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Nyheder2018juli16

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'Underworked' victims of modern slavery endure extra exploitation

People trapped in modern slavery can be 'underworked' by ruthless employers, to increase their debt bondage and provide revenue from living costs. The assumption that victims of exploitation are worked like 'slaves' is shielding extra layers of exploitation, shows research led by the University of Bath's School of Management, published by the Academy of Management.

8h

Archaeologists discover bread that predates agriculture by 4,000 years

At an archaeological site in northeastern Jordan, researchers have discovered the charred remains of a flatbread baked by hunter-gatherers 14,400 years ago. It is the oldest direct evidence of bread found to date, predating the advent of agriculture by at least 4,000 years. The findings suggest that bread production based on wild cereals may have encouraged hunter-gatherers to cultivate cereals, a

3h

Cykelbokse beskytter ikke mod højresvingsulykker

De nye cykelbokse, som bliver malet i vejkryds over hele landet, har ingen mærkbar effekt på trafiksikkerheden, viser evaluering.

16h

LATEST

The Atlantic Daily: Why Did Trump Take Putin’s Side?

What We’re Following Presidents’ Presser: At a joint press conference with Russian President Vladimir Putin in Helsinki, Donald Trump publicly sided with Putin against the consensus of U.S. intelligence agencies, stating that “I do not see any reason why” the Kremlin would be responsible for interference in the 2016 presidential election. That the president would defer to Putin rather than defend

5min

Political split on climate change isn’t so wide after all

Just how far apart are Republicans and Democrats when it comes to views on climate change? Not all that far, a new study suggests. They’re just too party-focused to notice. Researchers surveyed 2,000 adults and discovered that across party lines, there is general agreement that climate change is real, that it is caused by human activity, and that something should be done to mitigate it. The study

5min

When math teachers change mindset, student grades go up

When teachers reexamine how they were taught math and their perceptions of their ability, student test scores and attitudes about math dramatically improve, according to a new study. The research, which appears in the journal Education Sciences , shows that fifth-grade teachers who took an online class designed to give them a different approach to mathematics teaching and learning, achieved signi

5min

Intimate partner violence is just as common in male couples

Nearly half the men in a new study about intimate partner violence in male couples reported being the victim of abuse. The findings show that in addition to universal stressors–finances, unemployment, drug abuse–that both heterosexual and male couples share, experiences of homophobia and other factors unique to male couples also predict abuse among them. The study is one of the few that looks at

12min

Older kids who abuse animals much more likely to have been abused themselves

Older children who abuse animals are two to three times as likely to have been abused themselves as kids that don't display this type of behavior, highlights a review of the available evidence published online in the Archives of Disease in Childhood.

14min

Unhealthy blood fat profile linked to greater odds of having only one or no kids

An unhealthy blood fat (lipid) profile before pregnancy is linked to greater odds of having only one or no children, suggests an observational study published in the online journal BMJ Open.

14min

'Invisible' stool blood linked to heightened risk of death from all causes

'Invisible' blood detected in the stools is linked to a heightened risk of death from all causes, as well as from bowel cancer, reveals research published online in the journal Gut.

14min

Blood Pressure Medicine Is Recalled

The F.D.A. announced that batches of a widely used generic drug, valsartan, made in China, might be tainted with a probable cancer-causing ingredient.

16min

Rubio, Warner Stress Election Security After Trump-Putin Summit

Senators Mark Warner and Marco Rubio both cast President Trump's appearance in Helsinki as a major setback in the fight against Russian interference in elections around the world.

37min

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Off Putin

-Written by Elaine Godfrey ( @elainejgodfrey ), Maddie Carlisle ( @maddieec123 ), and Olivia Paschal (@ oliviacpaschal ) Today in 5 Lines During a joint press conference with Russian President Vladimir Putin, President Trump rejected the consensus among the U.S. intelligence community that Russia interfered in the 2016 presidential election. “They said, ‘I think it is Russia.’ I have President Pu

45min

Trump’s Meeting With Putin Draws Alarmed Responses From Both Parties

“Surreal.” “Extraordinary.” “Disgraceful.” Lawmakers in the U.S. and abroad appeared shell-shocked on Monday following President Trump’s press conference with his Russian counterpart, Vladimir Putin, in which Trump again refused to condemn Putin for Russia’s interference in the 2016 election, even going so far as to deny the conclusion of U.S. intelligence agencies that Russia was responsible. “I

45min

These tiny tree shrews can handle hotter peppers than you

Animals And now we know why they can handle the heat Spicy food doesn’t hurt you directly–it’s not poison–but your body thinks it’s getting real burns and reacts accordingly. Mammals who aren’t us steer clear of the…

47min

The Best Amazon Prime Day Deals for Home, Outdoor, and Lifestyle: Instant Pot, Zojirushi, Fitbit

Pull your shattered life back together with our favorite home and outdoor deals this Prime Day.

55min

‘My Past Has Caught Up to Me’

Justin Stoneham’s mother, Karin, was a vivacious woman. He has evidence of it in VHS tapes he discovered after his father died. There she is, in a swimsuit, frolicking on the beach with abandon; now, she’s goofing around with Justin’s father, who trains the lens on her lovingly. But to Justin, this person isn’t his mother. Although she’s still alive, Karin is a stranger he never knew. Karin suffe

1h

Do you really need to properly eject a USB drive before yanking it out?

Technology Short answer: Probably not. Just don’t do it while it is actively copying, and don’t do it within milliseconds after it has finished.

1h

Einstein Letter on Immigration Up for Auction

A letter written by Albert Einstein outlined his regrets about the plight of a European scholar hoping to immigrate to the U.S.

1h

Breast cancer follow-up imaging varies widely, study finds

Follow-up imaging for women with non-metastatic breast cancer varies widely across the country, according to a new study. Some patients go without the annual mammograms that experts recommend, while others with the same cancer diagnosis receive full-body scans that expose them to significant amounts of radiation and are not recommended by experts.

1h

We may have less control over our thoughts than previously assumed

A new study suggests that we have less control over our conscious thoughts than previously assumed.

1h

Electronic stickers to streamline large-scale 'internet of things'

Researchers have developed a new fabrication method that makes tiny, thin-film electronic circuits peelable from a surface. The technique not only eliminates several manufacturing steps and the associated costs, but also allows any object to sense its environment or be controlled through the application of a high-tech sticker.

1h

New ALS therapy in clinical trials

New research indicates an investigational therapy for an inherited form of ALS extends survival and reverses signs of neuromuscular damage in mice and rats. The findings have led to a phase one/two clinical trial to investigate whether the drug could benefit people with ALS whose disease is caused by mutations in a gene called SOD1.

1h

The origins of pottery linked with intensified fishing in the post-glacial period

A study into some of the earliest known pottery remains has suggested that the rise of ceramic production was closely linked with intensified fishing at the end of the last Ice Age.

1h

An immigrant workforce leads to innovation, according to new research

New federal restrictions on the temporary H-1B visa, which allows high-skilled foreign workers to be employed by U.S. companies, have increased debate on the economic impacts of the program, but little is known about its effect on product innovation — until now.

1h

Disruption tolerant networking to demonstrate Internet in space

The interplanetary Internet may soon become a reality. NASA is about to demonstrate Delay/Disruption Tolerant Networking, or DTN — a technology that sends information through space and ground networks to its destination.

1h

Scientists Prove Einstein Right Using the Most Elusive Particles in the Universe

Einstein was right about things he didn't even know existed.

1h

More data needed to determine safety of probiotics and prebiotics

Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) assessing the efficacy of probiotics, prebiotics, and synbiotics often fail to report potential harms. Without safety data, experts warn that they cannot broadly conclude that these interventions are safe. The findings are published in Annals of Internal Medicine.

1h

A new telescope shows the center of the Milky Way in dazzling, fiery detail

The first of many radio telescope images to come. Read More

1h

Surfing For Science: A New Way To Gather Data For Ocean And Coastal Research

Researchers at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography hope to turn surfers into citizen scientists by equipping them with a "smartfin" that gathers data as they surf.

1h

Protecting tropical forest carbon stocks may not prevent large-scale species loss

As the world seeks to curb human-induced climate change, will protecting the carbon of tropical forests also ensure the survival of their species? A study suggests the answer to this question is far from straightforward. Forests with the greatest carbon content do not necessarily house the most species, meaning carbon-focused conservation can miss large swathes of tropical forest biodiversity.

1h

Researchers make and test atom-thick boron's unique domains

Defects are often observed when making borophene, the single-atom form of boron, but unlike in other two-dimensional materials, these mismatched lattices can assemble into ordered structures that preserve the material's metallic nature and electronic properties.

1h

Why pulsed sparks make for better ignition

Researchers have learned the mechanisms behind a means of improved ignition, helping to open the door to better performance in all types of combustion systems.

1h

Herpetologists' League Revokes Distinguished Herpetologist Award

Richard Vogt, this year's awardee, showed inappropriate images of researchers in the field during his acceptance speech.

1h

Defendants on Probation Can Be Jailed for Drug Relapse, Court Rules

Many medical experts said that relapse is part of recovery and a symptom of disease, and shouldn’t be punished with jail. A court disagreed.

1h

Cognitive Test Trump Took May Have Been Undermined by Publicity, Doctors Warn

Articles about the test, known as the Montreal Cognitive Assessment, or MoCA, listed some of its questions, potentially influencing future patients.

1h

CRISPR Gene Editing May Be Doing More Damage Than Scientists Thought

In 15 percent of cases, cellular DNA was so scrambled that the cells lost function.

1h

1h

Data mining reveals fundamental pattern of human thinking

Word frequency patterns show that humans process common and uncommon words in different ways, with important consequences for natural-language processing.

1h

Neutrons analyze advanced high-strength steels to improve vehicle safety and efficiency

The demand for lighter, stronger, and more durable materials for use in vehicles has never been higher. Companies are looking at new and advanced materials such as lightweight advanced high-strength steels (AHSS) to develop automotive components that help increase gas efficiency, reduce maintenance costs, and save lives.

2h

Women Maintain NIH Funding Similar to Men: Study

Female PIs apply for fewer grants, but retain support once they get it.

2h

Magnetized wire could be used to detect cancer in people

A magnetic wire used to snag scarce and hard-to-capture tumor cells could prove to be a swift and effective tactic for early cancer detection, according to a new study.

2h

How foreign kelp surfed to Antarctica

A research team has found the first proof that Antarctica is not isolated from the rest of the Earth, with the discovery that foreign kelp had drifted 20,000 kilometers before surfing to the continent's icy shores.

2h

Self-control and obesity: Gender matters in children

A toddler's self-regulation — the ability to change behavior in different social situations — may predict whether he or she will be obese come kindergarten, but the connection appears to be much different for girls than for boys.

2h

High-stakes cellular process critical to small intestine development

A new study examining how the developing small intestine grows in mice found a surprising sequence of cellular events akin to a death-defying, high-wire circus performance in order for the organ to reach a proper length. A lack of coordination could have dire consequences.

2h

Archaeologists discover bread that predates agriculture by 4,000 years

At an archaeological site in northeastern Jordan, researchers have discovered the charred remains of a flatbread baked by hunter-gatherers 14,400 years ago. It is the oldest direct evidence of bread found to date, predating the advent of agriculture by at least 4,000 years. The findings suggest that bread production based on wild cereals may have encouraged hunter-gatherers to cultivate cereals, a

2h

Lava flies through roof of Hawaii tour boat, injuring 13

Hawaii officials say an explosion sent lava flying through the roof of a tour boat off the Big Island, injuring at least 13 people.

2h

SF State researcher explores how information enters our brains

A new study by SF State Associate Professor of Psychology Ezequiel Morsella suggests that we have less control over our conscious thoughts than previously assumed.

2h

Electronic stickers to streamline large-scale 'internet of things'

Researchers at Purdue University and the University of Virginia have developed a new fabrication method that makes tiny, thin-film electronic circuits peelable from a surface. The technique not only eliminates several manufacturing steps and the associated costs, but also allows any object to sense its environment or be controlled through the application of a high-tech sticker.

2h

FCC head has 'serious concerns' with Sinclair-Tribune deal

The chairman of the Federal Communications Commission is raising "serious concerns" about Sinclair's $3.9 billion deal for Tribune's television stations.

2h

Thawing permafrost microbiomes fuel climate change

A new study could lead to more accurate predictions or the rate of global warming from greenhouse gas emissions produced by thawing permafrost in the next 100 years. The study of the microorganisms involved in permafrost carbon degradation links changing microbial communities and biogeochemistry to the rise of greenhouse gas emissions.

2h

Crowdsourcing friendly bacteria helps superbug cause infection

Antimicrobial resistant pathogens crowdsource friendly bacteria to survive in immune cells and cause disease, a new study has revealed.

2h

Plant mothers 'talk' to their embryos via the hormone auxin

In plants, it has been clear for a while that maternal signals regulate embryo development. However, the signal itself was unknown — until now. Plant scientists have now found that a plant hormone called auxin from the mother is one of the signals that pattern the plant embryo.

2h

Forget joysticks, use your torso to pilot drones

Your torso is more intuitive — and more precise — than joysticks for piloting drones, both simulated and real, according to a recent study. Work is already underway to implement this new body-machine-interface technology for search and rescue with drones.

2h

Turns out CRISPR editing can also vandalize genomesCRISPR Editing Damage

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2h

DJI drones are now $300 off

Gadgets These are some of the best drones for photographers. Drones like the Mavic Pro and the Spark are on sale for the next 36 hours during Prime Day.

2h

Homology Medicines announces publication of in vivo gene editing data with nuclease-free technology

Homology Medicines, Inc., a genetic medicines company, announced today a peer-reviewed publication demonstrating that Homology's technology induces efficient and precise in vivo gene editing. The publication, by senior author Saswati Chatterjee, Ph.D., Department of Surgery, member of the Beckman Research Institute at City of Hope in California, and scientific co-founder of Homology, also highligh

2h

New ALS therapy in clinical trials

New research led by Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis indicates an investigational therapy for an inherited form of ALS extends survival and reverses signs of neuromuscular damage in mice and rats. The findings, published July 16 in The Journal of Clinical Investigation, have led to a phase one/two clinical trial to investigate whether the drug could benefit people with ALS who

2h

US investigates possible gender bias at UberUber Gender Discrimination

Uber is facing a federal investigation on alleged discrimination against women working at the smartphone-summoned ride service, a source familiar with the matter said Monday.

2h

A scientist's final paper looks toward Earth's future climate

A NASA scientist's final scientific paper, published posthumously this month, reveals new insights into one of the most complex challenges of Earth's climate: understanding and predicting future atmospheric levels of greenhouse gases and the role of the ocean and land in determining those levels.

2h

Researchers engineer bacteria to create fertilizer out of thin air

In the future, plants will be able to create their own fertilizer. Farmers will no longer need to buy and spread fertilizer for their crops, and increased food production will benefit billions of people around the world, who might otherwise go hungry.

2h

Study suggests buried Internet infrastructure at risk as sea levels rise

Thousands of miles of buried fiber optic cable in densely populated coastal regions of the United States may soon be inundated by rising seas, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the University of Oregon.

2h

NASA catches tropical cyclone 11W passing northern Philippines

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the Northwestern Pacific Ocean and captured a visible image of recently formed Tropical Depression 11W.

2h

UK to build record-breaking solar planes

The lightweight Zephyr aircraft could be used in communications and remote sensing.

2h

Study of high-energy neutrinos again proves Einstein right

A new study demonstrates that Einstein is right again. The most thorough test yet finds no Lorentz violation in high-energy neutrinos.

2h

Overcoming a major barrier to developing liquid biopsies

An international consortium tested nine different methods for RNA sequencing to understand and standardize the best way to sequence small RNAs. The goal was to create a process that could be reproduced from one lab to the next to advance the field of liquid biopsies.

2h

Test for Alzheimer's disease directly measures synaptic loss

Researchers have tested a new method for directly measuring synaptic loss in individuals with Alzheimer's disease. The method, which uses PET imaging technology to scan for a specific protein in the brain linked to synapses, has the potential to accelerate research for new Alzheimer's treatments, the researchers said.

2h

Cancer researchers suggest new treatment for rare inherited cancers

Studying two rare inherited cancer syndromes, scientists have found the cancers are driven by a breakdown in how cells repair their DNA. The discovery suggests a promising strategy for treatment with drugs recently approved for other forms of cancer, said the researchers.

2h

What's causing the voltage fade in Lithium-rich NMC cathode materials?

Researchers explain what's causing the performance-reducing 'voltage fade' that currently plagues a promising class of cathode materials called Lithium-rich NMC (nickel magnesium cobalt) layered oxides.

2h

Electric car batteries souped-up with fluorinated electrolytes for longer-range driving

The success of electric car batteries depends on the miles that can be driven on a single charge, but the current crop of lithium-ion batteries are reaching their natural limit of how much charge can be packed into any given space, keeping drivers on a short tether. Now, researchers at the University of Maryland (UMD), the U.S. Army Research Laboratory (ARL), and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL)

2h

Researchers develop new solar sailing technology for NASA

Spacecraft outfitted with sails and propelled by the sun are no longer the stuff of science fiction or theoretical space missions. Now, a Rochester Institute of Technology researcher is taking solar sailing to the next level with advanced photonic materials.

2h

Researchers determine why pulsed sparks make for better ignition

Researchers in the Oregon State University College of Engineering have learned the mechanisms behind a means of improved ignition, helping to open the door to better performance in combustion systems ranging from car engines to jet propulsion.

2h

Microscopic trampoline may help create networks of quantum computers

Take a bounce: A microscopic trampoline could help engineers to overcome a major hurdle for quantum computers, researchers from CU Boulder and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) report in a new study.

2h

New development in 3-D super-resolution imaging gives insight on Alzheimer's disease

Recent studies show that 40 percent of Americans over the age of 85 have Alzheimer's disease, and that the disease begins 10 to 20 years before people show up at the doctor's office with memory problems.

2h

The Unknowable Robin Williams

“Ladies and gentlemen, it’s time to pump neurons,” Robin Williams announces in voiceover, over a black screen. “We are about to enter the domain of the human mind.” In the two hours that follow, the director Marina Zenovich tackles one of the most explosively cerebral subjects in comedy. Williams was someone whose creative energy was so vast that it seemed to overwhelm his body in performance, hi

2h

An immigrant workforce leads to innovation, according to new research

New federal restrictions on the temporary H-1B visa, which allows high-skilled foreign workers to be employed by U.S. companies, have increased debate on the economic impacts of the program, but little is known about its effect on product innovation—until now. New research from the University of California San Diego School of Global Policy and Strategy shows that hiring high-skilled workers from a

2h

Amazon Prime Day: Best Health & Fitness Deals

Here's our roundup of the best deals on health and fitness products for Amazon's Prime Day.

2h

In borophene, boundaries are no barrier—researchers make and test atom-thick boron's unique domains

Borophene, the atomically flat form of boron with unique properties, is even more interesting when different forms of the material mix and mingle, according to scientists at Rice and Northwestern universities.

2h

Mysterianism Redux

A follow up to my Scientific American column on consciousness, free will, and God…the final mysteries? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

OSU researchers determine why pulsed sparks make for better ignition

Researchers have learned the mechanisms behind a means of improved ignition, helping to open the door to better performance in all types of combustion systems.

2h

France’s World Cup Victory Is a Win for Emmanuel Macron

PARIS —When the victorious World Cup–winning French national team arrived on the Champs-Élysées on Monday evening, welcomed home by massive crowds under massive security, it capped weeks during which France didn’t only cheer on its team, but also used the competition as a moment for soul-searching. The introspection was about race, about multiculturalism, about Paris’s banlieues , and about how m

3h

Trump Blames Bad Relations With Russia on Everything but Russia

During his press conference with Vladimir Putin in Finland on Monday, Donald Trump was given a chance to walk back his tweet from earlier in the day blaming poor U.S.–Russia relations on past American presidents and Robert Mueller’s probe into Russian meddling in U.S. politics. The real culprit, according to Trump, was not Russia’s interference in the 2016 U.S. election or illegal annexation of C

3h

Burnt bread shows that our ancestors were baking 4,000 years before agriculture

Science Charred flatbread found in a fireplace dates back to 14,400 years ago. A fire was burning in the circular stone fireplace when someone threw in bits of food—cruciferous vegetables, legumes, gazelle meat, and a flat bread. The leftovers from…

3h

Single-celled architects inspire new nanotechnology

Scientists have designed a range of nanostructures resembling marine diatoms — tiny unicellular creatures. To achieve this, they borrow techniques used by naturally-occurring diatoms to deposit layers of silica — the primary constituent in glass — in order to grow their intricate shells. Using a technique known as DNA origami, the group designed nanoscale platforms of various shapes to which pa

3h

In borophene, boundaries are no barrier

Defects are often observed when making borophene, the single-atom form of boron, but unlike in other two-dimensional materials, these mismatched lattices can assemble into ordered structures that preserve the material's metallic nature and electronic properties. Labs at Rice and Northwestern universities made the first detailed analysis of borophene defects.

3h

Turtle Researcher’s Award Rescinded After He Uses Racy Photos of Women in Presentation

A herpetologist was being honored for his scientific achievements. The award was swiftly rescinded when he showed revealing photos of women in swimsuits.

3h

Why an Escaped Jaguar Went on a Killing Spree at New Orleans Zoo

Nine animals have died since an escaped jaguar attacked them at the Audubon Zoo in New Orleans on Saturday (July 14). But the jaguar didn't actually eat the animals — including red foxes, alpacas and an emu — so why did it attack so many?

3h

How one fence ruined an eco-system

Seemingly inconsequential decisions can alter ecosystems, as a recent Australian study shows. Read More

3h

How Asia is pivoting away from the U.S.

The current U.S. Administration seems happier to pursue fleeting photo ops with strongmen than to cultivate long-standing alliances. Where does that leave American influence in Asia? Read More

3h

Forget joysticks, use your torso to pilot drones

Your torso is more intuitive — and more precise — than joysticks for piloting drones, both simulated and real, according to a recent study by EPFL scientists. Work is already underway to implement this new body-machine-interface technology for search and rescue with drones.

3h

New platform discovered at City of Hope poised to be next generation of genetic medicines

A City of Hope scientist discovered a gene-editing technology that could efficiently and accurately correct the genetic defects that underlie certain diseases, positioning the new tool as the basis for the next generation of genetic therapies. This editing platform may be used to cure inherited and acquired diseases. The proof-of-concept study spotlights a promising new gene-editing platform that

3h

The origins of pottery linked with intensified fishing in the post-glacial period

A study into some of the earliest known pottery remains has suggested that the rise of ceramic production was closely linked with intensified fishing at the end of the last Ice Age.

3h

Archaeologists discover bread that predates agriculture by 4,000 years

At an archaeological site in northeastern Jordan, researchers have discovered the charred remains of a flatbread baked by hunter-gatherers 14,400 years ago. It is the oldest direct evidence of bread found to date, predating the advent of agriculture by at least 4,000 years. The findings suggest that bread production based on wild cereals may have encouraged hunter-gatherers to cultivate cereals, a

3h

CRISPR Gene Editing Deletes, Shuffles More Genes than Intended

The DNA-cutting enzyme used in the technique is not as precisely targeted as scientists had thought, and investors take notice.

3h

Wildfires are making extreme air pollution even worse in the northwest U.S.

America’s air is getting cleaner — except in places that are prone to wildfires.

3h

Bacteria engineered to create fertilizer out of thin air

Researchers have created a bacteria that uses photosynthesis to create oxygen during the day, and at night, uses nitrogen to create chlorophyll for photosynthesis. This development could lead to plants that do the same, eliminating the use of some — or possibly all — human-made fertilizer, which has a high environmental cost.

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Mako Madness | Shark Week (360 Video)

What happens when you give the fastest shark in the world a frozen treat? Mako expert Joe Romeiro captures a never before seen behavior when two monster makos compete for a chumsicle. From: Discovery

3h

America Has Caught Up to Sacha Baron Cohen

When Sacha Baron Cohen emerged as a comedy force in the late ’90s, the quality that powered his appeal was his shamelessness. Whether in character as the clueless white-boy rapper Ali G, the bigoted Kazakh journalist Borat, or the outrageous fashion reporter Bruno, Cohen delighted in asking questions far outside the realm of politeness and in tormenting the subjects (celebrity and non-celebrity a

3h

Archaeologists find earliest evidence of bread

Tiny specks of bread found in fireplaces used by hunter-gatherers 14,000 years ago, predating agriculture by thousands of years Charred crumbs found in a pair of ancient fireplaces have been identified as the earliest examples of bread, suggesting it was being prepared long before the dawn of agriculture. The remains – tiny lumps a few millimetres in size – were discovered by archaeologists at a

3h

The Best Amazon Prime Day Deals (2018): Home, Laptops, Echo, Kindle

Prime Day is finally here! We have the deals you're looking for.

3h

The origins of pottery linked with intensified fishing in the post-glacial period

A study into some of the earliest known pottery remains has suggested that the rise of ceramic production was closely linked with intensified fishing at the end of the last Ice Age.

3h

Rising Seas Could Cause Problems For Internet Infrastructure

The Internet relies on a network of cables, many buried underground along U.S. coastlines. A new analysis finds sea level rise could put thousands of miles of cable underwater in the next 15 years. (Image credit: Stan Honda/AFP/Getty Images)

4h

Trump-Putin Press Conference Gave Russia Everything It Wanted

By refusing to acknowledge Russia's role in election interference, Trump has given it the green light to continue.

4h

Looking toward Earth's future climate

A new article reveals new insights into one of the most complex challenges of Earth's climate: understanding and predicting future atmospheric levels of greenhouse gases and the role of the ocean and land in determining those levels.

4h

New development in 3D super-resolution imaging gives insight on Alzheimer's disease

One major problem with understanding Alzheimer's is not being able to clearly see why the disease starts. A super-resolution 'nanoscope' now provides a 3D view of brain molecules with 10 times greater detail. This imaging technique could help reveal how the disease progresses and where new treatments could intervene.

4h

Electric car batteries souped-up with fluorinated electrolytes for longer-range driving

Researchers have figured out how to increase a rechargeable battery's capacity by using aggressive electrodes and then stabilizing these potentially dangerous electrode materials with a highly-fluorinated electrolyte.

4h

Microscopic trampoline may help create networks of quantum computers

Researchers have developed a microscopic "trampoline" that can absorb microwave energy and bounce it into laser light — a crucial step for sending quantum signals over long distances.

4h

Researchers engineer bacteria to create fertilizer out of thin air

A team at Washington University in St. Louis has created a bacteria that uses photosynthesis to create oxygen during the day, and at night, uses nitrogen to create chlorophyll for photosynthesis. This development could lead to plants that do the same, eliminating the use of some — or possibly all — man-made fertilizer, which has a high environmental cost.

4h

Early puberty in white adolescent boys increases substance use risk

White adolescent boys experiencing early puberty are at higher risk for substance use than later developing boys, a new study finds.

4h

Buried internet infrastructure at risk as sea levels rise

Thousands of miles of buried fiber optic cable in densely populated coastal regions of the United States may soon be inundated by rising seas, according to a new study.

4h

Reward and unease are closely linked in the brain

Mice that lack a certain receptor in the brain are attracted to situations associated with discomfort, such as inflammation and nausea, according to a new study.

4h

Plastic chemical linked to smaller prefrontal cortex, reduced cognitive ability in rats

Adult rats that had been exposed before birth and during nursing to a mixture of chemicals found in a wide range of consumer products have a smaller medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and perform worse on an attention-switching task than rats not exposed to the chemicals early in life. These findings demonstrate a long-term influence of endocrine-disrupting compounds on brain development.

4h

Seeing through the eyes of a crab

Crabs combine the input from their two eyes early on in their brain's visual pathway to track a moving object, finds new research. This study of adult male crabs from Argentina's Atlantic coast provides insight into the visual world of a crustacean.

4h

Indigenous peoples own or manage at least one quarter of world's land surface

Indigenous Peoples have ownership, use and management rights over at least a quarter of the world's land surface according to a new study.

4h

Email incivility has a ripple effect on households

The negative repercussions of email incivility extend beyond the workplace, and can even negatively affect a domestic partner's attitude toward their own work, says a new article.

4h

New England Biolabs® Launches NEBNext Direct® Custom Ready Panels for Efficient Targeted Re-sequencing

New England Biolabs (NEB®) today announced the launch of the NEBNext Direct Custom Ready Panels. The new panels — coupled with the proprietary NEBNext Direct target enrichment technology — enable the rapid development and deployment of a customized target enrichment panel by allowing users to select from an extensive library of genes to produce sequencing data with high specificity and coverage un

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An immigrant workforce leads to innovation, according to new UC San Diego research

New federal restrictions on the temporary H-1B visa, which allows high-skilled foreign workers to be employed by U.S. companies, have increased debate on the economic impacts of the program, but little is known about its effect on product innovation — until now.

4h

Study suggests buried Internet infrastructure at risk as sea levels rise

Thousands of miles of buried fiber optic cable in densely populated coastal regions of the United States may soon be inundated by rising seas, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the University of Oregon.

4h

Temple study calls into question IVC filter effectiveness in DVT patients undergoing CDT

The true benefit of inferior vena cava filter (IVCF) placement at the time of catheter-directed thrombolysis for patients with deep vein thrombosis is unclear. A research team led by Dr. Riyaz Bashir, Director of Vascular and Endovascular Medicine at Temple University Hospital, examined nationwide utilization rates of IVCFs in patients undergoing CDT to assess contemporary trends and comparative o

4h

Model for cutting binge drinking in college students

The study also analyzed participants' overall willingness to initiate and sustain responsible drinking habits or abstinence. Compared to men, women were 38 percent more willing to initiate or try responsible drinking and 49 percent more willing to sustain those habits. Non-white college students were 41 percent more willing to initiate responsible drinking behaviors than whites and 96 percent more

4h

Reducing carbon emissions will limit sea level rise

A new study demonstrates that a correlation also exists between cumulative carbon emissions and future sea level rise over time — and the news isn't good.

4h

Mangroves to mudflats and not back again

The long-term conversion of mangroves to mudflats can lead to destabilization of shorelines, negatively impacting their resilience to extreme weather events.

4h

The immune system: T cells are built for speed

It was previously thought that the T cell would concentrate the receptors at certain points in order to achieve the highest possible sensitivity. Biophysics now show that T cells are actually programmed to react as quickly as possible, and therefore their receptors are arranged at random.

4h

Scientists Are Key to Making Cities Sustainable

Urban leaders must work with researchers to solve real human problems — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

Rocket men: locals divided over plans for UK's first spaceport

Remote Scottish peninsula chosen for satellite launchpad with promise of jobs A remote area of land on the northern coast of Scotland is on track to become the UK’s first rocket spaceport after it was selected as the best place in the country from which to blast satellites into orbit. The isolated county of Sutherland is one of the few spots in Britain where golden eagles and sea eagles still tak

4h

The Neutrino Trappers

Deep in a mountain in southern Russia, scientists are tracking one of the universe’s most elusive particles.

4h

Microscopic trampoline may help create networks of quantum computers

Researchers have developed a microscopic "trampoline" that can absorb microwave energy and bounce it into laser light — a crucial step for sending quantum signals over long distances.

4h

Electric car batteries souped-up with fluorinated electrolytes for longer-range driving

Researchers at the University of Maryland (UMD), the U.S. Army Research Laboratory (ARL), and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) have figured out how to increase a rechargeable battery's capacity by using aggressive electrodes and then stabilizing these potentially dangerous electrode materials with a highly-fluorinated electrolyte.

4h

New development in 3D super-resolution imaging gives insight on Alzheimer's disease

One major problem with understanding Alzheimer's is not being able to clearly see why the disease starts. A super-resolution 'nanoscope' developed by Purdue University researchers now provides a 3D view of brain molecules with 10 times greater detail. This imaging technique could help reveal how the disease progresses and where new treatments could intervene.

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5h

Last week in tech: Prime Day, updated MacBook Pros, and a new Fortnite season

Technology Catch up on all the technology stories you missed while you were watching the World Cup. Download the latest episode of our podcast about Prime Day, the App Store anniversary, and more.

5h

The Crisis Facing America

We still do not know what hold Vladimir Putin has upon President Trump, but the whole world has now witnessed the power of its grip. Russia helped Donald Trump into the presidency, as Robert Mueller’s indictment vividly details. Putin, in his own voice, has confirmed that he wanted Trump elected. Standing alongside his benefactor, Trump denounced the special counsel investigating the Russian inte

5h

Using 'shade balls' in reservoirs may use up more water than they save

Preventing reservoir evaporation during droughts with floating balls may not help conserve water overall, due to the water needed to make the balls.

5h

Faster photons could enable total data security

Researchers have solved a key puzzle in quantum physics that could help to make data transfer totally secure.

5h

Missing bones and our understanding of ancient biodiversity

Fossils come in many shapes and sizes, ranging from isolated fragments of bones and teeth to complete skeletons.

5h

AI-based framework creates realistic textures in the virtual world

Many designers for the virtual world find it challenging to design efficiently believable complex textures or patterns on a large scale. Indeed, so-called 'texture synthesis,' the design of accurate textures such as water ripples in a river, concrete walls, or patterns of leaves, remains a difficult task for artists. A plethora of non-stationary textures in the 'real world' could be re-created in

5h

What happens when we heat the atomic lattice of a magnet all of a sudden?

Magnets have fascinated humans for several thousand years and enabled the age of digital data storage. They occur in various flavors. Ferrimagnets form the largest class of magnets and consist of two types of atoms. Similar to a compass needle, each atom exhibits a little magnetic moment, also called spin, which arises from the rotation of the atom's electrons about their own axes. In a ferrimagne

5h

Childhood infections may have lasting effects on school performance

Severe infections leading to hospitalizations during childhood are associated with lower school achievement in adolescence, reports a new study.

5h

Friendlier fish may be quicker to take the bait

The bluegill on your dinner plate might have been more social than the rest of its group, according to a new study, and its removal from the lake could mean major changes for the remaining population.

5h

NASA catches tropical cyclone 11W passing northern Philippines

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the Northwestern Pacific Ocean and captured a visible image of recently formed Tropical Depression 11W.

5h

A scientist's final paper looks toward earth's future climate

A NASA scientist's final scientific paper, published posthumously this month, reveals new insights into one of the most complex challenges of Earth's climate: understanding and predicting future atmospheric levels of greenhouse gases and the role of the ocean and land in determining those levels.

5h

How to build efficient organic solar cells

Twenty-five researchers from seven research institutes have put their heads together to draw up rules for designing high-efficiency organic solar cells.

5h

Flipping the switch: Making use of carbon price dollars for health and education

A switch from subsidizing fossil fuel to pricing CO2-emissions would not only help to meet global climate targets but also create additional domestic public revenues. These revenues could finance expenses towards sustainable development, improving health-care, education and infrastructure for energy, transportation or clean water. India could cover more than 90 percent of its needs to finance prog

5h

Potential DNA Damage from CRISPR "Seriously Underestimated," Study Finds

A flurry of recent findings highlight a contentious question in this area — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

Plastic chemical linked to smaller prefrontal cortex, reduced cognitive ability in rats

Adult rats that had been exposed before birth and during nursing to a mixture of chemicals found in a wide range of consumer products have a smaller medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and perform worse on an attention-switching task than rats not exposed to the chemicals early in life. These findings, published in JNeurosci, demonstrate a long-term influence of endocrine-disrupting compounds on brain

5h

Seeing through the eyes of a crab

Crabs combine the input from their two eyes early on in their brain's visual pathway to track a moving object, finds new research published in JNeurosci. This study of adult male crabs from Argentina's Atlantic coast provides insight into the visual world of a crustacean.

5h

Understanding Sharks | Shark Week (360 Video)

Welcome to Tiger Beach, home of some of the biggest tiger sharks in the world! Dive in with Dr. Neil Hammerschlag as he shows you how he tracks sharks and uses this data to better protect them. For a more immersive experience download and watch on the Discovery VR app – now available on Google Daydream! Visit http://www.discoveryvr.com/ to get started. Subscribe to Discovery VR: https://goo.gl/bn

5h

Strikes in Europe on Amazon's Prime Day

Workers in Spain, Germany and Poland plan to walk off the job on Tuesday as online retailing giant Amazon carries out its major summer sales event called Prime Day.

5h

Reducing carbon emissions will limit sea level rise, study says

In recent years, scientists have been able to correlate the amount of global warming to cumulative carbon emissions from the burning of fossil fuels—a relationship that became the basis of the Paris Agreement on climate change that guides policies of most world nations to limit their carbon emissions.

5h

China Expands Surveillance of Sewage to Police Illegal Drug Use

Privacy concerns, cultural differences fuel skepticism about this approach in other settings — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

Trilobites: Ancient Romans Hunted ‘Sea Monsters.’ Were They Whales?

Testing of archaeological remains show that two whale species once swam in the Mediterranean, suggesting that the Romans conducted industrial-scale whaling.

5h

This Is the Moment of Truth for Republicans

There are exactly two possible explanations for the shameful performance the world witnessed on Monday, from a serving American president. Either Donald Trump is flat-out an agent of Russian interests—maybe witting, maybe unwitting, from fear of blackmail, in hope of future deals, out of manly respect for Vladimir Putin, out of gratitude for Russia’s help during the election, out of pathetic inab

6h

Study: Indigenous peoples own or manage at least one quarter of world's land surface

Indigenous Peoples have ownership, use and management rights over at least a quarter of the world's land surface according to a new study published this week in the journal Nature Sustainability.

6h

Email incivility has a ripple effect on households

It turns out that a rude email's reach extends further than the recipients in the message's "To" field.

6h

Sound waves reveal enormous diamond cache deep in Earth's interior

Sound waves reveal a surprisingly large diamond cache deep in Earth's interior, researchers report.

6h

Emotional robot lets you feel how it's 'feeling'

Researchers have developed a prototype of a robot that can express 'emotions' through changes in its outer surface. The robot's skin covers a grid of texture units whose shapes change based on the robot's feelings.

6h

Tesla shares tumble after Musk tweet controversyTesla Elon Musk Twitter

Tesla shares stumbled Monday as chief executive Elon Musk faced criticism over a public spat with a British diver who worked on the Thai soccer team rescue.

6h

Study: Reducing carbon emissions will limit sea level rise

A new study demonstrates that a correlation also exists between cumulative carbon emissions and future sea level rise over time — and the news isn't good.

6h

Wireless implant lights up inside the body to kill cancer

Researchers have developed a sticky sheet that could allow a wirelessly-powered LED chip to be stuck inside the body to deliver "photodynamic therapy"

6h

CRISPR gene editing is not quite as precise and as safe as thoughtCRISPR Editing Damage

A study has found that CRISPR can delete large chunks of DNA, suggesting it could cause cancer if used to treat diseases by editing many cells in the body

6h

Trump Sides With the Kremlin, Against the U.S. Government

In an astonishing news conference on Monday, President Trump, standing next to Vladimir Putin, rejected the overwhelming consensus among U.S. intelligence agencies that Russia interfered in the 2016 presidential election. “They said, ‘I think it is Russia.’ I have President Putin. He just said it is not Russia,” Trump said in Helsinki after a two-hour private meeting with the Russian leader. “I w

6h

Extraordinary Show on Consciousness Extended

Baba Brinkman with his wife Heather Berlin, a neuroscientist at Mount Sinai School of Medicine. At $5 a ticket, theater lovers can experience the steal of the century at the SoHo Playhouse through mid-August. Baba Brinkman is starting a new run of his one-man, interactive show, “ Rap Guide to Consciousness .” “We’ve had good crowds the last couple of days, and I’m excited to be doing the show aga

6h

Researchers identify model for reducing binge drinking in college students

The study also analyzed participants' overall willingness to initiate and sustain responsible drinking habits or abstinence. Compared to men, women were 38 percent more willing to initiate or try responsible drinking and 49 percent more willing to sustain those habits.Non-white college students were 41 percent more willing to initiate responsible drinking behaviors than whites and 96 percent more

6h

connections between early childhood program and teenage outcomes

A new study examined the long-term impacts of an early childhood program called the Chicago School Readiness Project (CSRP) and found evidence suggesting that the program positively affected children's executive function and academic achievement during adolescence.

6h

Hidden signals in RNAs regulate protein synthesis

Scientists have long known that RNA encodes instructions to make proteins. The building blocks that comprise RNA — A, U, C, and Gs — form a blueprint for the protein-making machinery in cells. In a new study scientists describe how the protein-making machinery identifies alternative initiation sites from which to start protein synthesis.

6h

Implications of unmet promise of a miracle drug for Alzheimer's disease

Authors lament the unmet promise of a miracle drug for Alzheimer disease but are heartened by what they see as encouraging improvements in care (care transformation) for a growing population of older adults, many with dementia.

6h

Getting to know the microbes that drive climate change

A new understanding of the microbes and viruses in the thawing permafrost in Sweden may help scientists better predict the pace of climate change.

6h

Did you solve it? Head-spinning bicycle puzzles

The answers to today’s puzzles In my puzzle blog earlier today I set you the following three challenges: 1) The King of the Mountains went up the col at 15 km an hour and down it at 45 km an hour. It took him two hours in total. Assuming that the distance he travelled up and down are the same, how far is it from the bottom to the top of the col? Continue reading…

6h

Embraer sells United Airlines 25 jets valued at $1.1 billion

American carrier United Airlines has ordered 25 jets from Brazilian aerospace manufacturer Embraer, valued at $1.1 billion, the aircraft maker said Monday.

6h

Study: Indigenous peoples own or manage at least one quarter of world's land surface

Indigenous Peoples have ownership, use and management rights over at least a quarter of the world's land surface according to a new study published this week in the journal Nature Sustainability.

6h

Paper: Email incivility has a ripple effect on households

The negative repercussions of email incivility extend beyond the workplace, and can even negatively affect a domestic partner's attitude toward their own work, says a new paper from YoungAh Park, a professor of labor and employment relations at Illinois.

6h

Early treatment with nusinersen can mean better outcomes for babies

Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a genetic disease that affects motor neurons in the spinal cord, resulting in muscle atrophy and widespread weakness that eventually impair swallowing and breathing. A new study in the Journal of Neuromuscular Diseases finds that children with SMA type 1 can achieve improvements in motor function after six months of treatment with the drug nusinersen, particularly

6h

Early puberty in white adolescent boys increases substance use risk

White adolescent boys experiencing early puberty are at higher risk for substance use than later developing boys, a new Purdue University study finds.

6h

NASA finds fading Sub-Tropical Storm Beryl devoid of center precipitation

On Sunday, July 15, the National Hurricane Center (NHC) noted that Sub-Tropical Storm Beryl was devoid of precipitation around its center of circulation and infrared imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite confirmed it. By July 16, Beryl had again become a remnant low pressure area.

6h

6h

NASA finds fading Sub-Tropical Storm Beryl devoid of center precipitation

On Sunday, July 15, the National Hurricane Center (NHC) noted that Sub-Tropical Storm Beryl was devoid of precipitation around its center of circulation and infrared imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite confirmed it. By July 16, Beryl had again become a remnant low pressure area.

6h

Researchers find hidden signals in RNAs that regulate protein synthesis

Scientists have long known that RNA encodes instructions to make proteins. The building blocks that comprise RNA—A, U, C, and Gs—form a blueprint for the protein-making machinery in cells. To make proteins, the machinery latches on RNA at one end and then scans along the RNA until it reaches an AUG string, which is the signal to start translating the genetic code into a protein.

6h

Disruption tolerant networking to demonstrate internet in space

NASA's Human Exploration and Operations and Science Mission Directorates are collaborating to make interplanetary internet a reality.

6h

Getting to know the microbes that drive climate change

A new understanding of the microbes and viruses in the thawing permafrost in Sweden may help scientists better predict the pace of climate change.

6h

Ancient Papyrus Reveals Galen's Crazy Theory About 'Hysterical Suffocation'

The text is 2,000 years old and suggests a weird cause of hysterical suffocation in women.

6h

Study uncovers connections between early childhood program and teenage outcomes

A new study published in PLOS ONE by researchers from New York University's Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development examined the long-term impacts of an early childhood program called the Chicago School Readiness Project (CSRP) and found evidence suggesting that the program positively affected children's executive function and academic achievement during adolescence.

7h

India's deadly monsoon rainfall measured with NASA's IMERG

India's southwest monsoon normally occurs between June and September and is known for being a summertime rainy season.

7h

Australia has a new venomous snake — And it may already be threatened

The ink has not yet dried on a scientific paper describing a new species of snake, yet the reptile may already be in danger of extinction due to mining. A team of biologists discovered a new species of bandy-bandy snake at Weipa on the west coast of the Cape York Peninsula.

7h

A step closer to quantum computers: Researchers show how to directly observe quantum spin effects

Scientists have found a practical way to observe and examine the quantum effects of electrons in topological insulators and heavy metals. This could later pave the way for the development of advanced quantum computing components and devices.

7h

Researchers crack the code of the final blood group system

Ever since the blood type was discovered in 1962, no one has been able to explain why some people become Xga positive while others are Xga negative. But now, researchers have finally solved the mystery.

7h

Weight loss surgery may affect the risk of cancer

A new analysis indicates that weight loss surgery may affect an individual's risk of developing cancer.

7h

Particulate matter increases drought vulnerability of trees

Particulate matter deposits on leaves increase plant transpiration and the risk of plants suffering from drought. Particulate matter could thus be contributing more strongly to tree mortality and forest decline than previously assumed. This is suggested by results from a greenhouse study, in which tree seedlings grown in almost particulate matter free air or in unfiltered air were compared.

7h

Protecting ribosome genes to prevent aging

Aging is a process of gradual deterioration from exposure to time and the elements; this process begins with deterioration deep inside every cell. Researchers have identified a protein that guards cells against senescence — aging-related problems — by protecting a particularly vulnerable set of genes.

7h

New tool to calculate 'nitrogen footprint' offers guide to pollution reduction

Researchers have helped create the first tool to calculate the 'nitrogen footprint' of an organization. The tool will provide a guide to sustainability and pollution reduction for daily activities such as food consumption, travel and energy use.

7h

Most people still don't think texting and driving is dangerous, new study finds

A new study from Australia states that most drivers don't think distracted driving is an issue. Driving data prove otherwise. Read More

7h

How the Diderot Effect explains why you buy things you don't need

Do the clothes make the man? With the Diderot Effect, material goods can help forge your whole identity. Read More

7h

How a Government Program to Get Ethanol from Plants Failed

The decade-long, bipartisan program was aimed at reducing reliance on ethanol from food crops — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

India's deadly monsoon rainfall measured with NASA's IMERG

This year's monsoon has been assessed as average but India's Meteorological Department statistics show that daily mean rainfall for the country has recently been above normal. At least 15 people were killed by floods and landslides in India on Wednesday July 11, 2018. So far this year, close to 200 deaths may have resulted from India's heavy monsoon rainfall.

7h

Getting to know the microbes that drive climate change

A new understanding of the microbes and viruses in the thawing permafrost in Sweden may help scientists better predict the pace of climate change.

7h

Researchers find hidden signals in RNAs that regulate protein synthesis

Scientists have long known that RNA encodes instructions to make proteins. The building blocks that comprise RNA–A, U, C, and Gs–form a blueprint for the protein-making machinery in cells. In a new study published in Nature, scientists describe how the protein-making machinery identifies alternative initiation sites from which to start protein synthesis.

7h

Implications of unmet promise of a miracle drug for Alzheimer's disease

In 'The Unmet Promise of a Miracle Drug for Alzheimer's Disease: Implications for Practice, Policy, and Research,' the authors lament the unmet promise of a miracle drug for Alzheimer disease but are heartened by what they see as encouraging improvements in care (care transformation) for a growing population of older adults, many with dementia.

7h

AASM publishes clinical practice guideline on use of actigraphy for sleep disorders

Actigraphy can be a useful clinical tool for the evaluation of adult and pediatric patients with suspected sleep disorders, including circadian rhythm sleep-wake disorders, according to a clinical practice guideline from the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM).

7h

Disruption tolerant networking to demonstrate internet in space

NASA's Human Exploration and Operations and Science Mission Directorates are collaborating to make interplanetary internet a reality.They're about to demonstrate Delay/Disruption Tolerant Networking, or DTN — a technology that sends information much the same way as conventional internet does. Information is put into DTN bundles, which are sent through space and ground networks to its destination.

7h

NYU study uncovers connections between early childhood program and teenage outcomes

A new study published in PLOS ONE by researchers from New York University's Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development examined the long-term impacts of an early childhood program called the Chicago School Readiness Project (CSRP) and found evidence suggesting that the program positively affected children's executive function and academic achievement during adolescence.

7h

Emotional robot lets you feel how it's 'feeling'

Cornell University researchers have developed a prototype of a robot that can express 'emotions' through changes in its outer surface. The robot's skin covers a grid of texture units whose shapes change based on the robot's feelings.

7h

Sound waves reveal diamond cache deep in Earth's interior

Sound waves reveal a surprisingly large diamond cache deep in Earth's interior, an international team including MIT researchers reports.

7h

Increased communication between hospitals improves patient care and survival rates

More than a million patients are transferred between hospitals each year in the U.S. This process is challenging both for hospitals and patients and breakdowns in communication are common. A recent University of Minnesota Medical School study focuses on the patients transferring from one hospital to another and highlights the importance of efficient communication between hospitals.

7h

Fresh DNA tests authenticate bones of Russia tsar, family

Fresh genetic tests on bones of Russia's last tsar and his family murdered a century ago have confirmed their authenticity, investigators said Monday.

7h

Mangroves to mudflats and not back again

Over one-third of Earth's population lives with 100 km of a coastline and depend on the services that coastal ecosystems provide. With the intensity and impact of hurricanes expected to increase in the future, there is a need to understand how coastal ecosystems will be impacted by and recover from hurricanes, and how these changes will influence human well-being.

7h

AI-based framework creates realistic textures in the virtual world

Many designers for the virtual world find it challenging to design efficiently believable complex textures or patterns on a large scale. Indeed, so-called "texture synthesis," the design of accurate textures such as water ripples in a river, concrete walls, or patterns of leaves, remains a difficult task for artists. A plethora of non-stationary textures in the "real world" could be re-created in

7h

Friendlier fish may be quicker to take the bait

The bluegill on your dinner plate might have been more social than the rest of its group, according to a new study from the University of Illinois, and its removal from the lake could mean major changes for the remaining population.

7h

High-stakes cellular process critical to small intestine development

More than 40 percent of our small intestine develops before we are even born. In adulthood, the organ stretches more than three times the length of our bodies.

7h

Testosterone research brings new hope for cancer patients

Approximately 20 percent of cancer related deaths are attributed to the syndrome of cachexia. Medical researchers now show that the hormone testosterone is effective at combating cachexia in cancer patients and improving quality of life.

7h

A constellation of symptoms presages first definitive signs of multiple sclerosis

Researchers document the health problems that precede a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis.

7h

Single-celled architects inspire new nanotechnology

Diatoms are tiny, unicellular creatures, inhabiting oceans, lakes, rivers, and soils. Through their respiration, they produce close to a quarter of the oxygen on earth, nearly as much as the world's tropical forests. In addition to their ecological success across the planet, they have a number of remarkable properties. Diatoms live in glasslike homes of their own design, visible under magnificatio

7h

New study again proves Einstein right: Most thorough test to date finds no Lorentz violation in high-energy neutrinos

The universe should be a predictably symmetrical place, according to a cornerstone of Einstein's theory of special relativity, known as Lorentz symmetry. This principle states that any scientist should observe the same laws of physics, in any direction, and regardless of one's frame of reference, as long as that object is moving at a constant speed.

7h

Scientists learn to repair human bones by studying coral reefs

Nexus Media News Protecting corals from climate change could save lives. Scientists are studying coral skeletons not only to protect them from climate change, but also to better understand how human bones form.

7h

How to build efficient organic solar cells

Twenty-five researchers from seven research institutes have put their heads together to draw up rules for designing high-efficiency organic solar cells. The research is led by Feng Gao, associate professor at Linkoping University, Sweden.

7h

Friendlier fish may be quicker to take the bait

The bluegill on your dinner plate might have been more social than the rest of its group, according to a new study from the University of Illinois, and its removal from the lake could mean major changes for the remaining population.

7h

AI-based framework creates realistic textures in the virtual world

Many designers for the virtual world find it challenging to design efficiently believable complex textures or patterns on a large scale. Indeed, so-called 'texture synthesis,' the design of accurate textures such as water ripples in a river, concrete walls, or patterns of leaves, remains a difficult task for artists. A plethora of non-stationary textures in the 'real world' could be re-created in

7h

What happens when we heat the atomic lattice of a magnet all of a sudden?

'We now have a clear picture of how the hot atomic lattice and the cold magnetic spins of a ferrimagnetic insulator equilibrate with each other.' says Ilie Radu, scientist at the Max Born Institute Berlin. The international team of researchers discovered that energy transfer proceeds very quickly and leads to a novel state of matter in which the spins are hot but have not yet reduced their total m

7h

Surveys of patients about health care providers are likely of little use

For anyone who has ever taken a survey after a medical appointment and wondered whether the effort was worthwhile, the answer is probably 'No,' says a Baylor University psychologist and researcher.

7h

How our cells build different antennae to sense the world around us

Our cells communicate with each other and with the environment using tiny antennae, called cilia. Some of these antennae can also move, and are altered in several diseases. A team from the Gulbenkian Institute of Science has now discovered that the foundation of cilia is diverse, contributing to the assembly of antennae with such different functions. This study, now published in Nature Cell Biolog

7h

Using 'shade balls' in reservoirs may use up more water than they save

Preventing reservoir evaporation during droughts with floating balls may not help conserve water overall, due to the water needed to make the balls.

7h

Faster photons could enable total data security

Researchers at the University of Sheffield have solved a key puzzle in quantum physics that could help to make data transfer totally secure.

7h

The immune system: T cells are built for speed

It was previously thought that the T cell would concentrate the receptors at certain points in order to achieve the highest possible sensitivity. As a current publication by the biophysics research group at TU Wien shows, T cells are actually programmed to react as quickly as possible, and therefore their receptors are arranged at random.

7h

Convergence of synaptic signals is mediated by a protein critical for learning and memory

Researchers at the Max Planck Florida Institute for Neuroscience demonstrate that PKC is a highly versatile molecule, capable of assimilating many disparate sources of information. Because of this adaptability, the protein is well poised as a mediator of the processes underlying synaptic plasticity and learning. This work represents a substantial advancement in the field, providing integral tools

7h

Fetal gene therapy prevents fatal neurodegenerative disease

A fatal neurodegenerative condition known as Gaucher disease can be prevented in mice following fetal gene therapy, finds a new study led by UCL, the KK Women's and Children's Hospital and National University Health System in Singapore.The study, published today in Nature Medicine, highlights the potential of fetal gene therapy to prevent and cure neonatal lethal neurodegenerative diseases in huma

7h

AI accurately predicts effects of genetic mutations in biological dark matter

A new machine learning framework, dubbed ExPecto, can predict the effects of genetic mutations in the so-called 'dark matter' regions of the human genome. ExPecto pinpoints how specific mutations can disrupt the way genes express throughout your body. Using the method, its creators computed the genetic ramifications of more than 140 million mutations in different tissues. The researchers also prec

7h

What's causing the voltage fade in Lithium-rich NMC cathode materials?

Researchers led by a University of California San Diego team have published work in the journal Nature Energy that explains what's causing the performance-reducing 'voltage fade' that currently plagues a promising class of cathode materials called Lithium-rich NMC (nickel magnesium cobalt) layered oxides.

7h

Researchers map 'family trees' of acute myeloid leukemia

For the first time, a team of international researchers have mapped the family trees of cancer cells in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) to understand how this blood cancer responds to a new drug, enasidenib. The work also explains what happens when a patient stops responding to the treatment, providing important clues about how to combine enasidenib with other anti-cancer drugs to produce longer-last

7h

Genome damage from CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing higher than thought

Scientists at the Wellcome Sanger Institute have discovered that CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing can cause greater genetic damage in cells than was previously thought. This has safety implications for future gene therapies using CRISPR/Cas9 as the unexpected damage could lead to dangerous changes in some cells.The study in Nature Biotechnology revealed that standard DNA tests miss finding this genetic da

7h

Behavior-influencing policies are critical for mass market success of low carbon vehicles

Policies to entice consumers away from fossil-fuel powered vehicles and normalize low carbon, alternative-fuel alternatives, such as electric vehicles, are vital if the world is to significantly reduce transport sector carbon emissions, according to new research.

7h

Protecting tropical forest carbon stocks may not prevent large-scale species loss

As the world seeks to curb human-induced climate change, will protecting the carbon of tropical forests also ensure the survival of their species?A study published today in the leading journal Nature Climate Change suggests the answer to this question is far from straightforward.Forests with the greatest carbon content do not necessarily house the most species, meaning carbon-focused conservation

7h

Plant mothers talk to their embryos via the hormone auxin

In plants, it has been clear for a while that maternal signals regulate embryo development. However, the signal itself was unknown — until now. Plant scientists at IST Austria, CEITEC, and the University of Freiburg have now found that a plant hormone called auxin from the mother is one of the signals that pattern the plant embryo. Their study is published today in Nature Plants.

7h

Crowdsourcing friendly bacteria helps superbug cause infection

Antimicrobial resistant pathogens crowdsource friendly bacteria to survive in immune cells and cause disease, a new study by the University of Sheffield has revealed.

7h

Flipping the switch: Making use of carbon price dollars for health and education

A switch from subsidizing fossil fuel to pricing CO2-emissions would not only help to meet global climate targets but also create additional domestic public revenues.These revenues could finance expenses towards sustainable development, improving health-care, education and infrastructure for energy, transportation or clean water. India could cover more than 90 percent of its needs to finance progr

7h

Thawing permafrost microbiomes fuel climate change

A University of Queensland-led international study could lead to more accurate predictions or the rate of global warming from greenhouse gas emissions produced by thawing permafrost in the next 100 years.The study of the microorganisms involved in permafrost carbon degradation links changing microbial communities and biogeochemistry to the rise of greenhouse gas emissions.

7h

Pattern of association between toddler self-regulation, kindergarten obesity risk

Obesity is among the long-term adult health consequences associated with poor self-regulation during childhood. This study of a nationally representative group of U.S. children suggests the pattern of an association between levels of toddler self-regulation and risk for obesity at kindergarten age differs between boys and girls.

7h

Public attention on cognitive evaluation test used on President Trump

A screening test used in a cognitive evaluation of President Donald Trump received considerable public attention after it was announced earlier this year. A new study identified online news articles discussing the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (the 'MoCA') in association with President Trump and Internet search trends during the days immediately following his medical assessment.

7h

Comparison of outpatient antibiotic prescribing in traditional medical, retail clinic settings

Outpatient antibiotic prescribing varied among traditional medical and retail clinic settings and during visits with respiratory diagnoses where antibiotics were inappropriate, patterns that suggest differences in patient mix and antibiotic overuse.

7h

Yale cancer researchers suggest new treatment for rare inherited cancers

Studying two rare inherited cancer syndromes, Yale Cancer Center (YCC) scientists have found the cancers are driven by a breakdown in how cells repair their DNA. The discovery, published today in Nature Genetics, suggests a promising strategy for treatment with drugs recently approved for other forms of cancer, said the researchers.

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Yale-developed test for Alzheimer's disease directly measures synaptic loss

Yale researchers have tested a new method for directly measuring synaptic loss in individuals with Alzheimer's disease. The method, which uses PET imaging technology to scan for a specific protein in the brain linked to synapses, has the potential to accelerate research for new Alzheimer's treatments, the researchers said.

7h

Study of high-energy neutrinos again proves Einstein right

A new study by MIT and others proves Einstein is right again. The most thorough test yet finds no Lorentz violation in high-energy neutrinos.

7h

High-stakes cellular process critical to small intestine development

A new study examining how the developing small intestine grows in mice found a surprising sequence of cellular events akin to a death-defying, high-wire circus performance in order for the organ to reach a proper length. A lack of coordination could have dire consequences.

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Overcoming a major barrier to developing liquid biopsies

An international consortium tested nine different methods for RNA sequencing to understand and standardize the best way to sequence small RNAs. The goal was to create a process that could be reproduced from one lab to the next to advance the field of liquid biopsies.

7h

Magnetized wire could be used to detect cancer in people, Stanford scientists report

A magnetic wire used to snag scarce and hard-to-capture tumor cells could prove to be a swift and effective tactic for early cancer detection, according to a study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine.

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Single-celled architects inspire new nanotechnology

ASU professor Hao Yan and his colleagues have designed a range of nanostructures resembling marine diatoms — tiny unicellular creatures. To achieve this, they borrow techniques used by naturally-occurring diatoms to deposit layers of silica — the primary constituent in glass — in order to grow their intricate shells. Using a technique known as DNA origami, the group designed nanoscale platforms

7h

Genetic marker for drug risk in multiple sclerosis offers path toward precision medicine

A team of researchers has uncovered a specific gene variant associated with an adverse drug reaction resulting in liver injury in a people with multiple sclerosis (MS). It is the first time researchers have been able to establish a validated genetic marker for a drug-induced harm in people with MS.

7h

Kelp's record journey exposes Antarctic ecosystems to change

A 20,000 km journey by kelp through what were thought to be impassable barriers created by polar winds and currents has significant implications for how Antarctic ecosystems will change with global warming.

7h

Self-control and obesity: Gender matters in children

A toddler's self-regulation — the ability to change behavior in different social situations — may predict whether he or she will be obese come kindergarten, but the connection appears to be much different for girls than for boys.

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New study reveals how foreign kelp surfed to Antarctica

A research team led by the Australian National University (ANU) has found the first proof that Antarctica is not isolated from the rest of the Earth, with the discovery that foreign kelp had drifted 20,000 kilometers before surfing to the continent's icy shores.

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Mangroves to mudflats and not back again

The long-term conversion of mangroves to mudflats can lead to destabilization of shorelines, negatively impacting their resilience to extreme weather events. United States Geological Survey (USGS) scientists have measured surface elevation changes in these mangroves and adjacent mudflats for nearly 20 years.

7h

A bad mood may help your brain with everyday tasks

New research found that being in a bad mood can help some people's executive functioning, such as their ability to focus attention, manage time and prioritize tasks. The same study found that a good mood has a negative effect on it in some cases.

7h

Nursing notes can help indicate whether ICU patients will survive

Researchers have found that sentiments in the nursing notes of health care providers are good indicators of whether intensive care unit (ICU) patients will survive.

7h

Tuning into quantum: Scientists unlock signal frequency control of precision atom qubits

Scientists have achieved a new milestone in their approach to creating a quantum computer chip in silicon, demonstrating the ability to tune the control frequency of a qubit by engineering its atomic configuration.

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Neurobiology of fruit fly courtship may shed light on human motivation

New study reveals that a male fruit fly's decision to court or ignore a female stems from the convergence of motivation, perception and chance. The triad affects the balance of excitatory versus inhibitory signals in the brain to influence decision making. Findings may yield insights about addiction disorders, depression.

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The secret sulfate code that lets the bad Tau in

Researchers have uncovered details of how cells invite inside corrupted proteins that can turn normal proteins corrupt, leading to neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. Understanding the molecular details of how these proteins spread from cell to cell could lead to therapies to halt disease progression.

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Natural product that could lead to new class of commercial herbicide

A team of engineers and scientists discovered a new and potentially highly effective type of weed killer. This finding could lead to the first new class of commercial herbicides in more than 30 years, an important outcome as weeds continue to develop resistance to current herbicide regimens.

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Products of omega-3 fatty acid metabolism may have anticancer effects

A class of molecules formed when the body metabolizes omega-3 fatty acids could inhibit cancer's growth and spread, researchers report in a new study in mice. In mice with tumors of osteosarcoma – a bone cancer that is notoriously painful and difficult to treat — endocannabinoids slowed the growth of tumors and blood vessels, inhibited the cancer cells from migrating and caused cancer cell death.

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Routine, coordinated treatment of opioid abuse can stem national epidemic

To help stem the nationwide opioid epidemic and related increases in HIV, hepatitis C and other infections, health care providers should routinely screen and treat patients for opioid abuse when they come to clinics and hospitals seeking other services.

7h

A Short Guide to Hard Problems

How fundamentally difficult is a problem? That’s the basic task of computer scientists who hope to sort problems into what are called complexity classes. These are groups that contain all the computational problems that require less than some fixed amount of a computational resource — something like time or memory. Take a toy example featuring a large number such as 123,456,789,001. One might ask

7h

California Clinic Screens Asylum Seekers for Honesty

Facilities like these hunt for evidence that can determine the fate of applicants — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The mission to create a searchable database of Earth's surface | Will Marshall

What if you could search the surface of the Earth the same way you search the internet? Will Marshall and his team at Planet use the world's largest fleet of satellites to image the entire Earth every day. Now they're moving on to a new project: using AI to index all the objects on the planet over time — which could make ships, trees, houses and everything else on Earth searchable, the same way y

7h

Missing bones and our understanding of ancient biodiversity

Fossils come in many shapes and sizes, ranging from isolated fragments of bones and teeth to complete skeletons.

7h

Genome damage from CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing higher than thoughtCRISPR Editing Damage

Scientists at the Wellcome Sanger Institute have discovered that CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing can cause greater genetic damage in cells than was previously thought. These results create safety implications for gene therapies using CRISPR/Cas9 in the future as the unexpected damage could lead to dangerous changes in some cells.

7h

Protecting tropical forest carbon stocks may not prevent large-scale species loss

Tropical forests are rich in carbon and biodiversity. As the world seeks to curb human-induced climate change, will protecting the carbon of tropical forests also ensure the survival of their species?

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Crowdsourcing friendly bacteria helps superbug cause infection

Antimicrobial resistant pathogens crowdsource friendly bacteria to survive in immune cells and cause disease, a new study by the University of Sheffield has revealed.

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Thawing permafrost microbiomes fuel climate change

A University of Queensland-led international study could lead to more accurate predictions or the rate of global warming from greenhouse gas emissions produced by thawing permafrost in the next 100 years.

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Kelp's record journey exposes Antarctic ecosystems to change

When Chilean researcher Dr. Erasmo Macaya from Universidad de Concepción and Centro IDEAL stumbled upon foreign kelp washed up on an Antarctic beach, he knew he had found something significant.

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Using 'shade balls' in reservoirs may use up more water than they save

Preventing reservoir evaporation during droughts with floating balls may not help conserve water overall, due to the water needed to make the balls.

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Behavior-influencing policies are critical for mass market success of low carbon vehicles

Policies to entice consumers away from fossil-fuel powered vehicles and normalize low-carbon alternatives such as electric vehicles are vital if the world is to significantly reduce transport sector carbon emissions, according to new research.

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Maternal signals regulate embryo development in plants

While pregnancy in humans and seed development in plants look very different, parallels exist—not least that the embryo develops in close connection with the mother. In animals, a whole network of signals from the mother is known to influence embryo development. In plants, it has been clear for a while that maternal signals regulate embryo development. However, the signal itself was unknown—until

7h

Faster photons could enable total data security

Researchers at the University of Sheffield have solved a key puzzle in quantum physics that could help to make data transfer totally secure.

7h

Publicity over a memory test Trump took could skew its results

Many media outlets reporting on President Trump’s cognitive assessment test could make it harder for doctors to use the exam to spot dementia.

7h

Best Prime Day 2018 Deals: Echo, Kindle, Fire, Cloud Cam

Fire HD Tablets, Fire TVs, Kindles, Cloud Cams, Echo speakers, and more are as cheap as they'll get for Prime Day.

7h

Flipping the switch: Making use of carbon price dollars for health and education

A switch from subsidizing fossil fuel to pricing CO2-emissions would not only help to meet global climate targets but also create additional domestic public revenues. These revenues could finance expenses toward sustainable development, improving health-care, education and infrastructure for energy, transportation or clean water. India could cover more than 90 percent of its needs to finance progr

7h

Fruit fly mating driven by a tweak in specific brain circuit

According to a new National Institutes of Health-funded study, it is not destiny that brings two fruit flies together, but an evolutionary matchmaker of sorts that made tiny adjustments to their brains' mating circuits, so they would be attracted to one another while rejecting advances from other, even closely-related, species. The results, published in Nature, may help explain how a specific fema

7h

Childhood infections may have lasting effects on school performance

Severe infections leading to hospitalizations during childhood are associated with lower school achievement in adolescence, reports a study in the July issue of The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal (PIDJ). The official journal of The European Society for Paediatric Infectious Diseases, PIDJ is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

7h

Missing bones and our understanding of ancient biodiversity

Fossils come in many shapes and sizes, ranging from isolated fragments of bones and teeth to complete skeletons.

7h

That Self-Styled "Very Stable Genius" Is a Danger to Stability

Pres. Trump threatens the equilibrium not just of the international order, but of the planet we all depend on — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

'Underworked' victims of modern slavery endure extra exploitation

People trapped in modern slavery can be 'underworked' by ruthless employers, to increase their debt bondage and provide revenue from living costs.

8h

Protecting ribosome genes to prevent aging

Aging is a process of gradual deterioration from exposure to time and the elements; this process begins with deterioration deep inside every cell. Researchers from Stanford University and the VA Palo Alto Health Care System (VAPAHCS) have identified a protein that guards cells against senescence—aging-related problems—by protecting a particularly vulnerable set of genes. The study is published in

8h

EU warns Airbnb to obey rules or risk fines

The European Union on Monday warned holiday rental site Airbnb to bring consumer terms in line with the bloc's rules or risk financial penalties.

8h

Geologists from MSU found out how over 2.6 Ga years old rocks were formed at Limpopo Complex

MSU geologists and their colleagues from South Africa and Novosibirsk studied the interaction between the oldest blocks of the Earth's continental crust. Detailed analysis of graphite and microscopic gas inclusions in quartz confirmed that it involved CO 2 -rich fluids. Understanding the formation processes of these rocks scientists could predict the mechanisms of mineral ore deposit generation ne

8h

Football training may preserve bone health in prostate cancer patients

Androgen deprivation therapy for the treatment of prostate cancer can lead to loss of muscle and bone mass. In a recent Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sport study of elderly patients undergoing the treatment, playing football — or what's known as soccer in the United States — over a 5-year period was linked with preserved bone mineral density (BMD) in the neck of the leg's femur.

8h

Restrictions on research grant applications cause chaos

Mathematicians at the University of Kent, with input from the University of Sheffield, have established that current restrictions on academics applying for research grants are causing major problems, harming smaller institutions and minorities in the process. To reduce the time and money spent evaluating applications, many funding bodies responded by restricting the number they receive.

8h

Weight loss surgery may affect the risk of cancer

A new analysis published in the BJS (British Journal of Surgery) indicates that weight loss surgery may affect an individual's risk of developing cancer.

8h

Particulate matter increases drought vulnerability of trees

Particulate matter deposits on leaves increase plant transpiration and the risk of plants suffering from drought. Particulate matter could thus be contributing more strongly to tree mortality and forest decline than previously assumed. This is suggested by results from a greenhouse study led by the university of Bonn, in which tree seedlings grown in almost particulate matter free air or in unfilt

8h

Deep subterranean connection between two Japan volcanoes

Scientists have confirmed for the first time that radical changes of one volcano in southern Japan was the direct result of an erupting volcano 22 kilometers (13.7 miles) away. The observations from the two volcanos — Aira caldera and Kirishima — show that the two were connected through a common subterranean magma source in the months leading up to the 2011 eruption of Kirishima.

8h

Renault scores new sales record driven by emerging markets

French car giant Renault on Monday reported a nearly 10 percent surge in sales in the first half of 2018, scoring a new 2.1 million vehicle sales record driven by gains in Russia, Argentina and Brazil.

8h

A no-deal Brexit could lead to a catastrophe for science in the UK

The flurry of cabinet resignations in the aftermath of the Chequers agreement leaves the UK at serious risk of crashing out of the EU without a deal

8h

Honeybees gang up to roast invading hornets alive — at a terrible cost

The worker bees that form “hot defensive bee balls” are effectively kamikaze fighters, with the heat from the ball shortening their life expectancy

8h

DeepMind AI takes IQ tests to probe its ability for abstract thought

AIs that can match humans at abstract reasoning would be very useful, but testing them is difficult. Now Google DeepMind says it has a solution

8h

EU says VW repairs most cars with cheating devices

German auto giant Volkswagen has fixed millions of cars found with emissions cheating software since a 2015 scandal, but must do more to satisfy consumers, the EU said Monday.

8h

You Might Be Slightly Conscious Under Anesthesia

How conscious is the brain under anesthesia?

8h

The BMJ launches special collection on research for health in the Americas

The BMJ is launching a special collection of articles that will explore how research can drive effective and efficient health systems across the Americas.

8h

Researchers crack the code of the final blood group system

Ever since the blood type was discovered in 1962, no one has been able to explain why some people become Xga positive while others are Xga negative. But now, researchers at Lund University in Sweden have finally solved the mystery, and their study is being published in the scientific journal Blood.

8h

How many people die from tuberculosis every year?

The estimates for global tuberculosis deaths by the World Health Organisation (WHO) and the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME) differ considerably for a dozen countries, according to a study led by ISGlobal. The results highlight the need to improve the modeling approaches in these countries in order to understand the true burden of the disease and design adequate health policies.

8h

New study finds folding graphene significantly enhances mechanical performance

An international team of researchers, affiliated with South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) has discovered that folding is an efficient strategy to incorporate large-area monolayer graphene films on polymer composites and that doing so improves mechanical reinforcement. Their work has been published in the prestigious journal, Advances Materials.

8h

Protecting ribosome genes to prevent aging

Aging is a process of gradual deterioration from exposure to time and the elements; this process begins with deterioration deep inside every cell. Researchers from Stanford University and the VA Palo Alto Health Care System (VAPAHCS) have identified a protein that guards cells against senescence — aging-related problems — by protecting a particularly vulnerable set of genes. The study is publish

8h

Community colleges can boost access to primary care and physician diversity

Medical school graduates who attended community college are more likely to select family medicine for their residency training and to be from groups traditionally underrepresented in medicine, new UC Davis Health research shows.

8h

Barium ruthenate: A high-yield, easy-to-handle perovskite catalyst for the oxidation of sulfides

Researchers led by Keigo Kamata and Michikazu Hara of Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) have developed a ruthenium-based perovskite catalyst that shows strong activity even at low temperatures (down to 313 K). The reusable catalyst does not require additives, meaning that it can prevent the formation of toxic by-products. The oxidation of sulfides is a commercially important process with

8h

Image: The Herschel Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey

At first glance this frame is flooded with salt-and-pepper static. Rather than being tiny grains or pixels of TV noise, every single point of light in this image is actually a distant galaxy as observed by ESA's Herschel Space Observatory. Each of these minute marks represents the 'heat' emanating from dust grains lying between the stars of each galaxy. This radiation has taken many billions of ye

8h

Regulator unveils plan to monitor cryptocurrency threat

A financial regulator on Monday unveiled a strategy to monitor whether cryptocurrencies such as Bitcoin pose a threat to world economic stability.

8h

The Wildest Wimbledon in Recent Memory

The wildest Wimbledon in recent memory ended with Novak Djokovic playing against type. Over the years Djokovic, 31, has become as much defined by his 13 Grand Slam titles as by the exuberant manner in which he’s given to celebrate them. But when Kevin Anderson dumped one last forehand into the net on match point to cinch a 6-2, 6-2, 7-6 (3) victory for Djokovic, there was no roaring at the heaven

8h

Researcher develops algorithm to improve information security tools

Cryptography is a science of data encryption providing its confidentiality and integrity. After cryptographic transformations (the basis of encryption algorithms) are applied, only users that possess a relevant key can have access to the initial text.

8h

Silver salt used to break C–C bonds in unstrained cyclic amines

A team of researchers at the University of California has found a way to break C–C bonds in unstrained cyclic amines using silver salt. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes the technique they developed and how well it worked.

8h

Particulate matter increases drought vulnerability of trees

Particulate matter deposits on leaves increase plant transpiration and the risk of plants suffering from drought. Particulate matter could thus be contributing more strongly to tree mortality and forest decline than previously assumed. This is suggested by results from a greenhouse study led by the University of Bonn, in which tree seedlings grown in almost particulate matter free air or in unfilt

8h

Star Wars News: Look Out for Billy Dee Williams in 'Star Wars: Episode IX'

The actor has reportedly signed on to join J.J. Abrams' next 'Star Wars' movie.

8h

MagicMark: A marking menu using 2-D direction and 3-D depth information

A recent study presents a novel marking menu, MagicMark, to extend the selection capability of large screen interactions. By leveraging the 2-D direction information and 3-D depth information, MagicMark supports smooth freehand gesture to complete menu selection without any additional confirmation gesture. It can also provide seamless transition from a novice user to an expert user. Results of an

8h

Olfactory receptors have more functions than merely smell perception

Numerous studies to date have shown that olfactory receptors are relevant not only for smell perception, but that they also play a significant physiological and pathophysiological role in all organs. An overview of receptors detected so far and of the functions they fulfil within the human body is provided by researchers from Ruhr-Universität Bochum, published in the journal Physiological Reviews;

8h

New tool to calculate 'nitrogen footprint' offers guide to pollution reduction

University of Melbourne researchers have helped create the first tool to calculate the 'nitrogen footprint' of an organisation. The tool will provide a guide to sustainability and pollution reduction for daily activities such as food consumption, travel and energy use.

8h

A step closer to quantum computers: NUS researchers show how to directly observe quantum spin effects

A team led by Associate Professor Yang Hyunsoo from the National University of Singapore Faculty of Engineering has found a practical way to observe and examine the quantum effects of electrons in topological insulators and heavy metals. This could later pave the way for the development of advanced quantum computing components and devices.

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Can political party predict adultery?

Ever notice how people with conservative sexual attitudes seem to still cheat at the same rate as their more liberal peers? A new study says you're onto something. Read More

8h

KAIST to introduce enhanced PDT to cure cancer with fewer side effects

A KAIST research team developed near-infrared fluorophores-based photodynamic therapy (PDT) that reduced the downside of existing PDTs.

9h

Remembering ‘Big Nancy’ Sinatra

She was, a friend of hers once noted, “a great wife, a great ex-wife, and a great widow,” and when Nancy Barbato Sinatra died at 101 on Friday, she took with her perhaps the last living link to a world that knew Frank Sinatra not as a legend but as an impossibly skinny fireman’s son from Hoboken, who would sing for a pack or two of cigarettes and a sandwich, but dreamed of more. And from the mome

9h

There is good health and fitness advice on the web—here's how to find it

DIY Don't just assume that sore throat is a sign of cancer. At times, we all rely on the internet to diagnose our symptoms. But you can't believe everything you see online. Here are the health apps and sites you can trust.

9h

Chernobyl exposure alters the gut bacteria of wild animals

Researchers at the Universities of Oulu and Jyväskylä, together with their collaborators in the U.S. and France, have shown that wild animals living in areas contaminated by radioactive material have a different community of bacteria within their digestive system (the gut microbiome) compared with animals that do not live in areas affected by an increase in radiation.

9h

Do I want an always-on digital assistant listening in all the time?

The smart device market is exploding. Smart home kits for retrofitting "non-smart" houses have become cheaper.Earlier this year, Apple released the HomePod speaker, the company's response to dominant smart devices Google Home and Amazon Echo. Amazon, too, is expanding its lineup. Recently, it debuted the Amazon Echo Look, promising to make users more stylish.

9h

Restrictions on research grant applications cause chaos

Mathematicians at the University of Kent, with input from the University of Sheffield, have established that current restrictions on academics applying for research grants are causing major problems, harming smaller institutions and minorities in the process.

9h

Australia has a new venomous snake — And it may already be threatened

The ink has not yet dried on a scientific paper describing a new species of snake, yet the reptile may already be in danger of extinction due to mining.A team of biologists led by The University of Queensland's Associate Professor Bryan Fry discovered a new species of bandy-bandy snake at Weipa on the west coast of the Cape York Peninsula.

9h

All the best deals this Amazon Prime Day

Gadgets Today, Amazon is offering deals on millions (!) of products and bundles. Here are the ones that are worthwhile. All the Amazon Prime Day deals we like—continually updated, in one place. Read on.

9h

Pristine Antarctic fjords contain similar levels of microplastics to open oceans near big civilisations

In the middle of the last century, mass-produced, disposable plastic waste started washing up on shorelines, and to be found in the middle of the oceans. This has since become an increasingly serious problem, spreading globally to even the most remote places on Earth. Just a few decades later, in the 1970s, scientists found the same problem was occurring at a much less visible, microscopic level,

9h

How your social network could save you from a natural disaster

In early November 2017, Brooks Fisher's neighbor in Sonoma, California, pounded on his door at 2 a.m., rang the doorbell and shouted, "There's a fire coming and you need to get out now! I can hear trees exploding!"

9h

One of the densest clusters of galaxies in the universe is revealed

A study published recently in the journal Nature Astronomy and which questions current models of structure formation in the universe is based on data obtained with the Gran Telescopio Canarias and among its authors is a team of researchers from the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC).

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Hybrid device harvests both mechanical and magnetic energy

A new hybrid energy-harvesting device may one day replace the need for batteries in certain low-power electronics devices. The new device collects ambient wasted energy from both mechanical vibrations and magnetic fields to generate sustainable electricity, which could potentially provide enough power to run wireless sensors, cardio pacemakers, and other applications.

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A bad marriage can seriously damage your health, say scientists

Psychologists monitored 373 couples over 16 years and found that couples who disagree often have poorer health – especially for men A bad marriage with frequent conflicts could have a serious detrimental impact on your health, according to psychologists. The researchers at the universities of Nevada and Michigan monitored 373 heterosexual couples to investigate whether disagreeing about multiple

9h

‘Inverse sandwich’ makes boron clusters special

Nanoclusters made from boron and lanthanide elements form highly stable and symmetric structures with interesting magnetic properties, researchers report. The findings, which appears in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences , suggest that these nanoclusters may be useful as molecular magnets or assembled into magnetic nanowires. The research also helps shed light on the structure and ch

9h

Hackere bruger falsk Whatsapp til at stjæle data fra iPhones

Hackere lokker lige nu iPhone-brugere til at downloade falske udgaver af Telegram og Whatsapp. Herefter stjæles telefonnumre, sms-korrespondancer, og kontakter.

9h

Making Shark Cookies | Countdown to Shark Week: The Daily Bite

Our friends at Food Network stop by to prep some Shark Week cookies perfect for your Shark Week premiere party. Also, enjoy another edition of soaring sharks to some awesome music in this episodes Badass Breaches. Shark Week 2018 starts Sunday July 22 9p! Stream The Daily Bite on Discovery GO: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/the-daily-bite/ Stream Classic Shark Week Episodes: https://www.disco

9h

Roku TV Wireless Speakers: Price, Specs, and Release Date

Roku's new $199 wireless speakers are matched with an optional wireless button you place in another room and use as a voice remote.

9h

How Is a Runner Like a Bouncing Ball?

You can make a physics model that teaches you tons about running.

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You've heard of a carbon footprint – now it's time to take steps to cut your nitrogen footprint

Nitrogen pollution has significant environmental and human health costs. Yet it is often conflated with other environmental problems, such as climate change, which is exacerbated by nitrous oxide (N₂O) and nitrogen oxides (NOₓ), or particulate smog, to which ammonia (NH₃) also contributes.

9h

Babies’ Cries May Foretell Their Adult Voices, a Study Shows

New research indicates that the pitch of a baby’s cries at 4 months old may predict the pitch of its speech at age 5.

9h

In Yellowstone, one geyser's trash is a researcher's treasure

As tourists gathered on a cool June morning to view some of Yellowstone National Park's most iconic geysers, Montana State University researchers took to the boardwalks for another purpose: to collect trash that could lead to new ways of recycling plastic.

9h

New algorithm limits bias in machine learning

Machine learning—a form of artificial intelligence based on the idea that computers can learn from data and make determinations with little help from humans—has the potential to improve our lives in countless ways. From self-driving cars to mammogram scans that can read themselves, machine learning is transforming modern life.

9h

Chemical bits can be worse than the whole for bald eagles

Toxic chemicals in the environment that accumulate in the tissues of birds, fish, and other animals have been a concern for decades. A new study with bald eagles suggests that’s only part of the story. Scientists discovered that chemicals used in flame retardants, plasticizers, and other commercial products are broken down through the process of metabolism into other compounds. But not enough is

9h

A silicon-nanoparticlephotonic waveguide

A new way to efficiently guide light at tiny scales has been demonstrated by an all-A*STAR team. Their method, which involves lining up silicon nanoparticles, is promising for applications such as light-based integrated circuits, biosensors and quantum communications.

10h

Why women buy abortion meds online

A new study reveals the motivations and experiences of women seeking abortion medication online. The practice can be a response to clinic access barriers in states with and without restrictive abortion laws, or can occur when self-managed abortion is preferred over clinical care, researchers say. Researchers learned that online options may offer either information or medications, but not both. Fu

10h

How ideas of 'adulthood', its rights and responsibilities, are changing around the world

Around the world, the idea of adulthood—when it happens and how it is defined—is being challenged.

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Triple bend structure splits light into two highly pure polarization components

A plan to incorporate a third bent waveguide into a silicon-based light splitter led A*STAR researchers to develop a device capable of a 30-fold improvement in splitting efficiency. The novel on-chip light splitter marks a major breakthrough in improving high-performance data transmission systems, as well as applications in quantum computing.

10h

Making solar hydrogen generation more efficient in microgravity

An international team of researchers has found a way to make solar hydrogen generation more efficient in microgravity environments. In their paper published in the journal Nature Communications, the group describes what they learned from experiments with a photoelectrochemical cell falling in a drop tower.

10h

How quantum computers could steal your bitcoin

Cryptocurrencies like bitcoin have recently captured the public's imagination because they offer an exciting alternative to traditional monetary systems.

10h

Why plastic bag bans triggered such a huge reaction

Woolworths' and Coles' bans on plastic bags have been applauded by environmental groups, but were reportedly met with abuse and assault and claims of profiteering. Even comedians saw value in the theatre of the bag ban.

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New study reveals Ulsan is exposed to yearlong toxic fine dust

A new study, affiliated with South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) offers decisive proof that South Korea's Ulsan city is affected by toxic substances contained in fine dust particles, regardless of the season.

10h

Meet the folks designing the future of mouse mazes

Science What makes a maze, anyway? This startup makes bespoke mazes for research that uses mice and other animals.

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Ring-tailed lemurs can actually smell weakness

Ring-tailed lemurs can tell that a fellow lemur is weaker from only the natural scents they leave behind, according to a new study. Males act more aggressively toward scents that smell “off.” “Our study shows that physical injury from peers dampens an animal’s scent signature, and in a way that its counterparts can detect,” says Christine Drea, professor of evolutionary anthropology at Duke Unive

10h

Spørg Scientariet: Har fodboldspillere en anden tidsopfattelse end os andre?

En læser undrer sig over, hvordan fodboldspillere kan være så hurtige på fødderne. Oplever de simpelthen tiden langsommere, siden de når så meget? Det svarer forsker i tidsopfattelse på.

10h

Australia has a new venomous snake – and it may already be threatened

The ink has not yet dried on a scientific paper describing a new species of snake, yet the reptile may already be in danger of extinction due to mining.

10h

The Trump-Putin Summit Shows the Dangers of Executive Power

On Monday, President Donald Trump begins a summit with Vladimir Putin, the brutal authoritarian who leads Russia, a country where political dissidents are murdered; journalists, minorities, and homosexuals are persecuted; neighbors live under the threat of military takeover; and multiple hackers with close ties to the Kremlin are under FBI indictment for interfering in America’s 2016 election. It

10h

How New York City Is Tackling Extreme Heat in a Warming World

Extreme heat already kills more than 100 New Yorkers yearly. That could rise to thousands a year by 2080.

10h

Comcast and AT&T Are Fighting to Become Media Companies

Transmitting data makes steady, low returns. But the telecom giants want a grander life: in high-risk, high-reward, high-margins media.

10h

UK's first spaceport to be built on Scottish peninsula – video

Scotland’s north coast has been chosen as the site of Britain's first spaceport. Vertical rocket and satellite launches are planned from the A’Mhoine peninsula, in Sutherland, which the UK Space Agency says will pave the way for human spaceflights Spaceport receives go-ahead on Scottish peninsula Continue reading…

10h

The surprising impact happiness has on health, relationships and even the economy

"Don't worry, be happy," the song tells us, and all of popular culture seems to chime in. For eons, humans have wrestled with how to find happiness.

10h

Research focuses on impact of strategic shopping

A new study from the Naveen Jindal School of Management at UT Dallas examines how companies that push product innovation can persuade consumers to purchase the latest gear.

10h

Image of the Day: Not All Bad

In zebrafish, some amount of reactive oxygen species is required for normal development.

10h

Image: Jamming with the 'spiders' from Mars

This image from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, acquired May 13, 2018 during winter at the South Pole of Mars, shows a carbon dioxide ice cap covering the region and as the sun returns in the spring, "spiders" begin to emerge from the landscape.

11h

How glacial biomarkers can hone the search for extraterrestrial life

Detecting biomarkers in glacial lakes on Earth could pave the way for astrobiologists to detect evidence for life on other worlds, and also unravel the properties of the environments in which that life lived.

11h

Four ways the electric system can better integrate microgrids

The U.S. electric system is adapting to a new wave of distributed energy resources, such as solar panels and energy storage. Some of these work together in localized networks known as microgrids—nearly 2,000 are now operating or planned across the country, according to one estimate.

11h

Poll shows consensus for climate policy remains strong

While the United States is deeply divided on many issues, climate change stands out as one where there is remarkable consensus, according to Stanford research.

11h

Sound waves reveal diamond cache deep in Earth's interior

There may be more than a quadrillion tons of diamond hidden in the Earth's interior, according to a new study from MIT and other universities. But the new results are unlikely to set off a diamond rush. The scientists estimate the precious minerals are buried more than 100 miles below the surface, far deeper than any drilling expedition has ever reached.

11h

New study finds folding graphene significantly enhances mechanical performance

An international team of researchers, affiliated with UNIST has discovered that folding is an efficient strategy to incorporate large-area monolayer graphene films on polymer composites and that doing so improves mechanical reinforcement. Their work has been published in the prestigious journal, Advances Materials.

11h

Understanding the universe through neutrinos

Determining features of the elusive particle known as a neutrino – through the observation of an extremely rare nuclear process called neutrinoless double-beta decay (NDBD)—could provide a glimpse into the nature of the universe during the earliest moments of the Big Bang.

11h

Current strategies using satellite data limit the accuracy of space-based estimates of how aerosols brighten clouds

All cloud liquid drops and ice crystals originate on small particles called aerosols. Therefore, clouds can be sensitive – or susceptible – to particle variations in space and time that affect cloud characteristics such as their extent, lifetime, reflectivity, and precipitation. Computer model estimates of cloud susceptibility to aerosols frequently disagree with satellite susceptibility estimates

11h

mind: Psychology Itself Is Under Scrutiny

Many famous studies of human behavior cannot be reproduced. Even so, they revealed aspects of our inner lives that feel true.

11h

ATLAS telescope pinpoints meteorite impact prediction

A multinational team of scientists has just found the first fragments of the small asteroid 2018 LA, which exploded harmlessly high above Africa on June 2. The University of Hawaiʻi's Asteroid Terrestrial-Impact Last Alert System (ATLAS) telescope took the final images of 2018 LA before it entered Earth's atmosphere and exploded.

11h

New materials improve delivery of therapeutic messenger RNA

In an advance that could lead to new treatments for a variety of diseases, MIT researchers have devised a new way to deliver messenger RNA (mRNA) into cells.

11h

Gault site research pushes back date of earliest North Americans

For decades, researchers believed the Western Hemisphere was settled by humans roughly 13,500 years ago, a theory based largely upon the widespread distribution of Clovis artifacts dated to that time. In recent years, though, archaeological evidence has increasingly called into question the idea of "Clovis First."

11h

New tools to characterise physical properties of biofilms

NUS scientists, together with researchers from Nanyang Technological University (NTU) and Imperial College London (ICL), have developed non-invasive biophysical techniques to quantify oxygen concentration and micromechanical properties in bacterial biofilms and understand their real-time responses to environmental changes.

11h

Brown dwarf detected in the CoRoT-20 system

An international group of astronomers has discovered a new substellar object in the planetary system CoRoT-20. The newly identified object was classified as a brown dwarf due to its mass, which is greater than that of the heaviest gas giant planets. The finding is reported in a paper published July 3 on arXiv.org.

11h

Trials under way for new fibre-based ready meal pack

Ready meals may come in handy for the fast on the go, but the trays they're served in will likely be around for longer than your lifetime.

11h

Study shows painful eczema symptoms negatively impact quality of life

A new study published in Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology shows that eczema symptoms can have a profoundly negative impact on quality of life for those who suffer — even worse than for those with common chronic illnesses like heart disease, diabetes and high blood pressure.

11h

The Daniel Tiger Doctrine

There’s a particular type of parent whom Angela Santomero, the creator of a number of children’s shows including Blue’s Clues , Super Why! , and PBS’s Daniel Tiger’s Neighborhood , encounters a lot: the guilty-feeling, screen time–loving parent. “Is it okay to let my child watch TV in general? Is that okay?” Santomero says she gets asked. “Is it okay that I need that break and I’m letting my chil

11h

Chinese Researchers Achieve Stunning Quantum-Entanglement Record

In an unprecedented feat, physicists packed three qubits into each of six particles. The implications could be staggering.

11h

Solving problems by computer just got a lot faster

A new computer program sifts through all possible solutions to find the best answer to a given problem far faster than other algorithms.

11h

How Elucd's 'Sentiment Meter' Helps Cops in LA and NYC Understand Their Precincts

Cops in LA, NYC, and beyond are using software from Elucd to figure out how the sentiments of the people they protect.

11h

Juul’s Lobbying Could Send Its Public Image Up in Smoke

Maker of e-cigarettes is trying to convince regulators that it wants to push away the teens that made it famous, just as its trying to raise billions.

11h

What *Is* Meat, Anyway? Lab-Grown Food Sets Off a Debate

You don’t typically find philosophical bickering at an FDA public meeting. But then again, lab-grown meat is no ordinary topic.

11h

What Robert Mueller Knows—and 9 Areas He'll Pursue Next

The special counsel has collected a mountain of evidence in the Trump-Russia investigation, but so far only a tiny amount of it has been revealed in official indictments. Here are nine areas where we should expect answers as the inquiry unfolds.

11h

To Feed the World Sustainably, Repair the Soil

A reconceived farming system can rapidly improve fertility without chemical fertilizers ans without sacrificing crop yields — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

Angered By Attack, Mob Slaughters Hundreds Of Crocodiles In Indonesia

Following the funeral of a local resident killed by a crocodile after apparently straying into a local wildlife sanctuary, the mob slaughtered nearly 300 of the reptiles. (Image credit: SKYLA/AFP/Getty Images)

12h

Light Beam Lets the Deaf (Gerbil) Hear

A next-generation cochlear implant might allow the hearing-impaired to listen to music and cope with noise — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

12h

A Rare Outbreak of 'Rabbit Fever' Popped Up at a German Winery. The Surprising Cause? Grapes.

When grape harvesters at a German winery mysteriously fell ill with "rabbit fever," a rare bacterial illness, one question in particular stood out: How did they get sick?

12h

Why Mars Appears to Be Moving Backward

What's really happening when Mars is in retrograde?

12h

Techtopia #61: Skal Danmark have en national kryptovaluta?

Podcast: Finanssektoren er en af de brancher, der har ændret sig mest som følge af digitaliseringen.

12h

How Much Damage Will Trump’s Trade War Do?

Will Donald Trump’s trade war tip the economy into a recession? It seems a reasonable question to ask. The White House has initiated a rapidly escalating global tit for tat, with thousands of products from the United States, China, Canada, Mexico, and Europe now affected or threatened by tariffs. The price of imported goods is increasing. The demand for exported goods is falling. American busines

12h

What Breeds Make Up This Mutt?

Experts did little better than dog lovers — and nobody did very well — when asked to describe the heritage of various mutts.

12h

Historisk fund af meteorit skal afsløre hemmeligheder fra rummet

Det er kun anden gang i historien, forskere har opdaget en meteorit før den ramte jorden og fundet den efterfølgende. "Den er frisk", siger forsker.

13h

Heat Making You Lethargic? Research Shows It Can Slow Your Brain, Too

Hot weather can influence cognitive performance, according to new research. Young adults living in non-air-conditioned dorms during a heat wave performed worse on math and attention tests. (Image credit: Marcus Butt / Ikon/Getty Images)

13h

Ukraine Is Ground Zero for the Crisis Between Russia and the West

UKRAINE —To land in Kiev is to reach ground zero of today’s confrontation between Russia and the West. The start of the Ukraine conflict is, depending on one’s chronology, the defining moment of their crisis. It’s here that, in the spring of 2014, Moscow organized a referendum of dubious legitimacy to annex Crimea; that Russia used troops whose existence it denied to help rebels seize parts of Do

13h

Trump Meets Putin While America Confronts Russia

Donald Trump’s scolding of NATO allies, his digs at Britain’s prime minister, and his dismissal of investigations into Russian interference in the 2016 U.S. election as a “ rigged witch hunt” even though he knew Russian intelligence officers were about to be indicted back home for messing with American democracy —all right before meeting with Vladimir Putin in Finland—have revived a long-running

13h

Regioner med Sundhedsplatformen afviste option på billigere alternativ

Regionerne Sjælland og Hovedstaden afviste sidste år muligheden for at kunne udskifte Sundhedsplatformen uden endnu et udbud. “Ikke rationelt”, lyder kritikken fra dansk it-professor.

14h

Slovakiet vil af med russiske kampfly i en fart: Køber nye F-16 i stedet for Gripen

Slovakiet har fundet erstatningen for de russiske MiG-29.

14h

Fierce heatwave hits Japan flood recovery

A blistering heatwave smothered swathes of flood-hit western Japan Monday, hampering clean-up efforts as survivors and relief workers toil in stifling temperatures a week after devastating inundations that killed more than 200 people.

15h

Digital age 'desperately' needs ethical and legal guidelines

Digital technologies such as artificial intelligence and robotics, 'desperately' need an institutional framework and system of values to help regulate the industry, an ethics expert has told leading scientists and policymakers.

15h

Human evolution: back to the trees?

Scientists have uncovered new clues from the spinal columns of ancient human ancestors that suggest the various types moved in different manners within their environments.

15h

X-ray triggered nano-bubbles to target cancer

Innovative drug filled nano-bubbles, able to be successfully triggered in the body by X-rays, have been developed by researchers, paving the way for a new range of cancer treatments for patients.

15h

Some manufacturers feeling trade war pinch: survey

Some US manufacturers are delaying investments and raising prices as President Donald Trump escalates trade wars with key US economic partners but most companies report no change, according to a survey released Monday.

15h

Scotland chosen as site for first British space portUK Scotland Sutherland

The UK Space agency said Sunday that it had chosen a peninsula on Scotland's north coast as the site of the country's first space port.

15h

Archaeologists and astronomers solve the mystery of Chile's Stonehenge

A solar phenomenon found above mysterious pillars, or saywas, was likely designed to broadcast the ‘sacred power’ of the Inca Growing up on the edge of the Atacama desert in northern Chile, Jimena Cruz was often made to feel ashamed of her indigenous identity. Related: Stargazing in Chile: dark skies in the Atacama desert Continue reading…

15h

BetaDwarfs fans brugertester nyt spil hver dag: »Det er lidt ligesom et ægteskab«

Spilfirmaet BetaDwarf brugertester deres nyeste spil Minion Masters hver dag. Det er gratis kvalitetskontrol og bug-reporting, fortæller firmaets direktør, men også et meget paradoksalt forhold.

15h

Mobile coupons can increase revenue both during and after a promotion

Mobile coupons not only drive customers to spend money during a promotion—they can encourage long-term purchase behavior as well.

15h

Bad Faith: When conspiracy theorists play academics and the media for fools

Does a recent study of changes in brain cancer rates indicate we should fear our cell phones? Or does the problem lie elsewhere?

15h

Can you solve it? Head-spinning bicycle puzzles

Run your brain through the gears UPDATE: Click here for the solutions. Bonjour guzzleurs, As we are almost midway through the Tour de France, I thought it would be a good moment for some bicycle puzzles. Continue reading…

16h

Is UK science and innovation up for the climate challenge?

The government has shaken up the UK research system. But fossil fuels, not low-carbon technologies, still seem to be in the driving seat. A new report by Richard Jones and James Wilsdon invites us to question the biomedical bubble – the slow but steady concentration of research and development (R&D) resources in the hands of biomedical science. A provocative case, it’s already generated some disc

16h

Arundel road scheme 'could harm ancient woodland'

Road builders planning a bypass in Sussex have been urged to find a way that doesn't cause damage to ancient woodland.

17h

From the lab to the real world: program to improve elderly mobility feasible in community

A pilot study led by researchers from Tufts University and conducted at the Somerville Council on Aging in Somerville, Mass., translated for the first time the physical activity benefits of the Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders study in a community setting.

17h

Nye vejskilte sladrer om bilisters brug af mobiltelefon

Med tiden håber de britiske myndigheder, at teknologien kan udstyres med kameraer, der registrerer nummerpladen.

18h

Mobile coupons can increase revenue both during and after a promotion

New research from Binghamton University, State University at New York finds that mobile coupons can affect both short- and long-term sales goals, and that targeting customers with the right type of mobile coupon can boost revenue.

18h

Nursing notes can help indicate whether ICU patients will survive

Researchers at the University of Waterloo have found that sentiments in the nursing notes of health care providers are good indicators of whether intensive care unit (ICU) patients will survive.

18h

Traumatic brain injury biomarker shows promise to support rapid damage evaluation and predict outcomes

A new study in The American Journal of Pathology found that a brain lipid molecule, lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), was significantly increased after traumatic brain injury (TBI) in a preclinical animal model. They also found that it was elevated in areas associated with cell death and axonal injury, both major hallmarks of moderate and severe TBI. This strengthens the evidence that LPA could be used

18h

A constellation of symptoms presages first definitive signs of multiple sclerosis

Canadian researchers document the health problems that precede a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis.

18h

Death rates from heart failure higher for women than men

Death rates from heart failure are higher for women than men, and hospitalization rates have increased in women while declining in men, found a study from the University of Ottawa Heart Institute published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).

18h

Spaceport receives go-ahead on Scottish peninsula

Site between Tongue and Durness could be up and running by early 2020s A peninsula on Scotland’s north coast has been chosen for the site of the UK’s first spaceport. Vertical rocket and satellite launches are planned from the A’Mhoine peninsula in Sutherland which the UK Space Agency said would pave the way for spaceflights. Continue reading…

19h

When You Watch Sports, Your Brain Thinks You’re Playing

submitted by /u/recipriversexcluson [link] [comments]

21h

Tudor shipwreck discovered by local group on Kent beach

The government has listed the vessel as the only wreck of its kind in south-east England A Tudor shipwreck, discovered by members of a local history group surveying Tankerton beach, near Whitstable, in Kent for second world war pillboxes, has been given official protection by the government as the only wreck of its kind in south-east England. Another ship believed to date from the 19th century, g

23h

23h

Half of parents talk on the phone while driving kids

In the previous three months, about half of parents talked on a cell phone while driving with their kids in the car, research finds. The researchers also report that one in three read text messages, and one in seven used social media. The study also found a correlation between cell phone use while children were in the car and other risky driving behaviors, such as not wearing a seat belt and driv

23h

‘Rope-jumping’ rotor could pave way for molecular machines

Researchers have created a new type of molecular rotor that shows promise for future development as a functional machine capable of manipulating matter at atomic and subatomic levels. The research could transform multiple branches of chemistry, along with myriad related sectors and industries, they say. The researchers used a method called olefin metathesis recognized with the 2005 Nobel Prize in

23h

No, big feelings don’t threaten infertility treatment

A woman’s emotional state does not have a strong connection with the success of infertility treatment, according to new evidence. “Our results offer hope and optimism to the many women who feel emotionally responsible…” This runs counter to the advice many women struggling with infertility report receiving from family and friends: to “just relax.” This can suggest their mental state is to blame w

23h

Ancient collision with ‘Sausage’ galaxy shaped the Milky Way

Researchers have discovered an ancient and dramatic head-on collision between the Milky Way and a smaller object, dubbed the “Sausage” galaxy. The cosmic crash was a defining event in the early history of the Milky Way and reshaped the structure of our galaxy, fashioning both its inner bulge and its outer halo, astronomers report in a series of new papers. The astronomers propose that around 8 bi

1d

These Arctic mammals are most at risk from ships

As Arctic seas become increasingly ice-free, seasonal ship traffic from tourism and freight is expected to rise. A new study shows which animals will be the most vulnerable to the change. In August 2016, the first large cruise ship traveled through the Northwest Passage, the northern waterway linking the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. The following year, the first ship without an icebreaker plied t

1d

Lift-off for Scotland: Sutherland to host first UK spaceportUK Scotland Sutherland

The UK Space Agency backs Scotland's north coast as the place to launch satellites to orbit.

1d

American prison employees show PTSD levels similar to Iraq and Afghanistan war veterans

Prison isn't just terrible for the prisoners. Increasingly, the employees are suffering, too. Read More

1d

Starwatch: Mars, in opposition, is a radiant beacon

Over the next two weeks Mars will make its closest approach to Earth since 2003 Late birds with a good south-eastern horizon will probably have already noticed Mars in the dead of night. In the early hours of the morning, it is a radiant beacon, shining low in the constellation of Capricornus. During the next fortnight, the planet is going to brighten steadily as it heads for its closest approach

1d

William McBride, Who Warned About Thalidomide, Dies at 91

Proclaimed a hero, Dr. McBride was later embroiled in lengthy controversies over faulty research.

1d

Sea turtle found dead with beach chair string around neck

An endangered sea turtle has been found dead on an Alabama beach with a beach chair string tangled around its neck.

1d

Make Something

Sharing skills, sharing stories and creating with your own hands — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

Something Is Killing Young Great Whites In Southern California | Shark News

Research shows juvenile great white sharks are dying from unnatural causes, mostly due to being caught in fishing nets up and down the coast. Shark Week 2018 starts Sunday July 22 9p! Stream Classic Shark Week Episodes: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/shark-week/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery https://www.faceboo

1d

Longleat prepares for arrival vulnerable Southern Koalas

It's hoped a breeding programme will help maintain numbers of the vulnerable species.

1d

Ken Ribet's Favorite Theorem

The Berkeley math professor shares his favorite prime proofs — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

Læger: Stop penicillinkuren før tid og undgå resistens

Danske læger udskriver mindre antibiotika. I nogle tilfælde fordi det er unødvendigt og i andre tilfælde, fordi behandlingen med fordel kan forkortes.

1d

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