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Trump’s Russia Denials Have Real Consequences

Trump has denied or downplayed Russia's attempts to influence US democracy three times this week—and that has very real consequences.

30min

We Are Now Living in a New Geologic Age, Experts Say

We are all in the midst of a new geological age, experts say.

17min

More Americans agree on going green than you might think

While the United States is deeply divided on many issues, there is remarkable consensus on climate change, according to new research. “But the American people are vastly underestimating how green the country wants to be,” says Jon Krosnick, a professor of communication and of political science at Stanford University, about new findings from a poll he led on American attitudes about climate change

22min

LATEST

Who buys the most political ads on Facebook?Donald Trump Facebook

Donald Trump and Planned Parenthood are the top recent advertisers and young men were targeted most often, according to a new analysis of Facebook and Instagram political advertising. “We wanted to quickly give voters easy tools to understand who is advertising and what they are advertising…” Using complex data scraping methods, cybersecurity researchers analyzed more than 267,000 political ads t

8min

Drugs could destroy super-strong bacterial armor

Scientists have previously overlooked the astonishing physical strength of the thin outer membrane that clings to E. coli ‘s stout cell wall, according to a new study. For over a century, scientists have studied E. coli , one of the bacteria that cause food poisoning, as a model for fighting infections. Such research has led to a variety of antibiotics that penetrate the protective cell walls of

8min

More people opt in for colorectal cancer screening by mail

Sending tests in the mail can boost rates of colorectal cancer screening, research shows. In collaboration with the Mecklenburg County Health Department in Charlotte, researchers with UNC Lineberger’s Carolina Cancer Screening Initiative examined the impact of targeted outreach to more than 2,100 people insured by Medicaid who were not up-to-date with colorectal cancer screening. The project resu

15min

Alcohol-related cirrhosis deaths skyrocket in young adults

Liver disease deaths jumped by 65 percent in the United States, from 1999-2016, disproportionately affecting adults ages 25-34. The increase in deaths among young adults was driven entirely by alcohol-related liver disease, according to a study by Michigan Medicine.

22min

Take a Number: More Americans Are Dying of Cirrhosis and Liver Cancer

Death rates from both diseases have risen sharply, particularly among young adults over the last decade. A possible villain: the Great Recession.

23min

The tanning bed in your gym is worrying dermatologists

Health How healthy is that ‘healthy glow’? Gyms across the country include tanning beds among their offerings. A new paper is the first to look specifically at gym users who tan, finding that they’re part of a…

33min

Why websites still break at the worst possible times

Technology Even the mighty Amazon isn't immune from system failures. This is why even big companies like Amazon still sometimes have issues with their websites.

1h

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: ‘No’ Problem

Written by Elaine Godfrey ( @elainejgodfrey ), Maddie Carlisle ( @maddiecarlisle2 ), and Olivia Paschal (@ oliviacpaschal ) Today in 5 Lines When asked by a reporter on Wednesday whether Russia was still targeting the U.S., President Trump answered, “no.” White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders later clarified Trump’s response, saying the “no” was in reference to answering reporters’ q

1h

AI Innovators Take Pledge Against Autonomous Killer WeaponsElon Musk DeepMind AI

"We will neither participate in nor support the development, manufacture, trade, or use of" artificial intelligence that is used to kill people, leading AI researchers vowed. (Image credit: Christophe Morin/IP3/Getty Images)

1h

1h

For Mexican immigrants, politics is a family affair

SF State Assistant Professor of Political Science Marcela García-Castañon researches the important role spousal relationships play in forming political identities among immigrants, especially in today's political climate.

1h

Airbnb Can’t Win New York—But It Can’t Quit Either

New York City’s latest bill is part of a long campaign pitting hoteliers against the home-sharing site. But success in New York is crucial—regardless of the consequences and costs.

1h

Growing fire shows potential for explosive Northwest season

A fast-moving grass fire fueled by gusting winds in the Pacific Northwest has forced dozens of households to evacuate and prompted Oregon Gov. Kate Brown to declare an emergency Wednesday.

1h

Experts address ways to support latest science education standards

The Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) are K-12 science content standards, with three dimensions that are integrated in instruction at all levels: core ideas, science and engineering practices, and cross-cutting concepts. A new article in the Journal of Research Science in Teaching focuses on how to support enactment of the NGSS in diverse educational systems, including the challenges faced

1h

Cities as study proxies for climate change

Cities can serve as useful proxies to study and predict the effects of climate change, according to a North Carolina State University research review that tracks urbanization's effects on plant and insect species.

1h

Princeton's McComas will lead IMAP, a NASA mission to study the heliosphere

Princeton astrophysicist David McComas will be the principal investigator for a science mission to sample, analyze and map particles streaming to Earth from the sun and from the edges of interstellar space. He is presenting the mission's goals and status at the international Committee on Space Research (COSPAR) meeting today in Pasadena, California.

1h

In the ocean's twilight zone, tiny organisms may have giant effect on Earth's carbon cycle

Deep in the ocean's twilight zone, swarms of ravenous single-celled organisms may be altering Earth's carbon cycle in ways scientists never expected, according to a new study from Florida State University researchers.

1h

TGen-led study shows DNA methylation related to liver disease among obese patients

A TGen-led team has identified how DNA methylation is associated with a condition known as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), which can lead to liver cirrhosis and death, and is one of the leading indicators for liver transplants. In one of the most exacting studies of its kind, TGen scientists found evidence that DNA methylation has a role in the initiation of NAFLD-related fibrosis, acco

2h

Physicians who visit patients post-hospitalization give more comprehensive discharge plans

(Boston)– When resident physicians visit the homes of their former hospital patients they are better able to assess patient needs and understand the important role that community services and agencies play in keeping them at home and out of the hospital, according to a new study by Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM).

2h

The Unintended Consequences of Helsinki

After the summit comes the backlash, and after the backlash comes the climbdown. If Trump intended for his meeting with Vladimir Putin to set Russia and the United States on a course to a warmer relationship—something the U.S. president has repeatedly said he wants—his performance has achieved just the opposite. In his eagerness to pursue better relations with Putin—for example, by casting doubt

2h

The 10 Most Difficult-to-Defend Online Fandoms, from Barbz to Pewdiepie's Bro Army

Artists and entrepreneurs aren't responsible for the actions of their followers—and in some of these cases, that's a good thing.

2h

Physicists Go Small: Let's Put A Particle Accelerator On A Chip

A tiny accelerator could be useful in medicine as well as basic science. Instead of speeding up beams of electrons through giant tunnels, the aim here is to build accelerators on semiconductor chips. (Image credit: SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory)

2h

Researchers identify characteristics of over the counter skin lightening users

(Boston) — The desire for unblemished, clear skin permeates all cultures and societies, making the practice of skin lightening to minimize spots and even a skin tone quite common worldwide. Internationally, the use of creams to lighten skin is widespread and widely studied. In the U.S. however, information about use of these creams is sparse.

2h

Does loneliness have a genetic cause?

New research from the University of Cambridge says it does. Read More

2h

Want to genuinely (and scientifically) make the world a better place? Send thank-you notes

Because what the world needs now is love, sweet love… and perhaps a whole lot of stamps and stationery. Read More

2h

UCI-led study finds therapy dogs effective in reducing symptoms of ADHD

In a first of its kind randomized trial, researchers from the UCI School of Medicine found therapy dogs to be effective in reducing the symptoms of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children. The study's main outcomes were recently published by the American Psychological Association in the Society of Counseling Psychology's Human-Animal Interaction Bulletin (HAIB). Additional new

2h

Solar thermal energy will help China cut costs of climate action

A new study investigates the best combination of renewables for providing the lowest cost to power system operators in two of China's provinces best suited to scale up renewable energy.

2h

Cities as study proxies for climate change

Cities can serve as useful proxies to study and predict the effects of climate change, according to a North Carolina State University research review that tracks urbanization's effects on plant and insect species.

2h

Glowing bacteria on deep-sea fish shed light on evolution, 'third type' of symbiosis

For the first time, scientists have sequenced and analyzed the genomes of bacteria that live in anglerfish bulbs. The bacteria were taken from fish specimens collected in the Gulf of Mexico.

2h

Metal too 'gummy' to cut? Draw on it with a Sharpie or glue stick, science says

Your everyday permanent markers, glue sticks and packing tape may offer a surprisingly low-tech solution to a long-standing nuisance in the manufacturing industry: Making soft and ductile, or so-called 'gummy' metals easier to cut.

2h

The Top 30 Sharks of Shark Week: Part One

Celebrate 30 years of Shark Week by counting down the most grueling, most ghastly, and most infamous sharks. Count down sharks 30-21, including a tiny shark that lights up and an 18- foot pregnant female Shark living in the Guadalupe waters. Shark Week 2018 starts Sunday July 22 9p! Stream 30 Sharks of Shark Week on Discovery GO: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/30-sharks-of-shark-week/ Stream

2h

More Pregnant Women Are Having Heart Attacks. But Why?

Women who are pregnant may not spend much time worrying about their own hearts, but a new study suggests they should.

2h

What the Russian Revolution would have looked like on social media | Mikhail Zygar

History is written by the victors, as the saying goes — but what would it look like if it was written by everyone? Journalist and TED Fellow Mikhail Zygar is on a mission to show us with Project1917, a "social network for dead people" that posts the real diaries and letters of more than 3,000 people who lived during the Russian Revolution. By showing the daily thoughts of the likes of Lenin, Trot

2h

Prolonged opioid use before knee or hip replacement surgery increases risk of poor outcomes

Patients who take prescription opioids for more than 60 days before total knee or hip replacement surgery are at significantly higher risk of being readmitted to the hospital and of undergoing repeat joint-replacement surgery, compared to patients with no preoperative opioid use, reports a study in the July 18 issue of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery. The journal is published in the Lippincott

2h

Experts address ways to support latest science education standards

The Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) are K-12 science content standards, with three dimensions that are integrated in instruction at all levels: core ideas, science and engineering practices, and cross-cutting concepts. A new article in the Journal of Research Science in Teaching focuses on how to support enactment of the NGSS in diverse educational systems, including the challenges faced

2h

In the ocean's twilight zone, tiny organisms may have giant effect on Earth's carbon cycle

In a new study that challenges scientists' presuppositions about the carbon cycle, researchers find that tiny organisms may be playing in outside role in the way carbon is circulated throughout the ocean.

2h

Origami-inspired device helps marine biologists study octopuses and jellyfish

Scientists have tried to find the safest and most effective ways to explore marine life in the oceanic water, the largest and least explored environment on Earth, for years. Each time, they were faced with the same challenge: How to capture delicate or gelatinous pelagic animals — like jellyfish, squid, and octopuses — without harming them? An origami-inspired device may change that.

3h

Billion-year-old lake deposit yields clues to Earth's ancient biosphere

A sample of ancient oxygen, teased out of a 1.4-billion-year-old evaporative lake deposit in Ontario, provides fresh evidence of what the Earth's atmosphere and biosphere were like during the interval leading up to the emergence of animal life.

3h

Artery hardening and thickness not affected by stopping hormone therapy

Heart disease is still the number one killer of US women, and hormone therapy remains a top treatment for menopause symptoms. A new study connects these two facts to demonstrate little effect of hormone therapy on artery thickness as a precursor to heart disease.

3h

Neurons can carry more than one signal at a time

New research shows that neurons in the brain can carry two signals at once, using a strategy similar to multiplexing in telecommunications. The results may explain how the brain processes complex information from the world around us, and may also provide insight into some of our perceptual and cognitive limitations.

3h

Scientists lack vital knowledge on rapid Arctic climate change

Arctic climate change research relies on field measurements and samples that are too scarce, and patchy at best, according to a comprehensive review study. The researchers looked at thousands of scientific studies, and found that around 30% of cited studies were clustered around only two research stations in the vast Arctic region.

3h

Global study of world's beaches shows threat to protected areas

A first-of-its-kind survey of the world's sandy shorelines with satellite data found that they have increased slightly on a global scale over the past three decades but decreased in protected marine areas, where many beaches are eroding.

3h

The relationship between charge density waves and superconductivity? It's complicated

For a long time, physicists have tried to understand the relationship between a periodic pattern of conduction electrons called a charge density wave (CDW), and another quantum order, superconductivity, or zero electrical resistance, in the same material. Do they compete? Co-exist? Co-operate? Do they go their separate ways?

3h

Effort to preserve lory population shows success

A long-term plan to preserve the Rimatara lorikeet by restoring an extirpated population of the species on a neighboring island that is free of predatory ship rats is demonstrating the importance of this kind of protective program for the sustainability of endangered bird species.

3h

Fish consumption may prolong life

Consumption of fish and long-chain omega-3 fatty acids was associated with lower risks of early death in a new study.

3h

Celebrating positives improves classroom behavior and mental health

Training teachers to focus their attention on positive conduct and to avoid jumping to correct minor disruption improves child behavior, concentration and mental health.

3h

Researchers to present new results on hurricanes and other extreme events

The availability of water from underground aquifers is vital to the basic needs of more than 1.5 billion people worldwide.

3h

How a variation on Botox could be used to treat pain

Drugs that incorporate modified botulinum toxin provide long-term pain relief, a study in mice finds.

3h

Team studies complexities of biodiversity, disease transmission

Biodiversity is disappearing at an alarming rate as infectious diseases increasingly spill over from wildlife to humans. Disease ecologists fervently debate whether biodiversity loss leads to an increased disease risk. Now, a University of Montana researcher has published a new study with some answers.

3h

More category 5 hurricanes forecasted by scientists

In the midst of hurricane season, climatologists around the world are monitoring tropical storm formations that have the potential to escalate into deadly hurricanes. The Atlantic hurricane season included 17 named storms last year, many of which proved to be costly and destructive for communities in their path. Hurricanes are becoming stronger and wetter due to rising sea and air temperatures. Sa

3h

Hurricanes and other extreme events

The availability of water from underground aquifers is vital to the basic needs of more than 1.5 billion people worldwide. In recent decades, however, the over-pumping of groundwater, combined with drought, has caused some aquifers to permanently lose their essential storage capacity.

3h

More category 5 hurricanes forecasted by scientists

Researchers have learned from studying 2012's Hurricane Sandy, that we are more likely to see larger, more powerful hurricanes in the future.

3h

Agriculture: DIY field imaging system

Farmers and plant breeders can now build their own automated field camera track system to collect data on dynamic plant traits, such as crop lodging and movement, as it's happening in the field to help reduce losses in crop yield.

3h

Amazon Web Services Tests Out Two Tools to Help Keep the Cloud Secure

Amid frequent customer data exposures, Amazon Web Services is pushing to spot errors and promote access control.

3h

Lake bed reveals details about ancient Earth

Sulfate samples from an ancient lake bed yield new clues about the 'Boring Billion' years in Earth history between 'oxygenation events' that allowed life as we know it. A Rice University postdoctoral researcher's tests revealed the oxygen anomaly that gave researchers a glimpse into conditions 1.4 billion years ago.

3h

Don’t Expect Big Changes from Europe’s Record Google Fine

The European Commission ruled that Google had unfairly used its Android operating system to harm competitors and consumers.

3h

Overlooked No More: Beatrice Tinsley, Astronomer Who Saw the Course of the Universe

An insurgent who challenged the academic establishment and became a foremost expert on the aging of galaxies, she was eventually forced to choose between family and career.

3h

The weirdest things we learned this week: artistic farts, meat lozenges, and Tesla's beloved pigeon

Science Our editors scrounged up some truly bizarre facts. What’s the weirdest thing you learned this week? Well, whatever it is, we promise you’ll have an even weirder answer if you listen to PopSci’s newest podcast.

3h

NSF-supported researchers to present new results on hurricanes and other extreme events

The availability of water from underground aquifers is vital to the basic needs of more than 1.5 billion people worldwide.In recent decades, however, the over-pumping of groundwater, combined with drought, has caused some aquifers to permanently lose their essential storage capacity.

3h

More category 5 hurricanes forecasted by scientists

Researchers at Chapman University have learned from studying 2012's Hurricane Sandy, that we are more likely to see larger, more powerful hurricanes in the future.

3h

In rats, perinatal exposure to phthalates impairs brain structure and function

Rats exposed in the womb and during lactation to plasticizing chemicals known as phthalates had fewer neurons and synapses than those that were not exposed, researchers report in a new study. The phthalate-exposed rats had reductions in the size of their medial prefrontal cortex, a brain region that regulates behavior, and showed deficits in cognitive flexibility. The variety of phthalates and qua

3h

UM professor studies complexities of biodiversity, disease transmission

Biodiversity is disappearing at an alarming rate as infectious diseases increasingly spill over from wildlife to humans. Disease ecologists fervently debate whether biodiversity loss leads to an increased disease risk. Now, a University of Montana researcher has published a new study with some answers.

3h

Conservatives More Likely to Know 'the Meaning of Life' Than Liberals, Massive Study Finds

What's the meaning of life? That could depend on whom you voted for.

3h

Salmon with a Side of Squirm: Woman Finds Wriggling Worm in Fillet

It's not the type of garnish you want on your salmon: a translucent, wriggling worm.

3h

Oldest Fossil of a Baby Snake Discovered Trapped in Amber Tomb

A fossil of a baby snake entombed in amber dates to 99 million years ago.

3h

Identified RNA molecules that regulate action of male hormone in prostate cancer

A study detected in tumoral tissue hundreds of RNAs that do not encode proteins but appear to regulate effects of androgens and androgen receptors on gene expression in tumors. By investigating the connection between the presençe of these molecules and tumor aggressiveness, the research paves the way for new scientific approaches focusing on the transcription process of noncoding RNA.

4h

Great Barrier Reef not bouncing back as before, but there is hope

The Great Barrier Reef is losing its ability to recover from disturbances, but effective local management could revive its capacity to bounce back.

4h

4h

Temporary tattoo startup raises $10 million in funding

A Toronto-based startup that sells customizable temporary tattoos has received $10 million in Series A funding from venture capitalists, the company’s chief executive officer announced Tuesday. Read More

4h

Study: When Trump tweets about Muslims, hate crimes increase

"We find that Trump’s anti-Muslim tweets are highly correlated with the number of anti-Muslim hate crimes, particularly where Twitter usage is high, but only after the start of his presidential campaign." Read More

4h

Scientists discover a mechanism of drug resistance in breast and ovarian cancer

A new study helps explain why certain cancers don't respond to treatment, and offers hope for overcoming this deadly resistance.

4h

Researchers solve mystery of how ALL enters the central nervous system

A deadly feature of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is its invasion of the central nervous system. ALL in the central nervous system is very difficult to treat, because most drugs are blocked from the organ system due to a "blood-brain barrier" designed to protect the brain. How cancer cells enter the central nervous system has been an unanswered question for researchers and clinicians for deca

4h

Warming rivers make marked contribution to global greenhouse gas levels

Warming streams and rivers could be disproportionately contributing to the amount of planet-warming greenhouse gases, according to a new study.

4h

12 nye måner opdaget omkring Jupiter

Astronomer har spottet et dusin små måner i kredsløb om solsystemets største planet, der nu i alt har 79.

4h

Origami-inspired device helps marine biologists study aliens

Scientists have tried to find the safest and most effective ways to explore marine life in the oceanic water, the largest and least explored environment on Earth, for years. Each time, they were faced with the same challenge: How to capture delicate or gelatinous pelagic animals — like jellyfish, squid, and octopuses — without harming them? An origami-inspired device may change that.

4h

Visiting a National Park This Summer? Hold Your Breath

New study finds citylike air pollution levels in the nation’s parks — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

Jeff Bezos' Blue Origin launches spacecraft higher than ever

Jeff Bezos' Blue Origin rocket company shot a capsule higher into space Wednesday than it's ever done before.

4h

Life Is Suffering, and Everything Is Temporary

Late one night, filmmaker Brad Bischoff sat down with his father-in-law, Roberto Olivera, for a couple of beers. Bischoff knew little about Olivera’s background, save for Olivera’s heritage as a Mexican immigrant. He decided to ask. “I remember being totally awestruck by his captivating story,” Bischoff told The Atlantic . “I wanted to capture the feeling I felt and share it.” The result is Field

4h

Glowing bacteria on deep-sea fish shed light on evolution, 'third type' of symbiosis

You may recognize the anglerfish from its dramatic appearance in the hit animated film Finding Nemo, as it was very nearly the demise of clownfish Marlin and blue-tang fish Dory. It lives most of its life in total darkness more than 1,000 meters below the ocean surface. Female anglerfish sport a glowing lure on top of their foreheads, basically a pole with a light bulb on its end, where biolumines

4h

Metal too 'gummy' to cut? Draw on it with a Sharpie or glue stick, science says

Your everyday permanent markers, glue sticks and packing tape may offer a surprisingly low-tech solution to a long-standing nuisance in the manufacturing industry: Making soft and ductile, or so-called "gummy" metals easier to cut.

4h

Old footage of sports events can help scientists track climate change

Nexus Media News Cycling videos of the Tour of Flanders show how trees are responding to warmer weather. Scientists are using media coverage of annual sporting events to document climate change.

4h

Metal too 'gummy' to cut? Draw on it with a Sharpie or glue stick, science says

Your everyday permanent markers, glue sticks and packing tape may offer a surprisingly low-tech solution to a long-standing nuisance in the manufacturing industry: Making soft and ductile, or so-called 'gummy' metals easier to cut.

4h

Glowing bacteria on deep-sea fish shed light on evolution, 'third type' of symbiosis

For the first time, scientists have sequenced and analyzed the genomes of bacteria that live in anglerfish bulbs. The bacteria were taken from fish specimens collected in the Gulf of Mexico.

4h

Warming rivers make marked contribution to global greenhouse gas levels

Warming streams and rivers could be disproportionately contributing to the amount of planet-warming greenhouse gases, according to a new study.

4h

Barley heads east

New study identifies human choice and environmental adaptation as crucial factors for the spread of food staple in prehistory.

4h

Secular countries can expect future economic growth, confirms new study

New research measuring the importance of religion in 109 countries spanning the entire 20th century has reignited an age-old debate around the link between secularisation and economic growth. The study, published in Science Advances, has shown that a decline in religion influences a country's future economic prosperity.

4h

Erasing the memory of T cells could reverse vitiligo symptoms

Researchers have found that targeting the activity of a class of T cells restores pigmentation of the skin in a mouse model of vitiligo.

4h

Ozone levels in US national parks similar to levels in largest US cities

Ozone concentrations in U.S. national parks like Yellowstone and Acadia were largely indistinguishable from ozone levels in America's largest metropolitan areas between 1990 and 2014, according to a new analysis. It also suggests higher ozone levels are linked to a decrease in park visitation, during this time. The U.S. National Park Service has raised concerns over

4h

Novel botulinum toxin compound relieves chronic pain

A modified form of botulinum toxin gives long-lasting pain relief in mice without adverse effects and, in time, could replace opioid drugs as a safe and effective way of treating chronic pain, according to research by UCL, the University of Sheffield and the Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto.

4h

Study finds melanoma biomarkers predicting checkpoint blocker response

Scientists at Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center (DF/BWCC) have identified biomarkers in melanoma that could help tailor immunotherapy treatments to maximize the benefits for patients while reducing the likelihood of severe side effects.

4h

P38 alpha: The switch controlling obesity and diabetes

Researchers at the Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Cardiovasculares Carlos III (CNIC) have now uncovered the mechanism by which brown fat cells are activated to generate heat and eliminate excess fat. The results, published in PLoS Biology, have potential clinical implications for the treatment of obesity and related diseases like diabetes.

4h

Great Barrier Reef not bouncing back as before, but there is hope

The Great Barrier Reef is losing its ability to recover from disturbances, but effective local management could revive its capacity to bounce back.

4h

Iowa State study: Air pollution negatively associated with US national park visitation

The research matched pollution data to monthly park visitation statistics at 33 heavily visited national parks and found that visitation responds most to ozone during months with poor air quality.

4h

An underwater pokéball for capturing sea creatures

The ocean is home to millions of soft-bodied creatures — jellyfish, sponges, octopuses, squid, etc. — that are difficult to study using existing equipment, which was developed for the oil and gas industry and frequently destroys the delicate animals they're meant to sample. A new device from researchers at Harvard's Wyss Institute employs a rotating, folding polyhedron to harmlessly capture and

4h

Voluntary medical male circumcision may cost-effectively prevent HIV in Zimbabwe

Voluntary medical male circumcision could impact Zimbabwe's HIV epidemic in the coming years, and this investment may save costs in the longer term. These findings were reported by Jessica McGillen of Imperial College London and colleagues on July 18 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE.

4h

For one tropical tree, effective seed dispersal relies especially on elephants

Deer, bears, gibbons, but especially elephants, play an important role in seed dispersal for a large-fruited tree in the forests of Thailand, according to a new study publishing July 18 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Kim McConkey of the National Institute of Advanced Studies in Bangalore and colleagues from BIOTEC, Thailand. The data illustrate the complexity of forest ecology and hint tha

4h

Europe’s Smack to Google May Only Be the Beginning

On Wednesday, the European Union brought down an antitrust fine of 4.34 billion euros—or about $5.06 billion—against Google, for anticompetitive practices related to Android, the company’s mobile operating system. It’s the European Commission’s largest antitrust fine ever, topping the previous record of 2.42 billion euros—which was also levied against Google, just last year, for abuses of its sea

4h

This amber nugget from Myanmar holds the first known baby snake fossil

Amber preserves the delicate bone structure of a 99 million year old baby snake.

4h

New ‘Poké Ball’ robot catches deep-sea critters without harming them

A machine that gently catches and releases animals underwater could help researchers take a more detailed census of the deep sea.

4h

How a Flock of Drones Developed Collective Intelligence

Just like groups of birds or insects, these drones organize themselves into cohesive groups—a so-called "emergent" property of their individual actions.

5h

Trilobites: Baby Snake Fossil Found Trapped in Amber Offers Clues on Evolution

A baby snake and snakeskin were preserved in two specimens found in Myanmar.

5h

Trilobites: Don’t Squish the Jellyfish. Capture It With a Folding Robotic Claw.

A new invention could help marine scientists study sea creatures in their natural habitat more effectively without harming them in the process.

5h

Bowing to Trump, Novartis Joins Pfizer in Freezing Drug Prices

The move comes as drug companies scramble to show they are responding to criticism about their rising prices, including from President Trump.

5h

Scientists uncover DNA 'shield' w/crucial roles in normal cell division

New fundamental complex in cells drives 'messy' form of DNA repair. In immune cells, this is crucial to make antibodies. In cancer, mutations in complex could lead to resistance to BRCA-targeting PARP inhibitor drugs or platinum chemotherapies.

5h

Synthetic Botox Treats Chronic Pain in Mice

Researchers silence pain neurons in the mouse spinal cord with injections of botulinum toxins modified to bind to the neurons' receptors.

5h

Bacterial armor could be a new target for antibiotics

Boosting efforts to fight antibiotic resistance, researchers have found that a thin membrane, thought to be just a shrink wrap around some bacterial cell walls, has structural properties critical for survival. Drugs that destroy the membrane could be a new approach to treating infection.

5h

Gut's 'taste buds' help school the immune system in the thymus

Researchers were recently surprised to discover fully formed gut and skin cells in the thymus, a lemon-sized organ that sits in front of the heart and is responsible for training the T cells of the immune system not to attack the body's own tissues. The finding, based on studies conducted in mice, could lead to better understanding of the drivers of autoimmune problems in humans, the authors say.

5h

Solar corona is more structured, dynamic than previously thought

Scientists have discovered never-before-detected, fine-grained structures in the Sun's outer atmosphere, or corona. The team imaged this critical region in detail using sophisticated software techniques and longer exposures from the COR-2 camera on board NASA's Solar and Terrestrial Relations Observatory-A (STEREO-A).

5h

Barley heads east—living plant varieties reveal ancient migration routes across Eurasia

The emergence of agriculture is one of the most important transitions in the development of human societies, as it allowed the establishment of settled communities, specialization of labour and technological innovation.

5h

Secular countries can expect future economic growth, confirms new study

New research measuring the importance of religion in 109 countries spanning the entire 20th century has reignited an age-old debate around the link between secularisation and economic growth. The study, published in Science Advances, has shown that a decline in religion influences a country's future economic prosperity.

5h

For one tropical tree, effective seed dispersal relies especially on elephants

Deer, bears, gibbons, but especially elephants, play an important role in seed dispersal for a large-fruited tree in the forests of Thailand, according to a new study publishing July 18 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Kim McConkey of the National Institute of Advanced Studies in Bangalore and colleagues from BIOTEC, Thailand. The data illustrate the complexity of forest ecology and hint tha

5h

Air pollution negatively associated with US national park visitation

More than 300 million visitors travel to U.S. national parks every year to experience America's iconic landscapes. But poor air quality in parks may negatively affect visitation, according to a study published in Science Advances by researchers from Iowa State University and Cornell University.

5h

Great Barrier Reef not bouncing back as before, but there is hope

The Great Barrier Reef is losing its ability to recover from disturbances, but effective local management could revive its capacity to bounce back.

5h

Druggists Shouldn't Act as Morality Police

A number of states let pharmacists deny service based purely on their personal beliefs. That’s unconscionable. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

Martian atmosphere behaves as one

New research using a decade of data from ESA's Mars Express has found clear signs of the complex martian atmosphere acting as a single, interconnected system, with processes occurring at low and mid levels significantly affecting those seen higher up.

5h

The complicated, century-long relationship between swimming pools and chlorine

Technology Even new-fangled salt water systems can't quit chlorination. Pool owners may think they’re eschewing chlorine in favor of so-called saltwater systems. But no one can escape this omnipresent chemical cleaner.

5h

Ryanair strike hits 600 flights, 100,000 passengers

Ryanair on Wednesday said it had cancelled 600 flights in Europe on July 25 and 26 due to cabin crew strikes in Spain, Portugal and Belgium.

5h

Tesla Model 3 buyers lose patience and maybe tax credits

In March of 2016, Keith Reynolds flew from California to Atlanta so he could claim his spot in line at 4 a.m., and get a three-hour head start on his West Coast competitors.

5h

Suomi NPP satellite finds an elongated Tropical Storm Ampil

Tropical Depression 12W formed in the Philippine Sea and NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite analyzed the storm in infrared light. The depression strengthened into Tropical Storm Ampil later on July 18.

5h

Billion-year-old lake deposit yields clues to Earth's ancient biosphere

A sample of ancient oxygen, teased out of a 1.4 billion-year-old evaporative lake deposit in Ontario, provides fresh evidence of what the Earth's atmosphere and biosphere were like during the interval leading up to the emergence of animal life.

5h

Light-controlled polymers can switch between sturdy and soft

Researchers have designed a polymer material that can change its structure in response to light, converting from a rigid substance to a softer one that can heal itself when damaged.

5h

Atlantic circulation is not collapsing — but as it shifts gears, warming will reaccelerate

Data suggest that the recent, rapid slowdown of the Atlantic Ocean circulation is not a sign of imminent collapse, but a shift back toward a more sluggish phase. The slowdown implies that global air temperatures will increase more quickly in the coming decades.

5h

Where baby white sharks 'hang out' in the North Atlantic

A team of scientists is the first to confirm the movement patterns and seasonal migrations of baby white sharks in the north Atlantic Ocean. They put the New York Bight shark nursery theory to test by deploying satellite and acoustic tags on 10 baby white sharks (less than 1 year old) off Long Island's coast. Results provide novel insights into the distribution of this vulnerable early stage of li

5h

New breast cancer therapeutic target

Research has shown for the first time that a tiny piece of RNA deregulates energy metabolism, an emerging hallmark of cancer. The finding identifies a new target for therapeutic intervention in breast cancer.

5h

Suomi NPP satellite finds an elongated Tropical Storm Ampil

Tropical Depression 12W formed in the Philippine Sea and NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite analyzed the storm in infrared light. The depression strengthened into Tropical Storm Ampil later on July 18.

5h

Billion-year-old lake deposit yields clues to Earth's ancient biosphere

A sample of ancient oxygen, teased out of a 1.4 billion-year-old evaporative lake deposit in Ontario, provides fresh evidence of what the Earth's atmosphere and biosphere were like during the interval leading up to the emergence of animal life.

5h

Russian Speakers Explain What Putin Actually Said About Trump

On Tuesday, I noted that one of the key exchanges in the Trump–Putin press conference in Finland doesn’t appear in full in the White House transcript , or at all in the Kremlin’s English-language transcript of the event. The Reuters reporter Jeff Mason asked, “President Putin, did you want President Trump to win the election and did you direct any of your officials to help him do that?” But how e

5h

The Problem With Happy Endings

Late last week, as the world’s attention was tugged in the typical directions, a 6-year-old girl named Alison Jimena Valencia Madrid was reunited with her mother, Cindy. The two, who had fled El Salvador earlier in the summer, had been separated more than a month before, at the U.S.–Mexico border, in fulfillment of the Trump administration’s policy of breaking up migrant families as a deterrence

5h

Autism risk determined by health of mom's gut

The mother's microbiome, the collection of microscopic organisms that live inside us, determines the risk of autism and other neurodevelopmental disorders in her offspring, new research shows. The work raises the possibility we could prevent autism by altering expectant moms' diets.

5h

Climate determines shapes of river basins

Short and squat, or long and thin? An study finds climate determines a river basin's shape.

5h

Water may be key to understanding sweetness

A cranberry, honey or a candy bar – which tastes the sweetest? These foods contain sugars that humans can perceive differently. A cranberry seems tart, whereas a candy bar can be excessively sweet, and honey is somewhere in the middle. Now researchers have shown that the perception of sweetness depends on molecular interactions between specific sugars and water in the saliva.

5h

Feeding plants to this algae could fuel your car

The research shows that a freshwater production strain of microalgae, Auxenochlorella protothecoides, is capable of directly degrading and utilizing non-food plant substrates, such as switchgrass, for improved cell growth and lipid productivity, useful for boosting the algae's potential value as a biofuel.

5h

Faulty science and ethics cited in DNA analyzes of Atacama mummy

Researchers call into question the ethics and skeletal and genomic analysis surrounding research into the much publicized 'Atacama mummy'.

5h

Scientists recover possible fragments of meteorite that landed in marine sanctuary

The largest recorded meteorite to strike the United States in 21 years fell into NOAA's Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary, and researchers have recovered what are believed to be pieces of the dense, interstellar rock after conducting the first intentional hunt for a meteorite at sea.

5h

Gut's 'taste buds' help school the immune system in the thymus

UC San Francisco researchers were recently surprised to discover fully formed gut and skin cells in the thymus, a lemon-sized organ that sits in front of the heart and is responsible for training the T cells of the immune system not to attack the body's own tissues. The finding, based on studies conducted in mice, could lead to better understanding of the drivers of autoimmune problems in humans,

5h

Light-controlled polymers can switch between sturdy and soft

MIT researchers have designed a polymer material that can change its structure in response to light, converting from a rigid substance to a softer one that can heal itself when damaged.

5h

Bacterial armor could be a new target for antibiotics

Boosting efforts to fight antibiotic resistance, Stanford researchers have found that a thin membrane, thought to be just a shrink wrap around some bacterial cell walls, has structural properties critical for survival. Drugs that destroy the membrane could be a new approach to treating infection.

5h

Scientists discover a mechanism of drug resistance in breast and ovarian cancer

A new study helps explain why certain cancers don't respond to treatment, and offers hope for overcoming this deadly resistance.

5h

Researchers solve mystery of how ALL enters the central nervous system

A research team led by Duke Cancer Institute scientists has found that this blood cancer infiltrates the central nervous system not by breaching the blood-brain barrier, but by evading the barrier altogether.

5h

Atlantic circulation is not collapsing — but as it shifts gears, warming will reaccelerate

Data suggest that the recent, rapid slowdown of the Atlantic Ocean circulation is not a sign of imminent collapse, but a shift back toward a more sluggish phase. The slowdown implies that global air temperatures will increase more quickly in the coming decades.

5h

Study first to confirm where baby white sharks 'hang out' in the North Atlantic

Using cutting-edge satellite and acoustic technology, a researcher from Florida Atlantic University's Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute is among a team of scientists who are the first to confirm the movement patterns and seasonal migrations of baby white sharks in the north Atlantic Ocean. Until now, there has been little information on their habitat during this vulnerable early stage of life.

5h

X-ray data may be first evidence of a star devouring a planet

For nearly a century, astronomers have puzzled over the curious variability of young stars residing in the Taurus-Auriga constellation some 450 light years from Earth. One star in particular has drawn astronomers' attention. Every few decades, the star's light has faded briefly before brightening again.

5h

Team creates high-fidelity images of Sun's atmosphere

In 1610, Galileo redesigned the telescope and discovered Jupiter's four largest moons. Nearly 400 years later, NASA's Hubble Space Telescope used its powerful optics to look deep into space—enabling scientists to pin down the age of the universe.

5h

The relationship between charge density waves and superconductivity? It's complicated

For a long time, physicists have tried to understand the relationship between a periodic pattern of conduction electrons called a charge density wave (CDW), and another quantum order, superconductivity, or zero electrical resistance, in the same material. Do they compete? Co-exist? Co-operate? Do they go their separate ways?

5h

Light-controlled polymers can switch between sturdy and soft

MIT researchers have designed a polymer material that can change its structure in response to light, converting from a rigid substance to a softer one that can heal itself when damaged.

5h

Bacterial armor could be a new target for antibiotics

For over a century, scientists have studied E. coli, one of the bacteria that cause food poisoning, as a model for fighting infections. Such research has led to a variety of antibiotics that penetrate the protective cell walls of bacteria to kill them.

5h

Atlantic circulation is not collapsing—but as it shifts gears, warming will reaccelerate

A huge circulation pattern in the Atlantic Ocean took a starring role in the 2004 movie "The Day After Tomorrow." In that fictional tale the global oceanic current suddenly stops and New York City freezes over.

5h

You can legally download 3D-printed gun designs starting August 1

The Department of Justice has reached a settlement with Defense Distributed in a landmark decision that will enable the controversial organization to publish CAD files of firearms on its DEFCAD website. Read More

5h

The Marshall Plan: How America shaped the world after WWII

As victor of WWII, America set out with its allies to rebuild the broken world through its greatest diplomatic effort in history: The Marshall Plan. Read More

5h

Can Elon Musk Fix Flint's Water Problems?

The Michigan community of Flint has become a byword for lead poisoning. Elon Musk recently entered the fray.

6h

Study first to confirm where baby white sharks 'hang out' in the North Atlantic

A team of scientists is the first to confirm the movement patterns and seasonal migrations of baby white sharks in the north Atlantic Ocean. They put the New York Bight shark nursery theory to test by deploying satellite and acoustic tags on 10 baby white sharks (less than 1 year old) off Long Island's coast. Results provide novel insights into the distribution of this vulnerable early stage of li

6h

Molecular culprits of protein aggregation in ALS and FTLD

The mutated and aggregated protein FUS is implicated in two neurodegenerative diseases: amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). Using a newly developed fruit fly model, researchers have zoomed in on the protein structure of FUS to gain more insight into how it causes neuronal toxicity and disease.

6h

Rising microchip-maker demand boosts ASML profits

Dutch global hi-tech bellwether ASML Wednesday posted a huge hike in second quarter profits, after the technology industry snapped up more of its sophisticated microchip-making machines than expected.

6h

Discovering structure in the outer corona

Using advanced algorithms and data-cleaning techniques, scientists discovered never-before-detected, fine-grained structures in the outer corona — the Sun's million-degree atmosphere — by analyzing images taken by NASA's STEREO spacecraft.

6h

Social media can help with recovery for those who self-injure, U of G prof finds

Those who engage in non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) often go online for information and support.The researcher measured how online comments about self-injury affected the attitudes about recovery in people who have engaged in self-injury.While there is growing concern that accessing NSSI content online may hinder recovery, the researcher found exposure to positive comments improved participants' a

6h

SwRI-led team creates high-fidelity images of Sun's atmosphere

A Southwest Research Institute-led team discovered never-before-detected, fine-grained structures in the Sun's outer atmosphere, or corona. The team imaged this critical region in detail using sophisticated software techniques and longer exposures from the COR-2 camera on board NASA's Solar and Terrestrial Relations Observatory-A (STEREO-A).

6h

Asian-Americans face barriers to healthy aging

Older Asian-American immigrants are healthier and happier if they are socially active, connected to their families and communities and are able to maintain their cultural values while adapting to western culture, according to a new Rutgers study.

6h

Biological signalling processes in intelligent materials

Researchers are developing innovative biohybrid systems with information processing functionality.

6h

Dementia could be detected via routinely collected data

A new machine-learning model that scans routinely collected NHS data has shown promising signs of being able to predict undiagnosed dementia in primary care. The results from the feasibility study suggest that the model could significantly reduce the number of those living with undiagnosed dementia.

6h

Allergies: Mugwort pollen as main source of airborne endotoxins

Different airborne substances can cause respiratory problems for asthma sufferers. These include bacteria and their components, which can trigger inflammations. How they become airborne has not been fully explained up to now. A team has now shown that pollen from the mugwort plant is the main vector for bacteria and that this combination renders the pollen more aggressive. This is not the case in

6h

Planck: Final data from the mission lends support to the standard cosmological model

With its increased reliability and its data on the polarization of relic radiation, the Planck mission corroborates the standard cosmological model with unrivaled precision for these parameters, even if some anomalies still remain.

6h

Lateral gene transfer enables chemical protection of beetles against antagonistic fungi

Researchers have discovered that bacteria associated to Lagria villosa beetles can produce an antifungal substance very similar to one found in tunicates living in the marine environment. The researchers revealed that this commonality is likely explained by the transfer of genes between unrelated microorganisms.

6h

Compound identified that protects against neurodegeneration

Researchers have identified a new compound that protects against neurodegeneration in nematode worms. The discovery may enable novel treatments for human neurodegenerative diseases to be developed in the future.

6h

Ancient bakers made bread 4,000 years before farming

Researchers have discovered the charred remains of a flatbread that hunter-gatherers baked 14,400 years ago. It is the oldest direct evidence of bread found to date, predating the advent of agriculture by at least 4,000 years. The findings suggest that bread production based on wild cereals may have encouraged hunter-gatherers to cultivate cereals, and thus contributed to the agricultural revolut

6h

Scientists lack vital knowledge on rapid Arctic climate change

Arctic climate change research relies on field measurements and samples that are too scarce, and patchy at best, according to a comprehensive review study from Lund University in Sweden. The researchers looked at thousands of scientific studies, and found that around 30% of cited studies were clustered around only two research stations in the vast Arctic region.

7h

Reddit Reinvents the Chat Room With Subreddit ChatReddit Chat Rooms

Reddit wants to bring its communities closer together. Its solution: throwing it back to real-time chatrooms.

7h

Old Theban port of Chalcis: A medieval maritime crossroads in Greece

Researchers have examined widely disseminated style of ceramics called the 'main Middle Byzantine Production,' found in all four corners of the Mediterranean.

7h

Sugar improves memory in over-60s, helping them work smarter

Sugar improves memory in older adults — and makes them more motivated to perform difficult tasks at full capacity — according to new research.

7h

HIV infection doubles risk of heart disease

People infected with HIV are twice as likely to suffer from heart disease, research has found. Analysis of global figures reveals that HIV-associated cardiovascular disease has more than tripled in the past 20 years as more people are living longer with the virus. The greatest impact is in sub-Saharan Africa and Asia Pacific regions, with Swaziland, Botswana and Lesotho particularly affected.

7h

New retinal ganglion cell subtypes emerge from single-cell RNA sequencing

Single-cell sequencing technologies are filling in fine details in the catalog of life. Researchers have now identified 40 subtypes of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) along with the genetic markers and transcription factors that differentiate them.

7h

Link found between bitter-taste sensitivity and cancer risk

High bitter-taste sensitivity is associated with a significantly increased risk of cancer in older British women, according to researchers who conducted a unique study of 5,500 women whose diet, lifestyle and health has been tracked for about 20 years.

7h

'Nowcasting' beach water quality

Arriving at your favorite beach only to discover it's closed because of bacterial contamination can be a bummer. But even worse would be unknowingly swimming in waters polluted with fecal material — a very real possibility, given that current detection methods can require up to 24 hours to obtain results. Now, researchers have identified computer models that provide accurate short-term forecasts,

7h

Novel approach studies whale shark ages the best way — while they are swimming

A new study of whale sharks, using a novel approach to gathering data, shows these endangered animals can live longer and grow larger than previously believed.

7h

A safe and effective way to whiten teeth

In the age of Instagram and Snapchat, everyone wants to have perfect pearly whites. To get a brighter smile, consumers can opt for over the counter teeth-whitening treatments or a trip to the dentist to have their teeth bleached professionally. But both types of treatments can harm teeth. Researchers have now developed a new, less destructive method.

7h

The Only Republican Opposing Brett Kavanaugh

As a member of the House, Representative Justin Amash does not have a vote on Judge Brett Kavanaugh’s nomination to the Supreme Court. But that hasn’t stopped him from waging what is, so far, a lonely Republican campaign to defeat President Trump’s pick to replace Justice Anthony Kennedy. Amash, a fourth-term Michigan lawmaker who founded the congressional Liberty Caucus, immediately denounced Ka

7h

House Republican Is Proposing a $23 Carbon Tax

The draft bill is an attempt at compromise between environmentalists and conservatives favoring climate action — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

Suomi NPP satellite sees compact storm Son-Tinh Headed for Vietnam

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite flew over Tropical Storm Son-Tinh on July 18 after it crossed over Hainan Island, China and as it moved into the Gulf of Tonkin.

7h

Novel approach studies whale shark ages the best way—while they are swimming

Already the world's largest shark species, male whale sharks can swim around the ocean for up to 130 years, according to a recently published study by scientists at Nova Southeastern University's (NSU) Guy Harvey Research Institute (GHRI) and collaborators from the Maldives Whale Shark Research Programme.

7h

Neurons can carry more than one signal at a time

New research from Duke University shows that neurons in the brain can carry two signals at once, using a strategy similar to multiplexing in telecommunications. The results may explain how the brain processes complex information from the world around us, and may also provide insight into some of our perceptual and cognitive limitations.

7h

X-ray data may be first evidence of a star devouring a planet

MIT analysis of X-ray data suggests the first observations of a star swallowing a planet, and may also explain the star's mysterious dimming.

7h

The relationship between charge density waves and superconductivity? It's complicated

For a long time, physicists have tried to understand the relationship between a periodic pattern of conduction electrons called a charge density wave (CDW), and another quantum order, superconductivity, or zero electrical resistance, in the same material. Do they compete? Co-exist? Co-operate? Do they go their separate ways?

7h

Study finds climate determines shapes of river basins

Short and squat, or long and thin? An MIT study finds climate determines a river basin's shape.

7h

Global study of world's beaches shows threat to protected areas

A first-of-its-kind survey of the world's sandy shorelines with satellite data found that they have increased slightly on a global scale over the past three decades but decreased in protected marine areas, where many beaches are eroding.

7h

'Greener' ways to color clothes

When buying a new outfit, most people don't consider the process that went into tinting that vivid red shirt or colorfully patterned dress. But dyeing clothes requires massive amounts of water, energy and chemicals. So companies are working on new ways to color textiles that are both environmentally friendly and cost-effective, reports an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly n

7h

Water may be key to understanding sweetness

A cranberry, honey or a candy bar—which tastes the sweetest? These foods contain sugars that humans can perceive differently. A cranberry seems tart, whereas a candy bar can be excessively sweet, and honey is somewhere in the middle. Now, in a study in ACS' The Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters, researchers have shown that the perception of sweetness depends on molecular interactions between s

7h

Researchers develop DIY field imaging system

Farmers and plant breeders can now build their own automated field camera track system to collect data on dynamic plant traits, such as crop lodging and movement, as it's happening in the field to help reduce losses in crop yield.

7h

A safe and effective way to whiten teeth

In the age of Instagram and Snapchat, everyone wants to have perfect pearly whites. To get a brighter smile, consumers can opt for over the counter teeth-whitening treatments or a trip to the dentist to have their teeth bleached professionally. But both types of treatments can harm teeth. According to an article published in ACS Biomaterials Science & Engineering, researchers have now developed a

7h

WhatsApp seeks to stem fake news ahead of Pakistan election

The hugely popular WhatsApp messaging service began a week-long publicity campaign in Pakistan Wednesday offering tips to spot fake news, days before the country holds a general election.

7h

Proteomics studies on the basic biology of Alzheimer's, cancer and listeriosis

Recent articles in the journal Molecular & Cellular Proteomics investigate metabolic quirks of cancer cells, the effects of inhibiting the enzyme that generates amyloid beta, and the mechanism by which a bacterial toxin kills host cells.

7h

Do stress balls or hand holding reduce anxiety during skin cancer surgery?

Exploring whether hand-holding or squeezing a stress ball would reduce patient anxiety during skin cancer surgery under local anesthesia was the main focus of this randomized clinical trial. The study of 135 patients at an urban academic medical center reports that patients who used stress balls or whose hands were held weren't less anxious, didn't experience less pain and were no more satisfied w

7h

Lower default amount of opioid pills in electronic medical record may reduce opioid prescribing

Lowering the default amount of opioid pills prescribed to patients in a health care system's electronic medical record was associated with a deccrease in the amount of opioids prescribed systemwide.

7h

Cancer patients may experience delayed skin effects of anti-PD-1 therapy

Cancer patients receiving anti-PD-1 therapies who develop lesions, eczema, psoriasis, or other forms of auto-immune diseases affecting the skin may experience those adverse reactions on a delay — sometimes even after treatment has concluded.

7h

A carcinogen at the gym

Gyms are places people go to get healthier. But nearly half the gyms in the U.S. contain a potentially addictive carcinogen — tanning beds, report UConn researchers in the July 18 issue of JAMA Dermatology. Exercise reduces the risk of every cancer except melanoma. Tanning beds in gyms make tanning seem like part of a healthy lifestyle, undermine public health messaging and target a vulnerable po

7h

Trump Goes After Montenegro, a ‘Tiny Country’ With ‘Aggressive People’

President Donald Trump seems to have complicated feelings about Montenegro, the former Yugoslav republic whose admission into NATO he approved last year. At Trump’s first NATO summit in 2017, he shoved aside Montenegro’s prime minister, Duško Marković, during the so-called family photo that brings together the leaders of the alliance’s member states in order to get a more prominent position in th

7h

34 years ago, a KGB defector chillingly predicted modern America

A chilling interview given by a KGB defector in 1984 describes America of today and outlines four stages of mass brainwashing used by the KGB. Read More

7h

Alligators and Sharks Are in a Mysterious Shift for Dominance | Shark News

Gators are raiding shark pup nurseries for dinner along the Atlantic and Gulf coasts. Shark Week 2018 starts Sunday July 22 9p! Stream Classic Shark Week Episodes: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/shark-week/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery https://www.facebook.com/SharkWeek Follow on Twitter: https://twitter.com/D

7h

Supercharged blood helps some dolphins dive 1,000 meters

Animals They also might be better equipped to adapt to climate change. Researchers studying dolphins found that ones that practice deep diving have 25 percent more red blood cells compared to their shallow swimming counterparts. They think…

7h

Three Major Physics Discoveries and Counting

In 1963, Maria Goeppert Mayer won the Nobel Prize in physics for describing the layered, shell-like structures of atomic nuclei. No woman has won since. One of the many women who, in a different world, might have won the physics prize in the intervening 55 years is Sau Lan Wu . Wu is the Enrico Fermi Distinguished Professor of Physics at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, and an experimentalis

7h

Timing of dinner may affect breast and prostate cancer risk

A new International Journal of Cancer study reveals that eating an early supper and having a long interval between the last meal and sleep are associated with lower breast and prostate cancer risks.

7h

Autism risk determined by health of mom's gut, UVA research reveals

The mother's microbiome, the collection of microscopic organisms that live inside us, determines the risk of autism and other neurodevelopmental disorders in her offspring, new research from the UVA School of Medicine shows. The work raises the possibility we could prevent autism by altering expectant moms' diets.

7h

Water may be key to understanding sweetness

A cranberry, honey or a candy bar – which tastes the sweetest? These foods contain sugars that humans can perceive differently. A cranberry seems tart, whereas a candy bar can be excessively sweet, and honey is somewhere in the middle. Now, in a study in ACS' The Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters, researchers have shown that the perception of sweetness depends on molecular interactions between

7h

Research brief: UMN researchers develop DIY field imaging system

Farmers and plant breeders can now build their own automated field camera track system to collect data on dynamic plant traits, such as crop lodging and movement, as it's happening in the field to help reduce losses in crop yield.

7h

Global study of world's beaches shows threat to protected areas

A first-of-its-kind survey of the world's sandy shorelines with satellite data found that they have increased slightly on a global scale over the past three decades but decreased in protected marine areas, where many beaches are eroding.

7h

Research identifies new breast cancer therapeutic target

Research led by Suresh Alahari, PhD, Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at LSU Health New Orleans School of Medicine, has shown for the first time that a tiny piece of RNA deregulates energy metabolism, an emerging hallmark of cancer. The finding identifies a new target for therapeutic intervention in breast cancer.

7h

Suomi NPP satellite sees compact storm Son-Tinh Headed for Vietnam

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite flew over Tropical Storm Son-Tinh on July 18 after it crossed over Hainan Island, China and as it moved into the Gulf of Tonkin.

7h

BRIEF: Better Living Through Tide Pools

BRIEF: Better Living Through Tide Pools Algae and seaweed blooms in Greenland’s vast network of Arctic tidal pools offer shelter for some animals from an acidifying ocean. Greenland-Coast.jpg Image credits: Vadim Nefedoff via Shutterstock Earth Wednesday, July 18, 2018 – 10:30 Jennifer Leman, Contributor (Inside Science) — Many mussels, sea snails and other animals with calcium carbonate shells

8h

What your smart devices know (and share) about you | Kashmir Hill and Surya Mattu

Once your "smart" appliances can talk to you, who else are they talking to? Kashmir Hill and Surya Mattu wanted to find out — so they outfitted Hill's apartment with 18 different internet-connected devices and built a special router to track how often the devices contacted their servers and see what they were reporting back. The results were surprising — and more than a little bit creepy. Learn

8h

How to tell if you’re talking to a bot

The five best ways to detect fake social-media accounts.

8h

Splitting water: Nanoscale imaging yields key insights

In the quest to realize artificial photosynthesis to convert sunlight, water, and carbon dioxide into fuel — just as plants do — researchers need to not only identify materials to efficiently perform photoelectrochemical water splitting, but also to understand why a certain material may or may not work. Now scientists have pioneered a technique that uses nanoscale imaging to understand how local

8h

The not-school movement that's helping young people re-engage with learning

Alternative schooling programs could deliver greater learning outcomes for young people who are struggling at school.

8h

FEFU scientists reported on toxicity of carbon and silicon nanotubes and carbon nanofibers

Nanoparticles with a wide range of applying, including medicine, damage cells of microalgae Heterosigma akashivo badly. This algae species is widely spread in the Russian Far East marine area. The acute toxic effect exhibited at concentrations of 100 mg/l of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and silicon nanotubes (SiNTs) in the sea- or fresh water.

8h

PCI patients discharged against medical advice twice as likely to be readmitted

In a new study, researchers found discharge against medical advice as the strongest predictor of 30-day unplanned readmissions in heart attack patients. While only a small number of patients choose to discharge against medical advice following percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), these patients are twice as likely to be readmitted to the hospital, according to the study published in JACC: Car

8h

Innate stress

A team of researchers from the Higher School of Economics and the RAS Vavilov Institute of General Genetics has been able to statistically monitor the impact of the monoamine oxidase A gene (MAOA) on the subjective evaluation of well-being among men. This work has been published in the article 'Association of MAOA-uVNTR Polymorphism with Subjective Well-Being in Men' and is the latest step towards

8h

A safe and effective way to whiten teeth

In the age of Instagram and Snapchat, everyone wants to have perfect pearly whites. To get a brighter smile, consumers can opt for over the counter teeth-whitening treatments or a trip to the dentist to have their teeth bleached professionally. But both types of treatments can harm teeth. According to an article published in ACS Biomaterials Science & Engineering, researchers have now developed a

8h

Novel approach studies whale shark ages the best way — while they are swimming

A new study of whale sharks, using a novel approach to gathering data, shows these endangered animals can live longer and grow larger than previously believed.

8h

Finding a planet with a 10 year orbit in just a few months

To discover the presence of a planet around stars, astronomers wait until it has completed three orbits. However, this effective technique has its drawbacks since it cannot confirm the presence of planets at relatively long periods. To overcome this obstacle, astronomers have developed a method that makes it possible to ensure the presence of a planet in a few months, even if it takes 10 years to

8h

New creepy, crawly search and rescue robot

A new highly maneuverable search and rescue robot that can creep, crawl and climb over rough terrain and through tight spaces has been developed.

8h

Fatty liver disease pandemic needs 'gold standard' human-relevant research

New study calls for human-based tools to unravel the pathogenesis of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). The contribution of in silico, in vitro and pathways-based systems biology approaches to unraveling the pathogenesis of this disease are described, and how this human-relevant research can be used for anti-NASH drug development.

8h

Traditional Tibetan medicine exposes people and environment to high mercury levels

Many people view the Tibetan Plateau, or 'Roof of the World,' as a pristine alpine environment, largely untouched by pollution. But researchers have now shown that traditional Tibetan medicine exposes people and the environment to high levels of mercury and methylmercury.

8h

After 60, a bit of sugar sharpens the memory

Sugar improves memory in older adults—and makes them more motivated to perform difficult tasks at full capacity—according to new research. The study finds that increasing blood sugar levels not only improves memory and performance, but also makes older adults feel happier during a task. “Over the years, studies have shown that actively engaging with difficult cognitive tasks is a prerequisite for

8h

Adobe Photoshop is coming to iPad Pro

Technology A full version of the image editing program for iPad is expected to be announced in October. Adobe’s chief product officer, Scott Belsky, confirmed that an Adobe Photoshop app was in the works in an interview with Bloomberg.

8h

'Nowcasting' beach water quality

Arriving at your favorite beach only to discover it's closed because of bacterial contamination can be a bummer. But even worse would be unknowingly swimming in waters polluted with fecal material—a very real possibility, given that current detection methods can require up to 24 hours to obtain results. Now, researchers reporting in the ACS journal Environmental Science & Technology have identifie

8h

The Dark Knight Changed Hollywood Movies Forever

In 2008, the superhero movie was foundering at the box office. Just a few years after the success of films such as X-Men and Spider-Man had convinced Hollywood that a growing audience existed for comic-book adaptations, the bloom was off the rose. Films such as Hulk and Superman Returns were high-profile disappointments, opening big in theaters before fading in the face of mixed reviews; other ef

8h

NASA's new mini satellite will study Milky Way's halo

Astronomers keep coming up short when they survey "normal" matter, the material that makes up galaxies, stars and planets. A new NASA-sponsored CubeSat mission called HaloSat, deployed from the International Space Station on July 13, will help scientists search for the universe's missing matter by studying X-rays from hot gas surrounding our Milky Way galaxy.

8h

Potential for Antarctica to become plastics dumping ground and home for new species

Antarctica is not as isolated from the rest of the world as scientists have thought, new research reveals, with potential for drifting plastics to create problems in the continent in future and new species to colonise there as the climate warms.

8h

Supersharp images from new VLT adaptive optics

ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) has achieved first light with a new adaptive optics mode called laser tomography — and has captured remarkably sharp test images of the planet Neptune and other objects. The MUSE instrument working with the GALACSI adaptive optics module, can now use this new technique to correct for turbulence at different altitudes in the atmosphere. It is now possible to captur

8h

New retinal ganglion cell subtypes emerge from single-cell RNA sequencing

Single-cell sequencing technologies are filling in fine details in the catalog of life. Researchers at the University of Connecticut Health Center (UConn Health) and The Jackson Laboratory (JAX) have identified 40 subtypes of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) along with the genetic markers and transcription factors that differentiate them.

8h

'Nowcasting' beach water quality

Arriving at your favorite beach only to discover it's closed because of bacterial contamination can be a bummer. But even worse would be unknowingly swimming in waters polluted with fecal material — a very real possibility, given that current detection methods can require up to 24 hours to obtain results. Now, researchers reporting in the ACS journal Environmental Science & Technology have identi

8h

Link found between bitter-taste sensitivity and cancer risk

High bitter-taste sensitivity is associated with a significantly increased risk of cancer in older British women, according to researchers who conducted a unique study of 5,500 women whose diet, lifestyle and health has been tracked for about 20 years.

8h

HIV infection doubles risk of heart disease, global study finds

People infected with HIV are twice as likely to suffer from heart disease, research has found. Analysis of global figures reveals that HIV-associated cardiovascular disease has more than tripled in the past 20 years as more people are living longer with the virus. The greatest impact is in sub-Saharan Africa and Asia Pacific regions, with Swaziland, Botswana and Lesotho particularly affected.

8h

Lateral gene transfer enables chemical protection of beetles against antagonistic fungi

An international team of researchers has discovered that bacteria associated to Lagria villosa beetles can produce an antifungal substance very similar to one found in tunicates living in the marine environment. The researchers revealed that this commonality is likely explained by the transfer of genes between unrelated microorganisms.

8h

Research cites faulty science and ethics in DNA analyzes of 'Ata'

University of Otago-led international collaborative research calls into question the ethics and skeletal and genomic analysis surrounding research into the much publicised alien-like "Atacama mummy".

8h

Trump Says Russia Isn’t Still Targeting the U.S.—But He’s Wrong

This story was updated on Wednesday, July 18 at 1:17 p.m. Monday’s summit between President Donald Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin set a new low for American national security. Standing side by side with the Russian autocrat, Trump once again accepted Putin’s phony denials about Russia’s interference in the 2016 presidential election. “I have President Putin. He just said it’s not Russ

8h

Effort to preserve lory population shows success

A long-term plan to preserve the Rimatara lorikeet by restoring an extirpated population of the species on a neighboring island that is free of predatory ship rats is demonstrating the importance of this kind of protective program for the sustainability of endangered bird species. A case study published in the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) report Global Reintroduction Persp

8h

Tech leaders sign global pledge against autonomous weaponsElon Musk DeepMind AI

A who's who of CEOs, engineers and scientists from the technology industry—including Google DeepMind, the XPRIZE Foundation and Elon Musk—have signed a pledge to "neither participate in nor support the development, manufacture, trade, or use of lethal autonomous weapons".

8h

79 Moons of Jupiter and Counting

The latest survey of the region around the gas giant turned up a dozen new moons, including an oddball that was going in the wrong direction.

8h

Doing school differently

Alternative schooling programs could deliver greater learning outcomes for young people who are struggling at school, according to University of South Australia researcher, Dr. Thomas Stehlik.

9h

Sugar improves memory in over-60s, helping them work smarter

Sugar improves memory in older adults — and makes them more motivated to perform difficult tasks at full capacity — according to new research by the University of Warwick.

9h

Planck: final data from the mission lends support to the standard cosmological model

With its increased reliability and its data on the polarisation of relic radiation, the Planck mission corroborates the standard cosmological model with unrivalled precision for these parameters, even if some anomalies still remain. For this work the Planck consortium called upon some three hundred researchers, in particular from CNRS, CNES (the French national space agency), CEA (the French Alter

9h

Memorization test & resting state EEG components in mild & subjective cognitive impairment

Memorization test and non linear EEG analysis could be helpful in identifying subjects at high risk of dementia at the very early stages of cognitive impairment.

9h

Allergies: Mugwort pollen as main source of airborne endotoxins

Different airborne substances can cause respiratory problems for asthma sufferers. These include bacteria and their components, which can trigger inflammations. How they become airborne has not been fully explained up to now. A team from Technical University of Munich and Helmholtz Zentrum München has shown that pollen from the mugwort plant is the main vector for bacteria and that this combinatio

9h

Dementia could be detected via routinely collected data, new research shows

A new machine-learning model that scans routinely collected NHS data has shown promising signs of being able to predict undiagnosed dementia in primary care, according to research by the University of Plymouth. The results from the feasibility study suggest that the model could significantly reduce the number of those living with undiagnosed dementia.

9h

Biological signalling processes in intelligent materials

Researchers are developing innovative biohybrid systems with information processing functionality.

9h

Old Theban port of Chalcis: A medieval maritime crossroads in Greece

One CNRS researcher, in cooperation with Greek colleagues, has focused her attention on a widely disseminated style of ceramics called the 'main Middle Byzantine Production,' found in all four corners of the Mediterranean. The team's findings have just been published online by the Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports.

9h

Despite digital revolution, distance still matters

Even when people have well-connected social networks beyond their home cities and across state lines, they are still most frequently interacting with people who are geographically nearby. That is one of the major outcomes of an expansive, 16-month study of more than 51 million geo-tagged tweets generated by more than 1.7 million Twitter users across the United States.

9h

Visual illusion proves effective in relieving knee pain for people with osteoarthritis

Researchers have found people suffering osteoarthritis in the knees reported reduced pain when exposed to visual illusions that altered the size of their knees.

9h

Agriculture: Quick soil test aims to determine nitrogen need

One of the essential nutrients for vigorous crop production is nitrogen. Yet most routine tests done in commercial soil testing labs do not measure available nitrogen in the soil. Soil scientists think they have found a solution.

9h

Splitting water: Nanoscale imaging yields key insights

In the quest to realize artificial photosynthesis to convert sunlight, water, and carbon dioxide into fuel—just as plants do—researchers need to not only identify materials to efficiently perform photoelectrochemical water splitting, but also to understand why a certain material may or may not work. Now scientists at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) have pioneered a technique t

9h

Google braces for huge EU fine over AndroidGoogle $5B EU Android

Google prepared Wednesday to be hit with huge EU fine for freezing out rivals of its Android mobile phone system in a ruling that could spark new tensions between Brussels and Washington.

9h

Psychedelic discovery could lead to new antidepressants

Structural changes in the brain may suggest that psychedelics, such as LSD and MDMA, are capable of repairing the circuits that malfunction in mood and anxiety disorders. A wide range of psychedelic drugs increase the number of neuronal branches (dendrites), the density of small protrusions on these branches (dendritic spines), and the number of connections between neurons (synapses), report rese

9h

Compound identified that protects against neurodegeneration

Researchers from the University of Liverpool have identified a new compound that protects against neurodegeneration in nematode worms. The discovery may enable novel treatments for human neurodegenerative diseases to be developed in the future.

9h

Molecular culprits of protein aggregation in ALS and FTLD

The mutated and aggregated protein FUS is implicated in two neurodegenerative diseases: amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). Using a newly developed fruit fly model, researchers led by prof. Ludo Van Den Bosch (VIB-KU Leuven) have zoomed in on the protein structure of FUS to gain more insight into how it causes neuronal toxicity and disease.

9h

Searching for wind for the future

The first quantification of wind energy in Saudi Arabia points to high wind power potential for many decades to come.

9h

Otago-led research cites faulty science and ethics in DNA analyzes of 'Ata'

University of Otago-led international collaborative research calls into question the ethics and skeletal and genomic analysis surrounding research into the much publicised alien-like 'Atacama mummy'.

9h

Hormonal data in breath from whales interpreted for health indicators

Scientists were able to capture 100 blow samples from 46 right whales. This is the first time ever that researchers have successfully quantified hormone levels in breath from large whales at sea — a very difficult feat because breath samples can often be contaminated or diluted with seawater. The work is significant because breath samples contain various biological markers such as hormone levels

9h

Obesity and inflammation — A deadly combination for prostate cancer

A new Osaka-centered study identified the mechanisms of high-fat diet (HFD)-induced prostate cancer progression. They observed in a mouse model that HFD accelerated tumor growth and increased the myeloid-derived suppressor cells fraction and M2/M1 macrophage ratio. Additionally, the anti-inflammatory drug celecoxib suppressed tumor growth. Their results suggest that HFD-induced prostate cancer gro

9h

Feeding plants to this algae could fuel your car

The research shows that a freshwater production strain of microalgae, Auxenochlorella protothecoides, is capable of directly degrading and utilizing non-food plant substrates, such as switchgrass, for improved cell growth and lipid productivity, useful for boosting the algae's potential value as a biofuel.

9h

SD mines scientists and students contribute to IceCube breakthrough

An international team of scientists, including researchers at the South Dakota School of Mines & Technology, have found the first evidence of a source of high-energy cosmic neutrinos, ghostly subatomic particles that can travel unhindered for billions of light years from the most extreme environments in the universe to Earth.

9h

Beef jerky and other processed meats associated with manic episodes

An analysis of more than 1,000 people with and without psychiatric disorders has shown that nitrates — chemicals used to cure meats such as beef jerky, salami, hot dogs and other processed meat snacks — may contribute to mania, an abnormal mood state. Mania is characterized by hyperactivity, euphoria and insomnia.

9h

AI technology could help protect water supplies

Progress on new artificial intelligence (AI) technology could make monitoring at water treatment plants cheaper and easier and help safeguard public health.

9h

Materials processing tricks enable engineers to create new laser material

By doping alumina crystals with neodymium ions, engineers have developed a new laser material that is capable of emitting ultra-short, high-power pulses — a combination that could potentially yield smaller, more powerful lasers with superior thermal shock resistance, broad tunability and high-duty cycles.

9h

Raketentusiaster forsøger igen: Enten skal raketten flyve eller springe i luften

Rakertnørder vil sende en hundrede kilo raket flere kilometer op i luften.

9h

Electric scooters on collision course with pedestrians and lawmakers

Electric scooters are appearing in many major cities across the country, bringing fun to riders, profits to scooter makers – and lots of potential risks to walkers and riders.

9h

Life on Earth kept to darkness for much of history, study finds

Tiny creatures that lived in the dark—either underground or below the sea floor—were the dominant life forms on Earth for much of the planet's history, a study suggests.

9h

Hydrogen from water in iron nanotruss structures

Swedish researchers have discovered a new and efficient way to use electrocatalysis to produce hydrogen gas from water. Instead of using expensive and difficult-to-obtain platinum electrodes, the new method uses electrodes with nanotruss structures of iron oxide. The research is led by Professor Ulf Helmersson.

9h

Doing school differently

Alternative schooling programs could deliver greater learning outcomes for young people who are struggling at school.

9h

Splitting water: Nanoscale imaging yields key insights

In the quest to realize artificial photosynthesis to convert sunlight, water, and carbon dioxide into fuel — just as plants do — researchers need to not only identify materials to efficiently perform photoelectrochemical water splitting, but also to understand why a certain material may or may not work. Now scientists at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have pioneered a technique that uses

9h

New creepy, crawly search and rescue robot developed at Ben-Gurion U

'The RSTAR is ideal for search and rescue operations in unstructured environments, such as collapsed buildings or flooded areas, where it must adapt and overcome a variety of successive obstacles to reach its target,' says Dr. David Zarrouk, a lecturer in BGU's Department of Mechanical Engineering, and head of the Bio-Inspired and Medical Robotics Lab.

9h

The pain circuit breaker

In a new study published in the journal Peer J this week, researchers at UniSA's Body in Mind Research Group have found people suffering osteoarthritis in the knees reported reduced pain when exposed to visual illusions that altered the size of their knees.

9h

Despite digital revolution, distance still matters

Even when people have well-connected social networks beyond their home cities and across state lines, they are still most frequently interacting with people who are geographically nearby. That is one of the major outcomes of an expansive, 16-month study of more than 51 million geo-tagged tweets generated by more than 1.7 million Twitter users across the United States. The study was funded, in part

9h

Potential for Antarctica to become plastics dumping ground and home for new species

Antarctica is not as isolated from the rest of the world as scientists have thought, new research reveals, with potential for drifting plastics to create problems in the continent in future and new species to colonise there as the climate warms.

9h

Effort to preserve lory population shows success

A long-term plan to preserve the Rimatara lorikeet by restoring an extirpated population of the species on a neighboring island that is free of predatory ship rats is demonstrating the importance of this kind of protective program for the sustainability of endangered bird species. A case study published in the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) report Global Reintroduction Persp

9h

Shroud of Turin Is a Fake, Bloodstains Suggest

Jesus' crucified body did not make the bloodstains seen on this holy cloth, scientists find.

9h

Water desalination picks up the pace

A membrane made of porous carbon-fiber structures grown on a porous ceramic substrate is more efficient at filtering seawater than existing similar membranes.

9h

The brainwashing myth

Nearly 40 years ago, my two sisters, Carolyn Layton and Annie Moore, were among those who planned the mass deaths in Jonestown on Nov. 18, 1978.

9h

Solar supercapacitor could power future of wearable sensors

A new form of solar-powered supercapacitor could help make future wearable technologies lighter and more energy-efficient, scientists say.

9h

Staff in operating rooms follow these primate patterns

Humans working in operating rooms follow the general primate patterns of hierarchy and gender, according to new research. In a project they term “operating room primatology,” the researchers used ethological observation methods to record all social interactions within teams in three ORs during 200 surgical procedures. Previous studies of behavior in health care teams have mostly relied on questio

9h

Alien Sharks Are Coming! | Countdown to Shark Week: The Daily Bite

Shark IQ and top sharks are back to boost your Shark Week knowledge and we sit alongside comedian Yamaneika Saunders as she reacts to the upcoming Shark Week premiere of Alien Sharks! Shark Week 2018 starts Sunday July 22 9p! Stream The Daily Bite on Discovery GO: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/the-daily-bite/ Stream Classic Shark Week Episodes: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/shark-week/

9h

Junk food options swarm poorer urban schools

Schools in urban areas with high levels of socioeconomic distress are exposed to a disproportionate amount of junk food, according to a recent study. Researchers found high numbers of “junk food opportunities”—restaurants and convenience stores selling foods high in fat, salt, and sugar and low in nutritional value—concentrated near elementary schools in low-income areas of London, Ontario. The r

9h

Finding a planet with a 10 years orbit in a few months

To discover the presence of a planet around stars, astronomers wait until it has completed three orbits. However, this effective technique has its drawbacks since it cannot confirm the presence of planets at relatively long periods. To overcome this obstacle, astronomers under the direction of UNIGE have developed a method that makes it possible to ensure the presence of a planet in a few months,

10h

EU-bøde til Google på 32 milliarder kroner fra Vestager

EU har uddelt sin hidtil største bøde.

10h

Some of the People Trump Has Blamed for Russia’s 2016 Election Hack

The Democratic National Committee, China, a 400-pound person: These are just some of the people and entities Donald Trump has blamed for interfering in the 2016 election despite the assessment by U.S. intelligence agencies that Russia was behind the hack. When he was still a presidential candidate, Trump, reacting to the news that Russia was interfering with U.S. elections, issued a statement tha

10h

New evidence suggests the Devonian Nekton Revolution never occurred

A pair of researchers at Yale University has found evidence that suggests the Devonian Nekton Revolution never actually occurred. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, Christopher Whalen and Derek Briggs describe their study and what they believe actually happened in the world's oceans during the Devonian Period.

10h

10h

Largest-ever UK study into body shapes and sizes

Every year, 50 percent of online clothes shoppers return fashion items they purchased online, much of this due to incorrect fit and sizing. For the first time in nearly 20 years this is being addressed by an ambitious new nationwide survey profiling 30,000 adults.

10h

First major Carbon Landscape restoration project is officially opened

The first major restoration project of the Carbon Landscape—a £3.2 million programme to restore former industrial landscapes in the North West—has been officially opened near Warrington.

10h

Novel bioengineering technique for personalized bone grafts

Scientists have developed a new bone engineering technique called Segmental Additive Tissue Engineering (SATE). The technique allows researchers to combine segments of bone engineered from stem cells to create large scale, personalized grafts that will enhance treatment for those suffering from bone disease or injury through regenerative medicine.

10h

Omega 3 supplements have little or no heart or vascular health benefit

Omega 3 supplements have little or no effect on the risk of heart disease, stroke or death — according to new research. Increased consumption of omega 3 fats is widely promoted globally because of a common belief that that it will protect against heart disease. But a new Cochrane review finds that omega 3 supplements offer little, if any, benefit.

10h

Research on British teeth unlocks potential for new insights into ancient diets

Goofy, yellow and crooked: British smiles have sometimes had a less-than-flattering international image, but a new study has put tartar from our infamously bad teeth to good use. Researchers analysing the teeth of Britons from the Iron Age to the modern day have unlocked the potential for using proteins in tooth tartar to reveal what our ancestors ate.

10h

State of the Polar Oceans 2018 published

In a new report published this week scientists from leading UK and Norwegian research institutions highlights the urgency to further investigate the least understood regions on Earth.

10h

How language boosts satisfaction and buying behaviour

The adage "there is no 'I' in team" is a handy refrain used to emphasize the importance of teamwork in just about any setting, but new University of Alberta research shows that "I" works best alone when it comes to customer service.

10h

4 Myths about Extroversion We're Guilty of Believing

Is it true that extroverts have shallow relationships and draw energy from others like a vampire? Not so fast — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

10h

A possibly better way to measure our own galaxy speed moving through space

A pair of physicists at Aix-Marseille University has offered a possible way to measure the speed of our own galaxy more accurately as it moves through space. In their paper published in the journal Physical Review Letters, Julien Bel and Christian Marinoni describe their theory and how it might be tested.

10h

Biological signalling processes in intelligent materials

Scientists from the University of Freiburg have developed materials systems that are composed of biological components and polymer materials and are capable of perceiving and processing information. These biohybrid systems were engineered to perform certain functions, such as the counting signal pulses in order to release bioactive molecules or drugs at the correct time, or to detect enzymes and s

10h

Plastic poses biggest threat to seabirds in New Zealand waters, where more breed than elsewhere

Plastic pollution has the potential to cause the worst damage to seabirds in the seas around Aotearoa New Zealand, where many of them come to feed and breed.

10h

'I don't see race' and other white lies

No one white really wants to talk about being white.

10h

Your first memory probably isn't yours, no matter how real it seems

Science Around 40 percent of us may have a fictional recollection as our “first” memory. Most memory researchers argue that its essentially impossible to remember anything before those terrible twos. Understanding how and why our brains form memories in the…

10h

Traditional Tibetan medicine exposes people and environment to high mercury levels

Many people view the Tibetan Plateau, or 'Roof of the World,' as a pristine alpine environment, largely untouched by pollution. But researchers, reporting in ACS' journal Environmental Science & Technology, have now shown that traditional Tibetan medicine exposes people and the environment to high levels of mercury and methylmercury.

10h

What Is Ariana Grande Doing?

In the middle of Ariana Grande’s “God Is a Woman” video , the music cuts out, the pop star disappears, and a gopher screams. The rodent’s a puppet, one of a few who’re poking out of holes in a parched desert, and it shrieks like a man on fire might, or like small furry mammals actually sometimes do . Then the video flashes back to the main show—a purple-blue fantasia of Grande in goddess poses—ne

10h

The rollercoaster of exploding pollen

When I think about reading peer-reviewed natural history papers—including contemporary articles in a Natural History Miscellany Note or the Scientific Naturalist section—I imagine them mostly as a classic throwback—just a scientist, a hand lens, and a notebook. I generally do not think about employing $50,000 of high-speed video recording equipment to test dueling hypotheses about pollination mode

10h

A new study should be the final nail for open-plan offices

Open-plan offices have taken off because of a desire to increase interaction and collaboration among workers. But an innovative new study has found that employees in open-plan offices spend 73% less time in face-to-face interactions. Email and messaging use shot up by over 67%.

10h

The False Tale of Amazon's Industry-Conquering Juggernaut

Jeff Bezos may be the richest man of the modern age, but he built his e-commerce empire by playing freely with new ideas—not disrupting swaths of industries

10h

Photograph or Painting? These Landscapes Are Both

French artist Guillaume Hebert creates hybrid images that blur the differences between media.

10h

Rising Seas Could Cause Your Next Internet Outage

In just 15 years, roughly 4,000 miles of fiber-optic cables in US coastal cities could go underwater.

10h

Traditional Tibetan medicine exposes people and environment to high mercury levels

Many people view the Tibetan Plateau, or "Roof of the World," as a pristine alpine environment, largely untouched by pollution. But researchers, reporting in ACS' journal Environmental Science & Technology, have now shown that traditional Tibetan medicine (TTM) exposes people and the environment to high levels of mercury and methylmercury.

11h

11h

Image of the Day: A Good Egg

Osprey numbers are recovering after a drop in contaminants in the Delaware Estuary.

11h

11h

Health Insurers Are Vacuuming Up Details about You–and It Could Raise Your Rates

Insurers and data brokers are predicting your health costs based on data about race, marital status and other sensitive information — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

Researchers measure simulated spent nuclear fuel temperatures in a dry cask for new data set

Sandia National Laboratories researchers have built a scaled test assembly that mimics a dry cask storage container for spent nuclear fuel to study how fuel temperatures change during storage and how the fuel's peak temperatures affect the integrity of the metal cladding surrounding the spent fuel.

11h

Homeopathic Arnica in Plastic Surgery

Homeopathic Arnica is clearly pseudoscience and does not work for wound healing, so why are so many cosmetic surgeons recommending it?

11h

Nanotech diagnostic can indicate cancer or thrombotic risk in one drop of blood

A team of international researchers led by Professor Martin Hegner, Investigator in CRANN and Trinity's School of Physics, have developed an automated diagnostic platform that can quantify bleeding – and thrombotic risks – in a single drop of blood, within seconds.

11h

Microprocessor designers realize security must be a primary concern

Computers' amazing abilities to entertain people, help them work, and even respond to voice commands are, at their heart, the results of decades of technological development and innovation in microprocessor design. Under constant pressure to extract more computing performance from smaller and more energy-efficient components, chip architects have invented a dizzying array of tricks and gadgets tha

11h

Feeding plants to this algae could fuel your car

Researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory and partner institutions provided today the first published report of algae using raw plants as a carbon energy source. The research shows that a freshwater production strain of microalgae, Auxenochlorella protothecoides, is capable of directly degrading and utilizing non-food plant substrates, such as switchgrass, for improved cell growth and lipid pr

11h

Lateral gene transfer enables chemical protection of beetles against antagonistic fungi

Like all other living organisms, animals face the challenge of fending off enemies. Using chemical weaponry can be an effective strategy to stay alive. Instead of taking over this task themselves, many marine and terrestrial animals associate with microbial symbionts that can provide such protection. An international team of researchers led by scientists of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU

11h

Using camera fingerprints to catch cybercriminals

A technique that can match images and video to the device that took them, is being used to investigate cybercrimes.

11h

Green sea turtle digging its own watery grave due to invasion of non-native seagrass

A seagrass species from the Red Sea is outcompeting the native seagrass species in the Caribbean, where the green sea turtle lives. These iconic turtles are seeing their grazing areas decline, because they have little interest in the foreign seagrass. Wageningen researchers and colleagues from other research institutions discovered how these large underwater grazers seem to dig their watery grave

11h

Growing more food with less fertiliser

Researchers have found the key to increasing the rate at which maize absorbs nitrogen in the lab, a crucial step in growing higher yielding crops while using less fertiliser.

11h

U.S. citizens can now publish models of 3-D printed firearms online. What does it mean for us?

A landmark case in the United States has been settled out of court, giving gun rights advocate Cody Wilson the right to publish instructions on the web that explain how to 3-D print firearms.

11h

Crows Sometimes Have Sex With Their Dead

Updated on July 18 at 11:45 p.m. ET * In April 2015, Kaeli Swift laid a dead crow next to a cherry tree—and waited. Swift, who studies bird behavior at the University of Washington, had previously shown that crows conduct “ funerals ” by gathering around the corpses of their peers. Now a film crew had come to capture this behavior. As if on cue, another crow alighted on a nearby branch and gazed

11h

Ecuador's colonial past 'written in soil'

The impact of European settlers on the country is preserved in a detailed soil record, researchers have found.

11h

FE: Russiske hackere har spioneret mod den danske energiforsyning

Russiske hackere har spioneret mod Danmarks el-sektor og forsøgt at gennemtrænge systemer på danske el-værker.

11h

Urbanization and changes to climate could pack a one-two punch for watersheds in the future, study finds

Watersheds channel water from streams to oceans, and more than $450 billion in food, manufactured goods and other economic factors depend on them, according to the Environmental Protection Agency. Watersheds also are crucial to the health of surrounding ecosystems and communities. Now, researchers from the University of Missouri have found that climatic changes and urban development, when working

11h

Ferocious Ferguson fire in California threatens Mariposa—again

One year ago today residents of Mariposa, California, the largest town bordering Yosemite National Park, were evacuated due to the threat of the Detwiler Fire. Although thate fire burned thousands of acres and scorched the area right around the community, no one was killed. The Ferguson Fire today is inching closer to Mariposa and residents are once again on the brink of evacuation. This time, how

11h

Comprehensive report on private- and public-sector Big Data policies affecting transport

Researchers have published a comprehensive report on private- and public-sector Big Data policies affecting transport in EU countries and abroad.

11h

Can the GOP Demonize Pelosi One More Time?

An ominous ritual unfolds in the opening chapter of George Orwell’s 1984 . Staffers in the Records Department gather for an exercise known as the Two Minutes Hate. This gathering is disturbing and predictable, yet ever-changing. It goes like this: On an oversized telescreen, Big Brother’s party apparatchiks flash the face of Emmanuel Goldstein, a designated “Enemy of the People.” As Orwell tells

11h

Illegal Abortion Will Mean Abortion By Mail

With the prospect of a more conservative Supreme Court on the horizon, some progressive women have begun to fear what will happen if Roe v. Wade , the case that legalized abortion, is overturned. Some of these prophecies have centered on a popular meme in the pro-choice community: The coat hanger. During a recent rally, New York gubernatorial candidate Cynthia Nixon held up a wire coat hanger as

11h

Dear Therapist: I Care About My Friend More Than She Does About Me

Editor’s Note: Every Wednesday, Lori Gottlieb answers questions from readers about their problems, big and small. Have a question? Email her at dear.therapist@theatlantic.com . Dear Therapist, A friend of mine asked to rent a work tool of mine (namely, a high-end camera) in order for someone to photograph her wedding. I happily obliged, but then was shocked to later realize that not only was she

11h

Londoners feel ignored and not represented by adverts

75 per cent of Londoners feel that adverts should reflect the diversity of the city's population, yet fewer than one in four thinks adverts are culturally diverse, according to new research from the UCL Institute of Education.

11h

Searching for wind for the future

The first quantification of wind energy in Saudi Arabia points to high wind power potential for many decades to come.

11h

Study eyes worker mobility impact on economy

A new economic model developed at Western calculates the cost of reallocating working‐age Canadians (20-64 years old) from one industry to another and shows that an unwillingness by many to relocate or change careers hurts the economy and leads to high unemployment regionally and nationally.

11h

Outsider candidates perform better in polarized political environments, study finds

New research by Peter Buisseret, assistant professor in the University of Chicago Harris School of Public Policy, and a coauthor shows that in times of intense polarization, outsiders are more likely to win elections than establishment candidates if they are able to prevail within established parties.

11h

Why You Can't Trust More Cryptocurrency White Papers

Crypto-developers—ironically, a community devoted to eliminating centralized authority—could use more traditional vetting structures.

12h

Meet Jonathan Albright, The Digital Sleuth Exposing Fake News

Buried in media scholar Jonathan Albright's research was proof of a massive political misinformation campaign. Now he's taking on the the world's biggest platforms before it's too late.

12h

Comic-Con 2018: What We're Most Looking Forward to at This Year's Convention

Horror sequels, a Momoa-shaped tsunami, and the Spider-Man we've all been waiting for—SDCC may be light this year, but there's plenty to look forward to.

12h

A Trillion Worlds

Big-data statistics have revealed, among other things, that our own solar system is kind of an oddball — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

12h

Research collaboration could reshape injection molding

As Ralph Colby peers at the microscope image in front of him, he thinks he can make them out—"shish kebabs," as polymer scientists call them. Nobody knows for sure what they are, but these shapes that appear at seemingly unpredictable times when certain plastics cool have a big impact on the overall properties of plastics. It's not a big deal when a plastic fork breaks, but if a bearing cage on an

12h

A new approach for narrowing down huge calculations by focusing on a single, predictive parameter

A team that includes nuclear physicists, a machine-learning researcher and an NC State mathematician has created a new approach for narrowing down huge calculations – such as those involved in quantum physics – by focusing on a single, predictive parameter. This approach, dubbed the eigenvector continuation, could prove useful in solving other scientific and engineering problems where the calculat

12h

Image: Proba-1 view of Guam

A cloud-specked view of the US territory of Guam in the western Pacific Ocean, as seen by ESA's Proba-1 microsatellite, which is still observing Earth despite being launched 16 years ago.

12h

Keeping up with sea-level rise

Maintaining a balance between rising sea levels and soil accumulation will rely on careful management of coastal regions.

12h

Oddball Galaxy Puts Dark Matter Theory to the Test

Critical responses have broadsided a study claiming the discovery of a galaxy missing evidence of invisible mass — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

12h

Does Eating Beef Jerky Cause Psychiatric Symptoms? Not So Fast.

A new study makes some alarming claims about a relationship between cured meat consumption and bipolar mania, but a lot more research is necessary.

12h

12h

Butterflies Sip Turtle Tears in Stunning Video

In the Amazon, when turtles weep, butterflies drink.

12h

What is your earliest childhood memory – and did it really happen?

A new study suggests that many first memories are actually fictional and based on photographs and family stories. We would like to hear about what you believe is your earliest recollection It is a much pondered and discussed subject: your earliest childhood memory. For some, it is their first bee sting or a formative interaction with a parent as a toddler. Others claim to be able to recall lying

12h

Arriva skal skifte københavnske havnebusser på diesel ud med elektriske havnefærger

Arriva har vundet udbuddet om at levere fem nye elektriske havnefærger til Københavns Havn. De skal bygges af hollandske Damen Shipyards og være klar til driftstart i 2020.

12h

From an almost perfect universe to the best of both worlds

It was 21 March 2013. The world's scientific press had either gathered in ESA's Paris headquarters or logged in online, along with a multitude of scientists around the globe, to witness the moment when ESA's Planck mission revealed its 'image' of the cosmos. This image was taken not with visible light but with microwaves.

12h

Supersharp images from new VLT adaptive optics

ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) has achieved first light with a new adaptive optics mode called laser tomography — and has captured remarkably sharp test images of the planet Neptune and other objects. The MUSE instrument working with the GALACSI adaptive optics module, can now use this new technique to correct for turbulence at different altitudes in the atmosphere. It is now possible to captur

12h

Putin’s Big Tell?

Updated at 4:15 p.m. ET As Russian President Vladimir Putin stood next to President Donald Trump during a joint press conference in Helsinki on Monday, a wealthy banker turned human-rights activist named William Browder was on the Russian leader’s mind. Asked whether he would consider extraditing the 12 Russian intelligence officers accused by Special Counsel Robert Mueller of hacking into Democr

12h

Decency Loses Its Moral Force

When Louie Gohmert, the Republican representative from Texas, jabbed a forefinger at FBI Agent Peter Strzok during last week’s House Judiciary Committee hearings and asked, “How many times did you look so innocent into your wife’s eyes and lie to her?” one of the Democrats in the room cried, “Have you no shame?” The echo of Joseph Welch’s question to Senator Joseph McCarthy at the 1954 Army–McCar

12h

Trump Has Learned Nothing

Bill Clinton and Barack Obama liked to go to Martha’s Vineyard. George W. Bush repaired to his ranch in Crawford, Texas. Donald Trump has already cultivated his own summer tradition: the catastrophic, week-long meltdown. This summer’s edition started Thursday, when Trump departed the NATO summit in Brussels, leaving behind a trail of chaos. It could have been worse: Headed into the summit, some a

12h

Gold nanoparticles to find applications in hydrogen economy

An international team of scientist of Peter the Great St. Petersburg Polytechnic University (SPbPU), Leibniz University Hannover (Leibniz Universität Hannover) and the Ioffe Institute report a way to improve nanocomposite material, opening new opportunities in industry. The study, titled "The mechanism of charge carrier generation at the TiO2—n-Si heterojunction activated by gold nanoparticles," i

12h

Study finds climate determines shapes of river basins

There are more than 1 million river basins carved into the topography of the United States, each collecting rainwater to feed the rivers that cut through them. Some basins are as small as individual streams, while others span nearly half the continent, encompassing, for instance, the whole of the Mississippi river network.

12h

UK delivers super-cool kit to USA for Next-Generation Dark Matter Experiment

A huge U.K.-built titanium chamber designed to keep its contents at a cool -100C and weighing as much as an SUV has been shipped to the United States, where it will soon become part of a next-generation dark matter detector to hunt for the long-theorised elusive dark matter particle called a WIMP (Weakly Interacting Massive Particle).

12h

Skin Deep: Ticked Off

How ticks became the hottest topic of the summer.

12h

Move over, Hubble. This sharp pic of Neptune was taken from Earth

A new strategy at the Very Large Telescope lets astronomers take space telescope–quality pictures from the ground.

12h

Machine learning predicted a superhard and high-energy-density tungsten nitride

Although machine learning has been successful in many aspects, its application in crystal structure predictions and materials design is still under development. Recently, Prof. Jian Sun's group at the Department of Physics, Nanjing University, implemented a machine-learning algorithm into the crystal structure search method. They used a machine learning algorithm to describe the potential energy s

13h

How does the sun's rotational cycle influence lightning activity on earth?

A collaborative research team in Japan has taken the first steps to understanding how the sun's rotational cycle influences lightning activity. They found answers in an unusual source—diaries dating back to the 1700s.

13h

Supersharp images from new VLT adaptive optics

ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) has achieved first light with a new adaptive optics mode called laser tomography—and has captured remarkably sharp test images of the planet Neptune and other objects. The MUSE instrument working with the GALACSI adaptive optics module, can now use this new technique to correct for turbulence at different altitudes in the atmosphere. It is now possible to capture i

13h

What anthropologists can tell you about the US border immigration crisis

How anthropologists are helping tell real stories of migrants trying to cross US borders I am an anthropologist because I care about people. I am an archaeologist because I know our past is relevant to our present and future. Our borderlands are areas of enduring relevance to both fields of study. Related: Life and death on the border: effects of century-old murders still felt in Texas Continue r

13h

Slime Molds Remember — but Do They Learn?

submitted by /u/OneMansModusPonens [link] [comments]

13h

NYSCF researchers develop novel bioengineering technique for personalized bone grafts

Scientists from the New York Stem Cell Foundation (NYSCF) Research Institute have developed a new bone engineering technique called Segmental Additive Tissue Engineering (SATE). The technique, described in a paper published online today in Scientific Reports, allows researchers to combine segments of bone engineered from stem cells to create large scale, personalized grafts that will enhance treat

13h

Poor air quality does not offset exercise's heart benefits

Even in areas with moderate to high levels of traffic pollution, regular physical activity reduced the risk of first and recurrent heart attack.

13h

Evolutionary algorithm outperforms deep-learning machines at video games

Neural networks have garnered all the headlines, but a much more powerful approach is waiting in the wings.

13h

Archaeologists Find 14,500-Year-Old Bread

Archaeologists in Jordan's Black Desert found the burnt remains of bread, baked more than 14,000 years ago. It proves people were making bread far earlier than originally known.

13h

Spørg Scientariet: Hvorfor skifter trafiklyset ikke automatisk, når der kommer en ambulance?

En læser undrer sig over, hvorfor vi ikke gør som i Finland, hvor lyskryds automatisk giver udrykningsfartøjer fortrinsret. Det svarer trafikingeniør på – og vi får også en opfordring fra Finland.

14h

Legal battle over rights to Olympic founder's name

A Dutch branding company, a global sports organisation and the name of a French aristocrat who has been dead for 80 years might not seem like the ingredients for a high-stakes legal battle.

16h

Android software puts Google at heart of mobile lifeGoogle $5B EU Android

The Google Android operating system, the target of a long-running EU antitrust investigation, powers the vast majority of the world's smartphones and firmly rules the mobile world.

16h

Skeletons and scares at Portugal's dino park

Eyes popping in astonishment, his mouth hanging mutely open, seven-year-old Joel approaches the four-metre-high monster and stands nose-to-nose with one of the deadliest killing machines the world has ever known.

16h

Ocean Resort Casino joins New Jersey internet betting market

New Jersey's thriving internet gambling market continues to grow.

16h

Putin foreslår, at USA og Rusland sammen efterforsker valg-hack mod USA

Der er nye cybersikkerheds-boller på suppen efter topmødet mellem Donald Trump og Vladimir Putin i Helsinki i går.

16h

Otte BMW i3-batterier: Nu sejler den soldrevne turistkatamaran

120 solcellepaneler skal forsyne den soldrevne katamaran, som det spanske værft Metaltec Naval søsatte i foråret.

16h

Artificial intelligence technology could help protect water supplies

Progress on new artificial intelligence (AI) technology could make monitoring at water treatment plants cheaper and easier and help safeguard public health.

16h

Materials processing tricks enable engineers to create new laser material

By doping alumina crystals with neodymium ions, engineers at the University of California San Diego have developed a new laser material that is capable of emitting ultra-short, high-power pulses—a combination that could potentially yield smaller, more powerful lasers with superior thermal shock resistance, broad tunability and high-duty cycles.

16h

No more zigzags: Scientists uncover mechanism that stabilizes fusion plasmas

Sawtooth swings—up-and-down ripples found in everything from stock prices on Wall Street to ocean waves—occur periodically in the temperature and density of the plasma that fuels fusion reactions in doughnut-shaped facilities called tokamaks. These swings can sometimes combine with other instabilities in the plasma to produce a perfect storm that halts the reactions. However, some plasmas are free

16h

Quick soil test aims to determine nitrogen need

Healthy soil contributes to healthy crops. Farmers know this, so they do what they can to ensure their soil is in good shape. They send samples of their soil for lab testing to find out if it is low in any important nutrients. If it is, they can take steps to improve the health of their soil. These might include adding fertilizers or growing cover crops that feed the soil.

16h

The real palaeo diet: the nutritional value of dinosaur food

Experiments on modern plants show that the nutrients which dinosaurs could get from plants varied with carbon dioxide levels Our fascination with giant sauropod dinosaurs such as Diplodocus, Brachiosaurus and Brontosaurus stems from their colossal size. How could something 30 metres long, weighing 50 tonnes, function as a land animal? And how could something that big gain enough nutrition from pl

16h

Texas Instruments' new CEO loses job for personal misconduct

Texas Instruments has dumped CEO Brian Crutcher for personal misconduct less than two months after he took over the job, ruining the chip maker's hopes for a smooth transition to new leadership.

17h

China launched two more massive Type 055 warshipsApple iCloud China

Eastern Arsenal Another Record China's launched two of the world's largest warships at once on July 3rd, as it builds a navy fit for a superpower.

17h

Beef jerky and other processed meats associated with manic episodes

An analysis of more than 1,000 people with and without psychiatric disorders has shown that nitrates–chemicals used to cure meats such as beef jerky, salami, hot dogs and other processed meat snacks–may contribute to mania, an abnormal mood state. Mania is characterized by hyperactivity, euphoria and insomnia.

17h

Livsfarlig myg kan snart være fortid: 80 procent udryddet

I Australien har forskere i tre byer udryddet 80 procent af myggearten, der spreder zikavirus.

18h

Materials processing tricks enable engineers to create new laser material

By doping alumina crystals with neodymium ions, engineers at the University of California San Diego have developed a new laser material that is capable of emitting ultra-short, high-power pulses — a combination that could potentially yield smaller, more powerful lasers with superior thermal shock resistance, broad tunability and high-duty cycles.

18h

Quick soil test aims to determine nitrogen need

One of the essential nutrients for vigorous crop production is nitrogen. Yet most routine tests done in commercial soil testing labs do not measure available nitrogen in the soil. Soil scientists at The Ohio State University and Cornell University think they have found a solution.

18h

AI technology could help protect water supplies

Progress on new artificial intelligence (AI) technology could make monitoring at water treatment plants cheaper and easier and help safeguard public health.

18h

Fatty liver disease pandemic needs 'gold standard' human-relevant research

New study calls for human-based tools to unravel the pathogenesis of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). The contribution of in silico, in vitro and pathways-based systems biology approaches to unraveling the pathogenesis of this disease are described, and how this human-relevant research can be used for anti-NASH drug development.

18h

Which strategies help cut consumption of sugary beverages in young children?

An Obesity Reviews analysis of published studies reveals strategies that can successfully reduce the consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages in young children.

18h

Study finds high health burdens of very high risk drinking

In an Addiction Biology study, the estimated prevalence of very high risk drinking level (VHRDL, defined as drinking >100 g of ethanol per day) in 13 European Union countries was 0.74-0.85 percent, with a risk of disease or injury of 13.5 per 100 people with VHRDL per year.

18h

Breath tests may allow for earlier detection of pancreatic cancer

Pancreatic cancer carries a very poor prognosis as most patients are diagnosed at an advanced stage. Now a new BJS (British Journal of Surgery) study indicates that breath analyses may help detect pancreatic cancer earlier, when curative treatments may be possible.

18h

Study offers strategies to prevent death by suicide in patients with cancer

In addition to focusing on curing or prolonging the life of patients with cancer, it is important to also address mental health aspects of cancer care, especially because there is an elevated incidence of death by suicide in this patient population. A new Psycho-Oncology analysis uncovers opportunities to mitigate the risk of death by suicide among patients with cancer.

18h

Study results may lead to improved diagnostics for breast cancer

A study in Molecular Oncology indicates that examining the protein and RNA in leftover materials from routine diagnostic tests for breast cancer may lead to more accurate diagnoses.

18h

Fish consumption may prolong life

Consumption of fish and long-chain omega-3 fatty acids was associated with lower risks of early death in a Journal of Internal Medicine study.

18h

When should emergency departments order imaging tests for epileptic seizures?

Patients who go to the emergency department (ED) with seizures often undergo neuroimaging, usually CT scans. Such imaging in adults presenting with new onset ('index') seizures leads to a change in care for 9-17 percent of patients, but it's unclear if such changes are made following imaging in the ED for seizures in adults with known seizure disorders ('non-index' seizures).

18h

CT scans may increase the risk of brain cancer

A new study in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute suggests that CT scans, commonly used in medical imaging, may increase the risk of brain tumors.

18h

Cannabinoids may have a vast array of anti-cancer effects

Previous research has shown that cannabinoids can help lessen side effects of anti-cancer therapies. Now a new British Journal of Pharmacology review has examined their potential for the direct treatment of cancer.

18h

Mediterranean diet may improve academic performance by affecting sleep

A new Acta Paediatrica study indicates that following the Mediterranean diet may improve adolescents' academic performance, and the effect may relate to sleep quality.

18h

Study reveals benefits of yoga for pregnant women

New research in pregnant women suggests that practicing yoga activates the parasympathetic nervous system (which is responsible for bodily functions when at rest) during the third trimester, improves sleep at night, and decreases α-amylase levels, indicating reduced stress.

18h

Moderate alcohol consumption may boost male fertility

The question of whether alcohol intake affects male reproductive function is controversial. In a new Andrology study, moderate alcohol intake was linked with higher semen volume, sperm concentration, and total sperm count.

18h

Low-dose ketamine may be an effective alternative to opioids

Opioids are commonly prescribed in the emergency department (ED) for the treatment of acute pain, but due to the epidemic of opioid misuse, analgesic alternatives are being explored. A new Academic Emergency Medicine analysis of relevant studies found that low-dose ketamine is as effective as opioids for the control of acute pain in the ED.

18h

New research shows little effect of omega 3 on risk of heart disease, stroke or death

Omega 3 is a type of fat. Small amounts of omega 3 fats are essential for good health, and they can be found in the food that we eat.

18h

Artery hardening and thickness not affected by stopping hormone therapy

Heart disease is still the number one killer of US women, and hormone therapy remains a top treatment for menopause symptoms. A new study connects these two facts to demonstrate little effect of hormone therapy on artery thickness as a precursor to heart disease. Study results are published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS).

18h

Heart attack risk on the rise for pregnant women and death rate remains high

Study shows that the risk of having a heart attack while pregnant, giving birth, or during the two months after delivery, continues to increase for American women.

18h

Thousands of leading AI researchers sign pledge against killer robots

Co-founder of Google DeepMind and CEO of SpaceX among the 2,400 signatories of pledge to block lethal autonomous weapons Thousands of scientists who specialise in artificial intelligence (AI) have declared that they will not participate in the development or manufacture of robots that can identify and attack people without human oversight. Demis Hassabis at Google DeepMind and Elon Musk at the US

18h

Sprøjte-trick kan mindske brugen af kemiske insektmidler

Det har stor betydning, hvilken rækkefølge man doserer sine sprøjtemidler i, hvis man vil gøre kål på alle insekter, viser nye resultater fra Københavns Universitet.

19h

Yuh-Nung Jan (UCSF/HHMI) 2: Dendrite Morphology & Function

https://www.ibiology.org/neuroscience/dendrite-morphogenesis Dr. Yuh-Nung Jan outlines the sequence of events that led to the understanding of the molecular underpinnings that drive dendrite morphogenesis. Talk Overview: A dendrite is a tree-like structure in neurons, which receives the incoming signal from adjacent neurons or from sensory stimuli. Dr. Yuh-Nung Jan is interested in understanding

19h

Yuh-Nung Jan (UCSF/HHMI) 1: How Does a Neuron Develop its Dendritic Morphology?

https://www.ibiology.org/neuroscience/dendrite-morphogenesis Dr. Yuh-Nung Jan outlines the sequence of events that led to the understanding of the molecular underpinnings that drive dendrite morphogenesis. Talk Overview: A dendrite is a tree-like structure in neurons, which receives the incoming signal from adjacent neurons or from sensory stimuli. Dr. Yuh-Nung Jan is interested in understanding

19h

StudyTackles Neuroscience Claims to Have Disproved “Free Will”

submitted by /u/Matrovski22 [link] [comments]

20h

Welcome to the Meghalayan Age – a new phase in history

Geologists classify the last 4,200 years as being a distinct age in the story of our planet.

20h

Forty percent of people have a fictional first memory

Researchers have conducted one of the largest surveys of people's first memories, finding that nearly 40 per cent of people had a first memory which is fictional.

22h

The Atlantic Daily: What’s Missing From the White House Transcript of the Trump-Putin Press Conference?

What We’re Following President’s Pivot: President Trump attempted to walk back the defense of the Kremlin he gave at Monday’s press conference with Vladimir Putin, claiming that he intended to say he saw no reason why Russia wouldn’t be the culprit of election interference and had mistakenly used the word would . While Trump’s response to the controversy focused on this “key sentence in my remark

23h

The real cabbage soup diet: What Britons ate down the ages

Ancient Britons were eating dairy, peas, cabbage and oats, according to gunk trapped in their teeth.

23h

Are young people going cool on cars?

More and more young people are living without the car. Will the government change its road-building plans?

23h

What Is Dry Cleaning?

Dry cleaning isn't "dry"; the process uses liquids other than water to clean fabrics.

23h

Research on British teeth unlocks potential for new insights into ancient diets

Goofy, yellow and crooked: British smiles have sometimes had a less-than-flattering international image, but a new study has put tartar from our infamously bad teeth to good use.Researchers analysing the teeth of Britons from the Iron Age to the modern day have unlocked the potential for using proteins in tooth tartar to reveal what our ancestors ate.

23h

Omega 3 supplements have little or no heart or vascular health benefit

Omega 3 supplements have little or no effect on the risk of heart disease, stroke or death — according to new research led by the University of East Anglia, UK.Increased consumption of omega 3 fats is widely promoted globally because of a common belief that that it will protect against heart disease.But a new UEA-led Cochrane review — the international gold standard for high quality, trusted hea

23h

Concentrated wealth in agricultural populations may account for the decline of polygyny

Polygyny has been more common among relatively egalitarian low-tech horticulturalists than in highly unequal, capital-intensive agricultural societies. This surprising fact is known as the 'polygyny paradox,' and a new study from the Santa Fe Institute's Dynamics of Wealth Inequality Project provides a possible resolution of the puzzle.

23h

Forty percent of people have a fictional first memory, says study

Researchers have conducted one of the largest surveys of people's first memories, finding that nearly 40 per cent of people had a first memory which is fictional.

23h

End-of-life care across England not prioritized, despite aging population

Research by King's College London has found that English local authorities have failed to prioritize palliative and end-of-life care, despite the health care challenges posed by a rapidly aging population.

23h

Celebrating positives improves classroom behavior and mental health

Training teachers to focus their attention on positive conduct and to avoid jumping to correct minor disruption improves child behavior, concentration and mental health.

23h

CDC Chief Says Son Nearly Died from Cocaine Laced with Fentanyl

The director of the largest U.S. public health agency reveals he has a personal reason for fighting the opioid epidemic.

23h

Why men may recover from the flu faster

Men bounce back more quickly from the flu because they produce more of a key lung-healing protein, a study suggests. Scientists infected live mice and human cells with influenza virus, and found that both the male mice and male human cells produced more amphiregulin, a growth factor protein important in wound healing. The male mice recovered more quickly, compared to female mice, whereas male mic

23h

Omega-3 no protection against heart attack or strokes, say scientists

Supplements do not offer cardiovascular benefits, researchers conclude from trials involving 112,000 people The widespread belief that taking omega-3 capsules will help protect you from a heart attack, stroke or early death is wrong, according to a large and comprehensive review of the evidence. Thousands of people take omega-3 supplements regularly and for years. The belief that it protects the

23h

Using driving simulation to understand driver complacency at passive rail level crossings

The study replicates and extends prior research on the effectiveness of using driving simulators to detect and mitigate risky behaviors.

23h

Electronic stickers turn everyday objects into super sensors

Researchers have developed a new fabrication method that makes tiny, thin-film electronic circuits peelable from a surface. The new technique allows any object to sense its environment or be controlled through the application of a high-tech sticker, and also eliminates several manufacturing steps and the associated costs. Our connected world Billions of objects ranging from smartphones and watche

23h

An ancient swimming revolution in the oceans may have never happened

Swimmers may not have suddenly dominated the oceans during the Devonian Period after all: New analyses suggest they took over much more gradually.

23h

Concentrated wealth in agricultural populations may account for the decline of polygyny

Across small-scale societies, the practice of some males taking multiple wives is thought to be associated with extreme disparities of wealth. But in fact, polygyny has been more common among relatively egalitarian low-tech horticulturalists than in highly unequal, capital-intensive agricultural societies. This surprising fact is known as the polygyny paradox, and a new study from the Santa Fe Ins

23h

Research on British teeth unlocks potential for new insights into ancient diets

Goofy, yellow and crooked: British smiles have sometimes had a less-than-flattering international image, but a new study has put tartar from our infamously bad teeth to good use.

23h

World-first melanoma blood test detects early stages of deadly skin cancer

Australian scientists say test delivers a more accurate diagnosis than the human eye Australian scientists have developed the world’s first blood test to detect melanoma in its early stages. Early trials of the test involving 209 people showed it was capable of picking up early stage melanoma in 81.5% of cases. Continue reading…

23h

Lava Bomb Hits Tourist Boat in Hawaii, Injuring 23

A basketball-size chunk of molten rock hurtled into the roof of a tourist boat that was sailing off Hawaii’s Big Island.

23h

Trilobites: 3-D Color X-Rays Could Help Spot Deadly Disease Without Surgery

A new medical scanner, derived from technology used by particle physics researchers at CERN, “is like the upgrade from black-and-white film to color,” one of its developers said.

23h

Low-carb diet boosts artery health for women more than men

While men may lose more weight on low-carb diets, women actually see better improvements in artery flexibility, according to a new study. The finding may help pre-diabetic women reduce their risk for heart disease through a low-carb diet. “Previous research has shown that as women age, their blood vessels stiffen more so than men, putting them at an increased risk of heart disease,” says Elizabet

1d

What if plants could make their own fertilizer?

New research is a step toward engineering plants to develop their own fertilizer. Creating fertilizer is energy intensive, and the process produces greenhouse gases that are a major driver of climate change. And it’s inefficient. Fertilizing is a delivery system for nitrogen, which plants use to create chlorophyll for photosynthesis, but less than 40 percent of the nitrogen in commercial fertiliz

1d

What dehydration does to your mind after just 2 hours

Just two hours of vigorous yard work in the summer sun without drinking fluids could be enough to blunt concentration, according to a new study. After statistically analyzing data from multiple peer-reviewed research papers on dehydration and cognitive ability, researchers found that that cognitive functions often wilt as water departs the body. The data point to functions like attention, coordin

1d

This Big-Eyed, Deep-Sea Shark Looks Like an Anime Character

Alien, or anime character? Neither! It's Genie's dogfish — a new shark species named for the famous marine biologist, Eugenie Clark.

1d

Algorithm identifies patients best suited for antidepressants

Results of a new study bring us closer to identifying individuals likely to benefit from antidepressants.

1d

New target protein for colon cancer identified

Researchers have identified a new potential target protein (c-Cbl) they believe can help further the understanding of colon cancer and ultimately survival of patients with the disease.

1d

No more zigzags: Scientists uncover mechanism that stabilizes fusion plasmas

Article describes simulation of mechanism that eliminates sawtooth instabilities in fusion plasmas.

1d

Early supper associated with lower risk of breast and prostate cancer

People who have their evening meal before 9 p.m. or wait at least two hours before going to sleep have lower risk of breast and prostate cancer.

1d

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