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Nyheder2018juli19

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Using adrenaline in cardiac arrests results in less than 1 percent more people leaving hospital alive

A clinical trial of the use of adrenaline in cardiac arrests has found that its use results in less than 1 percent more people leaving hospital alive — but almost doubles the risk of severe brain damage for survivors of cardiac arrest. The research raises important questions about the future use of adrenaline in such cases and will necessitate debate amongst healthcare professionals, patients and

21h

Modeling the ecology and evolution of biodiversity: Biogeographical cradles, museums, and graves

Individual processes shaping geographical patterns of biodiversity are increasingly understood, but their complex interactions on broad spatial and temporal scales remain beyond the reach of analytical models and traditional experiments. To meet this challenge, we built a spatially explicit, mechanistic simulation model implementing adaptation, range shifts, fragmentation, speciation, dispersal,

3h

Biokemikere fra Esbjerg udvikler verdens første svampebaserede batteri

De elektrokemiske egenskaber i skimmelsvampes pigmenter kan bane vej for fremtidens miljøvenlige batterier, mener danske forskere.

17h

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That Massive Black Sarcophagus Was Opened. Here's What's Inside.

A massive black sarcophagus found in Egypt and dating to the time of Alexander the Great has been opened.

4min

Washington, D.C., Is Counting All Its Cats. It Will Take 3 Years And $1.5 Million

The nation's capital has a cat problem. And the first step toward fixing it, apparently, is to quantify it. (Image credit: Jean Flanagan/Flickr)

10min

Toward a secure electrical grid

Professor João Hespanha suggests a way to protect autonomous grids from potentially crippling GPS spoofing attacks.

14min

Fewer injuries in girls' sports when high schools have athletic trainers

Availability of a full-time certified athletic trainer in high school reduces overall and recurrent injury rates in girls who play on the soccer or basketball team, according to a study published in Injury Epidemiology.

14min

Overlooked '80s Sci-Fi Flicks, Recalled by Wired Readers

Some look back at the ’80s and recall Ronald Reagan, glam metal and The Breakfast Club — a time of weird hair, ridiculous fashions and a thaw in the Cold War. See also: Your Favorite Sci-Fi Flicks, From Metropolis Through the ’50s Best Sci-Fi Flicks of the ’60s, ’70s, According to You When prodded, Wired.com \[…\]

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How to Make Newborn Guitars Look Artfully Ancient

WATERFORD, Michigan — Not everybody wants a shiny new guitar these days. A few connoisseurs want one that looks like it’s taken more abuse than Keith Richards. Nailing the look and feel of a vintage guitar takes time. Guys like Vince Cunetto and Bill Nash, both known for their high-end “aged to perfection” instruments, make \[…\]

20min

New battery could store wind and solar electricity affordably and at room temperature

A new type of flow battery that involves a liquid metal more than doubled the maximum voltage of conventional flow batteries and could lead to affordable storage of renewable power.

36min

Relax, just break it

Argonne scientists and their collaborators are helping to answer long-held questions about a technologically important class of materials called relaxor ferroelectrics.

36min

Universities in Germany and Sweden Lose Access to Elsevier Journals

Consortia in both countries are pushing for open-access subscriptions with the publisher.

39min

Plastic bags that biodegrade to nothing?

It sounds like the perfect solution, but critics say it failed their test.

47min

How a #MeToo Facebook Group Became a Tool for Harassment

The closed group was taken over by abusive trolls, raising questions about Facebook's ability to monitor spaces designed for sharing intimate information.

50min

Chandra telescope detects likely devouring of planet(s) by young star 450 light years away

It will take further study to confirm the star's iron influx came from a planet or two, but the initial theory is quite compelling. Read More

55min

Princeton-UPenn research team finds physics treasure hidden in a wallpaper pattern

An international team of scientists has discovered a new, exotic form of insulating material with a metallic surface that could enable more efficient electronics or even quantum computing. The researchers developed a new method for analyzing existing chemical compounds that relies on the mathematical properties like symmetry that govern the repeating patterns seen in everyday wallpaper.

57min

Study finds Medicaid expansion boosts employment

A study from the University of Kansas found individuals with disabilities were more likely to be employed in states that expanded Medicaid than their peers in non-expansion states, reducing the need to live in poverty to qualify for Medicaid coverage.

57min

US opioid prescribing rates by congressional district

Congressional districts with the highest opioid prescribing rates are predominantly concentrated in the southeastern U.S., with other hotspots in Appalachia and the rural west, according to the first study to focus on opioid prescribing rates at the congressional district level.

57min

Trump’s Missing A-Game

It’s often hard to parse an historic marker, to pluck one from the velocity of events, but Helsinki may truly be the extraordinary moment when Donald Trump’s worst traits were so blatantly self-exposed that even some of his own partisans, in Congress and the conservative media, were compelled to confront the truth. Presidents typically succeed by controlling the narratives around them. Trump has

59min

Why Richard Dawkins Thinks ‘Allahu Akbar’ Sounds ‘Aggressive’

Richard Dawkins is at it again. The famous atheist and bestselling author of The God Delusion tweeted on Monday a picture of himself sitting on a park bench and enjoying a sunny day in Winchester, England. For many people, this moment might have been a chance to just kick back and relax. But apparently not for Dawkins. “Listening to the lovely bells of Winchester, one of our great mediaeval cathe

59min

Climate change is forcing geese to give up pit stops when they migrate

Barnacle geese are accelerating their migration journeys and taking fewer rest stops along the way to cope with early Arctic springs caused by a warming climate

1h

Neanderthal hand axes were also used as lighters for starting fires

There is no doubt that our ancient cousins used fire but we’ve only just found clues that reveal how they lit these fires

1h

Levitating glass particles are fastest spinning objects ever seen

Tiny particles of glass have been trapped in a laser and spun at more than 1 billion times per second, the fastest rotation of any object ever seen

1h

Smart bandage sees when wound is infected and treats it automatically

A high-tech bandage can keep an eye on chronic wounds by detecting infections and releasing medication

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Deaths from liver disease have been rising since the financial crisis

Cirrhosis deaths were falling in the US until the financial crisis hit in 2008, but have sharply risen since then, especially among young people

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Two Fungal Species—One Pathogenic, One Benign—Are Actually the Same

Under one name the species is used in food fermentation, and under the other it is a drug- resistant cause for yeast infections.

1h

Trilobites: Why Are Some Crows Committing Acts of Necrophilia?

“It was certainly very surprising to me,” said the researcher who observed the birds’ strange behaviors when presented with crow cadavers.

1h

Marion Woodman, Explorer of the Feminine Mind, Dies at 89

A Jungian psychoanalyst, she wrote popular books and lectured on mythical feminine archetypes and the primal, unconscious elements of feminine identity.

1h

With Comcast out, how Disney's empire will look with Fox

The Mouse House is getting close to catching the Fox.

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Traveling to the sun: Why won't Parker Solar Probe melt?

This summer, NASA's Parker Solar Probe will launch to travel closer to the Sun, deeper into the solar atmosphere, than any mission before it. If Earth was at one end of a yard-stick and the Sun on the other, Parker Solar Probe will make it to within four inches of the solar surface.

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Diabetes during pregnancy may increase baby's heart disease risk

Gestational diabetes may increase the risk of blood vessel dysfunction and heart disease in offspring by altering a smooth muscle protein responsible for blood vessel network formation. Understanding of the protein's function in fetal cells may improve early detection of disease in children. The study is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology — Cell Physiology.

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CRISPR Is Overcome When Viruses Gang Up on Bacteria

Phages that die during bacterial invasion help other viruses defeat the microbes' immune responses.

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Traveling to the sun: Why won't Parker Solar Probe melt?

This summer, NASA's Parker Solar Probe will launch to travel closer to the Sun, deeper into the solar atmosphere, than any mission before it. Cutting-edge technology and engineering will help it beat the heat.

1h

Discovery of kidney cancer driver could lead to new treatment strategy

Researchers suggest that ZHX2 is a potential new therapeutic target for clear cell renal cell carcinoma, which is the most common type of kidney cancer.

1h

Enzyme identified as possible novel drug target for sickle cell disease, Thalassemia

Medical researchers have identified a key signaling protein that regulates hemoglobin production in red blood cells, offering a possible target for a future innovative drug to treat sickle cell disease. Experiments in cultured human cells reveal that blocking the protein reduces the characteristic sickling that distorts the shape of red blood cells and gives the disease its name.

1h

Why this algebra teacher has her students knit in class

Science Knitting isn’t just for passing time. I decided to offer a class called “The Mathematics of Knitting” at my institution, Carthage College. In it, I chose to eliminate pencil, paper, calculator (gasp) and…

1h

Jeff Flake Hints at the T-Word

Eighteen months into Donald Trump’s tumultuous tenure in the White House, and days into a ferocious public backlash against Trump’s meeting with Vladimir Putin in Helsinki, Jeff Flake stands alone among the president’s Republican critics in the Senate. Bob Corker, who once likened Trump’s White House to an “adult day care center,” vacillates between defiance and deference. Ben Sasse keeps his occ

1h

Chance the Rapper’s Rejection of Sanctimony

Chance the Rapper has bought Chicagoist , a local news publication whose parent company was shockingly shuttered last year after the staff voted to unionize. The injection of cash into the endangered and important trade of neighborhood journalism marks the latest in a line of apparent good deeds by 25-year-old Chancelor Bennett. The rapper whose music preaches Christian love and forgiveness is he

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Interior Department Proposes a Vast Reworking of the Endangered Species Act

The revisions have wide-reaching implications, including for how the federal government would protect species from climate change.

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A Cobra Strikes. A Magician Is Stricken. Middle Eastern Foes Unite.

After an Egyptian cobra bit a famous Turkish illusionist, officials scrambled to get him to Cairo for treatment. It was a rare instance of cooperation between the countries.

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IBM thinks blockchains can help reduce carbon emissions

It’s turning carbon credits into crypto-tokens—part of a scheme to create a massive marketplace of novel digital assets.

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What's Really Behind Apple's New MacBook Pro Keyboard

iFixit performs surgery on Apple's new silicone-padded keyboard.

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From cradle to grave: Factors that shaped evolution

This study brings us closer to knowing the complex interactions between topography and climate change, and how these factors influence the evolutionary histories and biodiversity of species in natural ecosystems.

1h

German Scientists Frequently Publish in Predatory Journals

At least 5,000 of the country’s researchers have published their work on questionable platforms, often for exorbitant fees, a report finds.

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Shallow reef species may not find refuge in deeper water habitats

Coral reefs in deep-water ecosystems may not make good homes for species from damaged shallow reefs.

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Donald Trump Is No Patriot

In 1945, George Orwell distinguished between “nationalism” and “patriotism.” Nationalism, he argued, is the belief that your nation should dominate others. It “is inseparable from the desire for power.” A nationalist, Orwell argued, “thinks solely, or mainly, in terms of competitive prestige … his thoughts always turn on victories, defeats, triumphs and humiliations.” Patriotism, by contrast, inv

1h

Why Facebook Wants to Give You the Benefit of the Doubt

In an unusually revealing moment for Facebook’s CEO, Mark Zuckerberg told Recode ’s Kara Swisher on Wednesday that he didn’t support taking down content about Holocaust denial on Facebook. Zuckerberg is Jewish, and he finds such denials “deeply offensive,” he said. But Holocaust deniers were not “intentionally getting it wrong.” When Swisher followed up that “in the case of Holocaust deniers, the

1h

Tired of Waiting For 'Kingdom Hearts III'? Check Your Phone

'Kingdom Hearts Union χ' hit mobile a couple of years ago—and is the perfect appetizer for the long-awaited console title.

2h

Plague vaccine bait — look who's coming to dinner

Morris Animal Foundation-funded researchers suspected and have now confirmed that plague vaccine bait, designed to protect prairie dogs and assist with recovery efforts of the black-footed ferret, is readily consumed by thousands of small rodents each year but with no apparent ill effect. Results were recently published in the journal EcoHealth.

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Four World Cup gold medals — and a baby

Marit Bjørgen was a world-class athlete at the top of her career — and then she decided to have a baby. How did that change her ability to train — and her performance afterwards?

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Rapid cloud clearing phenomenon could provide another piece of climate puzzle

Researchers have described rapid and dramatic clearing of low cloud cover off the southwest coast of Africa. This newly observed phenomenon could help climatologists understand how clouds affect Earth's heating and cooling.

2h

Lying in a foreign language is easier

It is not easy to tell when someone is lying. This is even more difficult when potential liars speak in a language other than their native tongue. Psychologists investigated why that is so.

2h

Mixed mRNA tails act like a shield that delays its shortening

Biologists have identified how mixed tails — made of different nucleotides — protect mRNA from degradation for longer. This study could bring new insights to our understanding of gene regulation in healthy and diseased states.

2h

Deep-diving scientists say shallow reefs can't rely on twilight zone systems for recovery

A team of highly trained scientific divers explored Pacific and western Atlantic reefs to test a widely held hypothesis that climate-stressed life from shallow reefs can take refuge at mesophotic depths (100-500 feet beneath the ocean's surface). The results are clear: deep and shallow reefs are different systems with their own species, and deep reefs are just as threatened by climate impacts, sto

2h

Fruit fly species can learn each other's dialects

Fruit flies from different species can warn each other when parasitic wasps are near. But according to a new study, they are more likely to get the message across if the fly species have previously cohabited and learned each other's dialects.

2h

Why does making new egg cells require so much cell death?

A highly detailed study of how the roundworm C. elegans forms oocytes suggests that the egg-making process leads to the formation and subsequent destruction of cells with an extra nucleus, but that some cellular materials are recycled into new eggs.

2h

Are you prone to feeling guilty? Then you're probably more trustworthy, study shows

New research finds that when it comes to predicting who is most likely to act in a trustworthy manner, one of the most important factors is the anticipation of guilt.

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Paralyzed mice with spinal cord injury made to walk again

Most people with spinal cord injury are paralyzed from the injury site down, even when the cord isn't completely severed. Why don't the spared portions of the spinal cord keep working? Researchers now provide insight into why these nerve pathways remain quiet. They also show that a small-molecule compound, given systemically, can revive these circuits in paralyzed mice, restoring their ability to

2h

Sleep trackers probably won’t help you sleep any better

Health We know how sleep cycles work, but we don’t know what a normal one is or how to alter it. Aside from keeping count of the number of hours we get each night, sleep researchers say sleep monitors are cool to look at, but don’t provide any valuable data to…

2h

Samsung plans to unveil bendable smartphone in 2019

Samsung is planning to unveil a new type of bendable, foldable smartphone that could sell for more than $1,500, according to the Wall Street Journal. Read More

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Trump aims to end automatic protections for some species

The Trump administration on Thursday proposed ending automatic protections for threatened animal and plant species and limiting habitat safeguards that are meant to shield recovering species from harm.

2h

Learning from 'Little Monsters'

Caddisflies, crustaceans, mollusks and flatworms. Those are just a few of the curious creatures known as benthic (bottom-dwelling) invertebrates and commonly found in small streams. Fingernail clams and oligochaetes are part of the menagerie, too.

2h

Hawaii businesses seek lava viewing site to reignite tourism

Stunning images of Hawaii's erupting Kilauea volcano have captivated people around the world. But ironically it's nearly impossible for residents and visitors on the ground to see the lava—a fact that's squeezing the tourism-dependent local economy.

2h

A Photo Trip to China’s Qiandongnan Prefecture

In south central China’s Guizhou province sits Qiandongnan Miao and Dong Autonomous Prefecture, home to nearly four million people—approximately 50% from the ethnic Miao group, and 30% from the ethnic Dong people. The mountainous landscape is lined with terraced farm fields, the valleys dotted with villages made up of traditional wooden structures, and the local festivals burst with color.

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Trump’s Biggest Gift to Putin

President Donald Trump’s trip to Europe last week produced such a staggering volume of news that it is getting hard to keep up. Trump accused Germany of being “a captive of Russia,” warned NATO allies that the United States “might go it alone” if they didn’t increase spending immediately, accused the British prime minister of “wrecking Brexit,” and met one-on-one with the Russian president, after

2h

There Is No Escape for Corals

It’s faintly absurd to be in one of the most obscure parts of the planet—a creepy zone of perpetual gloom and imminent danger, where no other humans have ventured—and have a cartoonishly squeaky voice. That’s what Luiz Rocha and his team repeatedly experienced in their attempts to study the world’s deep coral reefs. Picture a coral reef and you’ll likely imagine a sun-drenched world lying just be

2h

Learning from 'Little Monsters'

By studying deep and shallow water zones of streams and their resident invertebrates, researcher reveals mysteries of fresh water life.

2h

Discovery of kidney cancer driver could lead to new treatment strategy

In a study published in the journal Science, researchers suggest that ZHX2 is a potential new therapeutic target for clear cell renal cell carcinoma, which is the most common type of kidney cancer.

2h

New particles are formed also in the polluted air of major cities

Researchers from the University of Helsinki's Institute for Atmospheric and Earth System Research (INAR) have discovered a mechanism that leads to atmospheric new particle formation in megacities.

2h

The tale of mRNA mixed tail

IBS biologists have identified how mixed tails — made of different nucleotides — protect mRNA from degradation for longer. This study could bring new insights to our understanding of gene regulation in healthy and diseased states.

2h

Rapid cloud clearing phenomenon could provide another piece of climate puzzle

Researchers from North Carolina State University have described rapid and dramatic clearing of low cloud cover off the southwest coast of Africa. This newly observed phenomenon could help climatologists understand how clouds affect Earth's heating and cooling.

2h

Abrupt cloud clearing events over southeast Atlantic Ocean are new piece in climate puzzle

Although clouds grow and dissipate all of the time, scientists think that low-lying clouds off the coast of subtropical Africa are being disrupted not simply by wind from the continent, but rather by a wave mechanism. For climate models, the way the clouds are being disrupted could make a big difference.

2h

Low/no calorie soft drinks linked to improved outcomes in advanced colon cancer patients

Drinking artificially-sweetened beverages is associated with a significantly lower risk of colon cancer recurrence and cancer death, a team of investigators led by a Yale Cancer Center scientist has found. The study was published today in the journal The Public Library of Science One or PLOS ONE.

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Why does making new egg cells require so much cell death?

A highly detailed study of how the roundworm C. elegans forms oocytes suggests that the egg-making process leads to the formation and subsequent destruction of cells with an extra nucleus, but that some cellular materials are recycled into new eggs. James Priess of the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and colleagues, report these findings in a new study published July 19th, 2018 in PLOS Gene

2h

Fruit fly species can learn each other's dialects

Fruit flies from different species can warn each other when parasitic wasps are near. But according to a new study led by Balint Z. Kacsoh of Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, published July 19th in PLOS Genetics, they are more likely to get the message across if the fly species have previously cohabited and learned each other's dialects.

2h

From cradle to grave: Model identifies factors that shaped evolution

This study brings us closer to knowing the complex interactions between topography and climate change, and how these factors influence the evolutionary histories and biodiversity of species in natural ecosystems.

2h

Broken bones among older people increase risk of death for up to 10 years

Broken bones among older people increase their risk of death for up to 10 years, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

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Enzyme identified as possible novel drug target for sickle cell disease, Thalassemia

Medical researchers have identified a key signaling protein that regulates hemoglobin production in red blood cells, offering a possible target for a future innovative drug to treat sickle cell disease. Experiments in cultured human cells reveal that blocking the protein reduces the characteristic sickling that distorts the shape of red blood cells and gives the disease its name.

2h

From cradles to graves: Modeling the ecology and evolution of biodiversity

Researchers have created a model capable of simulating the complex history of life in South America over thousands of years — an effort to better understand the many complex factors affecting the emergence, distribution and extinction of species on the continent.

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A 'fingerprint' for anthropogenic climate change in a new place

Adding to evidence attributing observed atmospheric changes to manmade influences, climate scientists leveraging satellite data from recent decades have identified a human 'fingerprint' on Earth's atmosphere in a new place: the troposphere, or, the lowest region of the atmosphere.

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No refuge in the deep for shallow reef ecosystems

Deep water coral reefs are not the places of refuge for shallow reef organisms that some scientists have considered them to be, a new report suggests.

2h

The puzzling problems of urban particle formation

Researchers who studied the heavily polluted air of Shanghai, China, between 2014 and 2016 report the chemical conditions that led to the surprising formation of new particles in the city's atmosphere, particles that likely worsened regional air quality.

2h

Deep-diving scientists say shallow reefs can't rely on twilight zone systems for recovery

A team of highly trained scientific divers — led by researchers from the California Academy of Sciences — explored Pacific and western Atlantic reefs to test a widely held hypothesis that climate-stressed life from shallow reefs can take refuge at mesophotic depths (100-500 feet beneath the ocean's surface). The results are clear: deep and shallow reefs are different systems with their own speci

2h

Yeast species used in food industry causes disease in humans

A major cause of drug-resistant clinical yeast infections is the same species previously regarded as non-pathogenic and commonly used in the biotechnology and food industries. The study, published on July 19 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens, was led by Alexander Douglass of University College Dublin in Ireland.

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Framework to help integrate social sciences into neglected tropical disease interventions

It has long been argued that social science perspectives have a great deal to offer the world of global public health. A new paper, published this week in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases, lays out an accessible and actionable socio-anthropological framework for understanding the effectiveness factors of neglected tropical disease (NTD) interventions.

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Rising global meat consumption 'will devastate environment'

Analysis suggests eating of meat will climb steeply and play significant role in increasing carbon emissions and reducing biodiversity Rising global meat consumption is likely to have a devastating environmental impact, scientists have warned. A new major analysis suggests meat consumption is set to climb steeply as the world population increases along with average individual income, and could pl

3h

Trilobites: The Stuff That Helps Leeches Get Their Fill of Blood

Researchers examined the arsenal of anticoagulants used by marine leeches to feed on turtles, fish and even sharks.

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Research suggests another way Neanderthals were like us: They could start their own fires

Humans may not have been the only hominids who knew how to start a fire long ago. New research suggests that as early as 50,000 years ago, Neanderthals wielded this power as well.

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Belgian airspace closed over computer glitch

Belgium on Thursday closed its airspace following a computer glitch linked to problems downloading data related to flight plans, said Belgocontrol, the company tasked with controlling the country's skies.

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News at a glance

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A second chance

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A path to clean water

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Sliding at the base

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The future of meat

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'Tis the seasonal

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A broader repertoire

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Wallpaper fermions and the nonsymmorphic Dirac insulator

Materials whose gapless surface states are protected by crystal symmetries include mirror topological crystalline insulators and nonsymmorphic hourglass insulators. There exists only a very limited set of possible surface crystal symmetries, captured by the 17 "wallpaper groups." Here we show that a consideration of symmetry-allowed band degeneracies in the wallpaper groups can be used to underst

3h

Electrofluorochromism at the single-molecule level

The interplay between the oxidation state and the optical properties of molecules is important for applications in displays, sensors, and molecular-based memories. The fundamental mechanisms occurring at the level of a single molecule have been difficult to probe. We used a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) to characterize and control the fluorescence of a single zinc-phthalocyanine radical cat

3h

Emergence of coexisting ordered states in active matter systems

Active systems can produce a far greater variety of ordered patterns than conventional equilibrium systems. In particular, transitions between disorder and either polar- or nematically ordered phases have been predicted and observed in two-dimensional active systems. However, coexistence between phases of different types of order has not been reported. We demonstrate the emergence of dynamic coex

3h

Cavity-mediated collective spin-exchange interactions in a strontium superradiant laser

Laser-cooled and quantum degenerate atoms are being pursued as quantum simulators and form the basis of today’s most precise sensors. A key challenge toward these goals is to understand and control coherent interactions between the atoms. We observe long-range exchange interactions mediated by an optical cavity, which manifest as tunable spin-spin interactions on the pseudo spin-1/2 system compos

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Torsional instability in the single-chain limit of a transition metal trichalcogenide

The scientific bounty resulting from the successful isolation of few to single layers of two-dimensional materials suggests that related new physics resides in the few- to single-chain limit of one-dimensional materials. We report the synthesis of the quasi–one-dimensional transition metal trichalcogenide NbSe 3 (niobium triselenide) in the few-chain limit, including the realization of isolated s

3h

Fault-tolerant detection of a quantum error

A critical component of any quantum error–correcting scheme is detection of errors by using an ancilla system. However, errors occurring in the ancilla can propagate onto the logical qubit, irreversibly corrupting the encoded information. We demonstrate a fault-tolerant error-detection scheme that suppresses spreading of ancilla errors by a factor of 5, while maintaining the assignment fidelity.

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The South Asian monsoon–pollution pump and purifier

Air pollution is growing fastest in monsoon-affected South Asia. During the dry winter monsoon, the fumes disperse toward the Indian Ocean, creating a vast pollution haze, but their fate during the wet summer monsoon has been unclear. We performed atmospheric chemistry measurements by aircraft in the Oxidation Mechanism Observations campaign, sampling the summer monsoon outflow in the upper tropo

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Friction at the bed does not control fast glacier flow

The largest uncertainty in the ice sheet models used to predict future sea level rise originates from our limited understanding of processes at the ice/bed interface. Near glacier termini, where basal sliding controls ice flow, most predictive ice sheet models use a parameterization of sliding that has been theoretically derived for glacier flow over a hard bed. We find that this sliding relation

3h

Atmospheric new particle formation from sulfuric acid and amines in a Chinese megacity

Atmospheric new particle formation (NPF) is an important global phenomenon that is nevertheless sensitive to ambient conditions. According to both observation and theoretical arguments, NPF usually requires a relatively high sulfuric acid (H 2 SO 4 ) concentration to promote the formation of new particles and a low preexisting aerosol loading to minimize the sink of new particles. We investigated

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Mesophotic coral ecosystems are threatened and ecologically distinct from shallow water reefs

The rapid degradation of coral reefs is one of the most serious biodiversity problems facing our generation. Mesophotic coral reefs (at depths of 30 to 150 meters) have been widely hypothesized to provide refuge from natural and anthropogenic impacts, a promise for the survival of shallow reefs. The potential role of mesophotic reefs as universal refuges is often highlighted in reef conservation

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Domain-focused CRISPR screen identifies HRI as a fetal hemoglobin regulator in human erythroid cells

Increasing fetal hemoglobin (HbF) levels in adult red blood cells provides clinical benefit to patients with sickle cell disease and some forms of β-thalassemia. To identify potentially druggable HbF regulators in adult human erythroid cells, we employed a protein kinase domain–focused CRISPR-Cas9–based genetic screen with a newly optimized single-guide RNA scaffold. The screen uncovered the heme

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VHL substrate transcription factor ZHX2 as an oncogenic driver in clear cell renal cell carcinoma

Inactivation of the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) E3 ubiquitin ligase protein is a hallmark of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC). Identifying how pathways affected by VHL loss contribute to ccRCC remains challenging. We used a genome-wide in vitro expression strategy to identify proteins that bind VHL when hydroxylated. Zinc fingers and homeoboxes 2 (ZHX2) was found as a VHL target, and its hydro

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Meat consumption, health, and the environment

Both the global average per capita consumption of meat and the total amount of meat consumed are rising, driven by increasing average individual incomes and by population growth. The consumption of different types of meat and meat products has substantial effects on people’s health, and livestock production can have major negative effects on the environment. Here, we explore the evidence base for

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Human influence on the seasonal cycle of tropospheric temperature

We provide scientific evidence that a human-caused signal in the seasonal cycle of tropospheric temperature has emerged from the background noise of natural variability. Satellite data and the anthropogenic "fingerprint" predicted by climate models show common large-scale changes in geographical patterns of seasonal cycle amplitude. These common features include increases in amplitude at mid-lati

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Migrating Arctic Geese Are Confused, Exhausted By Rising Temperatures

Warmer weather means that barnacle geese fly faster to their breeding grounds, leaving them too tired to lay eggs right away. By the time they're ready, the babies have missed the best food. (Image credit: Thomas Lameris/NIOO-KNAW)

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Three Dimensions, Endless Possibilities

3-D printing isn't the future. It's changing the world we live in right now. (Image credit: Cindy Ord/Getty for Dylan's Candy Bar)

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3-D technology to be tested for carry-on bags at JFK Airport

Travelers at John F. Kennedy Airport in New York will soon experience a test of more advanced, three-dimensional imaging to screen carry-on bags.

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Disney Animation to premiere first VR short at SIGGRAPH 2018

Walt Disney Animation Studios will debut its first ever virtual reality short film at SIGGRAPH 2018, and the hope is viewers will walk away feeling connected to the characters as equally as they will with the VR technology involved in making the film.

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Fruit fly species can learn each other's dialects

Fruit flies from different species can warn each other when parasitic wasps are near. But according to a new study led by Balint Z. Kacsoh of Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, published July 19th in PLOS Genetics, they are more likely to get the message across if the fly species have previously cohabited and learned each other's dialects.

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From cradle to grave: Model identifies factors that shaped evolution

Understanding the many factors that have played into shaping the biodiversity within Earth's ecosystems can be daunting. In a major step to that end, an international team of researchers built a computer simulation that takes into account many of the fundamental factors that drive evolutionary adaptation and extinction.

3h

Deep-diving scientists say shallow reefs can't rely on twilight zone systems for recovery

New findings suggest that out-of-sight deep reefs are unique habitats in need of protection. A team of highly trained scientific divers—led by researchers from the California Academy of Sciences—explored Pacific and western Atlantic reefs to test a widely held hypothesis that climate-stressed life from shallow reefs can take refuge at mesophotic depths (100—500 feet beneath the ocean's surface). T

3h

Rapid cloud clearing phenomenon could provide another piece of climate puzzle

Researchers from North Carolina State University have described rapid and dramatic clearing of low cloud cover off the southwest coast of Africa. This newly observed phenomenon could help climatologists understand how clouds affect Earth's heating and cooling.

3h

French automaker PSA confirms plans to re-enter US market by 2026

French automaker PSA confirmed Thursday its plan for a gradual return to the US market even if Washington follows through on a threat to impose tariffs of up to 25 percent on auto imports.

3h

Disney Animation to premiere first VR short at SIGGRAPH 2018

Walt Disney Animation Studios will debut its first ever virtual reality short film at SIGGRAPH 2018, and the hope is viewers will walk away feeling connected to the characters as equally as they will with the VR technology involved in making the film.

3h

Who Wins When France Claims the World Cup?

The final World Cup match was nothing short of exhilarating. Sunday’s showdown in Moscow saw France’s Les Bleus overtake the underdog Croatian team to win its second title, 4 to 2. The strange, stunning upset featured a gnarly goalkeeper gaffe , an especially ill-timed own goal , and a pitch invasion from the Russian protest performance group Pussy Riot. Played under a blanket of light rain, the

3h

The Worst Security Risk in U.S. History

As a candidate, Donald Trump promised to run the U.S. government in the same way he ran his businesses. At his Helsinki meeting with Russian president Vladimir Putin, President Donald Trump honored that commitment. According to the Russian government, Trump pledged the United States to a series of agreements on matters ranging from nuclear forces to Syria. The U.S. government seems to have no ide

3h

The Rise of ‘Revisionist’ America

H. R. McMaster, Donald Trump’s former national-security adviser, used to warn of the dangers of “revisionist powers.” He had in mind countries like China and Russia that are newly ascendant and determined to amend to their advantage the global status quo: a decades-old, U.S.-led international system of free trade, military and diplomatic alliances, and liberal rules and institutions that govern h

3h

Facebook in fresh controversy over Holocaust denialMark Zuckerberg Holocaust

Facebook found itself embroiled anew in controversy Thursday after chief executive Mark Zuckerberg argued the leading social network should not filter out posts denying the Holocaust.

3h

New malicious email detection method outperforms 60 antivirus engines

Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU) Malware Lab researchers have developed a new method to detect unknown, malicious emails that is more accurate than the most popular antivirus software products. Email messages are widely used by attackers to deliver dangerous content to a victim, such as attachments or links to malicious websites.

3h

New instruments push boundaries for precise measurements in jet engines, gas turbines

A Purdue University-affiliated startup is developing instruments to precisely measure pressure, temperature and other analytics inside the harsh environments of rocket engines and gas turbines.

3h

Chemists characterize the fatal fungus among us

Life-threatening fungal infections affect more than two million people worldwide. Effective antifungal medications are very limited. Until now, one of the major challenges is that the fungal cell wall is poorly understood, which has impeded the development of effective antifungal medications that target the cell wall. However, an LSU chemist has identified for the first time the cell wall structur

3h

Hovedløs babyslange fundet i 100 mio. år gammel ravklump

Fossilet af en babyslange er fundet i en oldgammel ravklump fra Burma. Enestående fund, der omskriver slangens evolution, mener forskere.

3h

Aqua Satellite finds a more organized, large Tropical Storm Ampil

When NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the Northwestern Pacific Ocean on July 19, the large Tropical Storm Ampil appeared much more organized than it did the previous day.

3h

Mystery of Spiky-Skulled Utah Dinosaur Solved

When paleontologists in Utah first dug up the fossil of a spiky-skulled ankylosaur in Utah, they were perplexed.

3h

Photos: Spiky-Headed Dinosaur Found in Utah, But It Has Asian Roots

A newly identified species of ankylosaur from Utah had an especially spiky skull.

3h

Chemists characterize the fatal fungus among us

Life-threatening fungal infections affect more than two million people worldwide. Effective antifungal medications are limited. A major challenge is that the fungal cell wall is poorly understood, which has impeded drug development. However, a chemist has identified for the first time the cell wall structure of one of the most prevalent and deadly fungi, which could usher in a new era of antifunga

3h

Aircraft campaign to clarify chemistry of wildfire smoke

This summer, a four-engine cargo airplane laden with both scientists and sophisticated equipment will fly straight into hazy smoke from Western wildfires.

3h

Scientists surmount epigenetic barriers to cloning with two-pronged approach

An international group of researchers have raised the viability of mice that were cloned using a method called somatic cell nuclear transfer, by stimulating two epigenetic factors, and by doing this have shown that creating cloned animals more efficiently will require further work in the area of epigenetics. They have also uncovered a key epigenetic mechanism that appears to be a major impediment

3h

Monkeys benefit from the nut-cracking abilities of chimpanzees and hogs

To investigate the scavenging behaviour first author Bryndan van Pinxteren of the University of Amsterdam analysed all video material from the camera traps by scoring the visiting behaviour of mangabey monkeys, fowl species and squirrels to chimpanzee nut-cracking sites in relation to known nut-cracking events. Furthermore, since mangabeys are infrequently preyed upon by chimpanzees, he investigat

3h

Evidence of Salmonella Paratyphi C found for the first time in medieval northern Europe

Genome research conducted by the University of Warwick suggests that enteric fever, a potentially lethal disease more commonly found in hot countries, was present in medieval Europe.

3h

Newly discovered armored dinosaur from Utah reveals intriguing family history

Fossils of a new genus and species of an ankylosaurid dinosaur — Akainacephalus johnsoni — have been unearthed in Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument in southern Utah, USA, and are revealing new details about the diversity and evolution of this group of armored dinosaurs. The research indicates that the defining features of Akainacephalus — the spiky bony armor covering the skull and sn

3h

App, brief intervention may be lifesaver for suicidal teens

A preliminary study shows an intervention program that includes a personalized app could make a difference: Researchers found the rate of attempted suicides by teenagers who received the intervention was halved compared to those who received the standard care during their hospitalization.

3h

Deepwater Horizon oil spill: Oil biodegradation inhibited in deep-sea sediments

Degradation rates of oil were slower in the dark and cold waters of the depths of the Gulf of Mexico than at surface conditions, according to an international team of geoscientists trying to understand where the oil went during the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

3h

Weird new fruits could hit aisles soon thanks to gene-editing

Supermarkets stocked with peach-flavoured strawberries and seedless tomatoes on horizon, scientists say Smooth or hairy, pungent or tasteless, deep-hued or bright: new versions of old fruits could be hitting the produce aisles as plant experts embrace cutting-edge technology, scientists say. While researchers have previously produced plants with specific traits through traditional breeding techni

3h

Andy Casagrande's Best Moments | The Faces of Shark Week

Shark week host and filmmaker Andy Casagrande has been the face of Shark Week for decades. In this episode, watch some of the best moments the host had, including a close call where he almost ended up as shark bait. Shark Week 2018 starts Sunday July 22 9p! Stream The Faces of Shark Week on Discovery GO: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/the-faces-of-shark-week/ Stream Classic Shark Week Episode

3h

Oil biodegradation inhibited in deep-sea sediments

Degradation rates of oil were slower in the dark and cold waters of the depths of the Gulf of Mexico than at surface conditions, according to an international team of geoscientists trying to understand where the oil went during the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

3h

China's 'livestock revolution' demands 'new transition'

Demand for animal protein and increasing wealth fuelled a tripling in the domestic production of livestock in China between 1980 and 2010, and the rise, despite some improvements in efficiencies at the farm level, had significant impacts on environmental sustainability, nationally and globally.

3h

Computer model predicts how fracturing metallic glass releases energy at the atomic level

Metallic glasses—alloys lacking the crystalline structure normally found in metals—are an exciting research target for tantalizing applications, including artificial joints and other medical implant devices. However, the difficulties associated with predicting how much energy these materials release when they fracture is slowing down development of metallic glass-based products.

4h

Video: The chemistry of food cooking

Bulky kitchen gadgets like slow cookers and pressure cookers take up a lot of space. Many people might wonder if owning so many glorified pots is worthwhile.

4h

The White House Can't Contain the Russia Story

Updated on July 19 at 2:37 p.m. EST The White House hasn’t lost control of the narrative surrounding President Donald Trump and Russia, because it never had control in the first place. The fallout from the past few days following Trump’s explosive press conference with Vladimir Putin has further exposed the deficiencies in the administration’s messaging capabilities, as the cleanup effort has bee

4h

Huge Egyptian sarcophagus found to contain three mummies

Archaeologists open granite tomb but are dismayed at state of decay after ‘sewage leak’ Egyptian archeologists have opened a 30-tonne black granite sarcophagus to find three decomposed mummies after sewage water apparently leaked inside. “The sarcophagus has been opened, but we have not been hit by a curse,” said Mostafa Waziry, the head of Egypt’s Supreme Council for Antiquities, in response to

4h

AI-equipped robots develop situational awareness in Earth's most uncertain environment

Waves, winds, currents, wakes from passing boats and eddies swirling around structures make water one of the most complex environments for experienced boat captains, let alone robots. Now, researchers at Stevens Institute of Technology are developing algorithms that teach robots to adapt to the constantly changing dynamics of the sea in order to address one of our nation's greatest concerns: prote

4h

Scientists Announce 10 New Moons for Jupiter

Space The gas giant now has 79 confirmed moons, including a new “oddball” one. 07/17/2018 James Gaines, Contributor To read more…

4h

New malicious email detection method that outperforms 60 antivirus engines — Ben-Gurion

They compared their detection model to 60 industry-leading antivirus engines as well as previous research, and found their system outperformed the next best antivirus engine by 13 percent — significantly better than such products including Kaspersky, MacAfee and Avast.

4h

Tropical Cyclone Son-Tinh makes landfall and NASA examines its trail of rainfall

Tropical Cyclone Son-Tinh made landfall in Vietnam and left a trail of heavy rainfall in its wake. NASA's Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite provided an estimate of that soggy trail through the Gulf of Tonkin.

4h

Physics Needs Philosophy / Philosophy Needs Physics

Philosophy has always played an essential role in the development of science, physics in particular, and is likely to continue to do so — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

U.S. Health Care Companies Begin Exploring Blockchain Technologies

The goal is a health care system where patients have accurate and updated records that are secure against tampering or snooping — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

Vast majority of Americans support Endangered Species Act despite increasing efforts to curtail it

Roughly four out of five Americans support the Endangered Species Act, and only one in 10 oppose it, found a survey of 1,287 Americans. Support has remained stable for the past two decades.

4h

Targeting headaches and tumors with nano-submarines

Scientists have developed a new method to enable miniature drug-filled nanocarriers to dock on to immune cells, which in turn attack tumors.

4h

Kan du holde varmen? Se hvordan din krop forandrer sig om sommeren

Godt nok gør varmen dig sløv i bøtten, men du bliver gladere og får lysere hår. Se hvad der ellers sker med din krop om sommeren

4h

Foundations of Immuno-Oncology: Advancing Basic Science & Translational Research

In this eBook, learn the tools needed to harness the power of immuno-oncology and supercharge the journey from the lab to the clinic.

4h

Nitrates in beef jerky, hot dogs, and cured meats linked to manic episodes

In a 10-year, 1,000 person study, people who ate cured meats like beef jerky, hot dogs, and pepperoni were 3.5x more likely to be hospitalized for mania. Read More

4h

10 fascinating discoveries from the Galapagos islands

The Galapagos Islands are among the most fascinating places on Earth. Their uniqueness has inspired science to make many important discoveries there. Read More

4h

Are you prone to feeling guilty? Then you're probably more trustworthy, study shows

New research from the University of Chicago Booth School of Business finds that when it comes to predicting who is most likely to act in a trustworthy manner, one of the most important factors is the anticipation of guilt.

4h

Newly discovered armored dinosaur from Utah reveals intriguing family history

Fossils of a new genus and species of an ankylosaurid dinosaur — Akainacephalus johnsoni — have been unearthed in Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument in southern Utah, USA, and are revealing new details about the diversity and evolution of this group of armored dinosaurs. The research indicates that the defining features of Akainacephalus — the spiky bony armor covering the skull and sn

4h

Mobile phone radiation may affect memory performance in adolescents, study finds

Radiofrequency electromagnetic fields may have adverse effects on the development of memory performance of specific brain regions exposed during mobile phone use, suggests a recent study involving nearly 700 adolescents in Switzerland.

4h

Depression-induced inflammation during pregnancy may impact newborns

The physiological impacts of depression on pregnant mothers may affect babies while in the womb and lead to changes in the behavior and biology of newborns, finds new research.

4h

Letters: ‘Find Your Passion’ Doesn’t Mean What You Think It Does

‘Find Your Passion’ Is Awful Advice Last week, Olga Khazan unpacked a recent study that questions the common wisdom on how we should choose our careers. Passions aren’t “found,” the study’s authors argued; they’re developed. Young people routinely mistake “find your passion” to mean “pick your interest early and do not waver from it,” rather than “constantly search for the things that make your s

4h

A new ankylosaur found in Utah had a surprisingly bumpy head

The spiky, fossilized skull of a newly discovered dinosaur species may be a road map to its ancestors’ journey to North America.

4h

4h

Newly discovered armored dinosaur from Utah reveals intriguing family history

Fossils of a new genus and species of an ankylosaurid dinosaur—Akainacephalus johnsoni— have been unearthed in the Kaiparowits Formation of Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument (GSENM), in Kane County, southern Utah, U.S.A., and are revealing new details about the diversity and evolution of this group of armored dinosaurs. Expected to look like other North American Late Cretaceous ankylosau

4h

Having the right name helps one to find housing

Discrimination against ethnic minorities on the housing market is declining — in Germany and other Western European countries and in the USA. But a new meta-study shows that applicants' surnames still influence the selection of new tenants.

4h

Wait, just a second, is your doctor listening?

On average, patients get about 11 seconds to explain the reasons for their visit before they are interrupted by their doctors. Also, only one in three doctors provides their patients with adequate opportunity to describe their situation. The pressure to rush consultations affects specialists more than primary care doctors.

4h

Anesthesia, surgery linked to decline in memory and thinking

In adults over 70, exposure to general anesthesia and surgery is associated with a subtle decline in memory and thinking skills, according to new research. The study analyzed nearly 2,000 people and found that exposure to anesthesia after age 70 was linked to long-term changes in brain function.

4h

CALET succeeds in direct measurements of cosmic-ray electron spectrum up to 4.8 TeV

Researchers have succeeded in the direct, high-precision measurements of cosmic-ray electron spectrum up to 4.8 TeV, based on observations with the Calorimetric Electron Telescope (CALET). Observations by CALET are expected to reveal the mysteries of cosmic-rays and nature of dark matter in the future.

4h

Reversing cause and effect is no trouble for quantum computers

Scientists show that a quantum computer is less in thrall to the arrow of time than a classical computer.

4h

Death rates from heart failure higher for women than men

Death rates from heart failure are higher for women than men, and hospitalization rates have increased in women while declining in men, found a new study.

4h

'Good cholesterol' may not always be good

Postmenopausal factors may have an impact on the heart-protective qualities of high-density lipoproteins (HDL) — also known as 'good cholesterol.' The findings bring into question the current use of total HDL cholesterol to predict heart disease risk.

4h

Gorilla Glass 6 Is More Durable and Built For the FutureCorning Gorilla Glass

The next generation of Corning's Gorilla Glass can withstand repeated drops—and is built for the future of smartphones.

4h

Careful patient selection is the key to achieving the best results for vaginal mesh surgery

The high number of reported complications from transvaginal repairs for pelvic organ prolapse (POP) using vaginal mesh have led to a significant decline in its use, despite its initial promise. Following a six-year analysis of California records of pelvic organ prolapse repairs, investigators reporting in The Journal of Urology conclude that use of vaginal mesh may be appropriate in specific cases

4h

Targeting headaches and tumors with nano-submarines

Scientists at the Mainz University Medical Center and the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research (MPI-P) have developed a new method to enable miniature drug-filled nanocarriers to dock on to immune cells, which in turn attack tumors.

4h

Oil biodegradation inhibited in deep-sea sediments

Degradation rates of oil were slower in the dark and cold waters of the depths of the Gulf of Mexico than at surface conditions, according to an international team of geoscientists trying to understand where the oil went during the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

4h

Most Americans support Endangered Species Act despite increasing efforts to curtail it

Roughly four out of five Americans support the Endangered Species Act, and only one in 10 oppose it, found a survey of 1,287 Americans. Support has remained stable for the past two decades.

4h

Most Americans support Endangered Species Act despite increasing efforts to curtail it

Just about any news story about the Endangered Species Act includes a prominent mention of the controversy around the 45-year-old law.

5h

Arctic Circle Burns As Record Heat Broils Northern Europe

Record temperatures are helping to turn northern Europe into a tinderbox.

5h

Nonprofit for Migrants Declines a Donation from SalesforceSalesforce RAICES US

RAICES, which received more than $20 million in donations through a viral Facebook campaign, wanted Salesforce to drop its contract with a US border agency.

5h

'Alien' Mummy DNA Probe May Have Crossed Ethical Lines

Did DNA analysis of an "alien" mummy violate legal and ethical boundaries?

5h

This Robot Just Wants To Hug A Jellyfish Without Committing Jellymurder

Its designers hope the device will make it much easier to collect delicate animals in the ocean without hurting them.

5h

Air pollution in national parks may keep visitors away

Poor air quality in national parks may put a damper on visitation, according to a new study. As reported in Science Advances , the researchers studied ozone levels in 33 of the largest national parks in the US. The researchers found that from 1990 to 2014 average ozone concentrations in national parks were statistically indistinguishable from those of the 20 largest US metropolitan areas—conditio

5h

Science Denialism in the 21st Century

It’s rampant, but it’s hardly a new phenomenon — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

Americans Have Some Pretty Vanilla Sexual Fantasies

In the canon of sex research, far more energy and attention has been devoted to the act of having sex—how, when, and with whom—than to how people think about it when they are on their own. Which is one reason why Justin Lehmiller, a research fellow at Indiana University’s Kinsey Institute for Research in Sex, Gender, and Reproduction and the author of the blog Sex and Psychology , decided to cond

5h

Who Is Sacha Baron Cohen Satirizing?

There’s a reason why Sacha Baron Cohen left the “Kinderguardians” segment to the end of the first episode of Who Is America? , his new satirical Showtime series. The 10-minute sequence is Cohen at his best, playing a swollen, testosteronic Israeli pro-gun advocate called Colonel Erran Morad who’s able—by sheer force of character—to get politicians and lobbyists to argue that children as young as

5h

The Trump Administration Contradicts Itself on Putin’s Offer

Updated at 1:53 p.m. ET President Trump’s news conference Monday with Russian President Vladimir Putin has quickly become the sort of gift that keeps on giving: The focus, initially, was on Trump saying he believed Putin’s assertion that Russia didn’t interfere in the 2016 presidential election over U.S. intelligence assessments that it did. Now, the question is just how seriously the Trump admin

5h

Democrats 'less inclined to cheat on spouses than Republicans'

Analysis finds Democrats used adultery website Ashley Madison substantially less than other US voters Democrats are less inclined than Republicans to cheat on their spouses, according to researchers who matched voter records to accounts hacked from a US website that specialises in extramarital affairs. The study of 80,000 voters in five US states found that Democrats used the Ashley Madison adult

5h

Scientists use satellites to measure vital underground water resources

With the hope of providing water resource managers with better tools to help keep aquifers healthy, a team of scientists are using the latest space technology to look underneath Earth's surface to measure this precious natural resource.

5h

Determining the bioaccumulation of 9 metals in aquatic invertebrates in mining areas

A new study has proposed an ecological threshold concentration of 9 metals for 10 taxa of aquatic macroinvertebrates from clean sites in the Nalón river basin (Asturias). This is the first step towards incorporating into river management plans quality criteria relating to the bioaccumulation of hazardous substances, as required by the EU.

5h

Sudden cold weather may increase stroke mortality

Study conducted in Southern Hemisphere's subtropical zone detects correlation between drop in temperature and rise in deaths from stroke, especially among women and older people.

5h

Puzzling results explained: A multiband approach to Coulomb drag and indirect excitons

A new theoretical study explains previous mystifying experimental results, in which coupled charged particles moved in exactly the opposite direction to that predicted. This apparently contradictory phenomenon is associated with the bandgap in dual-layer graphene structures, a bandgap which is very much smaller than in conventional semiconductors.

5h

Overuse of antibiotics not what the doctor ordered

With increased use of antibiotics worldwide linked to growing antibiotic resistance, a new study has highlighted the growing impact of non-prescription supply of antibiotics in community pharmacies, and the urgent need for better enforcement of laws. South America has the highest incidence of non-prescription supply of antibiotics in community pharmacies.

5h

Scientists develop proteins that self-assemble into supramolecular complexes

Scientists have designed new proteins that can self-assemble into the complex structures underlying biological organisms, laying the groundwork for leading-edge applications in biotechnology. The researchers created and developed the proteins with a specific function and their method reveals a possibility that certain protein functions can be created on demand. It is expected to contribute to the

5h

Robots working as a group are able to determine the optimal order of their tasks

Could robots soon help rescue crews save the survivors of a natural disaster? Such a mission would require that the robots be able to determine, on their own, which tasks to perform and in what order to perform them. Researchers have shown, for the first time, that this ability can emerge from a group of robots.

5h

Chemicals in beef jerky and hot dogs linked to mania

Chemicals used to cure beef jerky, salami, hot dogs, and other processed meat snacks may contribute to mania, an abnormal mood state characterized by hyperactivity, euphoria, and insomnia, according to a new study. The study, which appears in the journal Molecular Psychiatry , while not designed to determine cause-and-effect, did find that people hospitalized for an episode of mania were three ti

5h

This colorful web is the most complete look yet at a fruit fly’s brain cells

Scientists compiled 21 million images to craft the highest-resolution view yet of the fruit fly brain.

5h

Make cannabis-based medicines legal, say UK drug advisers

Advisory council’s recommendation may pave way for loosening of laws Doctors in the UK should be able to prescribe cannabis-derived medicine, the government’s chief drug advisers have recommended, paving the way for a loosening of the laws governing access to the substance. The Advisory Council on the Misuse of Drugs (ACMD) has recommended after a review that cannabis-derived medicinal products s

5h

This colorful web is the most complete look yet at a fruit fly’s brain cells

Scientists compiled 21 million images to craft the highest-resolution view yet of the fruit fly brain.

5h

Mobile phone radiation may affect memory performance in adolescents

Radiofrequency electromagnetic fields may have adverse effects on the development of memory performance of specific brain regions exposed during mobile phone use. These are the findings of a study involving nearly 700 adolescents in Switzerland. The investigation, led by the Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH), will be published on Thursday, July 19, 2018 in the peer-reviewed jo

5h

Engineers develop world's most efficient semiconductor for thermal management

Working to address 'hotspots' in computer chips that degrade their performance, engineers have developed a new semiconductor material, defect-free boron arsenide, that is more effective at drawing and dissipating waste heat than any other known semiconductor or metal materials.

5h

Heat Wave Scorches Sweden as Wildfires Rage in the Arctic Circle

High temperatures and low rainfall have fueled fires across the country. Elsewhere in Europe, drought in Britain and Ireland has exposed ancient structures.

5h

These Birds Are Racing to Their Mating Grounds. It’s Exhausting.

Global warming is making some geese speed up their northward spring migration. That means trouble when they arrive in the Arctic.

5h

U.K. Supermarket to Have ‘Quieter Hour’ for People With Autism

For an hour on Saturdays, Morrisons will dim the aisles, silence the music and take other steps aimed at easing sensory overload.

5h

Rising sea levels are going to mess with the internet, sooner than you think

Technology Connectivity issues could get much worse. Snaking beneath roads and strung across oceans, hundreds of thousands of miles of cables and their connections make up the backbone of the internet. Despite its…

5h

Danmark snuppede tre bronzemedaljer ved OL i matematik

Tre gymnasieelever fra Danmark fik i år bronze og en 58. plads ved det internationale OL i matematik. Det er det bedste resultat siden 2011.

5h

Archaeologists find ancient pottery workshop in Egypt

Archaeologists in Egypt have discovered an ancient pottery manufacturing workshop dating to more than 4,000 years ago in the southern province of Aswan, the Antiquities Ministry said Thursday.

5h

Comcast drops Fox bid, paving way for sale to DisneyComcast Disney 2CF

Comcast is dropping its bid for Fox's entertainment businesses, paving the way for Disney to boost its upcoming streaming service by buying the studios behind "The Simpsons" and X-Men.

5h

Premature baby penguin recovers after parents broke her egg

London Zoo says a premature baby penguin has been nursed back to health after her parents accidentally stepped on her egg and broke it.

5h

Airbus fetes first flight of its new 'whale in the sky'

European aerospace giant Airbus conducted Thursday the first test flight of the giant new Beluga XL, an even bigger version of the company's workhorse transport plane which has been in service since the mid 1990s.

5h

Zuckerberg at center of Holocaust denial controversy (Update)Mark Zuckerberg Holocaust

Facebook founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg has found himself at the center of a fresh row after saying the social network should not prohibit posts which deny the Holocaust.

5h

Indonesia's 'child' of Krakatoa spews ash and lava

An Indonesian volcano known as the "child" of the legendary Krakatoa erupted on Thursday, spewing a plume of ash high into the sky as molten lava streamed down from its summit.

5h

Future electronic components to be printed like newspapers

A new manufacturing technique uses a process similar to newspaper printing to form smoother and more flexible metals for making ultrafast electronic devices.

5h

Moving closer to completely optical artificial neural network

Researchers have shown that it is possible to train artificial neural networks directly on an optical chip.

5h

Methods to quantify the yips and golfer's cramp

Almost every golfer knows the feeling. Minutes after a picture-perfect drive down the fairway, a cascade of inexplicable missed putts leads to a disappointing triple bogey.

5h

Future electronic components to be printed like newspapers

A new manufacturing technique uses a process similar to newspaper printing to form smoother and more flexible metals for making ultrafast electronic devices.

5h

Computer model predicts how fracturing metallic glass releases energy at the atomic level

Metallic glasses are an exciting research target, but the difficulties associated with predicting how much energy these materials release when they fracture is slowing down development of metallic glass-based products. Recently, researchers developed a way of simulating to the atomic level how metallic glasses behave as they fracture. This modeling technique could improve computer-aided materials

5h

ADHD drugs do not improve cognition in healthy college students

Contrary to popular belief across college campuses, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) medications may fail to improve cognition in healthy students and actually can impair functioning.

5h

Sunscreen reduces melanoma risk by 40 per cent in young people

A world-first study has found that Australians aged 18-40 years who were regular users of sunscreen in childhood reduced their risk of developing melanoma by 40 percent, compared to those who rarely used sunscreen.

5h

How Big Batteries at Data Centers Could Replace Power Plants

Battery systems intended as backups may help companies like Microsoft increasingly employ renewable energy — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

Data Mining Reveals Fundamental Pattern of Human Thinking

submitted by /u/NaiveSkeptic [link] [comments]

5h

Determining the bioaccumulation of 9 metals in aquatic invertebrates in mining areas

A study conducted by the UPV/EHU's Animal Ecotoxicity and Biodiversity Group in collaboration with the University of Vigo has proposed an ecological threshold concentration of 9 metals for 10 taxa of aquatic macroinvertebrates from clean sites in the Nalón river basin (Asturias). This is the first step towards incorporating into river management plans quality criteria relating to the bioaccumulati

5h

App, brief intervention may be lifesaver for suicidal teens

A preliminary study from UT Southwestern's O'Donnell Brain Institute shows an intervention program that includes a personalized app could make a difference: Researchers found the rate of attempted suicides by teenagers who received the intervention was halved compared to those who received the standard care during their hospitalization.

5h

A smart safe rechargeable zinc ion battery based on sol-gel transition electrolytes

Thermal runaway has been a long-standing issue impeding the development of high-energy-density batteries. Recently, a research team led by Prof. Chunyi Zhi from City University of Hong Kong has successfully synthesized a temperature-sensitive sol-gel transition electrolyte and incorporated it into a rechargeable Zn/α-MnO2 battery system. The battery operation would be inhibited at high temperature

5h

Mayo Clinic study: Anesthesia, surgery linked to decline in memory and thinking

In adults over 70, exposure to general anesthesia and surgery is associated with a subtle decline in memory and thinking skills, according to new Mayo Clinic research. The study analyzed nearly 2,000 participants in the Mayo Clinic Study of Aging and found that exposure to anesthesia after age 70 was linked to long-term changes in brain function. The results appear in the British Journal of Anaest

5h

Having the right name helps one to find housing

Discrimination against ethnic minorities on the housing market is declining — in Germany and other Western European countries and in the USA. But a new meta-study shows that applicants' surnames still influence the selection of new tenants.

5h

ASU scientists use satellites to measure vital underground water resources

With the hope of providing water resource managers with better tools to help keep aquifers healthy, a team of scientists from Arizona State University and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory are using the latest space technology to look underneath Earth's surface to measure this precious natural resource.

5h

Taking the lead toward witchweed control

A compound that binds to and inhibits a crucial receptor protein offers a new route for controlling a parasitic plant.

5h

Evidence of Salmonella Paratyphi C found for the first time in medieval northern Europe

Genome research conducted by the University of Warwick suggests that enteric fever, a potentially lethal disease more commonly found in hot countries, was present in medieval Europe. Salmonella Paratyphi C causes enteric fever, a life-threatening infection, and has been detected in a 800 year old human skeleton discovered in Trondheim, Norway.

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Analytical tool predicts genes that can cause disease by producing altered proteins

A new computational tool predicts genes that can cause disease due to the production of truncated or altered proteins that take on a new or different function, rather than those that lose their function.

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Scientists surmount epigenetic barriers to cloning with two-pronged approach

An international group of researchers have raised the viability of mice that were cloned using a method called somatic cell nuclear transfer, by stimulating two epigenetic factors, and by doing this have shown that creating cloned animals more efficiently will require further work in the area of epigenetics. They have also uncovered a key epigenetic mechanism that appears to be a major impediment

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Analysis of prostate tumors reveals clues to cancer's aggressiveness

Using genetic sequencing, scientists have revealed the complete DNA makeup of more than 100 aggressive prostate tumors, pinpointing important genetic errors these deadly tumors have in common. The study lays the foundation for finding new ways to treat prostate cancer, particularly for the most aggressive forms of the disease.

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Overcoming resistance to a standard chemotherapy drug

Winship researchers identified an enzyme responsible for making tumors and cancer cell lines resistant to cisplatin, along with an experimental drug, lestaurtinib, which targets that enzyme.

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Complementary medicine for cancer can decrease survival

People who received complementary therapy for curable cancers were more likely to refuse at least one component of their conventional cancer treatment, and were more likely to die as a result, according to researchers from Yale Cancer Center and the Cancer Outcomes, Public Policy and Effectiveness Research Center (COPPER) at Yale School of Medicine. The findings were reported today online in JAMA

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Viruses cooperate to overcome immune defences of bacteria

Virus particles that infect bacteria can work together to overcome antiviral defences, new research shows.

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Association of monthly high-dose vitamin D supplementation and cancer risk

Monthly high-dose vitamin D supplementation without calcium for up to four years wasn't associated with reduced cancer risk among adults in New Zealand. This study analyzed data from a randomized clinical trial that included a placebo group. There were 328 total cases of cancer, with 165 among 2,558 participants (6.5 percent) who received monthly high-dose vitamin D supplementation and 163 among 2

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Are vision impairments more frequent among children with developmental dyslexia?

Developmental dyslexia emerges in childhood and is a reading disorder believed to involve language processing deficits. Reading is also a visual task but the potential role of visual processing in developmental dyslexia has been controversial. This study was a small observational study to assess the frequency of visual deficits in 29 children with developmental dyslexia compared with 33 typically

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Association of complementary medicine, cancer treatment, survival

The use of complementary medicine by patients with four common cancers (breast, prostate, lung or colorectal) was associated with refusal of conventional cancer treatment and with a greater risk of death, although the difference in survival may be alleviated by adherence to all recommended conventional cancer therapies.

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Paralyzed mice with spinal cord injury made to walk again

Most people with spinal cord injury are paralyzed from the injury site down, even when the cord isn't completely severed. Why don't the spared portions of the spinal cord keep working? Researchers at Boston Children's Hospital now provide insight into why these nerve pathways remain quiet. They also show that a small-molecule compound, given systemically, can revive these circuits in paralyzed mic

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New insights into plants' conquest of land

The Earth is filled with diverse and remarkable plant forms from the tallest redwoods that pierce forest canopies, to the smallest mosses that blanket the ground underfoot.

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Neural inflammation plays critical role in stress-induced depression

A group of Japanese researchers has discovered that neural inflammation caused by our innate immune system plays an unexpectedly important role in stress-induced depression. This insight could potentially lead to the development of new antidepressants targeting innate immune molecules. The findings were published on July 20 (Japan Standard Time) in the online edition of Neuron.

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Australia led global push to tackle PCOS — the principal cause of infertility in women

Australian led global guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of the primary cause of infertility in women will be published simultaneously in three international journals, supported by a suite of health professional and patient resources to improve health outcomes for women with PCOS.

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Complete fly brain imaged at nanoscale resolution

Scientists at HHMI's Janelia Research Campus have taken detailed pictures of the entire brain of an adult female fruit fly using transmission electron microscopy.

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In a warming climate, Arctic geese are rushing north

As Arctic temperatures continue to rise, migratory barnacle geese have responded by speeding up their 3,000-kilometer migration in order to reach their destination more quickly with fewer stops along the way, according to new evidence reported in Current Biology on July 19. Unfortunately, the birds' earlier arrival isn't making as much of a difference as one might expect.

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How plant breeding technologies could make fruits and vegetables more exciting to eat

Forget vegetables with dull colors and fuzzy skin or fruits that lack of flavor — the produce aisle of the future could offer plant products that are designed for creative cooks and fussy eaters. In a review article published July 19 in Trends in Plant Science, two food researchers describe how new breeding technologies have the potential to enhance the shape, size, color, and health benefits of

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Phages work together to suppress CRISPR bacterial immunity

CRISPR are an essential part of bacterial immunity designed to defend against foreign DNA. In bacteria, CRISPR acts just like it does in human cells as a pair of scissors, in their case with the goal of cutting strands of infecting DNA. While researchers have known that CRISPR is found in roughly half of all bacteria in the wild, they did not know much about the molecular battle between CRISPRs an

5h

The Frightening Link Between Beef Jerky and Bipolar Mania

For people with bipolar disorder, manic episodes can be euphoric, but they can also be terrifying. In the throes of mania, some people feel like they are superhuman. They start new projects and stay up all night to work on them. In the worst cases, they cease thinking coherently: They might attempt to walk into the sea or fly off the roof. Though medications can help manage the symptoms, no pill

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How Viruses Cooperate to Defeat CRISPR

No single wolf can take down a bison on its own, but the pack has strength in numbers. A lone army ant is little threat, but an entire colony is a mighty destructive force. The natural world abounds with examples of predators that cooperate to take down their prey. And such teamwork also exists at a microscopic scale, among things that some scientists wouldn’t even classify as alive: viruses. Mos

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Cruise Down The Pacific Shark Highway | Shark News

Armed with GoPros and sheer determination, a team of scientists from around the world came together to film shark migration between the Galapagos and Cocos Islands for the first time ever. Shark Week 2018 starts Sunday July 22 9p! Stream Classic Shark Week Episodes: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/shark-week/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https:/

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Politics this week

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Business this week

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KAL’s cartoon

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Phages work together to suppress CRISPR bacterial immunity

CRISPR, or clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats, are an essential part of bacterial immunity designed to defend against foreign DNA. In bacteria, CRISPR acts just like it does in human cells as a pair of scissors, in their case with the goal of cutting strands of infecting DNA. While researchers have known that CRISPR is found in roughly half of all bacteria in the wild, they

6h

In a warming climate, Arctic geese are rushing north

As Arctic temperatures continue to rise, migratory barnacle geese have responded by speeding up their 3,000-kilometer migration in order to reach their destination more quickly with fewer stops along the way, according to new evidence reported in Current Biology on July 19. Unfortunately, the birds' earlier arrival isn't making as much of a difference as one might expect. That's because, when the

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Complete fly brain imaged at nanoscale resolution

Two high-speed electron microscopes. 7,062 brain slices. 21 million images.

6h

New insights into plants' conquest of land

The Earth is filled with diverse and remarkable plant forms from the tallest redwoods that pierce forest canopies, to the smallest mosses that blanket the ground underfoot.

6h

Viruses cooperate to overcome immune defences of bacteria

Virus particles that infect bacteria can work together to overcome antiviral defences, new research shows.

6h

How plant breeding technologies could make fruits and vegetables more exciting to eat

Forget vegetables with dull colors and fuzzy skin or fruits that lack of flavor—the produce aisle of the future could offer plant products that are designed for creative cooks and fussy eaters. In a review article published July 19 in the journal Trends in Plant Science, two food researchers describe how new breeding technologies have the potential to enhance the shape, size, color, and health ben

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Cold fronts may increase stroke mortality

Study conducted in Southern Hemisphere's subtropical zone detects correlation between drop in temperature and rise in deaths from stroke, especially among women and older people.

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Wait, just a second, is your doctor listening?

On average, patients get about 11 seconds to explain the reasons for their visit before they are interrupted by their doctors. Also, only one in three doctors provides their patients with adequate opportunity to describe their situation. The pressure to rush consultations affects specialists more than primary care doctors says Naykky Singh Ospina of the University of Florida, Gainesville and the M

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Origami-inspired device enables easy capture, release of delicate underwater organisms

A new device developed by a University of Rhode Island engineer and researchers at Harvard University safely traps delicate sea creatures inside a folding polyhedral enclosure and lets them go without harm using a novel, origami-inspired design.

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Lying in a foreign language is easier

It is not easy to tell when someone is lying. This is even more difficult when potential liars speak in a language other than their native tongue. Psychologists of the University of Würzburg investigated why that is so.

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NASA's Aqua Satellite finds a more organized, large Tropical Storm Ampil

When NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the Northwestern Pacific Ocean on July 19, the large Tropical Storm Ampil appeared much more organized than it did the previous day.

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BU researcher receives NIH award to examine repetitive head injuries in former NFL players

Michael Alosco, PhD, assistant professor of neurology at Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM), has received a five-year, $793,000 K23 Award from the National Institutes of Health's National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS).

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Where are all the aliens? | Stephen Webb

The universe is incredibly old, astoundingly vast and populated by trillions of planets — so where are all the aliens? Astronomer Stephen Webb has an explanation: we're alone in the universe. In a mind-expanding talk, he spells out the remarkable barriers a planet would need to clear in order to host an extraterrestrial civilization — and makes a case for the beauty of our potential cosmic lonel

6h

A social tool for evaluating the environmental impact of residential buildings

for the first time, an open-source computing tool can, simply and intuitively, calculate the CO2 emissions in each phase of a building project, in order to obtain a global picture of its carbon footprint from its conception and to help decide every variable in the construction process.

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Deadly Rift Valley fever: New insight, and hope for the future

Health control measures alone could be ineffective in the long term fight against the deadly Rift Valley fever which affects both humans and animals, a new study reports.

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Monkeys benefit from the nut-cracking abilities of chimpanzees and hogs

Researchers describe for the first time the scavenging behavior of mangabey monkeys, guinea fowls, and squirrels on energy-rich nut remnants cracked by chimpanzees and red river hogs. The team used data collected by camera traps in the rain forest of Tai National Park in Ivory Coast. The results reveal new unknown interactions between different species and increase our understanding of the complex

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High fruit and vegetable consumption may reduce risk of breast cancer

Women who eat a high amount of fruits and vegetables each day may have a lower risk of breast cancer, especially of aggressive tumors, than those who eat fewer fruits and vegetables, according to a new study.

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The origin of humans is not East Africa. It's much broader.

Many thousands of miles broader. Read More

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How lobbyists buy climate change legislation

A new study looks at how lobbying expenditures affect climate change legislation. Read More

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Tropical Cyclone Son-Tinh makes landfall and NASA examines its trail of rainfall

Tropical Cyclone Son-Tinh made landfall in Vietnam and left a trail of heavy rainfall in its wake. NASA's Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite provided an estimate of that soggy trail through the Gulf of Tonkin.

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Study: ADHD drugs do not improve cognition in healthy college students

Contrary to popular belief across college campuses, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) medications may fail to improve cognition in healthy students and actually can impair functioning, according to a study by researchers at the University of Rhode Island and Brown University.

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Computer model predicts how fracturing metallic glass releases energy at the atomic level

Metallic glasses are an exciting research target, but the difficulties associated with predicting how much energy these materials release when they fracture is slowing down development of metallic glass-based products. Recently, researchers developed a way of simulating to the atomic level how metallic glasses behave as they fracture. This modeling technique could improve computer-aided materials

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Mayo Clinic researchers uncover methods to quantify the yips and golfer's cramp

Almost every golfer knows the feeling. Minutes after a picture-perfect drive down the fairway, a cascade of inexplicable missed putts leads to a disappointing triple bogey.

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Future electronic components to be printed like newspapers

A new manufacturing technique uses a process similar to newspaper printing to form smoother and more flexible metals for making ultrafast electronic devices.

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Researchers move closer to completely optical artificial neural network

Researchers have shown that it is possible to train artificial neural networks directly on an optical chip.

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Fukushima’s nuclear signature found in California wine

The Japanese nuclear disaster bathed north America in a radioactive cloud. Now pharmacologists have found the telltale signature in California wine made at the time.

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Researchers move closer to completely optical artificial neural network

Researchers have shown that it is possible to train artificial neural networks directly on an optical chip. The significant breakthrough demonstrates that an optical circuit can perform a critical function of an electronics-based artificial neural network and could lead to less expensive, faster and more energy efficient ways to perform complex tasks such as speech or image recognition.

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Anglerfish and their headlamp bacteria have a crazy relationship

Researchers have sequenced and analyzed the genomes of the glowing bacteria living in the bulbs that hang off the heads of anglerfish. The anglerfish lives most of its life in total darkness more than 1,000 meters below the ocean surface. Female anglerfish sport a glowing lure on top of their foreheads, basically a pole with a light bulb on the end, where bioluminescent bacteria live. The light-e

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Infrared sensor as new method for drug discovery

Using an infrared sensor, biophysicists have succeeded in analyzing quickly and easily which active agents affect the structure of proteins and how long that effect lasts. Researchers have performed time-resolved measurements of the changes to the structure of protein scaffolds, which were triggered by the active agents. Their methods might help develop drugs with little side effects in a quick an

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The effectiveness of chlorhexidine is limited in preventing infections in oral procedures

A large number of bacteria are present in human mouths and may pass into the blood when procedures such as the removal of a tooth are carried out. Chlorhexidine mouthwashes have a powerful antimicrobial effect, but there are opposing positions on its use in these cases.

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Low-cost formulas in the manufacturing of non-stick food molds

There is good news for amateur bakers of cakes, muffins and pastries made in extravagant shapes and small and medium-sized baking businesses. Molds will cease to be a problem if the system designed by a research group progresses. This system manufactures non-stick food molds at a low cost. A research group designs a new way to manufacture molds allowing small and medium-sized businesses to improve

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Aggressive immune cells aggravate Parkinson's disease

Parkinson's disease, formerly also referred to as shaking palsy, is one of the most frequent disorders affecting movement and the nervous system. Medical researchers have come across a possible cause of the disease – in the patients' immune system.

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Expected sea-level rise following Antarctic ice shelves' collapse

Scientists have shown how much sea level would rise if Larsen C and George VI, Antarctic ice shelves at risk of collapse, were to break up. While Larsen C has received much attention due to the break-away of a trillion-ton iceberg from it last summer, its collapse would contribute only a few millimeters to sea-level rise. The break-up of the smaller George VI Ice Shelf would have a much larger imp

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Food for thought: How the brain reacts to food may be linked to overeating

The reason why some people find it so hard to resist finishing an entire bag of chips or bowl of candy may lie with how their brain responds to food rewards, according to researchers who found that when certain regions of the brain reacted more strongly to being rewarded with food than being rewarded with money, those people were more likely to overeat.

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Scientists uncover the role of a protein in production and survival of myelin-forming cells

A new article explains how researchers have uncovered the role of a protein known as 'PRMT5' in the production of myelin and, ultimately, proper development and function of the Central Nervous System.

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The influence of plant photosynthetic indices on the effectiveness of PRI use

In the framework of the actively developing practice of "precision farming", Lobachevsky University researchers are working to develop and introduce methods for spatially heterogeneous treatment of plants that minimize costs and improve the ecological quality of the crops, due to the less intensive use of chemical compounds.

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Binge drinking during adolescence impairs working memory, finds mouse study

Using a mouse model to simulate binge drinking, researchers at Columbia University showed that heavy alcohol use during adolescence damages neurons in the part of the brain involved in working memory.

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Monkeys benefit from the nut-cracking abilities of chimpanzees and hogs

Researchers of the University of Amsterdam and the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology describe for the first time the scavenging behaviour of mangabey monkeys, guinea fowls, and squirrels on energy-rich nut remnants cracked by chimpanzees and red river hogs. The team used data collected by camera traps in the rain forest of Tai National Park in Ivory Coast. The results reveal new u

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High fruit and vegetable consumption may reduce risk of breast cancer

Women who eat a high amount of fruits and vegetables each day may have a lower risk of breast cancer, especially of aggressive tumors, than those who eat fewer fruits and vegetables, according to a new study led by researchers from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

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Deadly Rift Valley fever: New insight, and hope for the future

Health control measures alone could be ineffective in the long term fight against the deadly Rift Valley fever which affects both humans and animals, a new study in the journal PNAS reports.

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Researchers are one step closer to developing eye drops to treat common sight loss condition

Scientists at the University of Birmingham are one step closer to developing an eye drop that could revolutionise treatment for age-related macular degeneration (AMD).

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Aerial Images Capture Swathes of Amazon Rainforest Destroyed by Gold Mining

Ernesto Benavides hangs out of helicopters to document the devastation inside Peru's Tambopata National Reserve.

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Most common shoulder operation is no more beneficial than placebo surgery

In a landmark study published this week in the BMJ, Finnish researchers show that one of the most common surgical procedures in the Western world is probably unnecessary. Keyhole surgeries of the shoulder are useless for patients with 'shoulder impingement', the most common diagnosis in patients with shoulder pain.

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New training platform for big data analysis

The Galaxy Europe project has set up an infrastructure offering online tutorials for researchers in the life sciences.

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China's 'livestock revolution' demands 'new transition'

Demand for animal protein and increasing wealth fuelled a tripling in the domestic production of livestock in China between 1980 and 2010, and the rise, despite some improvements in efficiencies at the farm level, had significant impacts on environmental sustainability, nationally and globally. The country's scientists are now aiming to redress the balance.

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Colombia peace deal brings new threat to country's rainforest

The historic peace treaty in Colombia which brought an end to half a century of violence has led to mass deforestation. Once FARC soldiers were disarmed, it led to a vacuum of power which is being exploited by large landowners who are now deforesting the area at an alarming rate to make way for farms and for the illegal growth of coca crops. An ecologically significant region of Colombia, is now a

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Younger children tend to make more informed decisions

A new study has found that in some ways, the older you get the worse your decision making becomes.

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Cool your home without air conditioning

DIY Strategies for chilling out. Air conditioning makes your home much more comfortable during the summer. But you can do a lot to drive down the temperature before you flip on the AC.

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A social tool for evaluating the environmental impact of residential buildings

for the first time, an open-source computing tool can, simply and intuitively, calculate the CO2 emissions in each phase of a building project, in order to obtain a global picture of its carbon footprint from its conception and to help decide every variable in the construction process.

7h

Aggressive immune cells aggravate Parkinson's disease

Parkinson's disease, formerly also referred to as shaking palsy, is one of the most frequent disorders affecting movement and the nervous system. Medical researchers at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) have come across a possible cause of the disease – in the patients' immune system.

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Low-cost formulas in the manufacturing of non-stick food molds

A University of Córdoba research group designs a new way to manufacture molds allowing small and medium-sized businesses to improve their creativity.

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Infrared sensor as new method for drug discovery

Using an infrared sensor, biophysicists at Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB) have succeeded in analysing quickly and easily which active agents affect the structure of proteins and how long that effect lasts. Thus, Prof Dr Klaus Gerwert and Dr Jörn Güldenhaupt performed time-resolved measurements of the changes to the structure of protein scaffolds, which were triggered by the active agents. Their met

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Sunscreen reduces melanoma risk by 40 per cent in young people

A world-first study led by University of Sydney has found that Australians aged 18-40 years who were regular users of sunscreen in childhood reduced their risk of developing melanoma by 40 percent, compared to those who rarely used sunscreen.

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CALET succeeds in direct measurements of cosmic-ray electron spectrum up to 4.8 TeV

An international team of researchers, led by Professor Shoji Torii of Waseda University, succeeded in the direct, high-precision measurements of cosmic-ray electron spectrum up to 4.8 TeV, based on observations with the Calorimetric Electron Telescope (CALET). Observations by CALET are expected to reveal the mysteries of cosmic-rays and nature of dark matter in the future.

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Colombia peace deal brings new threat to country's rainforest

A historic peace treaty which brought an end to half a century of violence has led to mass deforestation in Colombia, scientists have warned.

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Mark Zuckerberg Is Doubly Wrong About Holocaust Denial

This week, Mark Zuckerberg kicked off another firestorm about Facebook when he appeared to defend the intentions of Holocaust deniers on the platform. In an interview with Recode ’s Kara Swisher, the Facebook CEO was asked why the site doesn’t just remove malevolent misinformation, like the claim that the Sandy Hook massacre never happened. Zuckerberg responded with an example from his own experi

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CT scans may increase risk of brain cancer, study suggests

A new study suggests that CT scans, commonly used in medical imaging, may increase the risk of brain tumors.

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Scientific procedures involving animals at lowest level since 2010

But animal rights groups say more should be done to reduce those bred with genetic alterations Scientific procedures involving animals are at their lowest level since 2010, but animal rights groups say the government is not doing enough to reduce the number of animals bred with genetic alterations. New statistics released by the Home Office show there were almost 3.8m scientific procedures involv

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Having the right name helps one to find housing

Discrimination against ethnic minorities on the housing market is declining—in Germany and other Western European countries and in the USA. But a new meta-study shows that applicants' surnames still influence the selection of new tenants.

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Scientists reveal the links between deep carbon cycle and geodynamics of big mantle wedge

The formation age of the big mantle wedge beneath eastern Asia and the lithospheric thinning mechanism of the North China craton are two key scientific issues. Based on new findings of deep carbon cycle, a recent study suggests that the big mantle wedge beneath eastern Asia was formed 125 Ma, and interaction between the CO2-rich silicate melt produced in the big mantle wedge and lithospheric mantl

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Robots working as a group are able to determine the optimal order of their tasks

Could robots soon help rescue crews save the survivors of a natural disaster? Such a mission would require that the robots be able to determine, on their own, which tasks to perform and in what order to perform them. Researchers at ULB's IRIDIA laboratory have shown, for the first time, that this ability can emerge from a group of robots.

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Building blocks of life

A collaborative research team based in Japan has designed new proteins that can self-assemble into the complex structures underlying biological organisms, laying the groundwork for leading-edge applications in biotechnology. The researchers created and developed the proteins with a specific function and their method reveals a possibility that certain protein functions can be created on demand. It

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The effectiveness of chlorhexidine is limited in preventing infections in oral procedures

A large number of bacteria are present in human mouths and may pass into the blood when procedures such as the removal of a tooth are carried out. Chlorhexidine mouthwashes have a powerful antimicrobial effect, but there are opposing positions on its use in these cases. The research by the UPV/EHU shows that its use would prevent 12 percent of cases of bacteraemia.

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Reconstruction of Arctic Barents-Kara sea ice extent changes over the last millennium

The Arctic Barents-Kara Sea is considered as one of the cradles for cold waves over the Eurasian continent, and it's a key sea sector that is closely connected with cold waves over Eurasia. A recent research published on the Science China Earth Sciences has shown the sea ice extent variations of this sea area over the last millennium.

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Generic direct acting antivirals in treatment of chronic hepatitis C patients

There has been published results of the study 'ORIGINAL VERSUS GENERIC DIRECT ACTING ANTIVIRALS IN TREATMENT OF CHRONIC HEPATITIS C PATIENTS: REAL LIFE DATA FROM LATVIA' authored by Tolmane I, Rozentale B, Arutjunana S et al., recently.

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Reversing cause and effect is no trouble for quantum computers

In research published 18 July in Physical Review X, an international team show that a quantum computer is less in thrall to the arrow of time than a classical computer.

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China's livestock transition: Driving forces, impacts, and consequences

To explore the impact of 'livestock revolution' (or transition) in China, a research group led by Prof MA Lin from the Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology, together with collaborators from home and abroad, quantified the livestock transition by using a Driver-Pressure-State-Impact-Response framework.

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Puzzling results explained: A multiband approach to Coulomb drag and indirect excitons

A new theoretical study explains previous mystifying experimental results, in which coupled charged particles moved in exactly the opposite direction to that predicted.This apparently contradictory phenomenon is associated with the bandgap in dual-layer graphene structures, a bandgap which is very much smaller than in conventional semiconductors.

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Overuse of antibiotics not what the doctor ordered

With increased use of antibiotics worldwide linked to growing antibiotic resistance, a world-first study co-authored by a QUT researcher has highlighted the growing impact of non-prescription supply of antibiotics in community pharmacies, and the urgent need for better enforcement of laws. South America has the highest incidence of non-prescription supply of antibiotics in community pharmacies.

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UCLA engineers develop world's most efficient semiconductor for thermal management

Working to address 'hotspots' in computer chips that degrade their performance, UCLA engineers have developed a new semiconductor material, defect-free boron arsenide, that is more effective at drawing and dissipating waste heat than any other known semiconductor or metal materials.

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Target's Coupon Fix for Cash-Strapped Teachers

In a textbook feel-good business move, the retail giant Target is offering a coupon to teachers this week that gives them 15 percent off select school supplies through Saturday. The coupon is part of the store’s back-to-school promotions , and covers folders and binders, arts-and-crafts materials, and classroom-storage equipment, as well as basics such as disinfecting wipes and food-storage bags.

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The Mystery of How Neanderthals Got Fire

The first step to re-creating 50,000-year-old technology is to collect a bunch of rocks. So began Andrew Sorensen’s plan to study a great mystery in archaeology: how Neanderthals controlled fire. Sorensen, an archeologist at Leiden University, collected a special kind of rock called flint off the beaches of England. If you hit it in just the right ways, flint will break to expose sharp edges that

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Sharks in Māori Mythology | Countdown to Shark Week: The Daily Bite

Three days until Shark Week and Jordan Carlos is here to take us the rest of the way as we take a trip to New Zealand for some shark mythology. Also, our third edition of Fin Frenzy comes your way while we learn some new Shark Vocab. Shark Week 2018 starts Sunday July 22 9p! Stream The Daily Bite on Discovery GO: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/the-daily-bite/ Stream Classic Shark Week Episode

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3-D X-ray tomography scoops up information about ice cream microstructure

There's nothing quite like an ice cream on a hot day, and eating it before it melts too much is part of the fun. Ice cream is a soft solid, and its appeal is a complex combination of 'mouthfeel', taste and appearance, which are all strongly affected by the underlying microstructure. We know that changes in the microstructure of ice cream occur at storage temperatures above -30°C, so they will occu

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Didi, SoftBank set up taxi-hailing joint venture in Japan

Chinese mobile service giant Didi Chuxing and Tokyo-based SoftBank Corp. have set up a joint venture for taxi-hailing in Japan.

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France closes in on phone ban in schools starting in September

French lawmakers have secured a deal on a bill that would outlaw the use of mobiles phones in schools starting in September, one of Emmanuel Macron's pledges during last year's presidential campaign.

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A Comprehensive Guide to the Physics of Running on the Moon

Humans are going to live on the moon eventually. So how are we going to *move around* there?

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Watch This Man Try to Break the Record for Paper Airplane Flight

On Friday, John Collins—aka The Paper Airplane Guy—will attempt to break his own world record for paper airplane flight distance.

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New greener and more efficient noise barriers

Researchers from Universidad Politécnica de Madrid (UPM) have developed a new vegetal and affordable noise barrier that significantly reduces both noise and the environmental and landscape impact.

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EU ruling against Google opens "opportunity," rival saysGoogle EU Android EC

European regulators' latest swipe at the dominance of U.S. tech giant Google could open new opportunities for rivals in search and web browsers—that is, if handset manufacturers decide to make the most of the opening.

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Research shows four in five experts cited in online news are men

Who gets to speak? Who do we listen to? And whose opinions do we respect? These questions are always important, but even more so now, as the UK faces an uncertain future, and political leaders need to make some tough decisions. So it's disappointing to learn that female voices continue to be marginalised in the nation's news coverage. Women's expertise is going untapped and unheard at a critical t

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Long way home as Przewalski's horses fly to Mongolia

Their violent kicks rattle the small army plane flying over Siberia as it transports the four rare horses from Prague to the vast Mongolian steppe where the once near-extinct species is slowly recovering.

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Colombia peace deal brings new threat to country's rainforest

The historic peace treaty in Colombia which brought an end to half a century of violence has led to mass deforestation. Once FARC soldiers were disarmed, it led to a vacuum of power which is being exploited by large landowners who are now deforesting the area at an alarming rate to make way for farms and for the illegal growth of coca crops. An ecologically significant region of Colombia, is now a

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Will hydrogen-powered cars gradually become mainstream in Europe?

An EU initiative will deploy hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicles in three European capitals as taxis, private-hire and police cars. The move will accelerate their commercialisation and help realise emissions-free transport.

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The Atlantic Adding Ten New Positions on White House, Pentagon, Intelligence, and National Security Beats

The Atlantic earlier this year announced plans to significantly grow the staff by 100 across the company, and make investments in all of its divisions and platforms. As part of this effort, The Atlantic is doubling the team covering politics and national affairs with the creation of ten new reporter and editor positions, posted today : Two Pentagon reporters Three White House reporters National S

8h

Spørg Scientariet: Har krumme brokonstruktioner en funktion?

En læser vil gerne vide, om der er tale om ren æstetik, når nogle brokonstruktioner er krumme. Det svarer fagspecialist fra Banedanmark på.

8h

Wave energy converters are not geared toward the increase in energy over the last century

The UPV/EHU-University of the Basque Country has been exploring how ocean energy has evolved in Ireland during the 20th century to determine how the converters would need to be adapted

8h

First-ever habitat connectivity report using species data shows positive impact of policies on butterflies

Butterflies are benefitting from environmental action to increase their habitats, scientists have argued following a pioneering government report.

8h

A Guide to Pursuing a Neuroscience Career

The Dana Foundation promotes a lot of resources designed for young students in hopes of inspiring them to want to learn more about the brain as they move up the ranks of grade school. But what if you’ve already been inspired and are now looking for practical ways to prepare for a neuroscience career? While there is certainly no “one way” to achieve this, we want to share a few resources that can

8h

Guide to Mars Opposition 2018

Have you checked out Mars this season? Mars reaches opposition on July 27th at 5:00 Universal Time (UT) shining at magnitude -2.8 and appearing 24.3" across—nearly as large as it can appear, and the largest since the historic opposition of 2003. We won't have an opposition this favorable again until September 15th, 2035.

8h

Infrared sensor as new method for drug discovery

Using an infrared sensor, biophysicists at Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB) have succeeded in analysing quickly and easily which active agents affect the structure of proteins and how long that effect lasts. Thus, Prof Dr. Klaus Gerwert and Dr. Jörn Güldenhaupt performed time-resolved measurements of the changes to the structure of protein scaffolds, which were triggered by the active agents. Their m

8h

New study puts a figure on sea-level rise following Antarctic ice shelves' collapse

Scientists have shown how much sea level would rise if Larsen C and George VI, Antarctic ice shelves at risk of collapse, were to break up. While Larsen C has received much attention due to the break-away of a trillion-tonne iceberg from it last summer, its collapse would contribute only a few millimetres to sea-level rise. The break-up of the smaller George VI Ice Shelf would have a much larger i

8h

'Glider trucks' are pollution machines, but they might roll past EPA regulations

Environment Old, inefficient engines inside new frames have been sneaking through a regulatory loophole that the EPA was supposed to be closing. Leading up to the Trump administration, the Environmental Protection Agency had been on track to regulate a group of highly polluting freight trucks called gliders or…

8h

The case for introducing rhinos to Australia

Rhinos in Australia might seem like an insane proposition – after all, we've had historically bad luck with introduced species. But on reflection it's not quite as crazy as it sounds.

9h

Taking the lead toward witchweed control

A compound that binds to and inhibits a crucial receptor protein offers a new route for controlling a parasitic plant.

9h

Slowing Gulf Stream current to boost warming for 20 years

The Atlantic system that warms the UK is slowing down but this may cause even more heating.

9h

Dive Under the Ice With the Brave Robots of Antarctica

Sending a robot into the icy depths and getting it back alive can be more challenging than communicating with a Mars rover millions of miles away.

9h

FDA Chief Slams Drugmakers for Stalling Release of Biosimilars

Americans could have saved $4.5 billion last year if these products were more available, agency official says — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9h

Image of the Day: Snakes Alive

Scientists have found the 99-million-year-old remains of a baby snake.

9h

New study puts a figure on sea-level rise following Antarctic ice shelves' collapse

An international team of scientists has shown how much sea level would rise if Larsen C and George VI, two Antarctic ice shelves at risk of collapse, were to break up. While Larsen C has received much attention due to the break-away of a trillion-tonne iceberg from it last summer, its collapse would contribute only a few millimetres to sea-level rise. The break-up of the smaller George VI Ice Shel

9h

Using elements in plants to increase fuel cell efficiency while reducing costs

Researchers from the Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique, Québec are looking into reeds, tall wetlands plants, in order to make cheaper catalysts for high-performance fuel cells.

9h

World-first program to stop hacking by supercomputers

IT experts at Monash University have devised the world's leading post-quantum secure privacy-preserving algorithm – so powerful it can thwart attacks from supercomputers of the future.

9h

The origins of those sexual organs: a fishy tale much more primitive than we thought

Fossil discoveries from the Devonian rocks of Scotland and Australia first revealed that the earliest jawed fishes, the placoderms, reproduced using copulation in much the same way as sharks and rays do today.

9h

Democracies more prone to start wars – except when they're not

Research shows public pressure pushes democratically elected leaders to be more aggressive in international conflicts than their autocratic counterparts but finds some exceptions. What kind of political leader is most likely to start a war—an invective-spewing dictator or the elected head of a democratic nation? Surprisingly, science says it's probably not the autocrat.

9h

Study reveals challenges of policing cannabis possession

Officers see their own policing of cannabis possession offences as largely ineffective, a study of rank and file officers has revealed.

9h

Columbia team helps investigate algae bloom near Kilauea eruption

Hawaii's Kilauea volcanic eruption, which continues spewing ash and lava, has been disrupting life on the Big Island. Since it began in May, the eruption has forced the evacuation of thousands of people, decimated more than 600 homes, and now is even impacting the state's agriculture industry. However, it has also created a rare opportunity for scientists to investigate how these events influence

9h

Ultra-bright early galaxies may be less common than we think

Ultra-bright galaxies in the early universe may be less common than initially thought, new research conducted using the Hubble Space Telescope has found.

9h

Red-light cameras don't reduce traffic accidents or improve public safety: analysis

Red-light cameras don't reduce the number of traffic accidents or injuries at intersections where the devices are installed, according a new analysis by Case Western Reserve University.

9h

New analysis tool could bolster development of efficient engines and fuel

A newly developed analysis method can detect hydroxyl radicals (OH) with unprecedented sensitivity. Because OH is a critical component in the combustion processes that power most vehicles, the new approach could advance the development of novel types of engines and fuels that would be more efficient and environmentally friendly.

9h

What Australia's convict past reveals about women, men, marriage and work

Success for women often comes at a cost. Award-winning, election-winning and high-earning women are more likely to be divorced in a strange trend that may affect other aspects of our lives.

9h

Bengal cat receives first feline hip replacement surgery performed at Purdue Veterinary Teaching Hospital

As busy as it is beautiful, the Bengal cat is an energetic domestic breed that tends to have a lot in common with its cousins in the wild – high jumping, climbing and even a love for water. So, imagine the pain and disappointment when Fridgey, a 2-year-old Bengal cat, started to have problems with his hips.

9h

Orion parachutes chalk up another test success in Arizona

The parachute system for Orion, America's spacecraft that will carry humans to deep space, deployed as planned after being dropped from an altitude of 6.6 miles on July 12, at the U.S. Army Proving Ground in Yuma, Arizona. Data from the successful seventh drop in a series of eight qualification tests will help NASA engineers certify Orion's parachutes for missions with astronauts.

9h

NASA debuts online toolkit to promote commercial use of satellite data

While NASA's policy of free and open remote-sensing data has long benefited the scientific community, other government agencies and nonprofit organizations, it has significant untapped potential for commercialization. NASA's Technology Transfer program has created an online resource to promote commercial use of this data and the software tools needed to work with it.

9h

Why the July 27 Lunar Eclipse Will Last So Freakishly Long

Some simple but fascinating science determines the length of each lunar (and solar) eclipse.

9h

Drone Reveals Massive Stonehenge-Like Circular Monument in Ireland

New finds in Ireland show the importance of ancient tombs and circular henges to Neolithic people, hundreds of years before the Egyptian pyramids were built.

9h

The Vindication of Cheese, Butter, and Full-Fat Milk

As a young child I missed a question on a psychological test: “What comes in a bottle?” The answer was supposed to be milk . I said beer . Milk almost always came in cartons and plastic jugs, so I was right. But this isn’t about rehashing old grudges. I barely even think about it anymore! The point is that the test was a relic of a time before me, when milk did come in bottles. It arrived on door

9h

Researchers to extend service life of nuclear reactors and improve their safety

Cooperating with students from the National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Russia), scientists from the Kurchatov Institute (Russia) have used new technology to extend the service life of the VVER-440 reactor up to 45 years, saving the cost of dismantling the old vessels. The results of the research were published in the Journal of Nuclear Materials.

10h

How 'empathy gap' among social workers can affect services for people of color

Social workers think of themselves as empathetic individuals—after all, they went into social work specifically to help people. But empathy isn't a perfect motivator. Terence Fitzgerald, a clinical associate professor at the USC Suzanne Dworak-Peck School of Social Work who studies institutional racism and child welfare, found that an "empathy gap" among white social workers can hurt the services

10h

In Photos: Ireland's Newgrange Passage Tomb and Henge

A drone flyby has revealed a huge Neolithic henge near a passage tomb at Newgrange in Ireland.

10h

Equinor ansætter gamere til at færdiggøre olieplatforme

Energiselskabet Equinor (tidligere Statoil) har inddraget Augmented Reality i arbejdet med at bygge olieplatforme.

10h

No, Caffeine Doesn't Help You Lose Weight

Some diet supplements that contain caffeine claim that the compound helps reduce appetite. Does it?

10h

Elizabeth Holmes’ Downfall From Theranos Has Been Explained Deeply—By Men

No one seems to have listened to the Theranos founder in her own words. Until now.

10h

The Challenge of Teaching Helicopters to Fly Themselves

Aviation companies like Sikorsky are working on self-flying helicopters, a technical ordeal that makes robo-planes look easy.

10h

Groupers on the Comeback in the Caymans

A government-science partnership with input from local fishermen is the reason—and it could be a model for natural resource science — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

10h

One particle’s trek suggests that ‘spacetime foam’ doesn’t slow neutrinos

Neutrinos and light travel at essentially the same speed, as predicted.

10h

First fossilized snake embryo ever discovered rewrites history of ancient snakes

The first-ever discovery of an ancient snake embryo, preserved in 105-million-year-old amber, provides important new information on the evolution of modern snakes, according to a new study led by University of Alberta paleontologists.

10h

Archaeologists reveal new finds from legendary Swedish warship

Cannons, hand grenades, and up to a thousand soldiers were on board the large Swedish warship when it exploded in the Baltic Sea, 454years ago.

10h

Wired Greenhouse Tech Could Help Arctic Communities Bloom with Bounty

Developments in LED lighting and remote monitoring have made year-round growing one feasible solution to Arctic food insecurity — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

10h

Trump Can Never Go Too Far for Republicans

Give Donald Trump and his team this much: They didn’t have a lot to work with. Facing an uproar even among allies, the president on Tuesday sought to reverse the controversial comments he’d made alongside Russian President Vladimir Putin in Finland. Speaking before a meeting with members of Congress, Trump said that in contrast to his remarks in Helsinki, he accepted the U.S. intelligence communi

10h

Can Trump’s Republican Critics Find Strength in Numbers?

Even after Hurricane Helsinki, Donald Trump’s Republican critics still find themselves shouting into the wind. While more Republicans than usual criticized Trump’s dizzying news conference with Vladimir Putin earlier this week, the possibility of a sustained backlash inside the party is already dwindling. It’s splintering against the same rocks that quickly ended the uprising last summer over the

10h

Two halves of Attenborough polar ship joined together

Engineers at Cammell Laird shipyard add the top six decks to the hull of the UK's new polar ship.

11h

Ryan Gosling astronaut biopic First Man picked to open Venice film festival

Damien Chazelle’s film about Neil Armstong will premiere in Italy, with Alfonso Cuarón’s Roma chosen for New York film festival gala First Man, a biopic of the pioneering astronaut Neil Armstrong starring Ryan Gosling and directed by Damien Chazelle, has been confirmed as the opening film of the 2018 Venice film festival . The slot is a highly prized, high-profile one, especially in Hollywood aft

11h

Drugs alone won't fix our epidemic of depression | James S Gordon

To fight a rising tide of depression and suicide, psychiatrists need to do more than just fill patients up with pills The New York Times recently published an important investigative report shining a long-overdue light on the painful, sometimes disabling experience of withdrawing from antidepressants – drugs that millions of Americans have been taking, sometimes for decades The recent deaths of K

11h

One Young Boy's Magnificent Obsession With Fans

It's a parent’s job to think her child is exceptional.

11h

Remembering an Era Before Roe, When New York Had the ‘Most Liberal’ Abortion Law

In 1970, before Roe v. Wade established a constitutional right to abortion, New York became a magnet for women seeking to terminate their pregnancies legally.

11h

Concentrated solar power will help China cut costs of climate action, study finds

Solar thermal energy turns out to be the key to China meeting its climate commitments. A new study investigates the best combination of renewables for providing the lowest cost to power system operators in two of China's provinces best suited to scale up renewable energy.

11h

Robot chemist discovers new molecules and reactions

A new type of artificial-intelligence-driven chemistry could revolutionise the way molecules are discovered, scientists claim.

11h

Image: Moon, Mars, station

This image was taken by ESA astronaut Alexander Gerst from the International Space Station on 30 June 2018 when the Moon and Mars were at its closest so far during his six-month Horizons mission.

11h

Puzzling results explained—a multiband approach to Coulomb drag and indirect excitons

Mystifying experimental results obtained independently by two research groups in the USA seemed to show coupled holes and electrons moving in the opposite direction to theory.

11h

Electron microscope detector achieves record resolution

Electron microscopy has allowed scientists to see individual atoms, but even at that resolution not everything is clear.

11h

Are star players over-rated in MLB? A key statistic—wins above replacement player—doesn't stand up to scrutiny

In football, soccer and basketball, player quality has one obvious and inescapable metric: scoring touch-downs, goals, points. In baseball, it's more complicated—it isn't easy to directly associate a single player's play with team wins. This is why "wins above replacement player" (WARP) has become so popular: It's a statistic that manages to aggregate a player's total contribution to their team—of

11h

The great NFL practice conundrum: How much should you train to avoid injury?

It seems like the most banal advice you could give an athlete: Don't overtrain. And yet, when the National Football League (NFL) and the NFL Players Association agreed, as part of their collective bargaining agreement (CBA) in 2011, to practice restrictions—ostensibly to cut down on injuries—controversy erupted.

11h

11h

Scientists lack vital knowledge on rapid Arctic climate change

Arctic climate change research relies on field measurements and samples that are too scarce, and patchy at best, according to a comprehensive review study from Lund University in Sweden. The researchers looked at thousands of scientific studies, and found that around 30 percent of cited studies were clustered around only two research stations in the vast Arctic region.

11h

Old Theban port of Chalcis—a medieval maritime crossroads in Greece

Showcased in museums the world over, Byzantine ceramics are the vestiges of an ancient empire that dominated the Mediterranean region for nearly 10 centuries. A CNRS researcher, in cooperation with Greek colleagues, has focused her attention on a widely disseminated style of ceramics called the "main Middle Byzantine Production," found in all four corners of the Mediterranean. Its origins had rema

11h

Scientists uncover the role of a protein in production & survival of myelin-forming cells

A paper published today in Nature Communications explains how researchers at the Advanced Science Research Center (ASRC) at The Graduate Center of The City University of New York have uncovered the role of a protein known as 'PRMT5' in the production of myelin and, ultimately, proper development and function of the Central Nervous System.

11h

'Good cholesterol' may not always be good

Postmenopausal factors may have an impact on the heart-protective qualities of high-density lipoproteins (HDL) — also known as 'good cholesterol.' The findings bring into question the current use of total HDL cholesterol to predict heart disease risk.

11h

Theresa May announces new environment bill

PM commits to laws that will ensure environmental protection improves – but not everyone is convinced.

12h

Shooting stars on demand: Japan start-up plans 2020 meteor shower

A Japanese start-up developing "shooting stars on demand" says it will be ready to deliver the world's first artificial meteor shower in a spectacular show over Hiroshima in early 2020.

12h

Don’t hold your breath for allergy-free cats

Gene-editing technology is eyed as the next step in the quest to create cats that don’t make you sneeze.

12h

Google anker Vestagers kæmpebøde – og truer med at tage betaling for Android

Google anker EU-bøden på 32 milliarder kroner. Og Sundar Pichai advarer om, at Android måske kommer til at koste penge i fremtiden.

13h

Nyt metastudie: Intensivt landbrug er sjældent bæredygtigt for miljø og mennesker

Internationale organisationer fremhæver, at bæredygtig intensivering af landbruget, kan være…

13h

How to protect yourself from 'spear phishing' hacking technique

As sophisticated as the scheme was by Russian intelligence agents to interfere in the 2016 presidential election, they used a simple hacking technique, among others, to infiltrate the email accounts of Democratic operatives, according to Special Counsel Robert Mueller's latest indictment. And that technique—known as "spear phishing—remains a threat not just to campaign officials but to employees a

13h

Amazon estimated to sell $3.5 billion during Prime Day sale, even after outage

Why did Amazon's site and app go down in the first hour of Prime Day? Amazon's not saying, but the outage shows that online shopping is not yet an infallible replacement for brick and mortar.

13h

Baby snake 'frozen in time' gives insight into lost world

The fossil of a prehistoric snake that lived alongside the dinosaurs has been found entombed in amber.

13h

Which new emojis are coming?

Let's face it, when it comes to holidays, some days are more important than others.

13h

Start-up behind self-driving robots raises $114M

San Diego's Brain Corp, the maker of self-driving technology used in supermarket floor cleaning robots, said that it has raised $114 million in a third round of venture capital funding led by SoftBank Vision Fund.

13h

Long-term changes crucial in charting future of ecosystems

Changes in ecosystems that happen over years can often go unnoticed. That is why long-term research is important in restoring and managing the Florida Everglades and other vulnerable ecosystems, according to a new Florida International University study.

13h

Facebook cracks down on bogus posts inciting violence

Facebook on Wednesday built on its campaign to prevent the platform from being used to spread dangerous misinformation, saying it will remove bogus posts likely to spark violence.

14h

Loon's Internet-Slinging Balloons Are Headed to Kenya

The former Google X project is now its own Alphabet company, and just signed its first commercial agreement with Telkom Kenya.

14h

EU fines Google a record $5 billion over mobile practicesGoogle EU Chrome Android

European regulators came down hard on another U.S. tech giant Wednesday, fining Google a record $5 billion for forcing cellphone makers that use the company's Android operating system to install Google search and browser apps.

14h

Clouds lift for SAP as it raises full-year forecasts

German software firm SAP raised its revenue forecasts for the full year Thursday, after sales of its cloud computing products and its bottom line swelled in the second quarter.

14h

For Mexican immigrants, politics is a family affair

Imagine adapting to life in the U.S. after emigrating from Mexico. With so many confusing new processes and systems to navigate, how would you begin to understand something as complex as local and national politics? According to San Francisco State University Associate Professor of Political Science Marcela García-Castañon, who studies political socialization, you'd likely turn to your spouse. In

14h

Her er de norske specialstyrkers nye køretøj

Det norske forsvar har modtaget Supacat HMT Extenda-vognen.

14h

Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2018 shortlist – in pictures

The Milky Way, the Andromeda galaxy and the Running Man nebula feature in the shortlist for the Insight Investment Astronomy Photographer of the Year award . The winners will be announced on 23 October, and an exhibition of the winning images from the past 10 years of the contest will be on show at the National Maritime Museum in Greenwich from 24 October Continue reading…

15h

Sunflowers and Santa Claus: Guardian writers and readers on how their first memory changed them

Our earliest memory can shape our lives, but new research suggests that many are false. Here, writers and readers reflect on their earliest recollections It starts as a dreamy state of dizzying vertigo, and then I rattle, headfirst, down the wooden stairs. Falling down the white-painted (I think), definitely uncarpeted stairs of our first house is my first memory, and I must have been around two.

16h

CVS sued for deceiving consumers in sale of homeopathic remedies

A lawsuit claiming pharmacy giant CVS fraudulently deceives consumers in the sale of worthless homeopathic remedies has been filed by the Center for Inquiry (CFI), acting on behalf of the general public. CFI says co-mingling ineffective homeopathic products with science-based treatments on CVS's retail shelves and online confuses consumers.

16h

Drop træningen og tag til koncert – du forbrænder samme antal kalorier

Du forbrænder ligeså mange kalorier under en fed koncert, som du gør til en omgang spinning, viser forsøg.

16h

Younger children tend to make more informed decisions

A new study from the University of Waterloo has found that in some ways, the older you get the worse your decision making becomes.

16h

Food for thought: How the brain reacts to food may be linked to overeating

The reason why some people find it so hard to resist finishing an entire bag of chips or bowl of candy may lie with how their brain responds to food rewards, according to researchers who found that when certain regions of the brain reacted more strongly to being rewarded with food than being rewarded with money, those people were more likely to overeat.

16h

Disparities in cancer mortality rates among minority subpopulations in NY

Analysis of cancer death data from 2008-2014 in New York state revealed high cancer mortality rates among US-born blacks and Puerto Ricans and relatively low cancer mortality rates among Hispanic South Americans and Asians.

16h

Caffeine affects food intake at breakfast, but its effect is limited and transient

A new study featured in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics found that after drinking a small amount of caffeine, participants consumed 10 percent less at a breakfast buffet provided by researchers, but this effect did not persist throughout the day and had no impact on participants' perceptions of their appetites. Based on these findings, the investigators have concluded that ca

16h

Trump Nominates Scott Hutchins for USDA Top Scientist

A pesticide industry leader, Hutchins was formerly president of the Entomological Society of America.

17h

Money talks when trying to influence climate change legislation

Climate lobbying is big business. A new analysis shows that between 2000 and 2016, lobbyists spent more than two billion dollars on influencing relevant legislation in the US Congress. Unsurprisingly, sectors that could be negatively affected by bills limiting carbon emissions, such as the electrical utilities sector, fossil fuel companies and transportation corporations had the deepest pockets.

17h

Use of nicotine during pregnancy may increase risk of sudden infant death syndrome

Nicotine exposure during pregnancy, whether from smoking cigarettes, or nicotine patches and e-cigarettes, increases risk of sudden infant death syndrome — sometimes known as 'cot death' — according to new research.

18h

Living plant varieties reveal ancient migration routes across Eurasia

New study identifies human choice and environmental adaptation as crucial factors for the spread of food staple in prehistory.

18h

Mammals Moonlight around Human Settlements

A study of human–mammal interaction across the globe found animals are more prone to take to the night around humans. Jason G. Goldman reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

18h

Proposed EPA "Transparency" Rule Criticized

Opponents of the guidelines, which would bar results of many public health studies from use in policy making, include scientific and healthcare organizations.

19h

Alcohol-related cirrhosis deaths skyrocket in young adults

Liver disease deaths jumped by 65 percent in the United States, from 1999-2016, disproportionately affecting adults ages 25-34. The increase in deaths among young adults was driven entirely by alcohol-related liver disease, according to a new study.

20h

Switching to certain antidiabetic drugs linked to increased risk of major complications

For people with type 2 diabetes, switching to sulfonylurea drugs to control blood sugar levels is associated with an increased risk of complications compared with staying on the drug metformin, a new study finds.

20h

NASA's new mini satellite will study Milky Way's halo

A new mission called HaloSat will help scientists search for the universe's missing matter by studying X-rays from hot gas surrounding the Milky Way galaxy.

20h

In the ocean's twilight zone, tiny organisms may have giant effect on Earth's carbon cycle

In a new study that challenges scientists' presuppositions about the carbon cycle, researchers find that tiny organisms may be playing in outside role in the way carbon is circulated throughout the ocean.

20h

A Spike In Liver Disease Deaths Among Young Adults Fueled By Alcohol

Deaths due to liver disease have increased among the young — and heavy drinking is to blame. (Image credit: South_agency/Getty Images)

21h

Money talks when trying to influence climate change legislation

Climate lobbying is big business. A new analysis shows that between 2000 and 2016, lobbyists spent more than two billion dollars on influencing relevant legislation in the US Congress. Unsurprisingly, sectors that could be negatively affected by bills limiting carbon emissions, such as the electrical utilities sector, fossil fuel companies and transportation corporations had the deepest pockets. T

21h

DNA methylation related to liver disease among obese patients, study shows

Researchers have identified how DNA methylation is associated with a condition known as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), which can lead to liver cirrhosis and death, and is one of the leading indicators for liver transplants.

21h

Cities as study proxies for climate change

Cities can serve as useful proxies to study and predict the effects of climate change, according to a research review that tracks urbanization's effects on plant and insect species.

21h

Therapy dogs effective in reducing symptoms of ADHD, study finds

Researchers have found therapy dogs to be effective in reducing the symptoms of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children.

21h

Does biodiversity loss leads to an increased disease risk?

Biodiversity is disappearing at an alarming rate as infectious diseases increasingly spill over from wildlife to humans. Disease ecologists fervently debate whether biodiversity loss leads to an increased disease risk. Now, a new study offers some answers.

21h

RNA molecules that regulate action of male hormone in prostate cancer identified

A study detected in tumoral tissue hundreds of RNAs that do not encode proteins but appear to regulate effects of androgens and androgen receptors on gene expression in tumors. By investigating the connection between the presence of these molecules and tumor aggressiveness, the research paves the way for new scientific approaches focusing on the transcription process of noncoding RNA.

21h

A billion-year-old lake could help find alien life

A sample of ancient oxygen from a 1.4 billion-year-old evaporative lake deposit in Ontario provides fresh evidence of what the Earth’s atmosphere and biosphere were like leading up to the emergence of animal life, according to new research. The findings, which appear in the journal Nature , represent the oldest measurement of atmospheric oxygen isotopes by nearly a billion years. The results supp

21h

What causes ‘brain freeze’ when you eat ice cream?

Although ice-cold drinks and ice cream can cause sharp, shooting mouth pain and the occasional “brain freeze,” the two reactions are completely unrelated, says neurologist Roderick Spears. “Brain freeze starts with a cold stimulus, such as ice cream, touching the palate, the roof of the mouth,” says Spears, a clinician in the neurology department in the Perelman School of Medicine at the Universi

21h

The Atlantic Daily: How to Understand Trump’s Latest Russia Comments

What We’re Following Parsing Trump: Just a day after he walked back comments about Russian interference in the 2016 election, President Trump appeared once again to reject the intelligence community’s conclusion that such information warfare is ongoing. While the White House denied that interpretation, the president’s rhetoric on Russia remains distant from the policies advanced by Congress and t

21h

Antarctic seabed site gets protection after reporter's submarine trip

Video of a seabed filmed by a BBC journalist has helped the area get special protection.

21h

Social Impact Bonds have a role but are no panacea for public service reform

The first evaluation of Social Impact Bonds (SIB) in health and social care in England suggests that while they encourage a stronger emphasis on demonstrating results than comparable ways of commissioning public services, there is still no clear evidence that SIBs lead to better client outcomes or if they are more cost-effective than alternative approaches.

21h

Ozone pollution in US national parks close to that of largest US cities

The research matched pollution data to monthly park visitation statistics at 33 heavily visited national parks and found that visitation responds most to ozone during months with poor air quality.

21h

Secular countries can expect future economic growth, confirms new study

New research measuring the importance of religion in 109 countries spanning the entire 20th century has reignited an age-old debate around the link between secularization and economic growth. The study has shown that a decline in religion influences a country's future economic prosperity.

21h

For one tropical tree, effective seed dispersal relies especially on elephants

Deer, bears, gibbons, but especially elephants, play an important role in seed dispersal for a large-fruited tree in the forests of Thailand, according to a new study. The data illustrate the complexity of forest ecology and hint that, at least for this one species, changes have occurred that have diminished its overall reproductive success.

21h

Google wants to make programming quantum computers easier

Its new open-source software will help developers experiment with the machines, including Google’s own super-powerful quantum processor.

22h

First snake found in amber is a baby from the age of the dinosaurs

Around 100 million years ago, this baby snake hatched on a tropical island in the Indian Ocean and then got stuck in resin oozing from a tree

22h

Robotic grabber catches squidgy deep sea animals without harming them

The deep sea is full of weird undiscovered creatures. A foldable robotic grabber captures them gently without causing damage

22h

The death of 9-year-old girl may be a tipping point for air pollution

The family of Ella Kissi-Debrah want an inquest to rule air pollution as the cause of her death, while other legal cases are challenging government inaction on dirty air

22h

Deepfakes won’t wreck politics this year even if politicians might

Political footage faked by AI is talked about as an imminent threat to US democracy. There are good reasons to think it's not a big problem yet, says Tim Hwang

22h

Robots and AI will actually create more jobs than they take

Artificial intelligence and robotics will displace up to 7 million jobs by 2037 – but will generate 7.2 million, leading to a net gain

22h

No, mobile phones still won’t give you brain cancer

We are so glued to our phones that people can't seem to stop worrying that they give you cancer – but if they did, we would have seen a massive increase in tumours

22h

We’ve started to uncover the true purpose of dreams

For the first time, researchers have got evidence that dreams help soothe the impact of emotional events in our lives, acting like overnight therapy

22h

Google hit with €4.3 billion fine from EU for abusing market dominanceGoogle EU Android EC

The EU has fined Google 4.3 billion euros for using its Android mobile operating system to "cement its dominant market position in internet search"

22h

Passing star may have disturbed the solar system billions of years ago

The outer solar system hosts a number of small bodies in mixed up orbits – and they may have been scattered there by a passing star

22h

Lazy thinking – not bias – is the real reason we believe fake news

It was thought that we’re tricked by fake news because we like to believe stories that confirm our world view. But not thinking actually seems to be to blame

22h

‘Toxic’ levels of borax in toy slime are unlikely to hurt children

A report by consumer group Which? has warned that many toy slime products break European Union limits on borax, but a few precautions should keep people safe

22h

Cape Town drought was made three times more likely by global warming

The city’s water crisis shows the high cost of failing to adapt to climate change, as it ignored warnings that water demand would exceed supply

22h

Tiny planets full of diamonds have been created in the lab

Carbon-rich planets laced with diamond may orbit distant stars, and now we’ve many miniature versions of them by crushing and heating chemical powders

22h

Routine treatment for cardiac arrest doubles risk of brain damage – study

Landmark trial likely to change the way cardiac arrest has been treated in the UK for more than half a century A treatment given to thousands of people who suffer cardiac arrest in Britain every year nearly doubles the risk of permanent brain damage and only marginally improves the chances of survival, a landmark study has found. More than 30,000 people have cardiac arrests – where the heart stop

22h

Melanoma biomarkers predicting checkpoint blocker response

Scientists have identified biomarkers in melanoma that could help tailor immunotherapy treatments to maximize the benefits for patients while reducing the likelihood of severe side effects.

22h

Scientists uncover DNA 'shield' w/crucial roles in normal cell division

New fundamental complex in cells drives 'messy' form of DNA repair. In immune cells, this is crucial to make antibodies. In cancer, mutations in complex could lead to resistance to BRCA-targeting PARP inhibitor drugs or platinum chemotherapies.

22h

Warming rivers make marked contribution to global greenhouse gas levels

Warming streams and rivers could be disproportionately contributing to the amount of planet-warming greenhouse gases, according to a new study.

22h

X-ray data may be first evidence of a star devouring a planet

An analysis of X-ray data suggests the first observations of a star swallowing a planet, and may also explain the star's mysterious dimming.

22h

Poor air quality does not offset exercise's heart benefits

Even in areas with moderate to high levels of traffic pollution, regular physical activity reduced the risk of first and recurrent heart attack.

22h

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