tesla Inc. says its customers won't get the full $7,500 federal electric vehicle tax credit after Dec. 31.

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How the Trade War with China Will Affect the U.S.

With the onset of Trump’s trade war , diplomatic relations between the U.S. and China—the world’s largest and second-largest economies, respectively—have reached a crisis point. Yasheng Huang, a political economist, MIT professor, and the author of Capitalism with Chinese Characteristics, argues that “a trade war would negatively affect the interest of U.S. consumers, companies, and the financial

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Trump’s London Visit Is the Normalization of Abnormality

LONDON —Peacetime visits by United States presidents are usually celebratory affairs. They’re opportunities for host countries to show off a little, to polish the silver and bring out the marching bands, to assert their place in the world and in the eyes of the United States. President Donald Trump’s visit to Britain—which kicked off Thursday afternoon and will include meetings with Prime Ministe

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Dansker i afrikansk megaby: Væltede lastbiler og øretæver i trafikken er hverdag

Hverdagen i megabyerne Lagos og Mumbai kan byde på ekstreme oplevelser for de danskere, der har bosat sig i de tætbefolkede og kaotiske områder. Her fortæller to danskere om deres oplevelser.

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Research team improves code to benefit industrial engineers

The Ohio Supercomputer Center's (OSC) Karen Tomko, Ph.D., and the University of Illinois/Urbana's Robert Dodds, Ph.D., recently wrapped up a project that will greatly enhance the simulation capabilities of manufacturing engineers.

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Climate change-induced march of treelines halted by unsuitable soils: study

New research from the University of Guelph is dispelling a commonly held assumption about climate change and its impact on forests in Canada and abroad.

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International collaboration finds land plant genes in ancient aquatic alga

Land plants, which split from their aquatic relatives 500 million years ago, are an extraordinarily diverse group of living organisms—from tall redwoods to fragrant roses to carpets of moss.

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Climate change-induced march of treelines halted by unsuitable soils: study

University of Guelph researchers have discovered unsuitable soil at higher altitudes may be halting the advancement of treelines. This finding dispells the commonly held assumption that climate change is enabling trees to move farther uphill and northward. The researchers looked at plant growth at higher altitudes in the Canadian Rockies, grew spruce and fir seedlings at varying elevations and col

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International collaboration finds land plant genes in ancient aquatic alga

An international team, which included three University of Maryland researchers, sequenced and analyzed the genome of Chara braunii, a freshwater green alga closely related to land plants. By comparing Chara's genome to multiple land plant genomes, the team was able to identify many important genes that originated in a common ancestor shared by Chara and land plants.

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This Holey Skull May Have Watched Over Dead People in the Afterlife Some 2,500 Years Ago

The ancient skull of a woman that was buried facing a cave holding the remains of 50 people has archaeologists puzzled.

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The right mix of gut microbes relieves autism symptoms in the long run

Replacing missing gut microbes improves autism symptoms in children even two years later.

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Discovery of Massive Granite Sarcophagus Presents Mystery of Who Is Inside

The coffin, discovered in Alexandria, Egypt, is a rare example of an unopened tomb — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Systematic review examines walnut consumption on cardiovascular risk factors

An updated systematic review from Harvard University examines 25 years of evidence for the role of walnut consumption on cardiovascular risk factors, including cholesterol, triglycerides, blood pressure, and weight. A diet supplemented with walnuts resulted in a significantly greater percent decrease in total cholesterol (3.25 percent), LDL cholesterol (3.73 percent), triglycerides (5.52 percent),

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Machine learning helps to predict the treatment outcomes of schizophrenia

University of Alberta researchers have used artificial intelligence to help identify patients suffering from schizophrenia and to ascertain if they would respond to treatment.Bo Cao, a psychiatry researcher in the U of A's Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, led a research team that used a machine learning algorithm to examine functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) images of both newly diagnos

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The infamous case of the racist murder of Emmett Till is being reopened

It was officially closed in 2007, but has just been reopened. Read More

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Study finds heterosexual women prefer benevolently sexist men

It’s been demonstrated that women are more attracted to men with attitudes of benevolent sexism. A new study asks why. Read More

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Why Some of Instagram's Biggest Memers Are Locking Their Accounts

Over the past six months, some of Instagram’s biggest meme pages—like Shithead Steve , with more than 2.5 million followers, howitlook.s (8 million), couplesnote , (8.2 million) greatercomedy , (5.3 million), Pubity (5.1 million), and more—have locked down their accounts, forcing non-followers to request access in order to view their content. “I’m getting real SICK of private meme pages,” one Twi

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Parental controls do not stop teens from seeing pornography

New research has found that Internet filtering tools are ineffective and in most cases, were an insignificant factor in whether young people had seen explicit sexual content.

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Quantum dot white LEDs achieve record efficiency

Researchers have demonstrated nanomaterial-based white-light-emitting diodes (LEDs) that exhibit a record luminous efficiency of 105 lumens per watt.

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Treatment prevents symptoms of schizophrenia in tests with rats

Researchers carried out studies in animal model that mimics condition in children and adolescents considered at risk for development of the disease in adulthood. Young and hypertense rats displaying cognitive and social impairments as well as hyperlocomotion have reached a healthy adulthood after being treated with daily doses of sodium nitroprusside doses for 30 days.

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Chemicals associated with oxidative stress may be essential to development

Some level of molecules linked to oxidative stress may be essential to health and development, according to new animal studies.

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Rat Infestation Takes a Toll on Nearby Coral Reefs

A study shows that by killing off seabirds on islands, rodents slash the flow of nutrients into the ocean.

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Wearable device can predict older adults' risk of falling

Every year, more than one in three individuals aged 65 and older will experience a fall. Treatment and awareness of falling usually happens after a fall has already occurred. As a part of the NIH's Women's Health Initiative, researchers at the University of Illinois wanted to see if they could predict an individual's risk of falling so that preventative measures could be taken to reduce this risk.

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Researchers turn exercise into a game and see encouraging results

A team of University of Iowa researchers built a web-based app called MapTrek. When synced with a Fitbit, MapTrek allows users to go on virtual walking tours of locations such as the Grand Canyon or Appalachian trail while competing against other users. A study showed MapTrek and Fitbit users averaged 2,200 more steps per day than a control group that used only Fitbits.

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First machine learning method capable of accurate extrapolation

Understanding how a robot will react under different conditions is essential to guaranteeing its safe operation. But how do you know what will break a robot without actually damaging it? A new method developed by scientists at IST Austria and the MPI for Intelligent Systems is the first machine learning method that can use observations made under safe conditions to make accurate predictions for al

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Chemists achieve unprecedented molecular triple jump with multi-ringed metal complexes

For decades, Texas A&M University chemist Dr. John A. Gladysz has been mixing metals and carbon to create novel molecules, from the world's longest molecular wires to microscopic gyroscopes controllable by cage size, molecular access and even progress toward unidirectional rotation via external electrical field manipulation.

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Alaska Wants to Fight Warming While Still Drilling for Oil

As the state weathers the impacts of climate change, its economy still relies on fossil fuels — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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VERITAS supplies critical piece to neutrino discovery puzzle

The VERITAS array has confirmed the detection of gamma rays from the vicinity of a supermassive black hole. While these detections are relatively common for VERITAS, this black hole is potentially the first known astrophysical source of high-energy cosmic neutrinos, a type of ghostly subatomic particle.

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Breakthrough in the search for cosmic particle accelerators

In a global observation campaign, scientist have for the first time located a source of high-energy cosmic neutrinos, ghostly elementary particles that travel billions of light years through the universe, flying unaffected through stars, planets and entire galaxies.

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How ocean warmth triggers glacial melting far away

The melting of glaciers on one side of the globe can trigger disintegration of glaciers on the other side of the globe, as has been presented by scientists, who investigated marine microalgae preserved in glacial deposits and subsequently used their findings to perform climate simulations.

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Algae have land genes

The genome of the algae species Chara braunii has been decoded. It already contains the first genetic characteristics that enabled the water plants' evolutionary transition to land.

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New evidence of two subspecies of American pikas in Rocky Mountain National Park

Rocky Mountain National Park provides habitat for not one, but two subspecies of the American pika.

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Novel therapy delays muscle atrophy in Lou Gehrig's disease model

Supplementing a single protein found in the spinal cord could help prevent symptoms of Lou Gehrig's disease, according to a new study out of Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. Researchers found high levels of the protein — called mitofusion 2 or Mfn2 — prevented nerve degeneration, muscle atrophy, and paralysis in a mouse model of the disease. Since Mfn2 is often depleted during

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Eighth Grade Is a Mesmerizing, Heartfelt Portrait of Teenhood

As she’s getting ready for bed after a taxing day at school, Kayla (Elsie Fisher), the heroine of Bo Burnham’s wonderful new film Eighth Grade , shoos her dad away, posts up in her bed, and cracks open her laptop. With her face illuminated just by the glow of her MacBook, Kayla pores over that most dreadful and magical of places: the internet. As Enya’s “ Orinoco Flow ” kicks up on the soundtrack

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The Mystery of Brett Kavanaugh’s Baseball-Ticket Debt

During his confirmation hearings in 2005, Chief Justice John Roberts told senators that he saw his job as a judge as a matter of calling balls and strikes. Brett Kavanaugh, whom President Trump has nominated to sit alongside Roberts on the Supreme Court, has apparently spent a great deal of time and money on observing literal balls and strikes being thrown. According to financial disclosures, Kav

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The Gospel According to Pusha T

T he cover art for Pusha T’s album Daytona is a picture of Whitney Houston’s bathroom. It was taken in 2006, but it appears older and more worn than it is, perhaps because of the border of what seems to be faux water damage. The décor is distinctly ’90s, an aggressive attempt to look soft. The counters are cluttered, strewn with all the ingredients required to sustain an addiction—spoons caked wi

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The Baddest Bumps | Shark Week's Most Intense Encounters

Getting really close to some of the most massive sharks in the world is part of the job description for our Shark Week experts. Unfortunately, these sharks can sometimes get a little too close! Shark Week 2018 starts Sunday July 22 9p! Stream Shark Week's Most Intense Encounters on Discovery GO: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/shark-weeks-most-intense-encounters/ Stream Classic Shark Week Epis

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Judd Legum's 'Popular Information' Is a Politics Newsletter for Everyone

The founder and editor in chief of ThinkProgress is starting over with "Popular Information," a one-man political newsletter "for people who are feeling overwhelmed."

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Ötzi loaded up on fatty food before he died

A new analysis provides a complete picture of what was in Ötzi the Iceman’s stomach when he died.

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Controlling the manufacture of stable aerogels

Researchers have developed a new approach to control the fabrication of soft, porous materials, overcoming a primary challenge in materials science.

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Soccer Has No Interest in Fairness

The World Cup has a long history of injustices. Diego Maradona’s infamous “hand of God” goal , in which the legendary player discreetly used his hand to send the ball into the net, helped Argentina beat England in the quarterfinals in 1986. In the final between England and West Germany in 1966, a shot by the striker Geoff Hurst apparently failed to cross the goal line , but the goal was awarded a

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The Self-Inflicted Demise of American Power

NATO leaders have a lot to worry about. The U.K. government is a Brexit hot mess. Germany’s Angela Merkel, who has been holding a unified Europe together on her shoulders like Atlas, may not be able to last much longer. Turkey’s Recep Tayyip Erdoğan has been channeling his inner authoritarian, and he’s not the only one. And then there’s President Donald Trump. Never one for subtlety, Europe’s mos

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