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Nyheder2018juli14

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Why American Spies Worry When Trump Meets Putin

It was going to be Donald Trump’s “ easiest ” meeting, at least according to Trump himself. After a week of tense exchanges with allies in Brussels and then the U.K., the U.S president would head to Helsinki for his first formal summit with Russian President Vladimir Putin. Then on Friday, right as the president was settling down to tea with the Queen, the indictments came; the Justice Department

7h

Microsoft urges regulation of face-recognizing tech

Microsoft's chief legal officer on Friday called for regulation of facial recognition technology due to the risk to privacy and human rights.

10h

Ny type tuberkulose-vaccine er kulminationen på 25 års forskning

Statens Serum Institut fokuserer på infektion og ikke sygdom i deres nye ’generationer’ af vacciner.

8h

LATEST

Changes in Hudson River may offer insight into how glaciers grew

Researchers say they may be able to estimate how glaciers moved by examining how the weight of the ice sheet altered topography and led to changes in the course of the river.

25min

Better methods improve measurements of recreational water quality

The concentration of enterococci, bacteria that thrive in feces, has long been the federal standard for determining water quality. Researchers have now shown that the greatest influences on that concentration are the quantity of mammalian feces in the water, and the numbers of enterococci that glom onto floating particulate matter.

25min

Barium ruthenate: A high-yield, easy-to-handle perovskite catalyst for the oxidation of sulfides

Researchers have developed a ruthenium-based perovskite catalyst that shows strong activity even at low temperatures (down to 313 K). The reusable catalyst does not require additives, meaning that it can prevent the formation of toxic by-products. The oxidation of sulfides is a commercially important process with broad applications ranging from chemicals production to environmental management.

25min

Synapse-specific plasticity governs the identity of overlapping memory traces

Each memory is stored in a specific population of neurons called engram cells. When a memory is linked with another to generate an associative memory, two memory traces overlap. At the same time, individual memories maintain their own identities. Using two overlapping fear memories in mice, researchers show that synapse-specific plasticity guarantees both storage and identity of individual memorie

25min

Teaching robots to be more reliable teammates for soldiers

Researchers have developed a new technique to quickly teach robots novel traversal behaviors with minimal human oversight.

25min

Uncertainty may be key in battlefield decision making

Researchers have discovered that being initially uncertain when faced with making critical mission-related decisions based on various forms of information may lead to better overall results in the end.

25min

Tree shrews can tolerate hot peppers: Mutation in pain receptor makes peppery plant palatable

Almost all mammals avoid eating chili peppers and other 'hot' foods, because of the pain they induce. But not the tree shrew, according to a new study. The researchers found that this close relative of primates is unaffected by the active ingredient in chili peppers due to a subtle mutation in the receptor that detects it.

25min

Finding the proteins that unpack DNA

A new method allows researchers to systematically identify specialized proteins called 'nuclesome displacing factors' that unpack DNA inside the nucleus of a cell, making the usually dense DNA more accessible for gene expression and other functions.

25min

Researchers trace Parkinson's damage in the heart

A new way to examine stress and inflammation in the heart will help Parkinson's researchers test new therapies and explore an unappreciated way the disease puts people at risk of falls and hospitalization.

53min

Fragile X: New drug strategy corrects behavior/biochemical measures in mouse model

Research in mice shows that a pharmacological strategy can alleviate multiple behavioral and cellular deficiencies in a mouse model of fragile X syndrome, the most common inherited form of intellectual disability.

53min

Looking at the urine and blood may be best in diagnosing myeloma

When it comes to diagnosing a condition in which the plasma cells that normally make antibodies to protect us instead become cancerous, it may be better to look at the urine as well as the serum of our blood for answers, pathologists say.

53min

How gold nanoparticles could improve solar energy storage

Star-shaped gold nanoparticles, coated with a semiconductor, can produce hydrogen from water over four times more efficiently than other methods – opening the door to improved storage of solar energy and other advances that could boost renewable energy use and combat climate change, according to researchers.

53min

Graphene could be key to controlling water evaporation

Graphene coatings may offer the ability to control the water evaporation process from various surfaces, according to new research. The study looked at the interactions of water molecules with various graphene-covered surfaces.

1h

'No evidence' grammar schools can promote social mobility

Expanding the number of grammar schools is unlikely to promote social mobility by providing more opportunities for disadvantaged pupils, a new study finds.

1h

Ant soldiers don't need big brains

Army ant (Eciton) soldiers are bigger but do not have larger brains than other workers within the same colony that fulfill more complex tasks, according to a new study. A collaborative team of researchers suggests that because the very specific and limited tasks soldiers fulfill place limited cognitive demands on them, investment in the development of brain tissue is also limited.

1h

Financial incentives create critical waterbird habitat in extreme drought

New research shows how financial incentive programs can create vital habitat for waterbirds, filling a critical need in drought years. Researchers used satellite images to evaluate two issues: 1) the impact of the 2013-2015 drought on waterbird habitat in the Central Valley; and, 2) the amount of habitat created by incentive programs.

1h

Early Primates Groomed with Claws

Fossils found in Wyoming help refine our understanding of when early primates switched claws for nails — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

Data-vagthund advarer alle britiske partier: I misbruger vælgernes data

Det er smart at bruge data til markedsføring, men de britiske partier har ifølge ny rapport været for smarte til det.

2h

The Elusive Underdog Magic of the World Cup

Neutrality may be a tenable position in geopolitics, but it’s tantamount to indifference when tuning into the World Cup. A soccer match can rarely be watched in earnest without one side winning you over. Croatia faces France in the World Cup final on Sunday, a game that (based on figures from the last tournament) could attract a global TV audience of more than one billion people , most of whom, o

4h

The Closest Calls | Shark Week's Most Intense Encounters

As you can probably guess, filming Shark Week each year can be quite dangerous! These are some of the closest calls ever in the history of Shark Week. Shark Week 2018 starts Sunday July 22 9p! Stream Shark Week's Most Intense Encounters on Discovery GO: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/shark-weeks-most-intense-encounters/ Stream Classic Shark Week Episodes: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/sh

4h

When Did That Happen?

Getting a handle on past scientific discoveries may require thinking about them in a new context — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

Mummy Wearing Gold-Gilded Face Mask Discovered at Ancient Egypt Burial Ground

The face mask was among a treasure trove of discoveries that included mummies, a burial shaft, mummification workshop and sarcophagi.

5h

Attenborough launches 'Boaty McBoatface' polar ship

Sir David Attenborough has launched the hull of the UK's newest polar ship, which is named after him.

5h

'A goldmine': mummies' secrets uncovered in Egypt

Archaeologists find mummification workshop in the Saqqara necropolis Deep below the sands of the Saqqara necropolis, archaeologists have uncovered a unique discovery they say reveals the secrets of the ancient Egyptian mummies. A mummification workshop and adjoining burial shaft as well as five mummies, their bejewelled sarcophagi, figurines, and a gilded silver and onyx mummy mask were all unear

5h

France’s Ghosts Return for the World Cup

As we flooded out Paris into the streets to celebrate France’s World Cup semifinal victory Tuesday night, I saw, here and there, people wearing jerseys from 1998. They are looser than the ones they sell now, a brighter blue, with a red stripe and a white collar. On the backs are the names of an older generation of players—Zidane, Thuram, Henry—who in that year won France’s first and only World Cu

5h

8 Critically Endangered Black Rhinos Die in Kenya

The Kenyan government said the rhinos, which were transported to a sanctuary southeast of Nairobi, most likely died from drinking water with a high saline level.

6h

South Africa Celebrates Completion of Gigantic, Super-sensitive Telescope

MeerKAT has drawn astronomers, engineers and data scientists from around the world — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

Don't try to fix your frayed cable—prevent the damage in the first place

DIY Worn-out chargers endanger you and your device. You carry your charger everywhere, but all that back-and-forth takes a toll. Here’s how to deal with fraying cables, and protect them from wearing out in the first…

7h

Shark Vocab: Intrauterine Cannibalism | Countdown to Shark Week: The Daily Bite

Some needy sharks wrote in to The Captain to get some relationship advice. Meanwhile, Jordan Carlos introduces us again to the legendary sharks of the past as we bring back "Top Sharks" and we take another shot at shark vocab. Shark Week 2018 starts Sunday July 22 9p! Stream The Daily Bite on Discovery GO: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/the-daily-bite/ Stream Classic Shark Week Episodes: http

7h

‘Hereditary’ Proves Satanists Just Aren’t Scary Anymore

The new horror movie is very frightening—but not entirely because of its occult twist.

7h

Ukraine Blocks a Russian Hack, a Silk Road Arrest, and More Security News This WeekRobert Mueller Russian

Drone plans for sale, a Silk Road arrest, and more security news this week.

7h

Do Microwaves Cause Cancer?

Let’s take a look at 4 microwave myths that science has proven false — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

Dust Bowl Mars

As our robotic rovers experience a global storm on Mars it’s an opportunity to reflect on billions of dry, dusty years — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

People Still Believe These 10 Myths About the Spanish Flu

This year marks the 100th anniversary of the great influenza pandemic of 1918. Between 50 and 100 million people are thought to have died, representing as much as 5 percent of the world's population. Half a billion people were infected.

8h

While You Live, Shine – Christopher C. King – Think Again – a Big Think Podcast #156

Think Again like you've never heard it before. A trip deep into the oldest living folk music in the Western world — that of Epirus, Greece — and what it reveals about why we make music at all. Read More

8h

Acid Rain: Causes, Effects and Solutions

Acid rain is any form of precipitation that contains acidic components, such as sulfuric or nitric acid. Acid rain affects nearly everything: plants, soil, trees, buildings and even statues.

8h

Crop Marks Reveal Ancient Structures

A recent heatwave in the U.K. has revealed outlines of ancient structures previously unknown to archaeologists. NPR's Renee Montagne asks aerial archaeologist Toby Driver what he's been learning.

8h

Towers Toppled at Historic Cape Canaveral Launch Complex 17

The last two launch towers to stand at Cape Canaveral since the dawn of the Space Age are no more.

8h

Why Do Some People Hate the Taste of Beer?

If the thought of sipping a beer is gag-inducing, you're not alone. But why does this happen: Why do some people hate the taste of beer?

8h

Space Photos of the Week: Mars Has Spiders in the Springtime

Beautiful evidence of our red neighbor’s watery past and current annual changes.

8h

The Best of the Physics arXiv (week ending July 14, 2018)

This week’s most thought-provoking papers from the Physics arXiv.

8h

Here's What Ötzi the Iceman Ate Before He Was Murdered

His mummified remains show he ate meat and a poisonous fern before his demise — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

The Family Weekly: The Days of ‘Peak Family Road Trip’

This Week in Family Sperm donation can look like a simple, practical solution for starting a family, but those who opt for the process are often surprised by its emotional consequences, Ashley Fetters reports. Some specialists argue that professional counseling is crucial to helping families untangle the messy emotional webs that the process can weave, and some countries legally require that sper

9h

GRAFIK Se hvor fremtidens krige kan bryde ud

Flere mennesker om de samme ressourcer betyder, at vi i fremtiden kommer til at gå i krig om vand, mad og mineraler.

9h

Pininfarina's Back With a $2 Million Electric Hypercar

The famed Italian design house hopes to win over customers with the PF0, a battery-powered ride that hits 60 mph in under two seconds and offers 310 miles of range.

9h

Electrolux Pure i9 Review: An Effective, But Expensive Robot Vacuum

This small, bashful botvac that will win over your heart, if not your wallet.

9h

Slime Molds Remember—But Do They Learn?

Evidence mounts that organisms without nervous systems can in some sense learn and solve problems, but researchers disagree about whether this is “primitive cognition.”

9h

The Red-State Democrats’ Many Paths to ‘No’

Conventional wisdom decrees that red-state Democratic senators running for reelection are politically screwed, regardless of how they vote on Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh. If they signal thumbs-up, they’ll infuriate the party’s progressive base and dampen the Democratic turnout they’ll badly need. Thumbs-down, they’ll make it easier for Republicans to attack them as Trump-hating obstruct

9h

Why Are Obstacle-Course Races So Popular?

Completing a marathon has long been the ultimate feather in the cap of an amateur endurance athlete. But the idea of trotting along a boring old paved road for 26.2 miles doesn’t thrill everyone. For the endurance athlete who gets bored easily, a new genre of race has emerged—peppered with obstacles requiring feats of strength and dexterity (Crawling under barbed wire! Climbing a rope! Throwing a

9h

The Swamp Isn’t Easy to Drain

Donald Trump rode to Washington, D.C., on a pledge to “drain the swamp,” but so far his administration has luxuriated in the filth. Trump’s hotels have made a mint from bookings related to government business. And with the president’s tax returns still under lock and key, it remains unclear how the Trump Organization may be profiting from his various policies. Meanwhile, former EPA Administrator

10h

NASA Juno data indicate another possible volcano on Jupiter moon Io

Data collected by NASA's Juno spacecraft using its Jovian InfraRed Auroral Mapper (JIRAM) instrument point to a new heat source close to the south pole of Io that could indicate a previously undiscovered volcano on the small moon of Jupiter. The infrared data were collected on Dec. 16, 2017, when Juno was about 290,000 miles (470,000 kilometers) away from the moon.

10h

Big petroleum projects in Argentina face tiny challenge: a lizard

A tiny but critically endangered lizard found in Argentina's extensive Vaca Muerta petroleum field could pose a major challenge to companies planning multimillion-dollar investments in the area.

10h

Aviation giants fly into Farnborough under Brexit cloud

Top global plane makers land at the Farnborough airshow in England next week, hoping to pick up speed on demand for passenger jets while charting a path through Brexit and trade war turbulence.

10h

Irish Silk Road suspect extradited to US: prosecutors

A 30-year-old Irish man accused of working for now defunct "dark web" marketplace Silk Road has been extradited to the United States to face charges in New York, four years after his arrest, prosecutors announced Friday.

10h

When fake news sparks violence: India grapples with online rumours

India has been shaken by a spate of mob killings sparked by a hoax about child kidnappers spread on WhatsApp.

10h

Shoots for the stars: Briton grows microgreens for top French chefs

Fuchsia-coloured lights glow over a miniature garden where tiny plants pack a wealth of flavour and nutrients headed for the tables of Michelin-starred French chefs.

10h

Fake news: algorithms in the dock

At the heart of the spread of fake news are the algorithms used by search engines, websites and social media which are often accused of pushing false or manipulated information regardless of the consequences.

10h

Study finds deep subterranean connection between two Japan volcanoes

Scientists have confirmed for the first time that radical changes of one volcano in southern Japan was the direct result of an erupting volcano 22 kilometers (13.7 miles) away. The observations from the two volcanos—Aira caldera and Kirishima—show that the two were connected through a common subterranean magma source in the months leading up to the 2011 eruption of Kirishima.

11h

Tiny sensors in your phone could be made from recycled wood

Minuscule machines that act as sensors in smartphones and other devices can be made from crystals extracted from discarded wood instead of silicon

11h

Artificial skin grown from spider silk could help heal wounds

Wounds and burns could one day be treated by the material spiders use to make their webs

11h

Will Ireland’s vote to divest from fossil fuels make a difference?

Ireland is set to become the first country to sell off all its investments in fossil fuels, but efforts to limit global warming must go much further

11h

Dopamine levels in our brains affect the risks we’re happy to take

The first brain-scanning study to track activity in the brain's decision-making centres during gambling shows fluctuations in dopamine levels affect risk-taking

11h

Think your surfing is secret in private browsing mode? Think again

Governments and employers can still snoop on you when you use Chrome’s Incognito Mode or other private browsers, but many people don’t know this

11h

En skyskraber, der styrer vejret: Fremtidens højhuse løser vilde problemer

Verdens højeste bygninger er i dag imponerende i sig selv, men fremover vil vi se bygninger, der i højere grad forsøger at løse udfordringer i lokalmiljøet på kreativ vis.

12h

Lundtoftebyggeriet skrider rask fremad

Syv kilometer underjordiske gange kommer til at forbinde bygningerne i den nye læreanstalt på Lundtoftesletten. De første professorer kan flytte ind til september 1962.

12h

Drought and Drone Reveal ‘Once-in-a-Lifetime’ Signs of Ancient Henge in Ireland

A local photographer’s drone captured signs, exposed by drought conditions in the soil, of a 5,000-year-old monument in a field north of Dublin.

15h

Sir David Attenborough launches 'Boaty' polar ship

The hull of the ship, which the public wanted to call Boaty McBoatface, is launched into the Mersey.

18h

Russians Found One Use for Bitcoin: Hacking the 2016 US Election

The 12 Russian intelligence officers accused of hacking the DNC allegedly used $95,000 worth of Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies to fund their operation.

19h

Horse sense: Happiest equines love to snort, says study

Snorting in horses is linked to a 'positive internal state', say scientists, and could improve animal welfare.

19h

An epidemic of "Necessary and Sufficient" neurons

A great deal of neuroscience has become “circuit cracking.” — Alex Gomez-Marin A miniaturized holy grail of neuroscience is discovering that activation or inhibition of a specific population of neurons (e.g., prefrontal parvalbumin interneurons ) or neural circuit (e.g., basolateral amygdala → nucleus accumbens ) is “necessary and sufficient” (N&S) to produce a given behavior. from: Optogenetics,

19h

Gadget Lab Podcast: Panos Panay on Why Microsoft Made the Surface Go

Microsoft's chief product officer, Panos Panay, tells us why the company made the Surface Go.

20h

In Ireland, Drought And A Drone Revealed The Outline Of An Ancient Henge

As crops get thirsty in Ireland, some plants are faring better than others. Aerial photos show a pattern in crop growth near Newgrange, believed to be the footprint of a previously unknown henge. (Image credit: Anthony Murphy/Mythical Ireland)

21h

Sir David Attenborough polar ship: Here's an inside peek

There's even space for a coffee shop, sauna and gym on the £200m vessel.

21h

Science News You Might Have Missed

Very brief reports about science and technology from around the globe. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

21h

The Atlantic Daily: What Does Mueller’s Latest Indictment Reveal?

What We’re Following Hacking Charges: Twelve Russian intelligence officers have been indicted on charges of hacking into Democratic Party computer systems, as well as those of an unidentified state board of elections, in an attempt to interfere with the 2016 presidential election. According to Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s indictment, the Russians attempted to access a server and email account

22h

Deaths from cardiovascular disease rising in India, study finds

Death due to cardiovascular disease is on the rise in India, causing more than one quarter of all deaths in the country in 2015 and affecting rural populations and young adults the most, suggests a new study.

22h

Drug to Treat Smallpox Approved by F.D.A., a Move Against Bioterrorism

Though the disease was eradicated decades ago, national security experts fear that stocks of the virus in labs could be released as a bioweapon.

22h

Can we really ever know if animals are happy?

Animals Tail wags, rat giggles, and horse snorts. We assume animals are happy, sad, scared or upset based on their behavior. But how do we know if our pets are content?

22h

French Farmer Discovered a Rare Mastodon Skull, But Kept It Secret for Years

After keeping it to himself for a while, this farmer finally let the world know about his amazing discovery.

22h

What The Diet Of A 5,300-Year-Old 'Iceman' Says About Ancient Europeans

NPR's Ailsa Chang talks with Frank Maixner about how scientists uncovered the last meal of a frozen hunter who died 5,300 years ago in the Alps. The stomach contents of the man show what ancient Europeans ate.

22h

Brett Kavanaugh, Jim Jordan, and the Fog of the Partisan

This week, shortly after Donald Trump announced his nominee for the Supreme Court seat left vacant by the retirement of Anthony Kennedy, a joking hashtag began trending on Twitter. #BrettKavanaughScandals , building on his public introduction at the White House—“For the past seven years, I have coached my daughter’s basketball teams,” Kavanaugh said; “the girls on the team call me ‘Coach K’”—reve

23h

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Russian to Conclusions

-Written by Elaine Godfrey ( @elainejgodfrey ) Today in 5 Lines A grand jury indicted 12 Russian intelligence officials for allegedly attempting to interfere with the 2016 presidential election by hacking into computers and email systems of the Democratic National Committee, the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee, and Hillary Clinton’s campaign. The White House responded in a statement,

23h

Mueller’s Blockbuster Indictment

It’s always on Fridays. Almost like clockwork, each new indictment from the Special Counsel’s office released on a Friday afternoon, just in time to disrupt the weekend news cycle. Not that anyone is complaining, because this week’s indictment is a blockbuster—an 11-count indictment of 12 Russian military officers alleging that they engaged in a hacking campaign against Hillary Clinton, the Democ

23h

Nikon’s new 125x zoom camera has a lens that would be impossible on a DSLR

Gadgets That much zoom pushes into telescope territory. The Nikon P1000 has 125x optical zoom, which means it starts a little wider than your typical smartphone camera lens, and can zoom far enough that you can focus on…

23h

Why Congress Needs to Revive Its Tech Support Team

To tackle real issues, legislators first need to understand them—and they need help. That means it’s time to reboot the Office of Technology Assessment.

23h

A Noninvasive Way to Control Individual Brain Regions

Researchers use a combination of ultrasound waves, genetic engineering, and synthetic drugs to switch specific neurons on and off in mice.

23h

Earthquake in Mexico Cracked a Pyramid and Revealed an Ancient Temple

A quake in Mexico had a surprisingly positive outcome for archaeologists.

23h

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