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Scientists reverse aging-associated skin wrinkles and hair loss in a mouse model

Researchers have reversed wrinkled skin and hair loss, hallmarks of aging, in a mouse model. When a mutation leading to mitochondrial dysfunction is induced, the mouse develops wrinkled skin and extensive, visible hair loss in a matter of weeks. When the mitochondrial function is restored by turning off the gene responsible for mitochondrial dysfunction, the mouse returns to smooth skin and thick

6h

SE LISTEN: 3 hajer der kan komme til Danmark

Hvidhajen kan svømme ind i danske farvande, hvis vandtemperaturen stiger. Men der er ingen grund til panik, mener biolog.

16h

Rapport: Mere end 100 statslige it-systemer er usikre og risikerer nedbrud

Ifølge en ny rapport fra Finansministeriet har 177 statslige it-systemer seriøse problemer med sikkerheden. Herunder systemer hos Skat og NemID.

8h

LATEST

Interior Department Proposes Major Changes to Wildlife Protections

Reshaping how the Endangered Species Act is implemented is seen as a way to streamline bureaucracy, but critics of the plan say it will leave species at greater risk of extinction.

12min

European heatwave brings drought, wildfires

Wildfires in the Arctic Circle, drought-stricken farmers and a spike in hospital treatment for sunburn: an unusually long heatwave this summer has northern Europe in its grip.

24min

Big tech firms agree on 'data portability' plan

Facebook, Google, Microsoft and Twitter unveiled plans Friday to make it easier for users to take their personal data and leave one online service for another.

24min

Fukushima’s Nuclear Imprint Is Found in California Wine (Drinkers, Don’t Panic)

A French research team says it has stumbled on the Japanese disaster’s signature in California wine, but the radioactive levels are too low to be dangerous.

27min

Newton's 'Principia' among items in alleged $8M book scheme

An archivist and an antique bookseller were charged Friday with stealing millions of dollars' worth of rare books, illustrations, maps and photographs from a Pittsburgh library over a 20-year period, including Isaac Newton's "Principia," considered a watershed of science.

30min

Two NASA satellites confirm Tropical Cyclone Ampil's heaviest rainfall shift

Two NASA satellites observed Tropical Storm Ampil in six and a half hours and found the storm's heaviest rainfall occurring in a band of thunderstorms shifted from north to south of the center. NASA's GPM satellite passed over the storm first and NASA's Aqua satellite made the second pass.

30min

Sahara dust may make you cough, but it's a storm killer

The bad news: Dust from the Sahara Desert in Africa—totaling a staggering 2 to 9 trillion pounds worldwide—has been almost a biblical plague on Texas and much of the Southern United States in recent weeks. The good news: the same dust appears to be a severe storm killer.

30min

The cost of Trump's Endangered Species Act proposal

The Trump administration wants to weaken the landmark protection law. What species are under threat?

36min

US Senate Republicans drop bid to block Trump's ZTE deal

US Senate Republicans on Friday dropped their effort to reimpose tough sanctions on Chinese telecommunications firm ZTE, a move Democrats lambasted as capitulating to President Donald Trump and his negotiating strategy with Beijing.

36min

NASA prepares to launch Parker Solar Probe, a mission to touch the Sun

Early on an August morning, the sky near Cape Canaveral, Florida, will light up with the launch of Parker Solar Probe. No earlier than Aug. 6, 2018, a United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy will thunder to space carrying the car-sized spacecraft, which will study the Sun closer than any human-made object ever has.

36min

SF State study compares athlete and truck driver, identical twins

Identical twins share over 99 percent of the same genetic material, which can make them ideal subjects for studying how other factors besides genetics can affect health. A new study by the San Francisco State University Kinesiology Department, CSU Fullerton, and Cal Poly, Pomona finds that 30 years of strenuous exercise made one twin much healthier than the other, with one exception.

38min

…Don't Drink the Mummy Juice

A change.org petition is asking for a taste of the red liquid found in the massive Egyptian sarcophagus.

38min

38min

Revel in these candid outtakes of the Apollo 11 moon landingApollo 11 Neil Armstrong

The images are being collected on a Flickr page dedicated to the Apollo missions. Read More

58min

Deepwater Coral Reefs Unlikely to Welcome Shallow-Water Animals

Historically thought to be a refuge for coral growing in the shallows, coral reefs from oceanic depths face similar threats, finds a new study.

1h

Eyewire Release Report 7/20/2018

Happy Friday! To give you a comprehensive picture of everything new on Eyewire, here are all changes since the last report a few weeks ago. We may have fixed the bug affecting Scythe Freeze where a Scythe clicking “Freeze” accidentally and unreversibly admin-freezes the cube(s) in question. Obviously, if the problem persists, please let us know. We’ve pushed some fixes for a few cube loading erro

1h

Britain's Big Butterfly Count Begins, With David Attenborough Leading The Charge

For the next three weeks, citizen volunteers in the United Kingdom will be tallying the painted ladies, peacocks and brimstones they see, to help create a nationwide count — and soothe their souls. (Image credit: Chris Golightly/Flickr)

1h

Bird Egg Science Takes Flight

Bird Egg Science Takes Flight Researchers have long pondered the humble egg. As some great puzzles are cracked open, new ones are laid. Eggs_topNteaser.jpg Image credits: Lorenz Oken Rights information: United States public domain Creature Friday, July 20, 2018 – 15:30 Katherine Gammon, Contributor (Inside Science) — Bird eggs have an immense diversity in shape. Scientists have long wondered wha

1h

Do Brown Recluse Spider Bites Really Lead to Amputations?

While brown recluse spiders are venomous, their alleged bites are often wrongly identified.

1h

A Rare Condition Is Causing a Boy's Skin to Turn to 'Stone.' What Is Stiff Skin Syndrome?

A Colorado boy has an extremely rare condition that's causing his skin to harden "like stone," his parents say.

1h

The Midterm Elections Are Already Under Attack

Phishing attempts and DDoS attacks have begun hitting 2018 campaigns. The US seems ill-prepared to meet the challenge.

1h

Trilobites: You Should Actually Send That Thank You Note You’ve Been Meaning to Write

New research showed the recipients of an emailed expression of gratitude felt much more “ecstatic” than writers expected.

1h

Research Dollars Go Farther at Less-Prestigious Institutions: Study

High-profile universities produce fewer papers, and with lesser influence, per federal dollar than less-celebrated recipients of federal funding.

1h

Here’s what you can do if your social media post gets taken down

Technology You can appeal when your social media content gets taken down, but you need to know where to look. If you think your social media post shouldn't have been removed, you have options.

2h

Wearable device measures cortisol in sweat

By drawing in a bit of sweat, a patch can reveal how much cortisol a person is producing. Cortisol is known as the stress hormone but is involved in many important physiological functions.

2h

The Democratic Party Apologizes to Black Voters

ATLANTA—Swanky fund-raisers don’t often begin with an apology to the well-heeled donors who shelled out thousands of dollars to sip wine, eat steak, and listen to pep-rally speeches. But as he looked out over a predominantly black crowd gathered at the Georgia Aquarium on Thursday night, Tom Perez, the Democratic National Committee chairman, felt compelled to issue a mea culpa. “I am sorry,” Pere

2h

Texas A&M study: Sahara dust may make you cough, but it's a storm killer

The bad news: Dust from the Sahara Desert in Africa — totaling a staggering 2 to 9 trillion pounds worldwide — has been almost a biblical plague on Texas and much of the Southern United States in recent weeks. The good news: the same dust appears to be a severe storm killer.

2h

Wearable device from Stanford measures cortisol in sweat

By drawing in a bit of sweat, a patch developed in the lab of Alberto Salleo can reveal how much cortisol a person is producing. Cortisol is known as the stress hormone but is involved in many important physiological functions.

2h

Parakeet pecking orders, basketball match-ups, and the tenure-track

Researchers from the Santa Fe Institute describe a new algorithm called SpringRank that uses wins and losses to quickly find rankings lurking in large networks. When tested on a wide range of synthetic and real-world datasets, ranging from teams in an NCAA college basketball tournament to the social behavior of animals, SpringRank outperformed other ranking algorithms in predicting outcomes and in

2h

2h

Legalizing marijuana gives police more time to clear real crimes

A new study shows that legalization has “produced some demonstrable and persistent benefit” to police departments in Washington and Colorado. Read More

2h

Study: Cancer patients who choose alternative treatments ‘twice as likely’ to die

Patients who choose alternative remedies, like traditional Chinese medicine and homeopathy, are more likely to opt out of additional conventional cancer treatments. Read More

2h

NASA prepares to launch Parker Solar Probe, a mission to touch the Sun

No earlier than Aug. 6, 2018, a United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy will thunder to space carrying the car-sized spacecraft, which will study the Sun closer than any human-made object ever has.

3h

Wearable device measures cortisol in sweat

The hormone cortisol rises and falls naturally throughout the day and can spike in response to stress, but current methods for measuring cortisol levels require waiting several days for results from a lab. By the time a person learns the results of a cortisol test—which may inform treatment for certain medical conditions—it is likely different from when the test was taken.

3h

Sea Level Rise Could Inundate the Internet

Extreme sea level rise could swamp internet cabling and hubs by 2033—and coastal cities like New York, Seattle and Miami are at greatest risk. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

Sleep Scientist Warns Against Walking Through Life 'In An Underslept State'

"Human beings are the only species that deliberately deprive themselves of sleep for no apparent gain," says sleep scientist Matthew Walker, author of Why We Sleep. Originally broadcast Oct. 17, 2017.

3h

This textile's twitching tendrils hint at a future of programmable materials

Technology Responsive environments. No robots needed. The Active Textile is the largest prototype in a new class of responsive materials developed by MIT’s Self-Assembly Lab in collaboration with Designtex and Steelcase.

3h

50 years ago, scientists took baby steps toward selecting sex

In 1968, scientists figured out how to determine the sex of rabbit embryos.

3h

How a Team of Experts Quelled Colorado's Enormous Spring Fire

The state's third-largest wildfire ever burned more than 100,000 acres and destroyed more than 200 homes.

3h

Barack Obama Still Doesn’t Understand Donald Trump

Barack Obama doesn’t often mention Donald Trump. More than anything else, that has been a constant in his random assortment of public appearances and statements since he left the White House. Even when he has occasionally answered the call from Americans to show leadership during a Trumpian scandal or crisis, Obama has preferred magnanimity, issuing statements exhorting his countrymen to soldier

3h

The Top 30 Sharks of Shark Week: Part Two

Celebrate 30 years of Shark Week by counting down the most grueling, most ghastly, and most infamous sharks. Count down sharks 20-11, a shark with reflective eyes that lives deep underwater and two brother sharks who always cause trouble in the waters. Shark Week 2018 starts Sunday July 22 9p! Stream 30 Sharks of Shark Week on Discovery GO: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/30-sharks-of-shark-we

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Photos of the Week: Pug Mugshot, Umbrella Sky, Helsinki Summit

Splashing in New York City, deadly protests in Nicaragua, a reunited migrant family in Texas, tornado damage in Iowa, mammoth transport in Austria, prayers for rain in India, meat-eating plants in Colombia, France wins the World Cup in Russia, and much more.

4h

‘There’s No Collusion’: Geology’s Timekeepers Are Feuding

“What the fuck is the Meghalayan?” asked Ben van der Pluijm , a geologist. Whatever the Meghalayan is , we live in it now. Earlier this week, the International Commission on Stratigraphy announced that the current stretch of geological time, the Holocene Epoch, would be split into three subdivisions. This is particularly noteworthy to the human species, as we have been living in the Holocene for

4h

SPIE journal announces public access to largest multi-lesion medical imaging dataset

A paper published today in the Journal of Medical Imaging – "DeepLesion: Automated mining of large-scale lesion annotations and universal lesion detection with deep learning," — announced the open availability of the largest CT lesion-image database accessible to the public. Such data are the foundations for the training sets of machine-learning algorithms; until now, large-scale annotated radiol

4h

Who Owns the Moon? A Space Lawyer Answers

Did the Stars and Stripes on the moon signify the establishment of an American colony? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

Last Survivor of Uncontacted Tribe, 'Man of the Hole,' Is Spotted in the Amazon

Video footage shows the "Man of the Hole" chopping trees in the Amazon.

4h

Blob-Like Sea Monster Washes Up on Maine Beach

What kind of sea monster is this?

4h

Eagle-eyed machine learning algorithm outdoes human experts

Researchers from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and Oak Ridge National Laboratory have trained computers to quickly and consistently detect and analyze microscopic radiation damage to materials under consideration for nuclear reactors. And the computers bested humans in this arduous task.

4h

Two NASA satellites confirm Tropical Cyclone Ampil's heaviest rainfall shift

Two NASA satellites observed Tropical Storm Ampil in six and a half hours and found the storm's heaviest rainfall occurring in a band of thunderstorms shifted from north to south of the center. NASA's GPM satellite passed over the storm first and NASA's Aqua satellite made the second pass.

4h

Five rad and random things I found this week

Gadgets The end-of-week dispatch from PopSci's commerce editor. Vol. 50. My job is to find cool stuff. Throughout the week I spend hours scouring the web for things that are ingenious or clever or ridiculously cheap.

4h

Bayer Will Stop Selling Essure Birth Control Implants

Thousands of women have complained that the device has caused injuries, including perforation of the uterus.

4h

Sympathy for the Devil: Shark Week Should Remind Us Humans Are the Apex Predator

For every human they kill, we kill literally millions of them — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

People love to hate do-gooders, especially at work

Highly cooperative and generous people can attract hatred and social punishment, especially in competitive environments, new University of Guelph study finds.

4h

World's fastest human-made spinning object could help study quantum mechanics

Researchers have created the fastest human-made spinning object in the world, which they believe will help them study material science, quantum mechanics and the properties of vacuum.

4h

Scientists reverse aging-associated skin wrinkles and hair loss in a mouse model

Researchers have reversed wrinkled skin and hair loss, hallmarks of aging, in a mouse model. When a mutation leading to mitochondrial dysfunction is induced, the mouse develops wrinkled skin and extensive, visible hair loss in a matter of weeks. When the mitochondrial function is restored by turning off the gene responsible for mitochondrial dysfunction, the mouse returns to smooth skin and thick

4h

Greening vacant lots reduces feelings of depression in city dwellers

Greening vacant urban land significantly reduces feelings of depression and improves overall mental health for the surrounding residents, researchers show in a new randomized, controlled study. The findings have implications for cities across the United States, where 15 percent of land is deemed "vacant" and often blighted or filled with trash and overgrown vegetation.

4h

Most common shoulder operation is no more beneficial than placebo surgery

Researchers show that one of the most common surgical procedures in the Western world is probably unnecessary. Keyhole surgeries of the shoulder are useless for patients with 'shoulder impingement', the most common diagnosis in patients with shoulder pain.

4h

Immigrants have less mental disorders than U.S.-born Americans. Why?

Immigrants who come to the U.S. are significantly less likely than U.S.-born individuals to have mental health problems, according to a new study published in Psychiatry Research. Read More

4h

The need for speed: Why malaria parasites are faster than human immune cells

Elementary cytoskeleton protein is different in parasites and represents a starting point for a possible new therapy against malaria infections. Researchers from the Heidelberg University Hospital, the Centre for Molecular Biology at the University of Heidelberg (ZMBH), and the Heidelberg Institute for Theoretical Studies (HITS) have published these findings in the journal "PLOS Biology".

4h

Most employees can work smarter, given the chance

More than half (58 percent) of employees in Britain can identify changes at work which would make them more productive, a research team drawn from UCL Institute of Education (IOE), Cardiff University and Nuffield College, Oxford has found.

4h

Big data playing bigger role as airlines personalize service

You're settling into your window seat, bound for a summer vacation, when the flight attendant wishes you a happy birthday or commiserates about the lousy weather that delayed the last leg of your trip.

4h

One giant sale: Neil Armstrong's collection goes to auctionApollo 11 Neil Armstrong

Admirers of Neil Armstrong and space exploration have a chance to own artifacts and mementos that belonged to the modest man who became a global hero by becoming the first human to walk on the moon.

5h

I got a hoax academic paper about how UK politicians wipe their bums published

I had what seemed like rather a good idea a few weeks back. Building on some prominent findings in social psychology, I hypothesised that politicians on the right would wipe their bum with their left hand; and that politicians on the left would wipe with their right hand.

5h

How Putin Squandered His Helsinki Triumph

Hesitance mixed with fear—that’s the feeling the Trump-Putin meeting was met with by the liberal circles in Moscow, or what is left of them by now. The country has been hemorrhaging its best and brightest ever since Vladimir Putin returned triumphantly to the Kremlin in 2012. Since then, the liberal middle classes have steadily lost influence in the face of powerful Kremlin propaganda. Democratic

5h

Effect of genetic factors on nutrition: The genes are not to blame

Individualized dietary recommendations based on genetic information are currently a popular trend. A team has systematically analyzed scientific articles and reached the following conclusion: There is no clear evidence for the effect of genetic factors on the consumption of total calories, carbohydrates, and fat. According to the current state of knowledge, the expedience of gene-based dietary rec

5h

Moving On Up

How behavioral science could boost upward mobility in housing voucher programs — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

Pathogens attack plants like hackers, so my lab thinks about crop protection like cybersecurity

Plants feed us. Without them we're goners. Through thousands of years of genetic modification by selective breeding, humans have developed the crops that keep us alive. We have large kernels of grains, plump fruits and nutritious, toxin-free vegetables. These forms would never be found in nature, but were bred by people to keep us healthy and happy.

5h

World's fastest man-made spinning object could help study quantum mechanics

Researchers have created the fastest man-made rotor in the world, which they believe will help them study quantum mechanics.

5h

Who owns the moon? A space lawyer answers

Most likely, this is the best-known picture of a flag ever taken: Buzz Aldrin standing next to the first U.S. flag planted on the Moon. For those who knew their world history, it also rang some alarm bells. Only less than a century ago, back on Earth, planting a national flag in another part of the world still amounted to claiming that territory for the fatherland. Did the Stars and Stripes on the

5h

Social media manipulation rising globally, new report warns

The manipulation of public opinion over social media platforms has emerged as a critical threat to public life. Around the world, government agencies and political parties are exploiting social media platforms to spread junk news and disinformation, exercise censorship and control, and undermine trust in media, public institutions and science.

5h

Blindspotting Is a Boldly Sincere Love Letter to Oakland

There’s perhaps no type of movie that’s harder to make than a sincere one. Not a film that’s sappy or cheerful or relentlessly emotional, but one that tries to make a genuine and powerful point about the way of the world. Carlos López Estrada’s directorial debut Blindspotting is a lot of things—it’s an anarchic buddy comedy, a sly satire of gentrification, and a sober drama about an African Ameri

5h

New material: Two faces offer limitless possibilities

Named for the mythical god with two faces, Janus membranes — double-sided membranes that serve as gatekeepers between two substances — have emerged as a material with potential industrial uses.

5h

Sea pickles are adapting to the Pacific Northwest

Tubular colonial jellies known as pyrosomes that arrived in 2014 along North America's Pacific Northwest Coast appear to be adapting to cooler water and may become permanent residents.

5h

Treating dementia with the healing waves of sound

Ultrasound waves applied to the whole brain improve cognitive dysfunction in mice with conditions simulating vascular dementia and Alzheimer's disease. It is possible that this type of therapy may also benefit humans.

5h

Oregon wheat farmers try to stop fire that's consuming crops

Farmers rushed to save their livelihoods as a wildfire roared through vast Oregon wheat fields Thursday and crushed their hopes at the peak of what was expected to be one of the most bountiful harvests in years.

5h

Where the wild—and dangerous—dogs roam

When Yang Yu, VG16, arrived in the Yushu Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture in southern Qinghai, China, the first thing she noticed was the dogs. Huge and black with thick ruffs of fur like lions' manes, Tibetan mastiffs were everywhere. Many were leashed, lying in people's yards to guard their houses. But plenty weren't: Yu saw them sleeping in the streets, begging scraps from monks at monasteries, an

5h

HRW urges Brazilian lawmakers to reject new pesticide law

Human Rights Watch (HRW) on Friday called on Brazilian lawmakers to reject a proposed law to relax regulations on the use of pesticides as it published a report blaming powerful landowners for the poisoning of rural residents.

5h

How plants use carbon affects their response to climate change

Under warmer conditions, plants can take up more carbon dioxide by using carbon more efficiently for growth, shows a new study.

5h

Fueling the MATE transporter

Evolutionarily conserved transport proteins, such as those belonging to the multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE) superfamily, protect cells against toxic chemicals and contribute to multidrug resistance in cancer and bacterial cells.

5h

Scientists identify most pressing issues posed by chemicals in the environment

Chemicals released into the environment by human activity are resulting in biodiversity loss; increased natural hazards; threats to food, water and energy security; negative impacts on human health and degradation of environmental quality. Now, an international study published in Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry involving scientists from the University of York has identified the 22 most impo

5h

New study shows certain video games can improve health in children with obesity

A new study showed for the first time that video games, in combination with fitness coaching and a step tracker, helped overweight children lose weight, lower their blood pressure and cholesterol and increase their physical activity.

5h

Drug now in clinical trials for Parkinson's strengthens heart contractions in animals

A drug currently in clinical trials for treating symptoms of Parkinson's disease may someday have value for treating heart failure, according to results of early animal studies.

5h

New findings on intercellular communication

This is a nice example of a rather unexpected discovery: by studying the development of the blood vessels of the brain, researchers have just shed light on a question that was pending for 10 years! They provide a molecular mechanism conferring ligand specificity to Wnt signaling, an ancestral communication pathway present in all vertebrates.

5h

A Dispatch From an Exclusive Retreat for Intelligence Officials

ASPEN , Colo.—With many of the nation’s leading national-security experts gathered here this week, the tension between President Donald Trump and several of his highest-ranking intelligence and law-enforcement officials was hard to miss. Speaking at the annual conference, the FBI director and the director of national intelligence didn’t deny that they had considered resigning over Trump’s attacks

5h

Three women are the wits behind Google Assistant's personality

The Google Assistant is on more than a half-billion devices around the world, but parts of its personality come from just three women at the tech giant's offices in Manhattan.

5h

Support for the Endangered Species Act remains high as Trump administration and Congress try to gut it

The Endangered Species Act, or "the Act," is arguably the most important law in the United States for conserving biodiversity and arresting the extinction of species.

5h

Why malaria parasites are faster than human immune cells

Elementary cytoskeleton protein is different in parasites and represents a starting point for a possible new therapy against malaria infections. Researchers from the Heidelberg University Hospital, the Centre for Molecular Biology at the University of Heidelberg (ZMBH), and the Heidelberg Institute for Theoretical Studies (HITS) have published these findings in the journal PLOS Biology.

5h

Image: Sweden in flames

With Europe in the grip of a heatwave and little rain, the scorched ground and dry vegetation is succumbing to fire. Fires have now broken out as far as the Arctic Circle, in Sweden. This animation shows images from the Copernicus Sentinel-2 and Sentinel-3 missions.

5h

The truth behind 8 common misconceptions about drugs

Health Your spine doesn't store LSD, and MDMA doesn’t put holes in your brain. Drugs, especially illegal ones, are notorious for their misinformation. Without a reliable knowledge base, users—from recreational ones to addicts—often rely on friends,…

5h

Greening vacant lots reduces feelings of depression in city dwellers, Penn study finds

Greening vacant urban land significantly reduces feelings of depression and improves overall mental health for the surrounding residents, researchers show in a new randomized, controlled study published in JAMA Network Open. The findings have implications for cities across the United States, where 15 percent of land is deemed "vacant" and often blighted or filled with trash and overgrown vegetatio

5h

Can greening vacant urban land improve mental health?

Physical conditions in a neighborhood matter. Trash, a lack of sidewalks and parks, and vacant or dilapidated spaces have been associated with depression, while living near green spaces has been associated with less depression, anxiety and stress. In Philadelphia, a citywide cluster randomized trial looked at whether greening vacant urban land by getting rid of trash, grading the land, planting ne

5h

Effect of twice-weekly calorie restriction diet for glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes

A diet with calorie restriction two days per week was comparable to a diet with daily calorie restriction for glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes.

5h

Sleeping vs Being Awake: Being Awake wins!

It was a fierce competition, but in the end there could only be one winner! Sleepwalking proved to be slightly less efficient than regular walking, and team Being Awake came out on top! Thanks to all who participated! Leaderboard:

5h

Nordic telecom operator Telia enters TV business

The Nordic region's largest telecoms operator, Telia, said Friday it has agreed to buy the broadcasting and streaming operations of Swedish publishing company Bonnier AB to gain a foothold in the television and entertainment business.

5h

US proposes roll back of endangered species protections

The US administration of President Donald Trump on Thursday proposed sweeping changes to the 45-year-old Endangered Species Act which would roll back protections for threatened animals, sparking alarm by environmentalists.

5h

Sharks Are Helping Find A Cure For Cancer | Shark News

Scientists are discovering how unique nanobodies found in sharks and llamas may help treat cancer and other deadly diseases in humans. Shark Week 2018 starts Sunday July 22 9p! Stream Classic Shark Week Episodes: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/shark-week/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery https://www.facebook.com/S

5h

Trilobites: White Clover Can Be an Annoying Weed. It May Also Hold Secrets to Urban Evolution.

The ubiquitous plant alters its defense systems in a tougher environment, prompting researchers to call it a perfect test species for study as urban areas expand.

5h

Talk Trump may tap strategic oil reserves raises questions

Reports that President Donald Trump could soon tap the Strategic Petroleum Reserve in a bid to lower gasoline prices have raised concerns the emergency stockpile is being compromised for political purposes.

6h

Zuckerberg's Holocaust comment puts Facebook on the spot

Denying the Holocaust happened is probably OK on Facebook. Calling for a mob to kill Jews is not.

6h

The Storm Petrel Is the Master of Extremes

T he peninsula northwest of the industrial city of Antofagasta, on Chile’s northern desert coast, is haloed with seabirds in flight. Pelicans lumber past wheeling gulls. Flocks of boobies cut the haze around Punta Tetas—Tits Point—like an avian punch line. Farther from shore, where the inappropriately named Pacific begins its wild pitch and yaw, is the domain of the order Procellariiformes : bird

6h

Heart attack risk on the rise for pregnant women and death rate remains high

Study shows that the risk of having a heart attack while pregnant, giving birth, or during the two months after delivery, continues to increase for American women.

6h

The cause of prostate cancer progression to incurable stage has likely been uncovered

Researchers have discovered novel genes and mechanisms that can explain how a genomic variant in a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs11672691 influences prostate cancer aggressiveness. Their findings also suggest ways to improve risk stratification and clinical treatment for advanced prostate cancer.

6h

Long-term effectiveness of therapy for common cause of kidney failure

Among individuals with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, those who were treated with tolvaptan for up to 11 years had a slower rate of kidney function decline compared with historical controls. Annualized kidney function decline rates of tolvaptan-treated patients did not change during follow-up.

6h

Diabetes raises risk of cancer, with women at even greater likelihood, a major new study has found

A global review involving almost 20 million people has shown that having diabetes significantly raises the risk of developing cancer, and for women the risk is even higher. Researchers also found diabetes (type 1 and type 2) conferred an additional risk for women, compared to men, for leukaemia and cancers of the stomach, mouth and kidney, but less risk for liver cancer.

6h

Response to HIV/AIDS epidemic at risk of 'dangerous complacency' as urgent change in approach is needed

HIV rates persist in high risk, marginalized populations and the Commission authors warn that a resurgence of the epidemic is likely as the largest generation of young people age into adolescence and adulthood. * Stalling of HIV funding in recent years endangers HIV control efforts. Historic 'exceptionalism' of HIV treatment and care may no longer be sustainable; services will likely need to be pa

6h

Fewer injuries in girls' sports when high schools have athletic trainers

Availability of a full-time certified athletic trainer in high school reduces overall and recurrent injury rates in girls who play on the soccer or basketball team, according to a new study.

6h

Protecting autonomous grids from potentially crippling GPS spoofing attacks

Not long ago, getting a virus was about the worst thing computer users could expect in terms of system vulnerability. But in our current age of hyper-connectedness and the emerging Internet of Things, that's no longer the case. With connectivity, a new principle has emerged, one of universal concern to those who work in the area of systems control. That law says, essentially, that the more complex

6h

Medicaid expansion boosts employment

A new study found individuals with disabilities were more likely to be employed in states that expanded Medicaid than their peers in non-expansion states, reducing the need to live in poverty to qualify for Medicaid coverage.

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WhatsApp curbs India service after lynchingsWhatsApp Forwarding India

WhatsApp announced limits on the forwarding of messages by its 200 million Indian users in an effort to stop a spate of horrific lynchings and to assuage government threats of legal action in its biggest market.

6h

Singapore says hackers stole 1.5 million health records in record cyberattack

Hackers have stolen health records belonging to 1.5 million Singaporeans, including Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong who was specifically targeted in the city state's biggest ever data breach, authorities said Friday.

6h

Urgent change needed to regulate the environmental impacts of chemicals

International study has identified the most important questions that researchers must address in order to help protect our planet over the next decade

6h

Researchers say sea pickles are adapting to the Pacific Northwest

Tubular colonial jellies known as pyrosomes that arrived in 2014 along North America's Pacific Northwest Coast appear to be adapting to cooler water and may become permanent residents.

6h

The Peculiar Math That Could Underlie the Laws of Nature

In 2014, a graduate student at the University of Waterloo, Canada, named Cohl Furey rented a car and drove six hours south to Pennsylvania State University, eager to talk to a physics professor there named Murat Günaydin . Furey had figured out how to build on a finding of Günaydin’s from 40 years earlier — a largely forgotten result that supported a powerful suspicion about fundamental physics a

6h

Houseplants could one day monitor home health

In a perspective published in the July 20 issue of Science, Neal Stewart and his University of Tennessee coauthors explore the future of houseplants as aesthetically pleasing and functional sirens of home health.

6h

How to weigh stars with gravitational lensing

Astronomy & Astrophysics publishes the predictions of the passages of foreground stars in front of background stars. A team of astronomers, using ultra-precise measurements from the Gaia satellite, have accurately forecast two passages in the next months. Each event will produce shifts in the background star's position due to the deflection of light by gravity, and will allow the measurement of th

6h

Space, not Brexit, is final frontier for Scottish outpost

Never mind Brexit: For a remote peninsula in the Scottish highlands, the buzz is all about hi-tech rocket launchers firing satellites into space.

6h

Feeling the heat: Tokyo preps for sweltering Summer Olympics

A heatwave in Japan that has killed more than a dozen people is reviving concerns about the Tokyo 2020 Olympics, which will be held during the country's notoriously sweltering summer.

6h

Kenya to get first deployment of internet balloons from Google parent

The first commercial deployment for Project Loon—the "balloon-powered internet" being developed by Google parent Alphabet—is headed for Kenya, the US tech giant said Thursday.

6h

Disappearing messages, private phones test open records laws

One app promotes itself as a way to discuss sensitive negotiations and human resources problems without leaving a digital record.

6h

World's fastest man-made spinning object could help study quantum mechanics

Researchers have created the fastest man-made spinning object in the world, which they believe will help them study material science, quantum mechanics and the properties of vacuum.

6h

Gene regulator may contribute to protein pileup in exfoliation glaucoma

In exfoliation glaucoma, a protein dandruff clogs the outflow pathway for the fluid in our eyes. Scientists have evidence that variants of the same gene that enables us to make connective tissue by crosslinking proteins is associated with this unusual glaucoma.

6h

New solar sailing technology for NASA

Researchers is taking solar sailing to the next level with advanced photonic materials. This new class of materials could be used to steer reflected or transmitted photons and enable near-Earth, interplanetary and interstellar space travel.

6h

White College Graduates Are Doing Great With Their Parents' Money

The numbers are staggering: White Americans with a college degree are on average three times as wealthy as black Americans with the same credential, and in families whose head of the household is employed, white families have 10 times the wealth of black ones. One estimate on the conservative end suggested that this wealth gap could take two centuries to close. And the thing about wealth, says Ta

6h

Humans Have Unleashed a ‘Landscape of Fear’

The more humans have flourished, the more the biggest animals have not. We have always hunted large mammals, downsizing the fauna of whatever continent we happen to visit. Mammoths , woolly rhinos, ground sloths —all gone. In slaying these giants, we have remade the world in ways that we are only starting to appreciate. We have, for example, made it easier for fear to sculpt the land. Predators i

6h

Protecting the Intellectual Property of AI with Watermarking

If we can protect videos, audio and photos with digital watermarking, why not AI models?

6h

What Hollywood gets right and wrong about hacking

Spoiler warnings for Mr. Robot, Arrow and Blackhat

6h

UK space officials seek nifty name for Mars rover

The U.K. Space Agency is looking for a catchy name for the ExoMars Rover being developed for use in a mission set for 2020.

6h

Arctic wild goose chase threatens chicks as temperatures rise

Migrating geese race to warmer Arctic but are too worn out to lay their eggs early when they get there.

6h

How to train employees to have difficult conversations | Tamekia MizLadi Smith

It's time to invest in face-to-face training that empowers employees to have difficult conversations, says Tamekia MizLadi Smith. In a witty, provocative talk, Smith shares a workplace training program called "I'm G.R.A.C.E.D." that will inspire bosses and employees alike to communicate with compassion and respect. Bottom line: always let people know why their work matters.

6h

Hold Still, Butterflies. Britain Is Counting.

Tens of thousands of volunteers are being sought for a survey of butterflies and day-flying moths, which are important indicators of an environment’s health.

6h

Microsoft profit climbs as cloud grows

Microsoft on Thursday said its revenue and profit climbed in the recently ended quarter, getting results from its bets on cloud computing services and artificial intelligence.

6h

Republicans and Democrats agree on climate change—they just don't realize it

Just how far apart are Republicans and Democrats when it comes to views on climate change? Not all that far, as it turns out. They're just too party-focused to notice.

6h

Israeli army unveils new 'dual-use' tank

The Israeli army on Thursday revealed details of a new tank it was developing, designed more for use in guerrilla warfare conditions.

6h

Cloud brightening, 'sun shields' to save Barrier Reef

Australia announced plans Friday to explore concepts such as firing salt into clouds and covering swathes of water with a thin layer of film in a bid to save the embattled Great Barrier Reef.

6h

5 Things to Watch as the Trump Administration Weakens Car Rules

Legal battles loom and pollution levels could rise as fuel economy standards are relaxed — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

Kakerlak-robotter skal fikse fremtidens flymotorer

Rolls-Royce udvikler nu små robotter, på størrelse med insekter, der kan kravle ind i fly og ordne motoren.

6h

Sweden's farmers count cost of historic drought

As an unprecedented drought scorches large swathes of Sweden's green pastures, farmers are having to send their animals to slaughter because they have no hay left to feed them.

6h

Young people who frequently argue with their parents are better citizens, research finds

Teenagers who regularly clash with their parents are more likely to have given time to a charity or humanitarian cause, a study has shown.

6h

Beets and carrots could lead to stronger and greener buildings

According to engineers, root vegetables aren't only good for the body. Their fibres could also help make concrete mixtures stronger and more eco-friendly.

6h

Electronic tongue allows for the fast, cheap detection of adulterated honey

Researchers of Valencia's Polytechnic University (UPV) have developed an electronic "tongue" able to distinguish adulterated honeys in an easy, fast and cheap way.

6h

Mother-child communication in plants

Researchers decipher how plants steer the development of their embryos using hormones.

6h

How California's sea stars are evolving past a devastating pandemic

In 2012, environmental systems graduate student Lauren Schiebelhut was collecting DNA from ochre sea stars living along the Northern California coast—part of an effort to study genetic diversity in various marine species that serve as indicators of habitat health. She had no idea that just one year later, most of the sea stars would be dead.

6h

Who needs science advice anyway? Governments, for one

There has been much consternation within the Ontario research community since Premier Doug Ford summarily dismissed the province's first chief scientist, Molly Shoichet, after she'd been in the job for only six months.

6h

Where to search for signs of life on Titan

New findings, published in the journal Astrobiology, suggest that large craters are the prime locations in which to find the building blocks of life on Saturn's largest moon, Titan.

6h

A phonon laser operating at an exceptional point

The basic quanta of light (photon) and sound (phonon) are bosonic particles that largely obey similar rules and are in general very good analogs of one another. Physicists have explored this analogy in recent experimental investigations of a phonon laser to provide insights into a long-debated issue of how a laser—or more specifically, its line width—is affected when operated at an exceptional poi

6h

The heat is on – and that's great news for rare Siamese crocodiles

As temperatures soar to record levels across much of the world, many people are complaining that it's hot enough to fry an egg outdoors. Thirty-degree heat may be too much for some, but for others it's just the ticket. Crocodile conservationists in Cambodia have been assiduously checking their own thermometers for the past few weeks, to ensure that it's hot enough to hatch an egg indoors – several

6h

Shining light on excited-state dynamics in perovskite materials

Through a close collaboration between experimentalists at University of California Berkeley and theorists in Los Alamos's Theoretical Division group T-1, the Center for Nonlinear Studies (CNLS), and Center for Integrated Nanotechnology (CINT), researchers have performed femtosecond transient absorption and density functional theory simulations to probe the excited-state dynamics of hybrid perovski

6h

Did a rogue star change the makeup of our solar system?

A team of researchers from the Max-Planck Institute and Queen's University has used new information to test a theory that suggests a rogue star passed close enough to our solar system millions of years ago to change its configuration. The group has written a paper describing their ideas and have posted it on the arXiv preprint server.

6h

Woman Tried to Treat Athlete’s Foot with Raw Garlic. It Burned Through Her Toe.

A woman in England learned the hard way that it's not safe to treat a foot fungus infection by covering it with slices of raw garlic, according to a new report of the woman's case.

6h

How virtual worlds can recreate the geographic history of life

The Amazon and the adjacent Andean slopes in South America host an astonishing richness of plants and animals. These species have been sources of food, shelter and medicine since the arrival of humans and a target of scientific curiosity since the days of the earliest European naturalist explorers.

7h

Researchers report two-faced Janus membrane applications

Named for the mythical god with two faces, Janus membranes—double-sided membranes that serve as gatekeepers between two substances—have emerged as a material with potential industrial uses. Creating two distinct "faces" on these delicate surfaces, however, is a process fraught with challenges.

7h

Exploji! A Timeline of Emoji's Sudden, Drastic Rise

Apple’s 2011 release of the emoji keyboard may have signaled the start of the spike, but it feels like emoji have been with us forever.

7h

How to weigh stars with gravitational lensing

Astronomy & Astrophysics publishes the predictions of the passages of foreground stars in front of background stars. A team of astronomers, using ultra-precise measurements from the Gaia satellite, have accurately forecast two passages in the next months. Each event will produce shifts in the background star's position due to the deflection of light by gravity, and will allow the measurement of th

7h

A molecular key for delaying the progression of Multiple Sclerosis is found

In the lab it was possible to improve the symptoms in the chronic phase of the disease while encouraging the repair of the nervous tissue, and the challenge now is to move the research forward in humans. This discovery is the outcome of the work by an international consortium led in the Basque Autonomous Community by the UPV/EHU and the Achucarro centre together with personnel from ciberNed and CI

7h

People love to hate on do-gooders, especially at work

Highly cooperative and generous people can attract hatred and social punishment, especially in competitive environments, new University of Guelph study finds.

7h

From pollutants to human health: Key questions for a better environmental future in Europe

A new study, published in the journal Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, wants to shape a new guideline –with a more global and coordinated perspective– for several social and economic sectors in the field of chemical products and management of environmental risks in Europe.

7h

Doctors rely on more than just data for medical decision making

A study from MIT computer scientists finds patients with similar medical profiles receive different treatments based on doctors' 'gut feelings.'

7h

Houseplants could one day monitor home health

In a perspective published in the July 20 issue of Science, a team of University of Tennessee faculty and a student from two unrelated disciplines — plant sciences and architectural design — explore the future of houseplants as aesthetically pleasing and functional sirens of home health. Their idea is to genetically engineer house plants to serve as subtle alarms that something is amiss in our h

7h

How Can Scientists Help Make Cities More Sustainable?

Researchers have data. Corporate executives have innovations. Mayors have real problems to solve. Yet these people do not necessarily understand how they can help one another make cities healthier… — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

Genome damage from CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing higher than thought

Scientists have discovered that CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing can cause greater genetic damage in cells than was previously thought. This has safety implications for future gene therapies using CRISPR/Cas9 as the unexpected damage could lead to dangerous changes in some cells. The study revealed that standard DNA tests miss finding this genetic damage, and that caution and specific testing will be requ

7h

US opioid prescribing rates by congressional district

Congressional districts with the highest opioid prescribing rates are predominantly concentrated in the southeastern U.S., with other hotspots in Appalachia and the rural west, according to the first study to focus on opioid prescribing rates at the congressional district level.

7h

Scientists explore new experimental model systems to advance biology

Tremendous advancement of basic biological knowledge has come from genetically manipulating model organisms to test mechanistic hypotheses. But the selection of traditional model organisms available offers a limited view of biological diversity, meaning that they cannot be used to investigate a broad swath of novel and important processes. Now an international team of scientists including Jackie C

7h

It's surprisingly easy for your headphones to damage your hearing

DIY Here's how to check. When the world gets too distracting, you crank up the volume on your headphones. But if you blast your music too loudly, you may permanently damage your hearing.

7h

Capturing the shadow of Saturn's moon Titan from right here on Earth

Titan is Saturn's largest moon, and it is more like a planet than a moon in many respects.

7h

The French Don’t Understand American Identity Politics

If you were looking for a textbook example of the differences between how the United States and France think of themselves as multiethnic nations, look no further than the tiff this week between The Daily Show ’s Trevor Noah and Gérard Araud, France’s ambassador to the United States. After France’s multiethnic national team won the World Cup , Noah joked on his show on Tuesday that “Africa won th

7h

Urgent change needed to regulate the environmental impacts of chemicals

International study has identified the most important questions that researchers must address in order to help protect our planet over the next decade.

7h

Secondhand smoke causing thousands of still births in developing countries

Exposure to secondhand smoke is causing thousands of still births in developing countries, according to new research carried out by the University of York.

7h

Wave energy converters are not geared towards the increase in energy over the last century

Wave energy converters are designed to generate the maximum energy possible in their location and take a typical year in the location as a reference. Alongside the Irish Centre for Ocean Energy Research, researchers from various UPV/EHU centres have been exploring how ocean energy in Ireland has evolved during the last century. The results reveal an increase of up to 40%, which directly affects th

7h

Speed up solving complex problems: Be lazy and only work crucial tasks

A new improvement to a programming technique called 'lazy grounding' could solve hard-set and complex issues in freight logistics, routing and power grids by drastically reducing computation times.

7h

A peek into the interplay between sleep and wakefulness

The ventrolateral preoptic nucleus (VLPO) in the brain plays a critical role in the initiation and maintenance of sleep, while the lateral posterior part of the hypothalamus contains neuronal populations implicated in maintenance of arousal. Now, a University of Tsukuba-centered study reveals that these arousal-related neurons are heavily innervated by GABAergic neurons in the preoptic area includ

7h

Physics treasure hidden in a wallpaper pattern

An international team of scientists has discovered a new, exotic form of insulating material with a metallic surface that could enable more efficient electronics or even quantum computing. The researchers developed a new method for analyzing existing chemical compounds that relies on the mathematical properties like symmetry that govern the repeating patterns seen in everyday wallpaper.

7h

New battery could store wind and solar electricity affordably and at room temperature

A new type of flow battery that involves a liquid metal more than doubled the maximum voltage of conventional flow batteries and could lead to affordable storage of renewable power.

7h

Diabetes during pregnancy may increase baby's heart disease risk

Gestational diabetes may increase the risk of blood vessel dysfunction and heart disease in offspring by altering a smooth muscle protein responsible for blood vessel network formation. Understanding of the protein's function in fetal cells may improve early detection of disease in children.

7h

How satellites and other aerial technologies have changed society

Satellites have changed the way we experience the world, by beaming back images from around the globe and letting us explore the planet through online maps and other visuals. Such tools are so familiar today we often take them for granted.

7h

Researchers study gravitational lensing around an extremely dense galaxy cluster

Dark matter halos are theoretical bodies inside which galaxies are suspended; the halo's mass dominates the total mass. These halos cannot be observed directly, but astronomers infer their presence by the phenomenon of gravity lensing—the distortion of background objects by strong gravitational sources that act as lenses. Astronomers can even study distant galaxies magnified by the gravitational l

7h

When political ideology shapes luxury buying

Those with conservative leanings tend to favor preservation of socio-economic order and social hierarchy. This can influence the demand for luxury products positioned as having the ability to maintain one's status.

7h

The genes are not to blame

Individualized dietary recommendations based on genetic information are currently a popular trend. A team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has systematically analyzed scientific articles and reached the following conclusion: There is no clear evidence for the effect of genetic factors on the consumption of total calories, carbohydrates, and fat. According to the current state of knowled

7h

New findings on intercellular communication

This is a nice example of a rather unexpected discovery: by studying the development of the blood vessels of the brain, researchers at Université libre de Bruxelles have just shed light on a question that was pending for 10 years! They provide a molecular mechanism conferring ligand specificity to Wnt signaling, an ancestral communication pathway present in all vertebrates. Their research is publi

7h

The cause of prostate cancer progression to incurable stage has likely been uncovered

Researchers at the University of Oulu in Finland have discovered novel genes and mechanisms that can explain how a genomic variant in a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs11672691 influences prostate cancer aggressiveness. Their findings also suggest ways to improve risk stratification and clinical treatment for advanced prostate cancer. The study is published in the journal Cell.

7h

Current noises of Majorana fermions

Majorana fermions, also named 'Angel particles', has become a hot topic in recent years for their potential application in topological quantum computation. A recent theoretical study reveals the connection between current noises of Majorana system and the multiple Andreev reflections, providing a method for the experimental detection of Majorana fermions. This work is reported by SCIENCE CHINA Phy

7h

New study shows video games can improve health in children with obesity

A new study from LSU's Pennington Biomedical Research Center showed for the first time that video games, in combination with fitness coaching and a step tracker, helped overweight children lose weight, lower their blood pressure and cholesterol and increase their physical activity.

7h

Oregon researchers say sea pickles are adapting to the Pacific Northwest

Tubular colonial jellies known as pyrosomes that arrived in 2014 along North America's Pacific Northwest Coast appear to be adapting to cooler water and may become permanent residents.

7h

Two faces offer limitless possibilities

Named for the mythical god with two faces, Janus membranes — double-sided membranes that serve as gatekeepers between two substances — have emerged as a material with potential industrial uses.

7h

Treating dementia with the healing waves of sound

Ultrasound applied to the brain could help treat patients with dementia.

7h

How decriminalizing pot benefits young people

In five states that decriminalized marijuana between 2007 and 2015, there was no corresponding rise in the drug’s use among young people, a new analysis shows. In addition, the research shows that marijuana-related arrests declined significantly in those states. “An arrest can have a long-term impact on a teenager, even if that individual isn’t ultimately found guilty or sent to jail.” As a handf

7h

Lower colon cancer death risk among diet-soda drinkers

New research finds an association between drinking artificially sweetened beverages and a significantly lower risk of colon cancer recurrence and cancer death. “Artificially sweetened drinks have a checkered reputation in the public because of purported health risks that have never really been documented,” says senior author Charles S. Fuchs, director of the Yale University Cancer Center. “Our st

7h

Complementary medicine for cancer can decrease survival

People who received complementary therapy for curable cancers were more likely to refuse at least one component of their conventional cancer treatment, and were more likely to die as a result, according to researchers.

7h

Neural inflammation plays critical role in stress-induced depression

A group of researchers has discovered that neural inflammation caused by our innate immune system plays an unexpectedly important role in stress-induced depression. This insight could potentially lead to the development of new antidepressants targeting innate immune molecules.

7h

How will climate change impact coastal communities? A study on Virginia's barrier islands

Off the seaside of Virginia's Eastern Shore is a chain of uninhabited barrier islands that help protect the mainland coast from storms that—thanks to climate change—are increasing in both frequency and intensity.

7h

CRISPR-based tool maps gene function in human cells

UC San Francisco scientists have used a high-throughput CRISPR-based technique to rapidly map the functions of nearly 500 genes in human cells, many of them never before studied in detail.

7h

New findings on intercellular communication

Led by Benoit Vanhollebeke, WELBIO investigator at the Université libre de Bruxelles (ULB), the Laboratory of Neurovascular Signaling has solved an important enigma of cell signaling related to Wnt signaling specificity.

7h

Dingoes may provide clues to understanding how Australia evolved

Researchers from The University of Western Australia and the Australian National University have uncovered new evidence that suggests dingoes arrived in Australia between 3,348 and 3,081 years ago, more recently than previously thought.

7h

Termites are nature’s most amazing skyscraper engineers

Animals Their towers even have central air. Some termites build towers that put our biggest feats of engineering to shame, with internal structures that act as an extension of their own bodies.

7h

Carbon components from a 3-D printer

Three ETH alumni have developed a 3-D printer capable of manufacturing components from carbon fiber composites. Their ETH spin-off, 9T Labs, could bring a breakthrough for the manufacturing and utilization of extremely lightweight and strong parts.

7h

Putting bacteria to work

The idea of bacteria as diverse, complex perceptive entities that can hunt prey in packs, remember past experiences and interact with the moods and perceptions of their human hosts sounds like the plot of some low-budget science fiction movie. But these are exactly some of the traits that scientists attribute to "bacterial cognition," which treats the microscopic creatures as something like inform

7h

Deep groundwater in coastal deltas resilient to contamination

Groundwater pumped from the depths of the coastal Bengal Basin supporting more than 80 million people is largely secure from contamination, according to new research by UCL and the British Geological Survey.

7h

New particle formation found to occur in heavily polluted air

An international team of researchers has found that new particle formation (NPF) can occur in the atmosphere even in heavily polluted air. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes air quality testing they did in China over a period of years and what they found.

7h

How good is your therapist? This machine will tell you

For people struggling to overcome addiction, good therapy can be hugely beneficial. But bad therapy is worse than no therapy at all.

7h

Dickie's Infamous Shark Decoy | Countdown to Shark Week: The Daily Bite

On today's episode you and Yamaneika Saunders get a sneak peek into the highly anticipated Shark Week show Ronda Uncaged and we get the final segment of Dickie Done Did It! Shark Week 2018 starts Sunday July 22 9p! Stream The Daily Bite on Discovery GO: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/the-daily-bite/ Stream Classic Shark Week Episodes: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/shark-week/ Subscribe t

7h

Shark data greatly expanded North America's biggest marine protected area

North America's biggest marine protected area—Mexico's Revillagigedo National Park—may have been nearly seven times smaller if not for shark-tracking data collected by researchers and alumni from the University of California, Davis.

7h

Poor mental health days may cost the economy billions of dollars

Poor mental health ranks as one of the costliest forms of sickness for U.S. workers and may sap billions of dollars from the country's income growth, according to a team of researchers.

7h

How China is taking on climate change

In 2017, China was the world's leading emitter of heat-trapping gases by a wide margin. Its policies for limiting emissions will have a significant impact on the global climate for decades to come.

7h

The Best Backpacks for Work (2018): GoRuck, Peak Design, Chrome, Tom Bihn

These are the work bags that we absolutely adore.

7h

'No Man's Sky' Finally Gets Multiplayer, and Everything Else in Games This Week

This week, we've got some big growth for some big games, alongside a very late bug fix and an excellent Nintendo Switch port.

7h

Welcome to the Era of Orbital Publicity Stunts

Are science and commerce the only legitimate pursuits off-planet—and who gets to decide?

7h

South Korean Company Claims Sunken Russian Warship Contains $132 Billion Worth of Gold

A 21st century rush for sunken treasure means a rush for stock investments.

7h

Single-molecule magnetic tweezers reveal dual function of FACT in gene regulation

Professors LI Wei and LI Ming from the Institute of Physics of the Chinese Academy of Sciences recently improved the temporal and spatial resolution of their self-developed magnetic tweezers.

8h

Former inmates at high risk for opioid overdose following prison release

A recent study in North Carolina found that in the first two weeks after being released from prison, former inmates were 40 times more likely to die of an opioid overdose than someone in the general population.

8h

The Authors Who Love Amazon

For most of Prime Day, Amazon’s annual sales bonanza, an unfamiliar face topped the site’s Author Rank page: Mike Omer, a 39-year-old Israeli computer engineer and self-published author whose profile picture is a candid shot of a young, blond man in sunglasses sitting on grass. He was—and at the time of this writing, still is—ranked above J.K. Rowling (No.8), James Patterson (No. 9), and Stephen

8h

Study Ties Autism to Maternal High Blood Pressure, Diabetes

Children born to women who had diabetes or high blood pressure while pregnant are at an increased risk of autism, two new studies suggest — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

Solving the mystery of an unusual medieval text

When historian Rowan Dorin first stepped onto the Stanford campus in early 2017, he made it a habit to visit Green Library every week to dig through its collection of medieval documents and objects.

8h

LC10 – the neuron that tracks fruit flies

Many animals rely on vision to detect, locate, and track moving objects. Male Drosophila fruit flies primarily use visual cues to stay close to a female and to direct their courtship song towards her. Scientists from the Max Planck Institute of Neurobiology in Martinsried and the Janelia Research Campus (USA) now described the nerve cells, which allow the detection and tracking of a moving female.

8h

Study suggests meat and dairy industry on track to surpass oil companies as biggest greenhouse gas emitters

Researchers at the Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy and GRAIN have released a report titled "Emissions impossible – How big meat and dairy are heating up the planet." The report is a discussion regarding an analysis the groups did on the impact the meat and dairy industries have on global warming. One of their major findings is that large meat and dairy corporations are set to overtake l

8h

"Dead Romance" | Boy Girl Banjo

Acoustic duo Anielle Reid and Matthew Brookshire (playing together as Boy Girl Banjo) take the TED stage to perform their original song "Dead Romance," weaving together the sounds of Americana folk music and modern pop.

8h

Copenhagen Suborbitals melder klar til raketopsendelse

Københavns amatørrumprogram Copenhagen Suborbitals (CS) er klar til at opsende raketten Nexø II. Går alt som planlagt, vil det blive sidste opsendelse, før fokus går videre til bemandede raketter.

8h

Human influence detected in changing seasons

For the first time, scientists from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and five other organizations have shown that human influences significantly impact the size of the seasonal cycle of temperature in the lowest layer of the atmosphere.

8h

Study finds key to plant growth control mechanism

A Purdue University study has mapped a complex series of pathways that control the shape of plant cells. The findings are an important step toward customizing how plants grow to suit particular agronomic needs and improving the quality of the cotton grown in the United States.

8h

Image: Technicians ensure James Webb Space Telescope's sunshield survives stresses experienced during liftoff

Technicians ensure James Webb Space Telescope's sunshield survives stresses experienced during liftoff

8h

Northwestern rocket to launch July 22 to explore 'star stuff'

As astronomer Carl Sagan famously said, "We are made of star stuff." So to better understand ourselves, we must look out into the galaxy.

8h

'Storm chasers' on Mars searching for dusty secrets

Storm chasing takes luck and patience on Earth—and even more so on Mars.

8h

Century-Old Burials of 95 Convict Slaves Uncovered in Texas

Ninety-five burials found in Texas likely belong to African Americans who were forced to work on plantations in the state's convict-leasing system.

8h

The brightest galaxy ever found is actually a ‘fraud’

Ultra-bright galaxies in the early universe may be less common than scientists initially thought, according to new research. Researchers used the Hubble Space Telescope to observe two galaxies thought to be so distant that we see them more than 13 billion years back in time when the universe was young. The Brightest of Reionizing Galaxies (BoRG) survey team found one galaxy was a bright source se

8h

Image: Mars dust storm

The high resolution stereo camera on board ESA's Mars Express captured this impressive upwelling front of dust clouds – visible in the right half of the frame – near the north polar ice cap of Mars in April this year.

8h

The influence of plant photosynthetic indices on the effectiveness of PRI use

To achieve success in agriculture, large expenditures are required for irrigation, fertilizing, pest control, etc. However, these costs are not always justified, since plants growing in different parts of the field can differ significantly in terms of water and fertilizer availability, in terms of the intensity of the abiotic stress factors, in the degree of damage caused by diseases and pests, et

8h

Beyond Elon Musk's Drama, Tesla's Cars Are Thrilling Drivers

Look beyond the Twitter antics and the up-and-down stock price, and you'll find a growing mass of happy customers.

9h

Post-Prime Day Deals: Dell, Bose, Urbanears

Did you miss the excellent deals this week? Don't worry. We got you.

9h

Image of the Day: Snapshot

Scientists map the fruit fly brain, giving an in-depth look at its neurons.

9h

The Unmonitored President

“I don’t see any reason why it wouldn’t be Russia. Sort of a double negative. So you can put that in. And I think that probably clarifies things pretty good by itself.” In this post-Helsinki feint in defense of his endorsement of Vladimir Putin’s denial about meddling in America’s election over the ironclad findings of the FBI, Donald Trump’s hallmark traits were on display in rather awesome cons

9h

Why Nature Prefers Couples, Even for Yeast

Some species have the equivalent of many more than two sexes, but most do not. A new model suggests the reason depends on how often they mate — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9h

Enzyme could make ‘smart’ cancer drugs a reality

A type of enzyme called matrix metalloproteinase could be key to the development of “smart” cancer drugs, according to new research. In a review article in the journal Trends in Pharmacological Sciences , Lin Zhu, an assistant professor at the Irma Lerma Rangel College of Pharmacy at Texas A&M University, and his colleagues explain the potential of these enzymes. “…we are entering the era of smar

9h

CALET succeeds in direct measurements of cosmic ray electron spectrum up to 4.8 TeV

An international team of researchers extended their results from a previous study to directly measure the cosmic-ray all-electron (electron + positron) spectrum in an energy range from 11 GeV to 4.8 TeV with the Calorimetric Electron Telescope (CALET).

9h

This Creepy Hole-Fish Is So Excited to Eat Literally Anything

Which unfortunate animal will wander too close to this ugly burrow fish's horrible mouth first?

9h

Low-cost formulas in the manufacturing of non-stick food molds

There is good news for small and medium-sized baking businesses and amateur bakers of cakes, muffins and pastries made in extravagant shapes. A system designed by a University of Cordoba Belmez Polytechnic School research group manufactures non-stick food molds at a low cost.

9h

A social tool for evaluating the environmental impact of residential buildings

The research group ARDITEC from the Higher Technical School of Building Engineering at the University of Seville has led a pioneering European project to calculate the environmental impact of residential buildings via the first open-source computing tool that can simply and intuitively calculate the CO2 emissions in each phase of a building project. The software will provide a global picture of th

9h

New training platform for big data analysis

Studies indicate that more than 95 percent of researchers in the life sciences are already working with big data or plan to do so—but more than 65 percent state that they only have minimal knowledge of bioinformatics and statistics. "Many are currently lacking training and instruction in this area—that's the real bottleneck that is making broader use of data science methods difficult," says bioinf

9h

Targeting headaches and tumors with nano-submarines

Scientists at the Mainz University Medical Center and the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research (MPI-P) have developed a new method to enable miniature drug-filled nanocarriers to dock on to immune cells, which in turn attack tumors. In the future, this may lead to targeted treatment that can largely eliminate damage to healthy tissue. The scientists have recently published their findings in t

9h

A smart safe rechargeable zinc ion battery based on sol-gel transition electrolytes

The thermal runaway issue has been a longstanding obstacle impeding the development of high-energy-density, high-power delivery batteries. These batteries would generate a lot of heat in ultrafast charge/discharge process or hazardous conditions, such as overcharging and short-circuits. To dissipate the heat accumulated in the batteries, physical safety designs such as fused disconnect switches, e

9h

Se billederne fra oven: Det grønne Danmark er blevet brunt

Tørken har sat sit præg på den danske natur.

9h

Reconstruction of Arctic Barents-Kara sea ice extent changes over the last millennium

Under the influence of global warming, temperature in the Arctic has increased more significantly than the global average. However, winter extreme cold events in Eurasia including China, have become frequent in recent years. This trend is obviously contrary to global warming. Severe weather with cold surges, ice-snow and frozen rain occurred in southern China in 2008, and the overwhelming "boss-le

9h

Scientists develop proteins that self-assemble into supramolecular complexes

A collaborative research team based in Japan has designed new proteins that can self-assemble into the complex structures underlying biological organisms, laying the groundwork for leading-edge applications in biotechnology. The researchers created and developed the proteins with a specific function, and their method reveals a possibility that certain protein functions can be created on demand.

9h

Norske ingeniørstuderende vil teste hyperloop i ubenyttet tunnel

Indbyggere i ny højteknologisk boligprojekt kan få Hypeloop som transportmiddel. Det foreslår en række ingeniørstuderende som begyndelsen til et landsdækkende banenet i 2026.

9h

You’re living in a new geologic age. It’s called the Meghalayan

The newly defined Meghalayan Age began at the same time as a global, climate-driven event that led to human upheavals.

10h

Uber's CEO Faces an Impossible Decision

With employees critiquing executives in the press, Dara Khosrowshahi must now decide whether to repeat history, or forge a new company culture based on trust.

10h

Zoox Flashes Serious Self-Driving Skills in Chaotic San Francisco

The secretive startup has released a video showing its car facing down some of San Francisco’s gnarliest thoroughfares and San Franciscans’ most befuddling behaviors.

10h

Some Scientists Work With China, but NASA Won't

NASA's ban on scientific contacts doesn't apply to all academics.

10h

How Americans Wound Up on Twitter's List of Russian Bots

Researchers analyzing the pattern of tweets say 20 or more real Americans may have been erroneously included on a list given to Congress, and later publicized.

10h

Using Herbicides to Save Endangered Snails

Sometimes, toxic chemicals are actually a good thing — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

10h

Nuclear Bomb Sensors Eavesdrop on Whales

A network of hydrophones intended to monitor nuclear tests may prove useful for conservation — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

10h

Zika epidemic sheds light on Brazil's 'invisible children'

Exclusive: families of thousands of babies born with neurodevelopmental disorders may get help for first time Brazil’s “invisible children”, the thousands of babies born with neurodevelopmental disorders, have been brought out of the shadows by the Zika virus epidemic and their families may get help for the first time. Almost 4,000 babies were born in Brazil with microcephaly as a result of Zika

10h

The Worst Russia Blunder in 70 Years

Whether Donald Trump is president for four years or eight, whatever history’s ultimate judgment of him is, and however he tries to explain it away, his remarks in Helsinki absolving Vladimir Putin of interference in the 2016 election will stand as the most surreal moment in 70 years of Russian-American relations, an ineradicable blot on the ledger of his presidency and maybe—just maybe—the most b

11h

ICE Is the Ugly Face of Big-Government Populism

House Republicans passed a resolution Wednesday that lauded as “brave” and “heroic” the federal workers of Immigration and Customs Enforcement, or ICE , the bureaucracy that identifies, arrests, immiserates, imprisons, and deports unlawful immigrants (though not the one that stands guard at the border to stop unlawful entries). Two hundred and forty-four GOP representatives voted in favor. They w

11h

Reversing cause and effect is no trouble for quantum computers

Watch a movie backwards and you'll likely get confused—but a quantum computer wouldn't. That's the conclusion of researcher Mile Gu at the Centre for Quantum Technologies (CQT) at the National University of Singapore and Nanyang Technological University and collaborators.

11h

Mixed mRNA tails act like a shield to delay its shortening

Cells curb the amount of specific proteins at any desired time via the control of mRNA degradation. As mRNA nucleotides tail plays a role in this process, biologists at the Center for RNA Research, within the Institute for Basic Science (IBS, South Korea), have identified how mixed tails made of different nucleotides protect mRNA from degradation for longer. Published in Science, these findings co

11h

Review: Motorola Moto G6 brings the look of a flagship phone at a quarter of the price

Some people are happy driving a Honda Accord or Kia Soul, while others are willing to pay more to drive a BMW or Mercedes.

11h

Wanted: Any name other than 'Spacey McSpaceFace'

What should we call a six-wheeled robot going to the Red Planet to look for signs of life?

11h

Drug now in clinical trials for Parkinson's strengthens heart contractions in animals

A drug currently in clinical trials for treating symptoms of Parkinson's disease may someday have value for treating heart failure, according to results of early animal studies by Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers.

11h

Frailty may be more deadly in younger heart patients, study finds

A new study conducted by researchers at the University of Ottawa Heart Institute and published in the Journal of the American Heart Association examines the prevalence of frailty and its association with long-term mortality in patients undergoing cardiac surgery.

11h

$1M award for Salk scientist Janelle Ayres, who befriends our microbial enemies

Janelle Ayres, a rising star at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies in San Diego, has collected her second honor in a month—one which brings $1 million to fund her microbial research.

11h

Doctors Raise Alarm About Shortages Of Pain Medications

A survey of anesthesiologists found that 95 percent say it is impacting patient care. Surgeons, emergency medicine physicians, intensive care unit doctors are also impacted. (Image credit: Rick Bowmer/AP)

11h

On the 48th floor in Philly, Comcast kicks off startup accelerator with 10 firms

Over the last few days, they flew in from all over—Singapore, Munich, Toronto and Los Angeles—and one walked from University City to be there for Comcast Corp.'s new boost-up program for young tech firms.

11h

Is UK barbecue charcoal fuelling global deforestation?

A growing taste for al fresco dining is driving record charcoal sales in the UK but is it also fuelling global deforestation and climate change?

11h

FN kårer Danmark som verdensmester i offentlig digitalisering

Danmark er for første gang blevet kåret som verdensmester i offentlig digitalisering. Det mener i hvert fald FN.

11h

Yemen's Fleeting Opportunity for Peace

The potential for a breakthrough in the Yemen war, now in its fourth year, may be close at hand. Last week, Martin Griffiths, the new UN envoy to Yemen, delivered a proposal that would avert a fight for Hodeidah, a city of as many as 600,000 people whose port provides an economic lifeline to millions of Yemenis. Now, it is up to the Houthis, the rebel group occupying Hodeidah, along with the inte

12h

Counting crows: Vancouver college maps thousands of attacks

Tool launched in response to dive-bombing birds documents 2,500 attacks since 2016 It was a crow fiercely protecting its nest – and repeated complaints of it dive-bombing and swooping – that prompted the idea. “Just about every day someone would come in and say: ‘I got smacked in the back of the head,’ or ‘Mary got smacked in the back of the head,’” said Jim O’Leary, a teacher at Langara College

12h

Italienske vandbombefly sendt op for at slukke svenske skovbrande

Norge har sendt ti helikoptere af sted for at assistere Superscooper-flyene.

12h

Radio Atlantic: Keepers of the Year 2018

The first anniversary of Radio Atlantic this week coincides with one of the newsiest weeks of 2018. So we’ve decided to take the opportunity to lift our sights above the fog of news for a few minutes, and discuss the things that are most important to remember—the Keepers of the Year. We revisit some of the most memorable keepers of the show’s earliest months, and share reflections from our Atlant

13h

A physics treasure hidden in a wallpaper pattern

An international team of scientists has discovered a new, exotic form of insulating material with a metallic surface that could enable more efficient electronics or even quantum computing. The researchers developed a new method for analyzing existing chemical compounds that relies on the mathematical properties like symmetry that govern the repeating patterns seen in everyday wallpaper.

13h

Scientists answer long-held questions about relaxor ferroelectrics

The properties of a solid depend on the arrangement of its atoms, which form a periodic crystal structure. At the nanoscale, arrangements that break this periodic structure can drastically alter the behavior of the material, but this is difficult to measure. Recent advances by scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory are starting to unravel this mystery.

13h

If we’re in the Meghalayan, whatever happened to the Anthropocene?

The decision to label our current geological phase the Meghalayan rather than the Anthropocene is misguided, say Mark Maslin and Simon Lewis

13h

Spectacular new photos of Titan show Saturn’s moon like never before

Saturn’s moon Titan is shrouded in a thick orange haze, but 13 years of data from the Cassini spacecraft have allowed us to peer through to the frozen surface

13h

Unusual sound waves discovered in quantum liquids

Ordinary sound waves—small oscillations of density—can propagate through all fluids, causing the molecules in the fluid to compress at regular intervals. Now physicists have theoretically shown that in one-dimensional quantum fluids not one, but two types of sound waves can propagate. Both types of waves move at approximately the same speed, but are combinations of density waves and temperature wa

13h

14h

Indehaver af @anders.dk bombarderet med yderst følsomme hovsa-mails

Det har visse ulemper at have et catch-all domæne. Mens nogle af de mange mails er sjove, har flere en kritisk og yderst følsom karakter.

14h

The dark side of happiness – Science Weekly podcast

Happiness means something different to all of us, be it contentment, pleasure or joy. But could pursuing it leave us sad instead? Nicola Davis explores the science and psychology of happiness Subscribe and review on Acast , Apple Podcasts , Soundcloud , Audioboom and Mixcloud . Join the discussion on Facebook and Twitter Happiness means something different to all of us. It could be the contentmen

15h

The dark side of happiness – Science Weekly podcast

Happiness means something different to all of us, be it contentment, pleasure or joy. But could pursuing it leave us sad instead? Nicola Davis explores the science and psychology of happiness

16h

Scientists identify most pressing issues posed by chemicals in the environment

Chemicals released into the environment by human activity are resulting in biodiversity loss; increased natural hazards; threats to food, water and energy security; negative impacts on human health and degradation of environmental quality.Now, an international study published in Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry involving scientists from the University of York has identified the 22 most impor

16h

Supplemental oxygen eliminates morning blood pressure rise in sleep apnea patients

Supplemental oxygen eliminates the rise in morning blood pressure experienced by obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients who stop using continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), the standard treatment for OSA, according to new research published online in the American Thoracic Society's American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

16h

Scientists identify most pressing issues posed by chemicals in the environment

Scientists have identified 22 key research questions surrounding the risks associated with chemicals in the environment in Europe.

16h

Aarhus-forskere vil sende omdannet CO2 ud på naturgasnettet

På Aarhus Universitet har forskere og danske virksomheder udviklet et pilotanlæg, der kan omdanne CO2 til methangas. I fremtiden kan drivhusgassen blive en værdifuld ressource, lyder det fra en af forskerne.

17h

Comic-Con 2018: *Doctor Who*’s First Female Doctor Will Bring a New Generation of Whovians

Jodie Whittaker, who plays the show's new (and thirteenth!) Doctor, met her fans at the show's Comic-Con panel today.

19h

Phages work together to suppress CRISPR bacterial immunity

CRISPR are an essential part of bacterial immunity designed to defend against foreign DNA. In bacteria, CRISPR acts just like it does in human cells as a pair of scissors, in their case with the goal of cutting strands of infecting DNA. While researchers have known that CRISPR is found in roughly half of all bacteria in the wild, they did not know much about the molecular battle between CRISPRs an

20h

How plant breeding technologies could make fruits and vegetables more exciting to eat

Forget vegetables with dull colors and fuzzy skin or fruits that lack of flavor — the produce aisle of the future could offer plant products that are designed for creative cooks and fussy eaters. In a new article, food researchers describe how new breeding technologies have the potential to enhance the shape, size, color, and health benefits of produce, as well as to inform conventional breeding

20h

New insights into plants' conquest of land

The ancestors of land plants were string-like (2D), aquatic green algae that looked very different from the three-dimensional (3D), upright stems and leaves of plants we are familiar with today. Now, researchers have revealed exciting insights into how land plants evolved these 3D forms that were crucial for their advancement onto land.

20h

Nairobi National Park railway 'threatens Kenyan wildlife'

Conservationists are crying foul over a high-speed railway being built through Nairobi National Park.

20h

Astronomy Tool Helps ID Sharks

Shark researchers used a system for recognizing patterns in star field photographs to identify whale sharks, which have individual spot patterns. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

20h

Viruses cooperate to overcome immune defenses of bacteria

Virus particles that infect bacteria can work together to overcome antiviral defenses, new research shows. The findings are a key breakthrough that will help improve phage therapy, which is used to treat life-threatening bacterial infections.

20h

Our job as scientists is to find the truth. But we must also be storytellers | Nick Enfield

Science can’t exist without telling a story. The question is not whether we should use it, but how we should use it best Scientists often struggle to communicate the findings of research. Our subject matter can be technical and not easily digested by a general audience. And our discoveries – from a new type of tessellating pentagon to the presence of gravitational waves in space – have no meaning

20h

Syphilis: Symptoms & Treatment

Syphilis is the third most common sexually transmitted disease in the United States. Nearly 28,000 cases of the most contagious stages of the disease were reported to the CDC in 2016.

20h

The Atlantic Daily: What Did Trump Tell Putin in Helsinki?

What We’re Following Communication Breakdown: The White House and the State Department initially gave contradictory answers about whether the U.S. would consider allowing Russia to question a group of American officials. According to Russian President Vladimir Putin, the offer had been discussed at his one-on-one meeting with President Trump in Helsinki. Even Trump’s team had little information o

21h

Merck Is Lowering Drug Prices. There’s a Catch.

The drugs singled out for discounts include the flagging hepatitis C treatment Zepatier and six drugs that have lost their patent protection.

21h

Judge Throws Out New York Climate Lawsuit

A federal judge has dismissed a suit brought by the city that would have forced fossil fuel companies to pay for some costs of climate change.

21h

Chemists characterize the fatal fungus among us

Life-threatening fungal infections affect more than two million people worldwide. Effective antifungal medications are limited. A major challenge is that the fungal cell wall is poorly understood, which has impeded drug development. However, chemist have identified for the first time the cell wall structure of one of the most prevalent and deadly fungi, which could usher in a new era of antifungal

21h

Complete fly brain imaged at nanoscale resolution

Scientists have taken detailed pictures of the entire brain of an adult female fruit fly using transmission electron microscopy.

21h

Australia-led global push to tackle PCOS — the principal cause of infertility in women

Australian led global guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of the primary cause of infertility in women will be published simultaneously in three international journals, supported by a suite of health professional and patient resources to improve health outcomes for women with PCOS.

21h

Broken bones among older people increase risk of death for up to 10 years

Broken bones among older people increase their risk of death for up to 10 years, according to a new study. The study included all individuals in Denmark over the age of 50 who first experienced fragility fractures in 2001 and were followed up to 10 years for their mortality risk.

21h

The World Burns. Sarah Sanders Says This Is Fine.

O n Wednesday, two representatives of the United States government held press briefings, both of them touching on one of the most astonishing news stories of the Trump presidency—a series of events that had begun two days earlier, when Donald Trump traveled to Helsinki to meet, behind closed doors, with Vladimir Putin. Here was the White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders responding to

21h

Climate change isn’t to blame for slower Atlantic circulation

Global warming isn’t the cause of slowdown in a huge circulation pattern in the Atlantic Ocean, which is, in fact, part of regular, decades-long cycle that will affect temperatures in coming decades, according to a new study. Oceanographers are concerned about the long-term stability of the Atlantic Ocean circulation, and previous studies show that it has slowed dramatically in the past decade. “

21h

DNA from skeleton puts enteric fever in medieval Europe

Researchers have detected Salmonella Paratyphi C, which causes enteric fever, in a 800-year-old human skeleton from Trondheim, Norway. This suggests the potentially lethal disease, more common in hot countries, was present in medieval Europe. Now scientists are speculating that the evolution of enteric fever could be linked to the domestication of pigs across northern Europe. “This is the first t

22h

The Fourteenth Amendment Can’t Be Revoked by Executive Order

Three weeks after he was elected president, Donald Trump tweeted, “Nobody should be allowed to burn the American flag—if they do, there must be consequences—perhaps loss of citizenship or year in jail!” Trump thinks about citizenship—and about taking it away—a lot. His entry into Republican politics was an attack on President Barack Obama’s status as a “natural-born citizen.” He is also no fan of

22h

Low- or no-calorie soft drinks linked to improved outcomes in colon cancer

Drinking artificially-sweetened beverages is associated with a significantly lower risk of colon cancer recurrence and cancer death, scientists have found.

22h

Researchers are one step closer to developing eye drops to treat common sight loss condition

Scientists are one step closer to developing an eye drop that could revolutionise treatment for age-related macular degeneration (AMD).

22h

Some plants have a trick for growing on extra-salty land

High levels of salt make toils toxic and gravely limit plant growth on approximately one third of the world’s cropland. New research uncovers how some kinds of rice cope, while others don’t. Some farmers call it a “white cancer” because white crusts of salt often mark the surface of afflicted soils. The losses in global crop productivity amount to some $12-27 billion each year. But some plants ha

22h

The Lancet: Response to HIV/AIDS epidemic at risk of 'dangerous complacency' as urgent change in approach is needed

HIV rates persist in high risk, marginalised populations and the Commission authors warn that a resurgence of the epidemic is likely as the largest generation of young people age into adolescence and adulthood.* Stalling of HIV funding in recent years endangers HIV control efforts.Historic 'exceptionalism' of HIV treatment and care may no longer be sustainable; services will likely need to be part

22h

22h

In a warming climate, Arctic geese are rushing north

As Arctic temperatures continue to rise, migratory barnacle geese have responded by speeding up their 3,000-kilometer migration in order to reach their destination more quickly with fewer stops along the way, according to new evidence. Unfortunately, the birds' earlier arrival isn't making as much of a difference as one might expect.

22h

Geologists think there could be a quadrillion tons of diamonds inside our planet

Science But we’ll never get them out of the ground. In a new paper published this week, an international team of researchers estimates that about 1 to 2 percent of the Earth’s cratonic roots are made of diamond. That…

22h

Diabetes increases the risk of cancer, with a higher risk in women

Diabetes is a risk factor for all-site cancer for both men and women, but the increased risk is higher in women than in men, according to a new article in Diabetologia (the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes).

22h

Diabetes raises risk of cancer, with women at even greater likelihood, a major new study has found

A global review involving almost 20 million people has shown that having diabetes significantly raises the risk of developing cancer, and for women the risk is even higher.Researchers from The George Institute for Global Health also found diabetes (type 1 and type 2) conferred an additional risk for women, compared to men, for leukaemia and cancers of the stomach, mouth and kidney, but less risk f

22h

The Stars of the Comic-Con 'Predator' Panel? Thomas Jane's Feet

The actor hardly ever wears shoes—a fact his co-stars were all too happy to discuss.

22h

FDA plans to restrict almond, soy milk makers from calling their products ‘milk’

The FDA plans to start enforcing guidelines that would prevent manufacturers of products like almond and soy milk from using the word ‘milk’ in marketing and labeling. Read More

22h

Diabetes May Increase Risk for Cancer, Especially for Women

A new meta-analysis finds it might, especially for women.

23h

Upload Complete: Transferring your brain to a digital format

Imagine a future in which your brain–conscious mind, memories, and emotions included–could be uploaded to a computer. Once running, the complex computer code would be able to perfectly reflect your mind: reacting as you would, showing your major personality traits, holding your unique knowledge from your life as a human. Maybe your personal code could […]

23h

Learning from 'little monsters'

By studying deep and shallow water zones of streams and their resident invertebrates, researcher reveals mysteries of fresh water life.

23h

Uganda's Regressive Social Media Tax Stays, at Least For Now

The internet is an essential tool for democracy in the modern era. And that's why the government wanted to tax it in Uganda.

23h

China's super-sized space plans may involve help from Russia

Eastern Arsenal Long March 9 The 4,000 ton Long March 9 (LM-9) could be destined for Mars missi…

23h

Yeast species used in food industry can cause disease in humans, study finds

A major cause of drug-resistant clinical yeast infections is the same species previously regarded as non-pathogenic and commonly used in the biotechnology and food industries.

23h

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: RSVPutin

Written by Elaine Godfrey ( @elainejgodfrey ), Maddie Carlisle ( @maddiecarlisle2 ), and Olivia Paschal (@ oliviacpaschal ) Today in 5 Lines The White House said that President Trump “disagrees” with Russian President Vladimir Putin’s proposal to interrogate 11 Americans, in exchange for allowing the U.S. to question the 12 Russians indicted last week. Trump first called the offer “incredible.” T

23h

Traveling to the sun: Why won't Parker Solar Probe melt?

This summer, NASA's Parker Solar Probe will launch to travel closer to the Sun, deeper into the solar atmosphere, than any mission before it. Cutting-edge technology and engineering will help it beat the heat.

23h

Relaxor ferroelectrics: Relax, just break it

Scientists are helping to answer long-held questions about a technologically important class of materials called relaxor ferroelectrics.

23h

Evidence of Salmonella Paratyphi C found for the first time in medieval northern Europe

Genome research suggests that enteric fever, a potentially lethal disease more commonly found in hot countries, was present in medieval Europe. Salmonella Paratyphi C causes enteric fever, a life-threatening infection, and has been detected in a 800 year old human skeleton discovered in Trondheim, Norway.

23h

Study reveals long-term effectiveness of therapy for common cause of kidney failure

Among individuals with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, those who were treated with tolvaptan for up to 11 years had a slower rate of kidney function decline compared with historical controls. Annualized kidney function decline rates of tolvaptan-treated patients did not change during follow-up.

23h

23h

A New Talking Point From the Pro-Trump Fringe

Updated at 5:28 p.m. ET On Wednesday morning, in the midst of yet another contentious news cycle dominated by coverage of Russian election meddling, I tweeted a kind of thought experiment: “If Trump & co. just pivoted to ‘Aren’t you glad Russia helped us defeat Hillary Clinton?’ would there be any serious blowback from his base?” The question was rhetorical. The answers that began trickling in we

23h

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