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Nyheder2018juli23

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
100+
Archaeologists identify ancient North American mounds using new image analysis technique
Researchers at Binghamton University, State University at New York have used a new image-based analysis technique to identify once-hidden North American mounds, which could reveal valuable information about pre-contact Native Americans.
16h
Viden
400+
Pakistansk multiresistent tyfus-bakterie spreder sig: Det er dybt alvorligt
Det er et spørgsmål om tid, før vi ikke kan behandle resistente bakterier, siger dansk overlæge.
15h
Ingeniøren
45
Elev fik sporbar trivselsmåling ved fejl, og nu kan cpr-nummer ikke slettes
Advokat og persondataekspert: Undervisningsministeriet er i besiddelse af ulovlig indhentet data.
10h
DigitalOcean
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
Democracies are more prone to start wars — except when they're not
A new study reveals surprising findings about how democracy affects international peace.
2min
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
Abnormal gene copying seen in tauopathy fruit fly models
A phenomenon by which genes clone themselves and paste their copies into other parts of DNA is drawing the attention of Alzheimer's disease researchers at UT Health San Antonio. The researchers discovered an uptick in this activity in fruit fly models of tauopathy. Alzheimer's is one of about 20 tauopathies.
2min
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
Scientists develop new materials that move in response to light
Researchers at Tufts University School of Engineering have developed magnetic elastomeric composites that move in different ways when exposed to light, raising the possibility that these materials could enable a wide range of products that perform simple to complex movements, from tiny engines and valves to solar arrays that bend toward the sunlight. The research is described in an article publish
2min
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
Standardized stroke protocol can ensure ELVO stroke patients are treated within 60 minutes
A new study shows that developing a standardized stroke protocol of having neurointerventional teams meet suspected emergent large vessel occlusion (ELVO) stroke patients upon their arrival at the hospital achieves a median door-to-recanalization time of less than 60 minutes. The study was presented at the Society of NeuroInterventional Surgery's (SNIS) 15th Annual Meeting.
2min
Popular Science
10
Evidence of life on Jupiter's moon Europa could be just inches below the surface
Space Researchers might not have to dig as deep as they thought to find proof of biological activity. As it turns out, you can literally scratch the surface of Europa to find life.
11min
Popular Science
2
Electric race cars will finally get through a race without recharging
Nexus Media News A power boost for Formula E. Electric race cars are wowing crowds with their speed and endurance.
11min
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
2
Scientists uncover new connection between smell and memory
Neurobiologists have identified a mechanism that allows the brain to recreate vivid sensory experiences from memory, shedding light on how sensory-rich memories are created and stored in our brains. Using smell as a model, the findings offer a novel perspective on how the senses are represented in memory, and could explain why the loss of the ability to smell has become recognized as an early symp
13min
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
6
Why eastern U.S. air pollution levels are more stagnant in winter
Observations captured during a 2015 field campaign show why winter haze has remained high, despite reduced emissions.
13min
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
6
Gene study pinpoints superbug link between people and animals
Scientists have shed light on how a major cause of human and animal disease can jump between species, by studying its genes. The findings reveal fresh insights into how new disease-causing strains of the bacteria — called Staphylococcus aureus — emerge. Experts say the research could help improve the use of antibiotics and design better strategies for limiting the spread of disease.
13min
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
2
Surprising findings on the physics of water entry could lead to smarter design of ships
The phenomenon of objects entering water is commonplace, yet a full understanding of the physics of water entry remains elusive, especially as it pertains to instances where a solid object enters a body of water that contains other solid objects. A team of researchers has published a series of surprising findings that may lead to strategies for minimizing the strain of water entry on marine vessel
13min
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
1
NIST builds statistical foundation for next-generation forensic DNA profiling
When experts compare the DNA left at a crime scene with the DNA of a suspect, they generate statistics that describe how closely those DNA samples match. These match statistics are reliable because they're based on rigorous scientific research. However, that research only applies to DNA fingerprints, also called DNA profiles, that have been generated using current technology. Now, scientists have
13min
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
Welcome to Fiji | Ronda Rousey Uncaged
Fijian locals welcome WWE star Ronda Rousey to the island with a sacred ceremony. Stream Ronda Rousey Uncaged: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/shark-week/full-episodes/ronda-rousey-uncaged Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery https://www.facebook.com/SharkWeek Follow on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Discovery https://tw
16min
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
Researchers unravel more mysteries of metallic hydrogen
Metallic hydrogen is one of the rarest materials on Earth, yet more than 80 percent of planets—including Jupiter, Saturn, and hundreds of extrasolar planets—are composed of this exotic form of matter.
16min
Live Science
5
Scientists Definitely Have Not Found Life on the Moon
A new paper opens a door to the possibility of life having maybe once existed, possibly, on the moon. But it presents no direct evidence for life.
20min
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Researchers unravel more mysteries of metallic hydrogen
Liquid metallic hydrogen is not present naturally on Earth and has only been created in a handful of places, including the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics. LLE scientists are researching the properties of liquid metallic hydrogen to understand how planets both inside and outside our solar system form magnetic shields.
23min
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
3
NIST unblinded me with science: New application of blue light sees through fire
Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have demonstrated that ordinary blue light can be used to significantly improve the ability to see objects engulfed by large, non-smoky natural gas fires — like those used in laboratory fire studies and fire-resistance standards testing.
23min
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
9
Warming alters predator-prey interactions in the Arctic
Under warming conditions, arctic wolf spiders' tastes in prey might be changing, according to new research — initiating a new cascade of food web interactions that could potentially alleviate some impacts of global warming.
27min
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
9
Detecting damage in non-magnetic steel with the help of magnetism
Magnetic test methods are used to detect damages to materials, which was previously impossible with non-magnetic steel. Researchers have now developed a process in which they apply a thin magnetic layer to steel. Changes in the microstructure can thus be detected by changes in magnetic effects. Materials such as aluminum can also be tested in this way.
27min
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
6
Stable marriages' between microbes, nutrients may explain diverse yet stable communities
A mathematical model could help scientists better understand an intriguing characteristic of microbial communities: their ability to achieve stability despite being so diverse.
27min
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
8
Mother's touch supports pup's brain development
A mother's presence may have immediate and long-term effects on her child's developing brain by modulating the serotonin system, suggests a study of rat moms and their pups. The research provides a potential mechanism by which separating a child from his or her mother early in life could derail development.
27min
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
15
Overnight brain stimulation improves memory
New research in humans demonstrates the potential to improve memory with a non-invasive brain stimulation technique delivered during sleep. The results come from a project that aims to better understand the process of memory consolidation, which could translate into improved memory function in both healthy and patient populations.
27min
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
8
How we see others' emotions depends on our pre-conceived beliefs
A new study makes new insights into how we recognize facial expressions of emotion, which is critical for successful interactions in business, diplomacy, and everyday social exchange.
27min
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
10
Slowdown of North Atlantic circulation rocked the climate of ancient northern Europe
Major abrupt shifts occurred in the climate of ancient northern Europe, according to a new study. The research reports that sudden cold spells, lasting hundreds of years, took place in the middle of the warm Eemian climate period, about 120,000 years ago.
27min
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
11
How cannabis and cannabis-based drugs harm your brain
Long-term use of either cannabis or cannabis-based drugs impairs memory, say researchers. Their study has implications for both recreational users and people who use the drug to combat epilepsy, multiple sclerosis and chronic pain.
27min
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
8
Scientists perfect technique to boost capacity of computer storage a thousand-fold
Scientists have created the most dense, solid-state memory in history that could soon exceed the capabilities of current hard drives by 1,000 times. New technique leads to the densest solid-state memory ever created.
27min
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
New data collection technology may help small airports improve operations counts
With just 521 airport traffic control towers in the U.S. and nearly 20,000 U.S. airports, documenting flight operations can be challenging, say airport managers. Costly too, as airports' can receive funding through the FAA's $1 billion-plus Airport Improvement Program, but this funding is highly dependent on documentation of an airport's operations.
28min
Feed: All Latest
26
Want Facebook to Censor Speech? Be Careful What You Wish For
Facebook is caught between the legal definition of "hate speech" and the more expansive common understanding of the term.
37min
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
9
How experience changes basics of memory formation
We know instinctively that our experiences shape the way we learn. If we are highly familiar with a particular task, like cooking for example, learning a new recipe is much easier than it was when we were a novice. New research shows that experience also changes the way our neurons become plastic and form new memories.
41min
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
9
Giant neurons in the brain may play similarly giant role in awareness and cognition
Scientists find that certain neurons release nitric oxide onto nearby blood vessels, and potentially use this mechanism to control awareness in the brain.
41min
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
10
Cold wave reveals potential benefits of urban heat islands
Researchers have found that the urban heat island effect — cities are hotter in the summer than their surrounding areas — also helps keep cities warmer during extreme cold. The findings have implications for urban planners in areas such as New York City or Chicago, which experience marked seasonal temperature swings.
41min
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
15
Gault site research pushes back date of earliest North Americans
Archaeological evidence has increasingly called into question the idea of 'Clovis First.' Now, a study has dated a significant assemblage of stone artifacts to 16-20,000 years of age, pushing back the timeline of the first human inhabitants of North America before Clovis by at least 2,500 years.
41min
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
7
Importance of language development in low-income, high-risk children
Researchers who examined child speech interactions over the course of a year found that vulnerable children benefit from conversations with their peers and their teachers.
41min
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
6
Diverse salmon populations enable 'resource surfing' bears to eat tons of fish
Research shows that Kodiak brown bears that sync their stream-to-stream movements to salmon spawning patterns eat longer and more than bears that don't, with one bear in the study consuming greater than 2 tons of fish in one summer.
41min
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
7
Microclimates may provide wildlife with respite from warming temperatures
Researchers suggest that locally variable habitats such as hummocky hillsides or shaded valleys could help a range of native species survive this modern warming episode — in much the same way as species such as red deer and squirrel survived the Ice Age by seeking refuge in pockets of warmer conditions sheltered from the extreme cold.
41min
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
9
Researchers discover the 'optimism' of E. coli bacteria
E. coli bacteria have different solutions to cope with different types of nutrient deprivation, including an 'optimistic' response to carbon limitations, according to a team of researchers. Carbon-limited cells generate a large number of inactive assembly lines (ribosomes), nitrogen-limited cells turn out proteins more slowly, and phosphorous-limited cells use only half as many assembly lines to g
41min
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
9
Imaging in living cells reveals how 'junk DNA' switches on a gene
New video shows how pieces of DNA once thought to be useless can act as on-off switches for genes. A team led by researchers has captured how this 'junk DNA' finds and activates a target gene in living cells. The video allows researchers to see the enhancers as they find and connect to a gene to kick-start its activity.
41min
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
10
Pregnancy and reproductive history may impact dementia risk, study suggests
New research highlights sex differences associated with dementia and Alzheimer's disease across the life course, including the first ever large-scale study of reproductive history and dementia risk in women.
41min
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Depleting microbiome with antibiotics can affect glucose metabolism
A new study from the Salk Institute has found that mice that have their microbiomes depleted with antibiotics have decreased levels of glucose in their blood and better insulin sensitivity. The research has implications for understanding the role of the microbiome in diabetes. It also could lead to better insight into the side effects seen in people who are being treated with high levels of antibi
44min
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Scientists uncover new connection between smell and memory
Neurobiologists at the University of Toronto have identified a mechanism that allows the brain to recreate vivid sensory experiences from memory, shedding light on how sensory-rich memories are created and stored in our brains. Using smell as a model, the findings offer a novel perspective on how the senses are represented in memory, and could explain why the loss of the ability to smell has becom
44min
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
Right-sided colon cancer patients have poorer survival than those with left-sided disease
Surgeons report that patients with tumors on the right side may benefit from greater lymph node harvest during their operations.
44min
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
24
A 3-D model of a human heart ventricle
Harvard University researchers have bioengineered a three-dimensional model of a human left heart ventricle that could be used to study diseases, test drugs and develop patient-specific treatments for heart conditions such as arrhythmia.
46min
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
A scientific study characterises our circles of friendships
On average, there are three to five people in our lives with whom we have a very close relationship (close friends and/or family), around ten with whom we have close friendships, a larger group of about 30-35 people with whom we frequently interact and around one hundred acquaintances we come into contact with every now and then in our daily lives. In other words, we interact on a regular basis wi
46min
NYT > Science
21
Nonfiction: A History of Everything, Served in a Cold Glass of Milk
Mark Kurlansky’s latest history, “Milk!,” ranges wide, from breast-feeding to crème vichyssoise glacée.
49min
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
New stroke imaging technology could reduce potential for patient brain damage
A new study, presented today at the Society of NeuroInterventional Surgery's (SNIS) 15th Annual Meeting, found that new stroke imaging technology could decrease delays in care by up to 60 minutes, giving patients a better chance at making a full recovery.
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
A 3D model of a human heart ventricle
Harvard University researchers have bioengineered a three-dimensional model of a human left heart ventricle that could be used to study diseases, test drugs and develop patient-specific treatments for heart conditions such as arrhythmia.
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Scientists get first look at T cell responses in Ebola virus survivors
Scientists conducting the first comprehensive study of key immune system cells-collected from West African Ebola survivors-that kill Ebola infected cells have made a surprising discovery that provides important clues to developing effective vaccines against the infection.
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
A scientific study characterises our circles of friendships
The organisation of our friendships is guided to a large degree by our cognitive capacity when it comes to managing them, that is, by the amount of time and mental effort we can devote to them. This is one of the conclusions of a study which was published by researchers from Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M) and the University of Oxford and which analysed these relationships from a mathemati
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
Test to save patients from invasive open biopsies
University of Queensland researchers are developing diagnostic tests for a genetic condition which can cause the body to fatally overheat while under a general anaesthetic.School of Biomedical Sciences Associate Professor Bradley Launikonis said malignant hyperthermia was caused by mutations in muscle proteins and could cause death under stressful conditions.
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
Pilot program improves staff confidence in dealing with airway emergencies
A patient safety team has restructured their protocols for treating airway failure in such a way that the change has measurably improved staff confidence to handle airway emergencies and can serve as a model for other health systems.
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
Time delays to thrombectomy for stroke reduce patient lifetime and economic value of care
Every minute that endovascular thrombectomy (EVT) for a stroke patient is delayed decreases the patient's quality of life and lifespan, and reduces the significant monetary benefits that EVT provides. A new study shows that using a Markov model of lifetime quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) of EVT-treated patients, every 10 minutes of delayed care reduced a patient's disability free lifetime by a
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
WSU researcher sees possibility of moon life
While the moon is uninhabitable today, there could have been life on its surface in the distant past. In fact, there may have been two early windows of habitability for Earth's moon.
1h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
8
We can feed the world if we change our ways
Current crop yields could provide nutritious food for the projected 2050 global population, but only if we make radical changes to our dietary choices, a new study shows.
1h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
9
Birth study empowers pregnant women
New research has shed light on why some women have 'normal' births and many don't, delivering vital information to help women make more informed maternity care decisions.
1h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
14
Elastic slingshot powers snipefish feeding
The snipefish, an ocean-dwelling relative of the seahorse, has a very long, skinny snout ending in a tiny mouth. A recent study shows that snipefish feed with an elastic-boosted head flick at almost unprecedented speed.
1h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
17
The Milky Way's long-lost sibling finally foundMilky Way Andromeda
Scientists at the University of Michigan have deduced that the Andromeda galaxy, our closest large galactic neighbor, shredded and cannibalized a massive galaxy two billion years ago.
1h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
12
Inspiration for Dr. Seuss's 'The Lorax' may be from real plant and animal life in Kenya
The inspiration for 'The Lorax' by Dr. Seuss may have been based on an actual tree and monkey species in Kenya, according to a new study. The researchers propose a new theory that the Lorax viewed himself as a part of the Truffula forest and was speaking as the personification of nature rather than as some sort of ecopoliceman.
1h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
24
Scientists generate key life event in artificial mouse 'embryo' created from stem cells
The creation of artificial embryos has moved a step forward after an international team of researchers used mouse stem cells to produce artificial embryo-like structures capable of 'gastrulation', a key step in the life of any embryo.
1h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
10
Nanocrystals emit light by efficiently 'tunneling' electrons
Using advanced fabrication techniques, engineers have built a nanosized device out of silver crystals that can generate light by efficiently 'tunneling' electrons through a tiny barrier. The work brings plasmonics research a step closer to realizing ultra-compact light sources for high-speed, optical data processing and other on-chip applications.
1h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
8
Warming temperatures could increase suicide rates across the US and Mexico
By comparing historical temperature and suicide data, researchers found a strong correlation between warm weather and increased suicides. They estimate climate change could lead to suicide rate increases across the US and Mexico.
1h
Big Think
5 philosophers who took drugs and what they got out of it
You can name a dozen rock stars on drugs, but can you name the philosophers who partook? We're here to help. Read More
1h
Big Think
Where to see this Friday's blood moon, the longest lunar eclipse of the century
It is projected to last for more than 100 minutes, and begins Friday July 27. Read More
1h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
7
NASA eyes Tropical Storm Son-Tinh affecting Hainan Island, China
NASA's Terra satellite found Tropical Storm Son-Tinh continuing to drop rain over Hainan Island and mainland China.
1h
Live Science
5
How on Earth Did These Burials of Viking Descendants Wind Up in Sicily?
The discovery of 10 burials near a medieval church in Sicily has led to a rare finding: the skeletal remains of the descendants of Vikings.
1h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
Study shows why eastern U.S. air pollution levels are more stagnant in winter
The air in the United States is much cleaner than even a decade ago. But those improvements have come mainly in summer, the season that used to be the poster child for haze-containing particles that cause asthma, lung cancer and other illnesses.
1h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
5
Native bison hunters amplified climate impacts on North American prairie fires
Native American communities actively managed North American prairies for centuries before Christopher Columbus' arrival in the New World, according to a new study led by Southern Methodist University (SMU) archaeologist Christopher I. Roos.
1h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Warming alters predator-prey interactions in the Arctic
Wolf spiders are so abundant that they outweigh real wolves in the Alaskan Arctic by several orders of magnitude. Their sheer numbers make them one of the important predators on the tundra. They may also be important in buffering some effects of climate change.
1h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
58
Researcher sees possibility of Moon life
While the Moon is uninhabitable today, there could have been life on its surface in the distant past.
1h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite catches Tropical Depression Ampil over Eastern China
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the Northwestern Pacific Ocean and captured a visible image of Tropical Depression Ampil moving over land in eastern China.
1h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
7
Scientists ID more than 1,200 genes linked to educational attainment
Scientists have identified more than 1,200 genetic variants associated with how much schooling an individual completes.
1h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
20
Ancient farmers transformed Amazon and left an enduring legacy on the rainforest
Ancient communities transformed the Amazon thousands of years ago, farming in a way which has had a lasting impact on the rainforest, a major new study shows.
1h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
16
Acidic oceans cause fish to lose their sense of smell
Fish are losing their sense of smell because of increasingly acidic oceans caused by rising levels of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere, new research shows.
1h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
27
Ribbon' wraps up mystery of Jupiter's magnetic equator
The discovery of a dark ribbon of weak hydrogen ion emissions that encircles Jupiter has overturned previous thinking about the giant planet's magnetic equator.
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Public support for Endangered Species Act is widespread
The Endangered Species Act is portrayed — by critics of the law, often by the media, and sometimes by conservation professionals — as increasingly controversial, partly due to the protection of species such as wolves and spotted owls. These portrayals suggest that public support for the law may be declining. However, new research indicates that support for this law has remained consistently high
1h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
NASA finds an ill-defined Tropical Depression 15W getting organized
Tropical Depression 15W appeared ill-defined on NASA satellite imagery on July 23. 15W formed on July 22 and the next day NASA's Aqua satellite captured an image of the storm.
1h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
EU anti-trust officials probe Thales, Gemalto merger
The European Union said Monday it has launched an anti-trust investigation into the planned purchase by French aerospace and defence group Thales of SIM manufacturer Gemalto.
1h
The Atlantic
100+
Trump, Iran, and the Dangers of Presidential Bluffing
What should we expect to happen next now that Donald Trump, who likes to “capitalize certain words … for emphasis,” sends an all-caps tweet in the middle of the night instructing Iran to “NEVER, EVER THREATEN THE UNITED STATES AGAIN OR YOU WILL SUFFER CONSEQUENCES THE LIKES OF WHICH FEW THROUGHOUT HISTORY HAVE EVER SUFFERED BEFORE”? There’s no way to know for sure, but Trump himself has actually
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
NASA eyes Tropical Storm Son-Tinh affecting Hainan Island, China
NASA's Terra satellite found Tropical Storm Son-Tinh continuing to drop rain over Hainan Island and mainland China.
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
New strategy for recruitment and participation in Alzheimer's disease clinical trials
Increased public and private investments in Alzheimer's disease research have brought about a proliferation of potential therapeutic targets. Drugs and other interventions to hit those targets are moving into clinical trials. Other studies are helping us better understand risks for dementia and examining best approaches to clinical and long-term care. Yet engagement and participation has not kept
1h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
Diverse salmon populations enable 'resource surfing' bears to eat tons of fish
Research shows that Kodiak brown bears that sync their stream-to-stream movements to salmon spawning patterns eat longer and more than bears that don't, with one bear in the study consuming greater than 2 tons of fish in one summer.
1h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
Drought spurs extreme measures to protect West's wild horses
Harsh drought conditions in parts of the American West are pushing wild horses to the brink and spurring extreme measures to protect them.
1h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Stable marriages' between microbes, nutrients may explain diverse yet stable communities
A mathematical model created by University of Illinois researchers could help scientists better understand an intriguing characteristic of microbial communities: their ability to achieve stability despite being so diverse.
1h
Scientific American Content: Global
24
Global Warming Linked to Higher Suicide Rates across North America
A 1-degree Celsius rise corresponded to a 1.4 percent increase in suicides — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
6
Mystery: Who bought websites implying US senators 'for sale'
Dozens of web addresses implying U.S. senators were "for sale" have been quietly and mysteriously purchased online, amid heightened concerns on Capitol Hill that foreign agents—especially Russians—might be trying to meddle in upcoming midterm elections.
1h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
NY Daily News slashes newsroom staffing in half
The New York tabloid Daily News cut half of its newsroom staff Monday including and Jim Rich, the paper's editor in chief.
1h
New on MIT Technology Review
100+
White House moving ahead with plans to unravel vehicle emissions standards, including California’sTrump EPA California
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1h
Popular Science
4
Last week in tech: Everything you missed while you were neck-deep in Comic-Con
Technology Facebook had a tough week, but your next phone may be a lot tougher. Catch up on all the latest tech news.
1h
Feed: All Latest
100+
The Ultimate Toxic Fandom Lives in Trumpworld
Donald Trump’s rise and reign was, and continues to be, anchored by an acutely corrosive variety of fandom.
2h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Stable marriages' between microbes, nutrients may explain diverse yet stable communities
A mathematical model created by University of Illinois researchers could help scientists better understand an intriguing characteristic of microbial communities: their ability to achieve stability despite being so diverse.
2h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite catches Tropical Depression Ampil over Eastern China
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the Northwestern Pacific Ocean and captured a visible image of Tropical Depression Ampil moving over land in eastern China.
2h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Diverse salmon populations enable 'resource surfing' bears to eat tons of fish
Research shows that Kodiak brown bears that sync their stream-to-stream movements to salmon spawning patterns eat longer and more than bears that don't, with one bear in the study consuming greater than 2 tons of fish in one summer.
2h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
A year in words
In a recent study published in the journal PLOS One, Lynn Perry and a team of fellow researchers who examined child speech interactions over the course of a year at the UM Linda Ray Intervention Center found that vulnerable children benefit from conversations with their peers and their teachers.
2h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
NASA finds an ill-defined Tropical Depression 15W getting organized
Tropical Depression 15W appeared ill-defined on NASA satellite imagery on July 23. 15W formed on July 22 and the next day NASA's Aqua satellite captured an image of the storm.
2h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
Researchers explore popular food trends in nutritional review
What's the bottom line on the potential heart health benefits of popular health foods? In their second paper on controversial nutrition trends, researchers from the American College of Cardiology Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease Council discuss nutritional "hypes" and controversies around dairy products, added sugar, legumes, coffee and tea, alcohol, energy drinks, mushrooms, fermented foods,
2h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
5
NASA finds tropical storm Wukong's comma shape
Tropical Depression 14W formed on July 22 and the next day, NASA's Aqua satellite captured an image of the storm that had strengthened into a tropical storm and taken on a comma shape.
2h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
No, Twitter will not ban Trump, here's why
Calls to ban Donald Trump from Twitter are at least as old as his presidency. But it's not going to happen, at least not while he's in office.
2h
The Scientist RSS
University of Edinburgh Demands Retraction of Researcher’s Papers
Cell biologist Irina Stancheva was dismissed in June 2017 after a scientific misconduct investigation.
2h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
9
Cold wave reveals potential benefits of urban heat islands
The concrete and asphalt that make city summers brutally hot might not be a bad thing during winter's deep freeze.
2h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Giant neurons in the brain may play similarly giant role in awareness and cognition
Scientists find that certain neurons release nitric oxide onto nearby blood vessels, and potentially use this mechanism to control awareness in the brain.
2h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
TGen-led study shows mutated gene is likely cause of 3-year-old girl's severe disorder
A young girl with severe neurological symptoms finally has a diagnosis, following the discovery by TGen of a genetic mutation that likely caused the girl to experience a cascade of symptoms. Like a train hitting a missing section of rail, a mutated copy of the gene FBXO28 is suspected of causing one of the girl's chromosomes to go off track — a frameshift mutation — leading to a host of neurolog
2h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Cold wave reveals potential benefits of urban heat islands
Researchers from Princeton University have found that the urban heat island effect — cities are hotter in the summer than their surrounding areas — also helps keep cities warmer during extreme cold. The findings have implications for urban planners in areas such as New York City or Chicago, which experience marked seasonal temperature swings.
2h
New on MIT Technology Review
200+
Million-person genetic study finds gene patterns linked to how long people stay in school
Researchers explore genetic “scores” that may predict educational success.
2h
Scientific American Content: Global
11
Signs of Life on Europa May Be Just Beneath the Surface
New maps suggest evidence of alien life in the icy moon’s buried ocean could be surprisingly easy to find — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
2h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
7
Study finds flushing water lines protects inconsistently and may increase lead exposure
Research conducted by LSU Health New Orleans School of Public Health finds that the current recommendations for running water to flush out lead are not consistently effective and may not be the best way to protect children from lead in drinking water. The findings are published in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health .
2h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
How students view intelligence affects how they internalize stress
As students transition into high school, many see their grades drop. And while some students are resilient in the midst of this challenge, others succumb to the pressure. How they think about themselves and their abilities could make the difference, according to adolescent psychology researchers at The University of Texas at Austin and the University of Rochester.
2h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Slacking on your savings? Cognitive bias could be to blame
Despite working hard, Americans are notoriously poor at saving money. The average American working-age couple has saved only $5,000 for retirement, while 43 percent of working-age families have no retirement savings at all, according to a 2016 analysis of a Federal Reserve survey.
2h
Live Science
7
Here's a Disturbing Theory About Why Climate Change Seemed to 'Pause' for 15 Years
A new paper argues that the apparent "pause" in climate change of the last decade might have resulted from a hidden global heat sink.
2h
The Atlantic
21
Japan’s Fiery Toyohashi Gion Festival
In central Japan, near Mikawa Bay, the Toyohashi Gion Festival—during which local men set off large handheld fireworks as part of a Shinto ritual—has taken place annually for more than 350 years. According to the AFP photographer Yasuyoshi Chiba, “Every year, each male member of the shrine makes his own set of tezutsu hanabi from bamboo covered by straw ropes with a loaded gun and metal powder.”
2h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
News from the Journal of Lipid Research
Recent research in the Journal of Lipid Research addresses complex questions ranging from enzyme mechanisms to the epidemiology of noncommunicable diseases.
2h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
How experience changes basics of memory formation
We know instinctively that our experiences shape the way we learn. If we are highly familiar with a particular task, like cooking for example, learning a new recipe is much easier than it was when we were a novice. New research from UC Davis shows that experience also changes the way our neurons become plastic and form new memories.
2h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
17
Cloud formation and distribution follows simple thermodynamic, statistical laws
Take a look at the clouds, if there are any in your sky right now. Watch the billows, the white lofty tufts set against the blue sky. Or, depending on your weather, watch the soft grey edges smear together into blended tones that drag down through the air to the ground.
2h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
8
Environmental changes in the Mekong Delta spell trouble for farmers
The Mekong Delta is home to 15 million people, many of whom rely on the delta's rich soil and water resources for farming and fishing. But their livelihoods are being threatened by rising sea levels, droughts, dams, and other hydrological shifts. A new article from researchers at the University of Illinois and Iowa State University explains the challenges.
2h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
The shape in water: First nanoscale measurements of biomolecule folding in liquid
Tinkering with a method they helped develop over the last few years, scientists have for the first time measured at the nanometer scale the characteristic patterns of folds that give proteins their three-dimensional shape in water. Developed by researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and their colleagues, this technique will help scientists gain insights about the
2h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Elastic slingshot powers snipefish feeding
The snipefish, an ocean-dwelling relative of the seahorse, has a very long, skinny snout ending in a tiny mouth. A recent study by UC Davis graduate student Sarah Longo shows that snipefish feed with an elastic-boosted head flick at almost unprecedented speed.
2h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
83
Cell-sized robots can sense their environment
Researchers at MIT have created what may be the smallest robots yet that can sense their environment, store data, and even carry out computational tasks. These devices, which are about the size of a human egg cell, consist of tiny electronic circuits made of two-dimensional materials, piggybacking on minuscule particles called colloids.
2h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
3
Cell-sized robots can sense their environment
MIT researchers have created what may be the smallest robots yet that can sense their environment, store data, and even carry out computational tasks. Made of electronic circuits coupled to minute particles, the devices could flow through intestines or pipelines to detect problems.
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Slacking on your savings? Cognitive bias could be to blame
A new study by Cornell neuroscientists suggests that, to some degree, we can blame limited savings on our brains in addition to our bills. According to the human development professors Adam Anderson and Eve De Rosa, humans have a cognitive bias toward earning, which makes us unconsciously spend more brain power on earning than on saving. The cognitive bias is so powerful that it can even warp our
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Largest genetic database on Alzheimer's disease now re-open for business
The National Institute on Aging Genetics of Alzheimer's Disease Data Storage Site will begin making large-scale DNA sequence data available to investigators. The goal is to make Alzheimer's disease-relevant genetic data available to as many investigators as possible to accelerate research.
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
Overnight brain stimulation improves memory
New research in humans demonstrates the potential to improve memory with a non-invasive brain stimulation technique delivered during sleep. The results, published in JNeurosci, come from a project funded by the United States Department of Defense that aims to better understand the process of memory consolidation, which could translate into improved memory function in both healthy and patient popul
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
Mother's touch supports pup's brain development
A mother's presence may have immediate and long-term effects on her child's developing brain by modulating the serotonin system, suggests a study of rat moms and their pups published in eNeuro. The research provides a potential mechanism by which separating a child from his or her mother early in life could derail development.
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
Cognitive consequences of age-related increase in brain activity
Increased frontal brain activity in healthy older adults reflects reduced efficiency rather than a way to maintain cognitive function, finds a study of two human samples published in JNeurosci. The findings contradict a leading theory in the neuroscience of aging.
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
Estrogen could promote healthy development of preterm infants
Premature birth alters the balance of interneurons in the cerebral cortex that can be restored with estrogen treatment, according to a study of human brain tissue and preterm rabbits published in JNeurosci.
3h
Big Think
Economist causes controversy: 'Replace public libraries with Amazon bookstores'
A controversial article from Forbes argues that libraries, once an important public resource, are outdated, costly and should be replaced by Amazon book stores. Read More
3h
Big Think
Caution to late eaters: New study links meal times to cancer
We've long known what you eat matters. When you eat matters, too. Read More
3h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
The Scream: What were those colorful, wavy clouds in Edvard Munch's famous painting?
What inspired the iconic red-and-yellow sky in The Scream, the painting by Norwegian artist Edvard Munch that sold for a record $119.9 million in 2012? Some say it was a volcanic sunset after the 1883 Krakatau eruption. Others think the wavy sky shows a scream from nature.
3h
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
3
Sharks Prefer Jazz | Shark News
Humans love sharks so much, we study everything about them. Even their musical preference. Stream Shark Week Episodes: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/shark-week/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery https://www.facebook.com/SharkWeek Follow on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Discovery https://twitter.com/SharkWeek We're
3h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
22
Material formed from crab shells and trees could replace flexible plastic packaging
Researchers have created a material derived from crab shells and tree fibers that has the potential to replace the flexible plastic packaging used to keep food fresh.
3h
Scientific American Content: Global
21
Why Do Paper Cuts Hurt So Much?
The injury is too shallow to impair pain signals — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
3h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
14
We can feed the world if we change our ways
Current crop yields could provide nutritious food for the projected 2050 global population, but only if we make radical changes to our dietary choices, a new study shows.
3h
The Scientist RSS
Genomics Company Human Longevity Sues J. Craig Venter Institute
Genetics pioneer Craig Venter is not named as a defendant, but the company he founded alleges that he stole trade secrets.
3h
The Scientist RSS
1
Oldest Evidence of Terrestrial Life on a Young Earth
Microbes were living on land as early as 3.22 billion years ago, fossilized rocks show, 500 million years earlier than previously documented.
3h
Live Science
56
Ritz Recall: Cracker Products with Cheese Pulled Over Salmonella Risk
A number of Ritz Cracker products are being recalled because an ingredient used in the products may be contaminated with Salmonella.
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Environmental changes in the Mekong Delta spell trouble for farmers
The Mekong Delta is home to 15 million people, many of whom rely on the delta's rich soil and water resources for farming and fishing. But their livelihoods are being threatened by rising sea levels, droughts, dams, and other hydrological shifts. A new article from researchers at the University of Illinois and Iowa State University explains the challenges.
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Elastic slingshot powers snipefish feeding
The snipefish, an ocean-dwelling relative of the seahorse, has a very long, skinny snout ending in a tiny mouth. A recent study by UC Davis graduate student Sarah Longo shows that snipefish feed with an elastic-boosted head flick at almost unprecedented speed.
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
6
Cloud formation and distribution follows simple thermodynamic, statistical laws
Clouds are exceptionally complex creatures, and that complexity makes it difficult to predict how and where they'll form. But University of Utah researchers may have found a way to greatly reduce the difficulty of predicting formation of clouds. The results could fill a key gap in scientists' understanding of how climate change may play out.
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
A promising approach to translational research on stem cells for Parkinson's disease
A major factor underlying Parkinson's Disease (PD) pathology is the loss of dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra, and thus current therapies often aim to restore dopamine signaling.
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Emergency departments can be an effective venue for hepatitis C virus testing
Boston Medical Center has shown that testing for the hepatitis C virus (HCV) outside the typical high-risk population can be successfully implemented in an emergency department setting.
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Rationalizations by low-paid microworkers raise questions of ethics, rigor
Researchers found that lower-paid Amazon Mechanical Turk microworkers — or Turkers — were more likely to reduce their efforts, as well as experience psychological states that could impact the results of the study. Microwork sites offer scientists and other researchers an inexpensive way to recruit participants, who often agree to be paid well below the minimum wage.
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
3
How students view intelligence affects how they internalize stress
As students transition into high school, many see their grades drop. And while some students are resilient in the midst of this challenge, others succumb to the pressure. How they think about themselves and their abilities could make the difference, according to adolescent psychology researchers at The University of Texas at Austin and the University of Rochester.
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
The shape in water: First nanoscale measurements of biomolecule folding in liquid
For the first time, scientists have measured at the nanometer scale the characteristic folding patterns that give proteins their three-dimensional shape in water.
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Natural chromium sources threaten California groundwater
Natural sources of the toxic form of chromium appear in wells that provide drinking water to a large population in California, offering a new perspective on California's groundwater management challenges.
3h
The Atlantic
31
Snowfall’s Compelling Second Season Is All About Power
What does power look like, really? In the infinitely improved second season of Snowfall , John Singleton’s FX drama about the origins of the crack epidemic in America, power takes a multitude of forms: brute aggression, political maneuvering, financial capital, bravado. But it’s embodied most memorably in the third episode, when the furious, grieving drug dealer Kevin (Malcolm M. Mays) briefly ai
3h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Solving the cave shrimp mystery: Geology and evolution in action
Caves are a very special environment characterized by complete darkness, low temperature fluctuations and high humidity. Species that live there have adapted to these conditions and have developed unique characteristics: they are eyeless or have degenerated eyes, and they lack pigments. Often, these animals are endemic—their distribution is restricted to a specific area, sometimes to only one cave
3h
Live Science
25
What's Behind 'Weeping' Virgin Mary Statues?
To understand why a weeping statue would be religiously meaningful, it's first important to appreciate the connection between miracles and the Virgin Mary.
3h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
NIST builds statistical foundation for next-generation forensic DNA profiling
DNA is often considered the most reliable form of forensic evidence, and this reputation is based on the way DNA experts use statistics. When they compare the DNA left at a crime scene with the DNA of a suspect, experts generate statistics that describe how closely those DNA samples match. A jury can then take those match statistics into account when deciding guilt or innocence.
3h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
8
Increases in westerly winds weaken the Southern Ocean carbon sink
A new study of lake sediments from the sub-Antarctic reveals for the first time that increases in westerly winds are likely to reduce the ability of the Southern Ocean to absorb carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. The results are significant as the Southern Ocean currently absorbs over 40% of human-produced carbon dioxide, so any weakening of this 'carbon sink' could accelerate climate change. The
3h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
5
If only A.I. had a brain
Digital computation has rendered nearly all forms of analog computation obsolete since as far back as the 1950s. However, there is one major exception that rivals the computational power of the most advanced digital devices: the human brain.
3h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
26
NASA's MAVEN spacecraft finds that 'stolen' electrons enable unusual aurora on Mars
Auroras appear on Earth as ghostly displays of colorful light in the night sky, usually near the poles. Our rocky neighbor Mars has auroras too, and NASA's MAVEN spacecraft just found a new type of Martian aurora that occurs over much of the day side of the Red Planet, where auroras are very hard to see.
3h
Viden
100+
Hemmeligt projekt: Facebook udvikler satellit
Facebook bekræfter til amerikansk medie, at man vil lave et netværk af satellitter.
3h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
9
Sulfur analysis supports timing of oxygen's appearance
Scientists have long thought oxygen appeared in Earth's lower atmosphere 2.7 billion years ago, making life as we know it possible. A Rice University researcher has added evidence to support that number.
3h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
5
NASA finds Tropical Depression 13W hugging southeastern coast
Tropical Depression 13W formed on July 22 and the next day, NASA's Aqua satellite captured an image of the storm hugging the coast of southeastern China.
3h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
Slimy chemical clues: Changing algae could alter ecosystems
Colorful, hardened algae that dot the ocean floor from Alaska to Mexico often set the tone for which plant and invertebrate species inhabit a given ecological community.
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Study finds flushing water lines protects inconsistently and may increase lead exposure
Research conducted by LSU Health New Orleans School of Public Health finds that the current recommendations for running water to flush out lead are not consistently effective and may not be the best way to protect children from lead in drinking water.
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Paying parents to read to their children boosts literacy skills
Researchers have found a surprising way to help boost the skills of children with language impairment: Pay their parents to read to them.
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
NASA finds tropical storm Wukong's comma shape
Tropical Depression 14W formed on July 22 and the next day, NASA's Aqua satellite captured an image of the storm that had strengthened into a tropical storm and taken on a comma shape.
3h
New on MIT Technology Review
100+
Facebook is creating an internet satellite
[no content]
3h
Scientific American Content: Global
17
Will Trump's Plans Bring Down Drug Prices?
Healthcare experts seek to unpack the bold and the bluster in the varying proposals — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
3h
NYT > Science
200+
For Scientists Racing to Cure Alzheimer’s, the Math Is Getting Ugly
To find 25,000 participants to enroll in all the approved trials, researchers would have to begin by approaching more than 37 million people with early memory loss.
3h
NYT > Science
90
Trilobites: Who Was the Real Lorax? Seeking the Inspiration for Dr. Seuss
A new essay explores the possible real-life examples for the Lorax character and Truffula trees.
3h
Quanta Magazine
100+
How Artificial Intelligence Can Supercharge the Search for New Particles
The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) smashes a billion pairs of protons together each second. Occasionally the machine may rattle reality enough to have a few of those collisions generate something that’s never been seen before. But because these events are by their nature a surprise, physicists don’t know exactly what to look for. They worry that in the process of winnowing their data from those bill
3h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
5
New scholarly focus needed to help solve global food crisis, experts say
The global food system is unsustainable and urgently needs an overhaul. Yet current approaches to finding solutions through applied academic research are too narrow and treat the food system as a collection of isolated components within established disciplines such as agronomy, sociology or nutritional science.
3h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
A warmer Midwest could lead to a common bird being less common over the next century
A warmer future may lead to a common Midwestern songbird becoming considerably less common, according to a team of researchers whose study of the population-level impacts of climate change on Acadian flycatchers was published today in the journal Nature Climate Change.
3h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
Honeybee pheromones safely repel elephants, study finds
An organic formulation containing honeybee pheromones has been found to safely repel elephants, offering promise for a new strategy to prevent the world's largest land animals from destroying crops or causing other damage in areas where humans conflict with elephants, according to a study published July 23, 2018 in Current Biology.
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
The Scream: What were those colorful, wavy clouds in Edvard Munch's famous painting?
What inspired the iconic red-and-yellow sky in The Scream, the painting by Norwegian artist Edvard Munch that sold for a record $119.9 million in 2012? Some say it was a volcanic sunset after the 1883 Krakatau eruption. Others think the wavy sky shows a scream from nature.
4h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Model fuses social media, remote sensing data with goal of identifying nuclear threats
A new computational model allows researchers to draw on normally incompatible data sets, such as satellite imagery and social media posts, to answer questions about what is happening in targeted locations. The researchers developed the model to serve as a tool for identifying violations of nuclear nonproliferation agreements.
4h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
3
If only A.I. had a brain
A team of researchers from Pitt's Swanson School of Engineering have developed an 'artificial synapse' that does not process information like a digital computer but rather mimics the analog way the human brain completes tasks. Led by Feng Xiong, assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering, the researchers published their results in the recent issue of the journal Advanced Materials
4h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
NASA's MAVEN spacecraft finds that 'stolen' electrons enable unusual aurora on Mars
NASA's MAVEN spacecraft just found a new type of Martian aurora that occurs over much of the day side of the Red Planet, where auroras are very hard to see.
4h
New on MIT Technology Review
50
SpaceX has entered a new stage of reusability
[no content]
4h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
49
Ribbon' wraps up mystery of Jupiter's magnetic equator
The discovery of a dark ribbon of weak hydrogen ion emissions that encircles Jupiter has overturned previous thinking about the giant planet's magnetic equator.
4h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
20
Writing the future of rewritable memory
Scientists at the University of Alberta in Edmonton, Canada have created the most dense, solid-state memory in history that could soon exceed the capabilities of current hard drives by 1,000 times.
4h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
55
Surprising findings on the physics of water entry could lead to smarter design of ships
Countless times a day, seabirds dive-catch prey from the ocean, boats enter the water from dry land, and seaplanes touch down gently amid the waves. The phenomenon of objects entering water is commonplace, yet a full understanding of the physics of water entry remains elusive, especially as it pertains to instances where a solid object enters a body of water that contains other solid objects, such
4h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
5
Researchers find connection between viruses and inflammatory bowel disease
A study led by a researcher at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus reveals a key connection between viruses and inflammatory bowel diseases like ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease.
4h
Scientific American Content: Global
200+
U.S. Is Unprepared for the Health Challenges of Climate Change, Experts Warn
Insect-borne disease and damage to hospitals during disasters are among their concerns — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
4h
New on MIT Technology Review
36
Waymo racks up a million autonomous miles in one month
[no content]
4h
Science | The Guardian
61
Gordon Hillman obituary
Archaeobotanist who was a distinguished researcher into ancient food plants and the history of agriculture Well before the beginnings of farming, people had developed an understanding of how to use the plant world that was detailed and sophisticated. That observation is far less surprising now than it was before the life’s work of Gordon Hillman, a distinguished researcher into ancient food plants
4h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
3
New study uncovers how lutemax 2020 protects the eyes against blue light damage
Morristown, N.J., July 23, 2018 – In a new study published in Nutrients titled 'Lutein and Zeaxanthin Isomers Protect Against Light-induced Retinopathy via Decreasing Oxidative and Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in BALB/cJ Mice', Lutemax 2020 supplementation was shown to protect photoreceptors against blue light damage by mitigating oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum stress — a primary mechanism a
4h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Writing the future of rewritable memory
Scientists at the University of Alberta in Edmonton, Canada have created the most dense, solid-state memory in history that could soon exceed the capabilities of current hard drives by 1,000 times. New technique leads to the densest solid-state memory ever created.
4h
New on MIT Technology Review
100+
Nerves repaired using bioscaffold fitted with “radio” antenna
Electrical signals generated outside the body by transcranial stimulation have helped repair severed sciatic nerves in rates, says researchers
4h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Materials scientists of Lomonosov MSU proposed a novel approach for obtaining films for solar cells
Scientists of the Lomonosov Moscow State University, Department Materials Science explained the key mechanisms of interaction of hybrid perovskites with solvents and suggested new approaches to obtain perovskite light-absorbing layers for thin-film solar cells from weakly coordinating aprotic solvents.The results of the study have been recently published in the high-rating journal Chemistry of Mat
4h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
3
Researchers find connection between viruses and inflammatory bowel disease
A study led by a researcher at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus reveals a key connection between viruses and inflammatory bowel diseases like ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease.
4h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
6
NUST MISIS scientists present metamaterial for solar cells and nanooptics
A research team from the NUST MISIS Laboratory of Superconducting Metamaterials led by Alexey Basharin, Senior Lecturer and Candidate of Technical Sciences, has developed a metamaterial-dielectric that has unique characteristics and is easy to manufacture. This ease of access will allow researchers to use it to create the latest optical devices. The research results were published in Laser&Photoni
4h
BBC News – Science & Environment
51
Hyperloop test pod sets speed record
German engineering students set a record as their pod hits 457km/h in a hyperloop tunnel test.
4h
The Atlantic
200+
Climate Change May Cause 26,000 More U.S. Suicides by 2050
For almost two centuries now, scientists have noticed a place’s suicide rate bears troubling links to the changing of the seasons and the friendliness of its climate. In 1881 , the Italian physician Enrico Morselli noted that suicide rates peak in the summer , deeming the effect “too great for it to be attributed to chance of the human will.” Two decades later, the French sociologist Emile Durkhe
4h
cognitive science
1
A new paper in JEP:General explores the role of time perception in the difficulty people have learning new material in noisy environments.
submitted by /u/markmana [link] [comments]
4h
Big Think
Street grids matter more to your commute than you might think
Simple diagrams reflect straightforward grids that make navigation easy. Complex diagrams equal ‘messy’ street grids, making it harder to find your way. Read More
4h
Big Think
The drastic measure America needs to take to protect itself from Internet attacks
The continuing cyber threats to American democracy expose the serious vulnerabilities of its Internet and call for dramatic changes. Read More
4h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Sulfur analysis supports timing of oxygen's appearance
A team led by a Rice University scientist analyzes water to assess the sulfur composition of ancient rock used to mark the 'great oxygenation event' that gave rise to abundant life on Earth.
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
New scholarly focus needed to help solve global food crisis, U-M experts say
The global food system is unsustainable and urgently needs an overhaul. Yet current approaches to finding solutions through applied academic research are too narrow and treat the food system as a collection of isolated components within established disciplines such as agronomy, sociology or nutritional science.
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
NASA finds Tropical Depression 13W hugging southeastern coast
Tropical Depression 13W formed on July 22 and the next day, NASA's Aqua satellite captured an image of the storm hugging the coast of southeastern China.
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
NASA launches X-ray telescope on sounding rocket to study star wreckage
The High-Resolution Microcalorimeter X-ray Imaging Rocket (Micro-X) briefly launched into space to map the elements of Cassiopeia A, expanding debris from an exploded star.
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
A warmer Midwest could lead to a common bird being less common over the next century
Discussion of how climate change might affect wildlife has largely centered on the effects of change on habitat, but a study published today in the journal Nature Climate Change suggests that predicting how climate will affect wildlife demands an understanding of exactly how complex ecological interactions are in nature.
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Ever gone to put your keys in the fridge, not the milk? New research sheds light on why
New research shows for the first time that forming a strong mental picture of a motor action can make a person involuntarily do it.
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
3
The 'secret sauce' for high-performing NICUs
The nation's neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) use similar interventions in similar fashions but often do not achieve identical results. These variable outcomes prompt the question: What is the secret sauce that explains the success of Children's National and other high-performing NICUs?
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Surprising findings on the physics of water entry could lead to smarter design of ships
The phenomenon of objects entering water is commonplace, yet a full understanding of the physics of water entry remains elusive, especially as it pertains to instances where a solid object enters a body of water that contains other solid objects. A team of researchers has published a series of surprising findings that may lead to strategies for minimizing the strain of water entry on marine vessel
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Increases in westerly winds weaken the Southern Ocean carbon sink
A new study of lake sediments from the sub-Antarctic reveals for the first time that increases in westerly winds are likely to reduce the ability of the Southern Ocean to absorb carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. The results are significant as the Southern Ocean currently absorbs over 40 percent of human-produced carbon dioxide, so any weakening of this 'carbon sink' could accelerate climate chan
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Gene study pinpoints superbug link between people and animals
Scientists led by the University of Edinburgh have shed light on how a major cause of human and animal disease can jump between species, by studying its genes. The findings reveal fresh insights into how new disease-causing strains of the bacteria — called Staphylococcus aureus — emerge. Experts say the research could help improve the use of antibiotics and design better strategies for limiting
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Breast cancer fuelled by mysterious Yin Yang protein
Scientists have unveiled clues about a mysterious molecule called Yin Yang1 — and revealed it may fuel tumour growth in breast cancer.
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
Imaging in living cells reveals how 'junk DNA' switches on a gene
Researchers have captured video showing how pieces of DNA once thought to be useless can act as on-off switches for genes. A team led by researchers at Princeton University has captured how this 'junk DNA' finds and activates a target gene in living cells. The video allows researchers to see the enhancers as they find and connect to a gene to kick-start its activity.
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
Study provides insight into how dying neurons control eating behaviors of the brain microglia
Aberrant clearance activity of microglia in particular brain regions leads to changes associated with neurodegenerative diseases.
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
Princeton researchers discover the 'optimism' of E. coli bacteria
E. coli bacteria have different solutions to cope with different types of nutrient deprivation, including an 'optimistic' response to carbon limitations, according to a team of Princeton researchers. Carbon-limited cells generate a large number of inactive assembly lines (ribosomes), nitrogen-limited cells turn out proteins more slowly, and phosphorous-limited cells use only half as many assembly
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
States boost renewable energy and development when utilities adopt renewable standards
States that require utilities to increase renewable energy see expansion of renewable energy facilities and generation — including wind and other renewable sources, but especially solar — according to new research from Indiana University and two other institutions.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
Ribbon' wraps up mystery of Jupiter's magnetic equator
New data from Jupiter observations is a gift to Leicester astronomers.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Microclimates may provide wildlife with respite from warming temperatures
researchers suggest that locally variable habitats such as hummocky hillsides or shaded valleys could help a range of native species survive this modern warming episode – in much the same way as species such as red deer and squirrel survived the Ice Age by seeking refuge in pockets of warmer conditions sheltered from the extreme cold.
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
Ytterbium: The quantum memory of tomorrow
Quantum communication and are the future of high-security communication. One of the major challenges is to create memories with the capacity to store quantum information carried by light. Researchers at UNIGE and CNRS have discovered a new material in which an element, ytterbium, can store and protect the fragile quantum information even while operating at high frequencies. This makes ytterbium an
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
New research: High burden of hepatitis C among people who inject drugs
Globally, more than one in three (39 percent) people who have injected drugs in the last year are living with hepatitis C infection, according to new research from the National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre and the Kirby Institute at UNSW Sydney.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
Should you share data of threatened species?
Scientists and conservationists have continually called for location data to be turned off in wildlife photos and publications to help preserve species but new research suggests there could be more to be gained by sharing a rare find, rather than obscuring it, in certain circumstances. Researchers have developed a framework — considering a range of case studies including the 'world's largest bloo
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
Warming temperatures could increase suicide rates across the US and Mexico
By comparing historical temperature and suicide data, researchers found a strong correlation between warm weather and increased suicides. They estimate climate change could lead to suicide rate increases across the US and Mexico.
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
Nanocrystals emit light by efficiently 'tunneling' electrons
Using advanced fabrication techniques, engineers at the University of California San Diego have built a nanosized device out of silver crystals that can generate light by efficiently 'tunneling' electrons through a tiny barrier. The work brings plasmonics research a step closer to realizing ultra-compact light sources for high-speed, optical data processing and other on-chip applications.
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
Acidic oceans cause fish to lose their sense of smell
Fish are losing their sense of smell because of increasingly acidic oceans caused by rising levels of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere, new research shows.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
20
Ancient farmers transformed Amazon and left an enduring legacy on the rainforest
Ancient communities transformed the Amazon thousands of years ago, farming in a way which has had a lasting impact on the rainforest, a major new study shows.
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
Screening for paternal depression in primary care clinics
Fathers screened positive for depression almost as often as mothers during well-child care visits with their young children in a small study at community health care centers in Indianapolis, Indiana. Researchers estimated the frequency of paternal depression using the Child Health Improvement Through Computer Automation (CHICA) system, which administers a tablet-based prescreening form to English-
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
What midlife risk factors are associated with late onset of epilepsy?
Potentially changeable lifestyle and vascular risk factors in midlife were associated with onset later in life of epilepsy, a neurological disorder with higher risk in older age. This observational study used data from a large, biracial group of people followed for more than 25 years.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
Scientists ID more than 1,200 genes linked to educational attainment
An international research team including CU Boulder scientists has identified more than 1,200 genetic variants associated with how much schooling an individual completes.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
Inspiration for Dr. Seuss's 'The Lorax' may be from real plant and animal life in Kenya
The inspiration for 'The Lorax' by Dr. Seuss may have been based on an actual tree and monkey species in Kenya, according to a new Dartmouth-led study in 'Nature Ecology & Evolution.' The co-authors propose a new theory that the Lorax viewed himself as a part of the Truffula forest and was speaking as the personification of nature rather than as some sort of ecopoliceman.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
How we see others' emotions depends on our pre-conceived beliefs
How we see emotions on another person's face depends on our pre-conceived views of how we understand these emotions.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
Scientists generate key life event in artificial mouse 'embryo' created from stem cells
The creation of artificial embryos has moved a step forward after an international team of researchers used mouse stem cells to produce artificial embryo-like structures capable of 'gastrulation', a key step in the life of any embryo.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Hijacked' cell response to stress reveals promising drug targets for blood cancer
A signaling pathway that helps promote normal cell growth worsens a form of leukemia by taking control of another pathway better known for protecting cells from biological stress, a new study shows.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
The Milky Way's long-lost sibling finally found
Scientists at the University of Michigan have deduced that the Andromeda galaxy, our closest large galactic neighbor, shredded and cannibalized a massive galaxy two billion years ago.
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
Organic Mega Flow Battery transcends lifetime, voltage thresholds
Harvard researchers have demonstrated a new organic molecule that outlives and outperforms its predecessors, offering the longest-lasting high-performance organic flow battery to date. Nicknamed the Methuselah quinone — after the longest-lived Biblical figure — this molecule could usefully store and release energy many tens of thousands of times over multi-year periods.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Honeybee pheromones safely repel elephants, study finds
A study conducted at Greater Kruger National Park in South Africa found that a formulation that steadily released bee pheromones successfully repelled elephants, offering a potential management strategy to prevent elephants from trampling crops and causing other damage in places where humans and elephants are in conflict.
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Science | The Guardian
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Discovered: Milky Way's long-lost galactic sibling
The M32 galaxy was shredded and consumed by our closest neighbour, Andromeda, scientists say The Milky Way once had a massive galactic sibling that was shredded and consumed by our closest neighbour, Andromeda, scientists have discovered. The dramatic sequence of events, dating back 2bn years, was reconstructed through a detailed survey of stars in the faint halo surrounding the Andromeda galaxy.
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Science | The Guardian
15
Dr Seuss's Lorax 'inspired by orange Kenyan monkeys'
Moustachioed animals’ relationship with whistling thorn acacia trees resembles that of the Lorax with truffulas, researchers say “I am the Lorax, I speak for the trees,” says the eponymous hairy hero of Dr Seuss’s children’s book after he climbs out of the stump of a truffula tree. An irate orange figure with a bristling moustache, the Lorax is an environmental activist who wastes no time in bera
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New Scientist – News
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Deadly heatwave hits Japan and Korea as temperatures soar past 40°C
Japan has experienced its highest temperature since records began as a deadly heatwave continued to grip large parts of the country as well as neighbouring North and South Korea
5h
New Scientist – News
We cannot breathe easily when deadly air threatens young children
As a silent, faceless killer, air pollution is often ignored, but a young girl's tragic death may finally wake us up to this toxic threat
5h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
36
Ancient farmers transformed Amazon and left an enduring legacy on the rainforest
Ancient communities transformed the Amazon thousands of years ago, farming in a way which has had a lasting impact on the rainforest, a major new study shows.
5h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
Research reveals how whistling thorn acacia tree and patas monkey resemble the Truffula tree and the Lorax
Ever since "The Lorax" by Dr. Seuss (the pen name for Theodor Geisel), was first published in August of 1971, it has captured the minds of young readers. It's been translated into 15 languages and more than 1.6 million copies were sold by 2010. The short and spunky, furry orange creature called the Lorax, who "speaks for the trees," is famous for his environmental pleas, as he demands that the Onc
5h
Popular Science
200+
Here are 10 plants and animals that might have gone extinct without the Endangered Species Act
Environment The administration has proposed changes to the popular law. Last Thursday, the Trump administration proposed cutting provisions in the Endangered Species Act (ESA)—the law protecting plants and animals threatened by extinction.
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Feed: All Latest
100
Comic-Con 2018: This Year's Best Cosplay
Comic-Con 2018's best costumes included Wonder Woman, 'Game of Thrones', and more.
5h
Live Science
92
This Mustached Monkey Likely Inspired Dr. Seuss' Lorax
Dr. Seuss' famous Lorax — a mustached and mossy fellow who "speaks for the trees" — was likely inspired by the long-limbed patas monkeys the children's book writer saw while on a safari in Kenya, a new study finds.
5h
Live Science
13
Andromeda Killed and Ate Another Galaxy
Astronomers have solved an intergalactic murder mystery: Andromeda did it. And researchers found the victim's corpse.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
38
A new kind of spray is loaded with microscopic electronic sensors
For the first time, researchers have built circuits on microscopic chips that can be mixed into an aerosol spray.
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Breakthrough in battle against type 2 diabetes
Experts from the University of Stirling have made a breakthrough in understanding how people respond to lifestyle treatment for preventing Type 2 diabetes.
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
3
In Southern Mozambique, only half of people diagnosed with HIV enroll in medical care
HIV diagnosis is the first of many steps in the path to global disease control. However, in Southern Mozambique, more than half of people diagnosed with HIV do not initiate the next steps in the cascade of HIV care, and this is particularly true for those that perform the test at home. The study, led by ISGlobal, reveals the need to develop interventions to facilitate access to care and treatment
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Discovery reveals how obesity causes disease — and two ways to stop it
New research explains why obesity causes harmful inflammation that can lead to diabetes, clogged arteries and other health problems. Doctors may be able to use this knowledge to battle these chronic diseases and others driven by damaging inflammation.
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
NIST builds statistical foundation for next-generation forensic DNA profiling
When forensic experts compare DNA left at a crime scene with DNA from a suspect, they generate statistics that describe how closely those DNA samples match. "If you're working criminal cases, you need to be able to generate match statistics," said Katherine Gettings, the NIST biologist who led the study. "The data we've published will make it possible for labs that use Next Generation Sequencing t
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
3
Solving the cave shrimp mystery: Geology and evolution in action
Although they live isolated for millions of years small shrimp that occur in various caves in Israel and Italy, are related. This has now been proven by a team of researchers from the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel and Israeli institutions using genetic and geological analyses. The study appears today in the scientific journal PeerJ.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
3
We can feed the world if we change our ways
Current crop yields could provide nutritious food for the projected 2050 global population, but only if we make radical changes to our dietary choices, a new study shows.
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Slimy chemical clues: Changing algae could alter ecosystems
Acidification of ocean waters from rising global temperatures is changing a type of rock-like algae that sets the tone for what species are welcome in ecological communities.
5h
Scientific American Content: Global
18
Honey Bee Alarm Signal Could Protect Elephants
Chemicals designed to simulate honeybee alarm pheromones could deter elephants from farmers’ crops, easing conflicts with humans. Annie Sneed reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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New on MIT Technology Review
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Climate change could drive tens of thousands of additional suicides in North America
Stanford and Berkeley scientists found that suicides, as well as depressive language on Twitter, rise as temperatures do.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
9
Surprising similarity between stripy black holes and high-temperature superconductors
Scientists don't understand how some materials become superconducting at relatively high temperatures. Leiden physicists have now found a surprising connection with auxiliary black holes. It enables researchers to apply knowledge of black holes to the mystery of high-temperature superconductivity. The new study is published in Nature Physics.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
300+
Ytterbium: The quantum memory of tomorrow
Quantum communication and cryptography are the future of high-security communication. But many challenges lie ahead before a worldwide quantum network can be set up, including propagating the quantum signal over long distances. One of the major challenges is to create memories with the capacity to store quantum information carried by light. Researchers at the University of Geneva (UNIGE), Switzerl
5h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
Microclimates may provide wildlife with respite from warming temperatures
Sheltered pockets of cooler and more variable conditions in the British countryside may help native species of flora and fauna survive warming temperatures caused by climate change, researchers have found.
5h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
100+
The Milky Way's long-lost sibling finally foundMilky Way Andromeda
Scientists at the University of Michigan have deduced that the Andromeda galaxy, our closest large galactic neighbor, shredded and cannibalized a massive galaxy two billion years ago.
5h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
500+
Nanocrystals emit light by efficiently 'tunneling' electrons
Using advanced fabrication techniques, engineers at the University of California San Diego have built a nanosized device out of silver crystals that can generate light by efficiently "tunneling" electrons through a tiny barrier. The work brings plasmonics research a step closer to realizing ultra-compact light sources for high-speed, optical data processing and other on-chip applications.
5h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
Should you share data of threatened species?
Scientists publishing locations of rare species have been blamed for helping poachers drive them to extinction, such as the local extinction of the Chinese cave gecko.
5h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
Acidic oceans cause fish to lose their sense of smell
When carbon dioxide is absorbed by seawater carbonic acid is formed, making the water more acidic. Since the Industrial Revolution, oceanic CO2 has risen by 43% and is predicted to be two and a half times current levels by the end of this century.
5h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
5
Scientists generate key life event in artificial mouse 'embryo' created from stem cells
The creation of artificial embryos has moved a step forward after an international team of researchers used mouse stem cells to produce artificial embryo-like structures capable of 'gastrulation', a key step in the life of any embryo.
5h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
77
Researchers discover the 'optimism' of E. coli bacteria
A team of researchers from across the Princeton University campus collaborated to determine how E. coli bacteria respond when they are deprived of three key nutrients: carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus.
5h
The Atlantic
90
An Enormous Study of the Genes Related to Staying in School
When scientists publish their research, it’s rare for them to write an accompanying FAQ that explains what they found and what it means. It’s especially rare for that FAQ to be three times longer than the research paper itself . But Daniel Benjamin and his colleagues felt the need to do so, because they work on a topic that is frequently and easily misunderstood: the genetics of education. Over t
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The Atlantic
100+
Can Richard Carranza Integrate the Most Segregated School System in the Country?
I t was just a hair past 7 o’clock in the evening at Frederick Douglass Academy in Harlem, and Richard Carranza was a little late to the party. The cafeteria was bulging with parents, translators, and a handful of staff. The recently minted chancellor of the New York City public-school system had planned to arrive at 6 to talk to a handful of community activists in advance of a town-hall-style me
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Ingeniøren
2
Danske brandfolk i Sverige: »Ser vi væk, blusser en ny brand op«
I ‘danskerområdet’ arbejder Martin Vendelbo og hans folk for at holde tilstrækkeligt tryk på vandslangerne og kommunikere med radioer, der ikke duer på det svenske net.
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)
99
Why doctors are offering free tax prep in their waiting rooms | Lucy Marcil
More than 90 percent of children in the US see a doctor at least once a year, which means countless hours spent in waiting rooms for parents. What if those hours could be used for something productive — like saving money? Through her organization StreetCred, pediatrician and TED Fellow Lucy Marcil is offering free tax prep to parents right in the waiting room, reimagining what a doctor's visit ca
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
Tesla stock skids on report it asked suppliers for refunds
Shares of Tesla are down sharply after a report that the company asked suppliers for refunds to help it turn a profit.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
6
Alarming error common in survey analyses
It is difficult to understate the importance of survey data: They tell us who we are and—in the hands of policymakers—what to do.
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Futurity.org
5
Without ADHD, ‘study drugs’ may only make you feel smarter
ADHD drugs don’t improve cognition of college students who don’t have the condition, a small pilot study suggests. Not only that, but taking them could actually impair functioning, say researchers, who anticipated a different result. “We hypothesized that Adderall would enhance cognition in the healthy students, but instead, the medication did not improve reading comprehension or fluency, and it
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Science : NPR
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Pizza Physics: Why Brick Ovens Bake The Perfect Italian-Style Pie
Brick transfers heat to dough more slowly than steel, allowing both crust and toppings to simultaneously reach perfection. In a home oven, that balance is elusive — but you might be able to get close. (Image credit: Aldo Pavan/Getty Images)
5h
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
12
Changing the Image of Sharks | 30 Years of Shark Week
Learn how Shark Week has helped change the negative perception of sharks from man-eating monsters to an intelligent, awe-inspiring creature. Stream Fin Frenzy on Discovery GO: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/fin-frenzy/ Stream Shark Week Episodes: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/shark-week/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.co
5h
The Atlantic
300+
Remembering the Inimitable Jonathan Gold
Every so often, I would send the food critic Jonathan Gold a fan note when one of his pieces seemed even better written than usual. He would always reply with something gracious like “Too kind, as always,” or with a reciprocal compliment for a piece of mine he’d happened to see. What I never said and always meant was, “Reading your latest piece made me think, as I always do the minute I start any
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
3
Alarming error common in survey analyses
But possibly worst of all, these problems were just as prevalent in the peer-reviewed literature in their sample as they were in technical reports and conference presentations.
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Study shows how the brain controls food cravings
A newly published study from the University of Waterloo shows that when activity in a specific part of the brain is suppressed, our desire for high-calorie foods increases.
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Rise in vehicle ramming attacks a 'social virus' spread through media networks
The rise in vehicle ramming attacks (VRAs) is as much the product of a virus-like spread of the act due to mass media coverage and online networks inspiring others to do likewise, as it is the rise of terrorist propaganda or a response to heightened security at high-profile targets.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
11
How cannabis and cannabis-based drugs harm your brain
Long-term use of either cannabis or cannabis-based drugs impairs memory say researchers.The study has implications for both recreational users and people who use the drug to combat epilepsy, multiple sclerosis and chronic pain.They found that mice exposed to the drug long-term had 'significant … memory impairments' and could not even discriminate between a familiar and novel object.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Enzyme lays the foundations for allergic immune response
While in search of the causes of allergies and asthma, a chance discovery has yielded new clues: researchers led by Dr Marcus Peters have ascertained that the enzyme guanylate cyclase in cells lays the foundations for the type of immune response. Allergic symptoms are more or less pronounced depending on which immune response gains the upper hand. 'This is particularly interesting as there are act
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
3
Novel intervention for anxiety symptoms among people with Bipolar Disorder
Psychologists at Lancaster University have devised a novel psychological intervention to address Anxiety in Bipolar Disorder (AIBD).Anxiety is common in Bipolar Disorder (BD) and associated with worse clinical outcomes including increased suicidality. Despite effective psychological treatments for anxiety, research into treating anxiety in BD is underdeveloped.
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
5
Virtual reality may help students experience life with dementia first hand
Virtual reality technology gives high school students greater insight into what it's like to be Alfred — a 74-year-old African American man with suspected mild cognitive impairment (MCI), plus age-related vision and hearing loss, or Beatriz, a middle-aged Latina, as she progresses through the continuum of Alzheimer's disease.
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Futurity.org
7
5 high-tech solutions to challenges with wine
New research shows how artificial intelligence and machine learning could change winemaking—an industry with an old-school image that faces modern challenges. Here, plant physiologist and agronomist Sigfredo Fuentes of the University of Melbourne shares five ways cutting-edge technology can help keep our wine racks stocked. 1. Offer check-ups via drone Drones are at the heart of many agricultural
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
6
Drought forces emergency measures for US West's wild horses
Harsh drought conditions in parts of the American West are pushing wild horses to the brink and spurring extreme measures to protect them.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
66
Solar model used to predict exoplanet's ability to withstand stellar wind
A team with members from institutions across the U.S. has used an existing solar model to predict the ability of exoplanets to withstand localized stellar wind. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes their approach and how they think it might help with the search for life in places beyond Earth.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
6
Sweden faces 'extreme' fire risk in coming days
Sweden is facing an "extreme" risk of more wildfires in coming days because of hot and dry weather, authorities warned Monday, as dozens of fires raged across the Scandinavian country.
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
An overview of healthcare monitoring by flexible electronics
Flexible electronics integrated with stretchable/bendable structures and various microsensors that monitor the temperature, pressure, sweat, bioelectricity, body hydration, etc., have a wide range of applications in the human healthcare sector. Now researchers in Chinese Academy of Sciences and Dalian University of Technology have reviewed the designs, materials, structures and functions of numero
6h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Children of mothers with type 1 diabetes have a higher body mass index
Children of mothers with type 1 diabetes are at significantly higher risk of being overweight and of exhibiting insulin resistance. This was published by scientists from Helmholtz Zentrum München and the Technical University of Munich in the journal 'Diabetologia'.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
A new model to estimate lifetime risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease
Considering the enormous public health burden imposed by atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD), accurate and early estimation of individuals' lifetime risk is an important step for ASCVD prevention. The China-PAR project (Prediction for ASCVD Risk in China) developed and validated sex-specific lifetime risk prediction equations for ASCVD, which have good internal consistency and external
6h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
3
Detecting damage in non-magnetic steel with the help of magnetism
Magnetic test methods are used to detect damages to materials, which was previously impossible with non-magnetic steel. Researchers from Kaiserslautern and Mainz have now developed a process in which they apply a thin magnetic layer to steel. Changes in the microstructure can thus be detected by changes in magnetic effects. Materials such as aluminum can also be tested in this way. The correspondi
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
73
Deep learning cracks the code of messenger RNAs and protein-coding potential
Researchers at Oregon State University have used deep learning to decipher which ribonucleic acids have the potential to encode proteins.
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Science | The Guardian
100+
Our Elgin marbles': Stephenson's Rocket returns to north
The Victorian railway icon will go on long-term display in York, reveals culture secretary Stephenson’s Rocket, the world-changing locomotive, which was built in Newcastle but has been in London for more than 150 years, is to go on long-term display in York. The news of its return to the north of England was announced on Monday by the culture secretary , Jeremy Wright, as he attended Theresa May’
6h
Futurity.org
4
Wearable patch measures stress hormone in sweat
A new stretchy patch applied directly to the skin wicks up sweat to measure the stress hormone cortisol. Cortisol rises and falls naturally throughout the day and can spike in response to stress, but current methods for measuring it require waiting several days for results from a lab. By the time a person learns the results—which may pinpoint the best treatment for certain medical conditions—it’s
6h
The Atlantic
500+
Is Trump Going to War With Iran?
In a tweet late Sunday, President Donald Trump warned Iran of “consequences the likes of which few throughout history have suffered before,” seemingly raising the odds of military conflict with one of the most powerful armed forces in the Middle East. He was responding to Iranian President Hassan Rouhani’s remarks to Iranian diplomats that “America should know that peace with Iran is the mother o
6h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Birth study empowers pregnant women
New QUT research has shed light on why some women have 'normal' births and many don't, delivering vital information to help women make more informed maternity care decisions.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
A new 'periodic table' for nanomaterials
A new simulation could help scientists decide what molecules best interact with each other to build nanomaterials from scratch.
6h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Bigger eyes but reduced brain power in nocturnal fishes
How does living life in darkness influence the way nocturnal fishes see? A study by OIST scientists finds out.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Slowdown of North Atlantic circulation rocked the climate of ancient northern Europe
The scientists used intelligent computer algorithms based on machine learning when studying geological deposits from Sokli, Northern Finland. Fresh results were reported in Nature Communications recently.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Blindness gene discovered
Researchers from UNIGE have investigated a recessive genetic disorder that destroys the eyes from developing and results in childhood blindness. After analysing the genomes of each member of a consanguineous family with affected children, the geneticists pinpointed pathogenic mutations in a new gene, MARK3, as being the cause. They subsequently confirmed their findings by modifying the homologous
6h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
6
Artificial intelligence saves water for water users associations
A research group at the University of Cordoba has developed a model based on artificial intelligence techniques that can predict how much water each water user will use.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Exercise cuts risk of chronic disease in older adults
People who engaged in the highest levels of total physical activity were twice as lively to avoid stroke, heart disease, angina, cancer and diabetes, and be in optimal physical and mental shape 10 years later, experts found.
6h
Popular Science
53
How to ditch your iPhone for Android—and take your files with you
DIY From Apple to Google. Switching from iPhone to Android involves moving all your data to a new system full of new, non-compatible apps. That's why you need our step-by-step guide.
6h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
7
In Mozambique, a joint fight against climate change and forest loss
From a distance, the Gile National Reserve in northern Mozambique is a vast, dense ocean of green that reaches as far as the horizon.
6h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
People—and politics—threaten Kano's ancient walls
Young boys scramble up the remains of a crumbling section of the ancient city wall in the Kofar Na'isa area of Kano, in northern Nigeria.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Red Sea flushes faster from far flung volcanoes
Volcanic eruptions in Mexico and the Philippines can lead to atmospheric changes that favor the ventilation of deep water in the Red Sea.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
3
Are star players over-rated in MLB? A key statistic doesn't stand up to scrutiny
Assessing play quality In baseball is complicated. "Wins above replacement player" (WARP) aggregate a player's total contribution to their team–offense and defense and primary position–into one easily understood statistics. But does it actually measure–or even roughly estimate–player value? Ph.D. student Austin Brown investigated the 2014-2017 MLB seasons and didn't find that WARP was related
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Why did home runs surge in baseball? Statistics provides twist on hot topic
Around the middle of the 2015 season, something odd started happening in Major League Baseball (MLB): Home runs surged. They surged again in 2016 and then again in 2017. Statistician Jason Wilson provides this explanation. The quality of pitching between 2015 and 2017 had gotten worse if one breaks a pitch down into measurable components and then measured pitching quality over time. Wilson called
6h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
4
Deep learning cracks the code of messenger RNAs and protein-coding potential
Researchers at have used deep learning to decipher which ribonucleic acids have the potential to encode proteins.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Crocodile in Paradise: Thailand hunts reptile in resort town
Thailand is in hot pursuit of a cagey crocodile that has made unwelcome appearances off the beaches of resort island Phuket only to slip through the clutches of local authorities.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
French IT services group Atos to buy Syntel of US
French IT services group Atos said Sunday it has agreed to buy US information technology group Syntel in a move to significantly expand its presence in North America.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
10
BHP vows to fight Australia Samarco mine disaster class action
BHP Monday vowed to fight an Australian class action alleging the mining giant breached its disclosure obligations and engaged in misleading and deceptive conduct over the deadly Samarco dam failure in Brazil.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
10
French soldiers arrive in Sweden to fight wildfires
Dozens of French soldiers specialised in firefighting arrived in Sweden early Monday to tackle blazes raging across the country during an extreme heatwave.
6h
Ingeniøren
Efter kritisk rapport: Alle statslige myndigheder skal kortlægge deres it
Digitaliseringsstyrelsen kræver, at samtlige statsinstitutioner gennemgår deres it, efter at en rapport for nylig afslørede flere end 100 sårbare systemer.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
66
Cell Studio: Serious games for immunology
Researchers at the Tel Aviv University, Israel, Dortmund University, Germany, and Arizona State University, U.S., have collaborated to engineer an interactive 3-D simulation in silico that can mimic in vitro, or in vivo experiments as seen under the microscope using interactive game engines. The novel platform, known as Cell Studio, can simulate an organic microenvironment with biological and biop
6h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Pregnancy and reproductive history may impact dementia risk
Research reported at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference (AAIC) 2018 in Chicago highlighted sex differences associated with dementia and Alzheimer's disease across the life course, including the first ever large-scale study of reproductive history and dementia risk in women.
7h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
The great NFL practice conundrum: How much should you train to avoid injury?
Researchers from Emory's Rollins School of Public Health studied whether there were any sudden changes in injuries after the NSF implemented practice restrictions in 2011, while adjusting for the fact that more attention has been paid to NFL injuries over time, which means the number of reported injuries had been going up even before the new CBA. In a nutshell, we they didn't seem to go up or down
7h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
The short, tumultuous working life of a major league baseball pitcher
There are pitchers in Major League Baseball (MLB) who have had 30-year careers, but as UC Riverside demographer David Swanson points out, these are extreme outliers and often the stars of the game who receive most of the media's attention. The reality for most pitchers in baseball is that their professional working lives are surprisingly short–3.99 years on average–according to a new method of c
7h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Statistics informs market: Sales stability spurs long-run success, not just sales
Acquiring customers is a fundamental goal of any start-up company, but those raw numbers can be a misleading metric for assessing the value of that company. "It's the stability of sales–the repeatability of sales from existing customers–that has significant implications for the long-run ability of a company to survive," says Daniel McCarthy, a statistician at Emory University of his ongoing rese
7h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
3
Saliva test could improve diabetes control and treatment
A simple saliva sample could replace blood tests to assess and monitor diabetes, finds a new study. The most comprehensive analysis of proteins in saliva to date finds that these proteins reflect high blood sugar and associated disease processes in children and adolescents with uncontrolled type 1 diabetes, long before the appearance of clinical symptoms. This could lead to better prediction and p
7h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Gault site research pushes back date of earliest North Americans
Archaeological evidence has increasingly called into question the idea of 'Clovis First.' Now, a study published by a team including DRI's Kathleen Rodrigues, Ph.D. student, and Amanda Keen-Zebert, Ph.D., associate research professor, has dated a significant assemblage of stone artifacts to 16-20,000 years of age, pushing back the timeline of the first human inhabitants of North America before Clo
7h
Live Science
300+
Radioactive Traces from the Fukushima Nuclear Disaster Found in California Wine
Wine with a twist of radioactive isotope?
7h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Guns and roses: Afghan farmers enjoy sweet smell of success
Standing in a field of roses in eastern Afghanistan, former poppy grower Mohammad Din Sapai quickly but carefully plucks the delicate petals that will be turned into rose water and oils for sale around the world.
7h
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
2
Who's Your Shark Week Hero? | Shark Week's The Daily Bite
On this episode of The Daily Bite, comedian Tim Mahoney bounces around New York City to figure out who the people's hero is for Shark Week 30. Stream The Daily Bite on Discovery GO: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/the-daily-bite/ Stream Shark Week Episodes: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/shark-week/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.f
7h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
11
Material formed from crab shells and trees could replace flexible plastic packaging
From liquid laundry detergent packaged in cardboard to compostable plastic cups, consumer products these days are increasingly touting their sustainable and renewable origins.
7h
Science : NPR
500+
Hormone Levels Likely Influence A Woman's Risk Of Alzheimer's, But How?
Scientists are taking a second look at the idea that hormone replacement therapy could reduce a woman's risk of dementia. New research suggests the key may be in giving it at the right time. (Image credit: Ronnie Kaufman/Blend Images/Getty Images)
7h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Vessel tracking exposes the dark side of trading at sea
First ever large-scale analysis of fishing vessel interactions exposes the potential extent of the unmanaged exchange of goods at sea, raising global concerns over illegal fishing and human rights abuses. The study, published in Frontiers in Marine Science, brings transparency to trading at sea. It provides the first ever public view of the extent to which these exchanges could be occurring and ex
7h
Feed: All Latest
100+
The Physics of Drafting in the Tour de France
Drafting decreases the overall power needed to ride at a constant speed *or* allows a rider to go slightly faster with the same power.
7h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
When political ideology shapes luxury buying
Political allegiance plays a critical role in the decision to buy luxury goods. New empirical research by David Dubois, associate professor of marketing at INSEAD, Jeehye Christine Kim of Hong Kong UST Business School and Brian Park of J. Mack Robinson College of Business at Georgia State University, shows that conservative shoppers are much more likely than their liberal counterparts to purchase
7h
Futurity.org
3
The crust on Mars seems to be crystallized magma
Mars, strewn with rocks and pocked by craters, may not have an Earth-like continental crust, according to a new study. Instead, researchers pose an alternative theory: Crystallized magma welled up from inside the red planet. Three years ago, scientists published work based on data returned by the NASA rover Curiosity that drilled into the Martian surface near Gale Crater. The rover found “granite
7h
The Atlantic
200+
Sharp Objects’ Music Contains a Chilling Message
This post contains spoilers for the first three episodes of Sharp Objects . Three episodes in, it’s still not clear what HBO’s Sharp Objects is about, exactly. A string of murders in a small Missouri town? The secrets of Camille Preaker (Amy Adams), a journalist addicted to booze, self-harm, and flashbacks? The ominousness of swivel fans? The creator/writer Marti Noxon’s elliptical storytelling a
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Futurity.org
17
Young brain’s reactions to food rewards may predict overeating
The way some people’s brains respond to food rewards may explain why they have a hard time not finishing the whole bag of chips or bowl of candy, new research shows. “Until we know the root cause of overeating and other food-related behaviors, it’s hard to give good advice on fixing those behaviors…” In a study with children, researchers found that when certain regions of the brain reacted more s
7h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
5
What is behind belief in weeping Virgin Mary statues
In a Catholic parish in Hobbs, New Mexico, a statue of the Virgin Mary has been "weeping."
7h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
50
Uncovering the interplay between two famous quantum effects
The Casimir force and superconductivity are two well-known quantum effects. These phenomena have been thoroughly studied separately, but what happens when these effects are combined in a single experiment? Now, Delft University of Technology have created a microchip on which two wires were placed in close proximity in order to measure the Casimir forces that act upon them when they become supercon
7h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Single-molecule magnetic tweezers reveal dual function of FACT in gene regulation
In eukaryotic cells, linear genetic DNA wraps around histones to form stable nucleosomes that further assemble to form chromatins. Nucleosomes represent big barriers to the transcription machine RNA polymerase.
7h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Bigger eyes but reduced brain power in nocturnal fishes
Coral reefs buzz with activity around the clock. As the day-active fishes retreat at dusk, the night-active or nocturnal fishes venture out to forage and hunt. Equipped with special traits, these fishes are adapted to lead a life in darkness. So how do the dark surroundings influence the way they see?
7h
Ingeniøren
32
Spørg Scientariet: Hvorfor sætter man ikke solceller på vindmøllerne?
En læser vil gerne vide, om man ikke kunne få endnu mere energi ud af vindmøller ved at beklæde tårnet med solceller. Det svarer European Energy på.
7h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
17
Interstellar Technologies continues work on its own rocket despite MOMO-2 launch failure
Japanese startup Interstellar Technologies Inc. (IST) continues the development of its launch vehicle amid the recent failure of the MOMO-2 rocket that exploded shortly after liftoff.
8h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Detecting damages in non-magnetic steel through magnetism
Wear, corrosion, material fatigue—these signs of degradation are common to most materials. This makes it all the more important to detect damage early, preferably on the micro-scale. Magnetic test methods are often used for this purpose, which was previously impossible with non-magnetic steel. Researchers from Kaiserslautern and Mainz have now developed a process in which they apply a thin magneti
8h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
3
Material formed from crab shells and trees could replace flexible plastic packaging
Researchers at Georgia Institute of Technology have created a material derived from crab shells and tree fibers that has the potential to replace the flexible plastic packaging used to keep food fresh.
8h
Popular Science
400+
Here's what the U.S. Army's new gender neutral fitness test will look like?
Military All soldiers are expected to do the same basic tasks, so they should all have to pass the same test. As of October 2018, precisely 38 years to the day that the current APFT went into effect, all soldiers will perform exactly the same test. Why? Because it actually…
8h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
21
Geologist leads effort to update Earth's geologic time scale
It's official. More than 8,000 years ago, a vast amount of water from melting glaciers flooded North America and caused havoc with the currents and atmosphere of the North Atlantic.
8h
Futurity.org
2
New method prints thin, flexible metals like a newspaper
Researchers have developed a new manufacturing technique that uses a process similar to newspaper printing to form smoother and more flexible metals for making ultrafast electronic devices. The low-cost process combines tools that metal manufacturing already uses on a large scale, but uses the speed and precision of roll-to-roll newspaper printing to remove a couple of fabrication barriers in mak
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
19
Researchers report success with complex quantum states
Scientists from the Niels Bohr Institute at the University of Copenhagen have, for the first time, succeeded in producing, controlling and understanding complex quantum states based on two electron spins connected to a superconductor. The result has been published in Nature Communications, and has come about in a collaboration between the scientists of the Niels Bohr Institute, a scientist from ab
8h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
7
How old is my pet in dog years or cat years? A veterinarian explains
"Just how old do you think my dog is in dog years?" is a question I hear on a regular basis. People love to anthropomorphize pets, attributing human characteristics to them. And most of us want to extend our animal friends' healthy lives for as long as possible.
8h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
A numbers game—killing rabbits to conserve native mammals
Invasive species have a devastating effect on biodiversity. In Australia, introduced red foxes and feral cats have been implicated in the majority of the extinctions of the native mammal fauna, which has been decimated since European arrival.
8h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
20
New sources of melanin pigment shake up ideas about fossil animals' colour
A team of palaeontologists, led by University College Cork (UCC) and including the University of Bristol, have discovered new sources of the pigment melanin, calling for a rethink of how scientists reconstruct the colour of fossil birds, reptiles and dinosaurs.
8h
The Scientist RSS
3
Image of the Day: Hell-Bent on Repopulation
Researchers will be releasing captive-grown eastern hellbenders in southern Indiana to help raise their numbers.
8h
The Atlantic
17K
Donald Trump’s Reckless Iran Tweet
On Sunday, Iranian President Hassan Rouhani said in a televised speech to a domestic audience that the United States cannot prevent his country from exporting oil, adding that “peace with Iran would be the mother of all peace and war with Iran would be the mother of all wars.” Donald Trump could have responded like an unflappable world leader. Instead, he replied in the favorite style of easily b
8h
Ingeniøren
4
Nu kommer Norges første landbaserede lakseopdræt
Norske Nordic Aquafarms satser stort på laks på land.
8h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
100+
Current noises of Majorana fermions
Majorana fermions are particles that are their own antiparticles. In condensed matter physics, zero-energy Majorana fermions obey non-abelian statistics, and can be used in fault-tolerant topological quantum computation. They are thus the subject of extensive studies. However, as Majorana fermions carry no electric charge, detecting them experimentally is still a challenge. A current noise study n
8h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
7
America is in the middle of a battle over the meaning of words like 'diversity'
You might think that the culture war over race and immigration primarily transpires in dramatic events, like the woman who climbed the Statue of Liberty to protest Trump's child detention policy or the events in Charlottesville last summer.
8h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
Remembering antarctica's nuclear past with 'nukey poo'
We think of Antarctica as a place to protect. It's "pristine", "remote" and "untouched". (Although a recent discovery reveals it's less isolated from the world than previously thought.)
8h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
38
Archaeologists identify ancient North American mounds using new image analysis technique
Researchers have used a new image-based analysis technique to identify once-hidden North American mounds, which could reveal valuable information about pre-contact Native Americans.
8h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
15
Vessel tracking exposes the dark side of trading at sea
Transshipment — exchanging seafood, crew or supplies between boats at sea — is common in many fisheries, but it creates opportunity for illegal activity involving drugs and people. This first large-scale analysis of transshipment events exposes the potential extent of the unmanaged exchange of goods at sea. The study provides first ever public view of the extent to which these exchanges could be
8h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
24
New health calculator can help predict heart disease risk, estimate heart age
A new online health calculator can help people determine their risk of heart disease, as well as their heart age, accounting for sociodemographic factors such as ethnicity, sense of belonging and education, as well as health status and lifestyle behaviors.
8h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
24
Build an ark? Biologists discuss conservation prioritization
Conservation biologists recognize a sobering reality. "We're losing species left, right and center," says a biologist. "We call it the 'Noah's Ark Problem,' and we have to pick species to save. We can't save them all."
8h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
16
Enabling technology in cell-based therapies: Scale-up, scale-out or program in-place
Technologies are reducing costs and changing the ways in which researchers and clinicians process and use therapeutic cells.
8h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
30
Curing breast cancer but at what cost? Patients report heavy financial toll
A new study finds many breast cancer patients are concerned about the financial impact of their diagnosis and treatment, and that they feel their doctor's offices are not helping with these concerns.
8h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
E-commerce clicks can connect consumers to their causes
The European marketplace is increasingly geared to e-commerce, with turnover up 15 percent to EUR 530 billion in 2016. Yet, current architecture remains basic and misses opportunities, such as fundraising for social causes; a situation WIDGET 3.0 set out to rectify.
8h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
9
Big Brother facial recognition needs ethical regulations
My mother always said I had a face for radio. Thank God, as radio may be the last place in this technology-enhanced world where your face won't determine your social status or potential to commit a crime.
8h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
More sensitive modelling for better economic forecasting
How can policymakers avoid being wrong-footed by 'black swan' events such as the global financial crisis, when their modelling proves limited and rigid? One project employs sophisticated algorithms that uses localised data for better forecasting.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
5
Social gaming for better energy efficiency in public buildings
Tackling the energy inefficiency of public buildings, TRIBE developed a mobile game to educate and change behaviour. Its simulation draws on real data to demonstrate the human aspects of building use, such as ingrained attitudes and the pursuit of comfort.
8h
NYT > Science
21
Q&A: The Flush Is Just the Beginning
What happens after they clean out your septic tank? Well, it’s complicated.
8h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
100+
Ocean acidification to hit levels not seen in 14 million years
New research led by Cardiff University has shown that under a 'business-as-usual' scenario of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, ocean acidification is likely to hit unprecedented levels.
8h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
9
Red Sea flushes faster from far flung volcanoes
Deep water in the Red Sea gets replenished much faster than previously thought and its circulation is directly affected by major climatic events, including volcanic eruptions, KAUST researchers have found.
8h
Live Science
300+
Will Parker Solar Probe Really 'Touch the Sun'?
The Parker Solar Probe's mission is to "touch the sun." What does that really mean though since the sun is a sizzling ball of gas?
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
NASA's Aqua satellite captures burn scars from Substation Fire
The Substation Fire started on private land southeast of The Dalles, Oregon on Tuesday, July 17, 2018 and grew quickly moving more than 18 miles in the first period of burning. Weather has played a major factor in the swift growth of the fire with gusy winds and uphill fire runs allowing the blaze to reach 70,421 acres. Crews did do a huge amount of work on Thursday with containment and that has n
9h
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
38
Shaq's First-Ever Shark Encounter | Shaq Does Shark Week
Shaq dives in for his first-ever shark encounter with Rob Riggle Stream "Shaq Does Shark Week" on Discovery GO: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/shark-week/full-episodes/shaq-does-shark-week Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery https://www.facebook.com/SharkWeek Follow on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Discovery https://t
9h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
5
How to cheat at dice – from an expert in games
Archaeologists recently uncovered a 600-year-old die that was probably used for cheating. The wooden die from medieval Norway has two fives, two fours, a three and a six, while the numbers one and two are missing. It is believed that the die was used to cheat in games, rather than being for a game that requires that specific configuration of numbers.
9h
Feed: All Latest
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Users Sue Juul for Addicting Them to Nicotine
Juul Labs, the nation's most popular e-cigarette, is also under scrutiny from parents, health advocates, and regulators.
9h
Feed: All Latest
200+
This Bomb-Simulating US Supercomputer Broke a World Record
A trillion-particle simulation? No sweat for the Trinity supercomputer at Los Alamos National Lab.
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Feed: All Latest
82
The Secret Internet War Over Bots
Companies deploy scraper bots to snoop on rivals' websites. The targets try to sniff out and block the bots, setting off an escalating arms race.
9h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Research reveals 'crucial' importance of gender balance in bank boards
Women in senior leadership roles in the financial services sector behave in a way that may have made the global banking crisis less likely to happen, according to a University research study.
9h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
11
Build an ark? Biologists discuss conservation prioritization
Conservation biologists recognize a sobering reality.
9h
Latest Headlines | Science News
79
The giant iceberg that broke from Antarctica’s Larsen C ice shelf is stuck
A year ago, an iceberg calved off of the Larsen C ice shelf. The hunk of ice hasn’t moved much since, and that has scientists keeping an eye on it.
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The Atlantic
90
Dear Therapist: My Adult Son Walked Out on Me on Mother’s Day
Editor’s Note: Editor's Note: Every Monday, Lori Gottlieb answers questions from readers about their problems, big and small. Have a question? Email her at dear.therapist@theatlantic.com . Dear Therapist, My 30-year-old son and I had a fight on Mother’s Day, and he walked out and went home. We screamed at each other and both said things that were extremely ugly and hurtful. However, I cannot get
9h
The Atlantic
500+
Moms Running for Office Are Finally Advertising Their Motherhood
In March, the Maryland gubernatorial candidate Krish Vignarajah made her case to voters in a striking 30-second ad featuring a shot of her breastfeeding her infant daughter intercut with photos showing her family and various moments from her political career. She ended the video with a simple appeal: “I’m a mom. I’m a woman. And I want to be your next governor.” With a historic number of women ru
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The Atlantic
200+
Artificial Intelligence Shows Why Atheism Is Unpopular
Imagine you’re the president of a European country. You’re slated to take in 50,000 refugees from the Middle East this year. Most of them are very religious, while most of your population is very secular. You want to integrate the newcomers seamlessly, minimizing the risk of economic malaise or violence, but you have limited resources. One of your advisers tells you to invest in the refugees’ edu
9h
New on MIT Technology Review
200+
One woman’s race to defuse the genetic time bomb in her genes
How DNA sequencing and new genetic drugs raise the chance we can cure any inherited disease.
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Scientific American Content: Global
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Where Do Ideas Come from?
They’re nurtured by informal dialogues in environments where mistakes are tolerated and critical thinking is encouraged — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
15
Seeing Titan with infrared eyes
These six infrared images of Saturn's moon Titan represent some of the clearest, most seamless-looking global views of the icy moon's surface produced so far. The views were created using 13 years of data acquired by the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) instrument on board NASA's Cassini spacecraft. The images are the result of a focused effort to smoothly combine data from the mult
9h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
45
Study supports Maine's current management practices for ruffed grouse hunting
Maintaining current hunting regulations for ruffed grouse will help ensure sustainable population management in the state, according to a new University of Maine study.
9h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
100+
Scientists probe 'magical' royal jelly for clues to control cancer
Royal jelly, or milky-white "bee milk," has long been known for its mysterious growth effects on future queen honey bees, while also hailed by some as an anti-aging, cholesterol-lowering super supplement. But how this "queen magic" actually happens, and its potential benefit to humans, has remained a mystery to scientists.
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Scientific American Content: Global
200+
Did a Stellar Intruder Deform Our Outer Solar System?
New results suggest a massive star once swung dangerously close to our sun—helping to shape the mysterious features we see today — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
Do soldiers care about the environment? A study in South Africa suggests they do
Kermit the frog declared that it is difficult to be green. Obviously, he was referring to the colour, rather than to the condition of being environmentally conscious. But for soldiers it is also not always easy to be pro-environmental.
9h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Researchers pinpoint best locations for cameras
Like in real estate, the most important factors in preventing crime with video cameras are location, location, location, new UT Dallas research has found.
9h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
14
Lighting the way to harvest water from air
A low-cost method for collecting water from the atmosphere could be used to provide potable water to dry, inland regions.
9h
Ingeniøren
Techtopia #62 – sommerMIX: Hvad skal vi med kryptovaluta og blockchain?
Skal Techtopia have sin egen kryptovaluta? En kryptopia. Det undersøgte vi i løbet af vinteren, og de interviews er samlet i dette sommermix.
9h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
Widespread groundwater contamination risk from chromium
When Erin Brockovich sued a major utility company in the 1990s for contaminating drinking water with hexavalent chromium, a toxic and carcinogenic metal, national attention turned to California. Now researchers have determined that natural sources of the element may be geographically more important when it comes to the state's groundwater management.
10h
NYT > Science
400+
Basics: In Mozambique, a Living Laboratory for Nature’s Renewal
At Gorongosa National Park, scarred by civil war, scientists are answering fundamental questions about ecology and evolution, and how wildlife recovers from devastation.
10h
NYT > Science
66
Children’s Books: Facts About the Natural World Astound and Delight in These Picture Books
Dancing bees, ruthless hawks, sensitive whales and an eternal forest in picture books by Evan Turk, Isabelle Arsenault, Brian Floca and more.
10h
NYT > Science
300+
The New Health Care: What if a Study Showed Opioids Weren’t Usually Needed?
‘Pragmatic trials’ differ from most research studies by focusing on effects in the real world.
10h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
Quality control in science
The marketing of research results has become a significant economic factor. Worldwide, the annual turnover of scientific articles alone amounts to 8 billion euros. Unfortunately, this environment also attracts market players who are not committed to scientific integrity, and whose practices are primarily aimed at maximizing profits. Internal figures have shown, however, that predatory publishing d
10h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
58
Researchers study the opaque accretion disk of Beta Lyrae A
An international team of astronomers has conducted a study of the opaque accretion disk of the multiple star system known as Beta Lyrae A (β Lyr A for short). The research reveals important insights into nature of this disk and also discloses some parameters of the system. The study was presented in a paper published July 12 on arXiv.org.
10h
The Atlantic
76
After the Police Brutality Video Goes Viral
McKINNEY, Texas—When I approached a small house in the Craig Ranch neighborhood here on a steamy day in early June, an angry, white man stormed out. He only grew more irate throughout our conversation. Three years ago, he was getting death threats, he said: messages saying his daughter would be raped or his son hanged. Texas Rangers were opening suspicious packages on his lawn. Friends of his sai
10h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
13
How disc galaxies work
Disc galaxies like our own Milky Way, characterized by a flattened disc of stars and gas (often with a central bulge of material as well) have a wide range of masses, spatial extents, and stellar content. Nonetheless all disc galaxies, both locally and in the distant Universe, share some strikingly similar properties. Most notable is that the star formation rate correlates tightly with the galaxy'
10h
cognitive science
1
China developing robotic subs to launch new era of sea power
submitted by /u/trot-trot [link] [comments]
10h
Ingeniøren
11
Hamborg tester førerløse S-tog i 2021
Ligesom i København håber Hamborg på længere sigt på at gøre hele S-togsnettet førerløst. Siemens og Deutsche Bahn udvikler systemet, som skal køre de indledende meter om tre år.
10h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
10
Build an ark? Biologists discuss conservation prioritization
Supported by Leipzig, Germany-based sDIV, Will Pearse, Utah State University; Florent Mazel, Arne Mooers and Caroline Tucker, Simon Fraser University and the University of British Columbia; Marc Cadotte , University of Toronto; Sandra Diaz, National University of Cordoba, Argentina; Giulio Valentino Dalla Riva, University of British Columbia; Richard Grenyer, University of Oxford; Fabien Leprieur,
11h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
8
Vessel tracking exposes the dark side of trading at sea
Transshipment — exchanging seafood, crew or supplies between boats at sea — is common in many fisheries, but it creates opportunity for illegal activity involving drugs and people. This first large-scale analysis of transshipment events exposes the potential extent of the unmanaged exchange of goods at sea. The study provides first ever public view of the extent to which these exchanges could be
11h
Inside Science
5
Mapping Fishing Vessel Traffic
Mapping Fishing Vessel Traffic Analysis of vessel interactions reveals large potential for illegal activities, researchers say. Coast_guard_1.jpg Image credits: US Navy Rights information: Public Domain Culture Monday, July 23, 2018 – 05:00 Tracy Staedter, Contributor (Inside Science) — Out in the middle of the Atlantic, the scene unfolds like this: A fishing boat rendezvouses with a huge refrig
11h
Science : NPR
1K
Spring Is Springing Sooner, Throwing Nature's Rhythms Out Of Whack
A warming climate is knocking nature's rhythms out of sync. High in the Rocky Mountains, scientists have been tracking the impact for decades. (Image credit: Nathan Rott/NPR)
11h
Science : NPR
3K
Words Matter When Talking About Pain With Your Doctor
When you go to the doctor in pain, you'll probably be asked to rate your discomfort on a scale of 0 to 10. But doctors say there may be a better way to assess pain. (Image credit: Lynn Scurfield for NPR)
11h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
500+
Physicists demonstrate new method to make single photons
Scientists need individual photons for quantum cryptography and quantum computers. Leiden physicists have now experimentally demonstrated a new production method. Publication in Physical Review Letters on July 23rd.
11h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
13
Exhaled e-vapor particles evaporate in seconds — new study
Study shows exhaled e-vapour product particles are liquid droplets that evaporate within seconds with particle counts returning rapidly to background values, reinforcing evidence that vaping has minimal impact on indoor air quality
11h
Science-Based Medicine
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Alternative medicine kills cancer patients, “complementary” edition
By definition, alternative medicine has not been shown to be effective or has been shown to be ineffective. Thus, alternative medicine is ineffective against cancer and can best be represented as either no treatment at all or potentially harmful treatment. It is thus not surprising that cancer patients who choose alternative medicine have a higher risk of dying from their cancer. A followup study
13h
Ingeniøren
Nye tiltag skal mindske plastforurening fra kunstgræsbaner i Norge
Det norske miljødirektorat er kommet med et forslag til politikerne, der kan reducere udledningen af gummigranulat fra kunstgræsbaner med op til 98 pct.
13h
Science | The Guardian
59
Two quarks for Muster Higgs
Since the big discovery of 2012, the Large Hadron Collider at CERN has been accumulating data and making steady progress. Two recent results establish the origins of the mass of the two heaviest quarks Every atom has a nucleus at its centre, and the smallest constituents of that nucleus are quarks. Named by Murray Gell-Mann after James Joyce’s Finnegan’s Wake, nothing is smaller than a quark. In
13h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
53
Archaeologists identify ancient North American mounds using new image analysis technique
Researchers at Binghamton University, State University at New York have used a new image-based analysis technique to identify once-hidden North American mounds, which could reveal valuable information about pre-contact Native Americans.
14h
cognitive science
1
Self-Object Actualization: A Theoretical Integration
submitted by /u/provostg [link] [comments]
14h
BBC News – Science & Environment
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Recycled packaging 'may end up in landfill', warns watchdog
There is no guarantee that the products you recycle are actually recycled, the UK watchdog warns.
15h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
4
Enabling technology in cell-based therapies: Scale-up, scale-out or program in-place
Technologies that are reducing costs and changing the ways in which researchers and clinicians process and use therapeutic cells are showcased in the August 2018 special issue of SLAS Technology.
16h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
5
Greater efforts are needed to address 'financial toxicity' of cancer treatment
In addition to facing new concerns about their health, individuals who are diagnosed with cancer often worry about the financial burdens of treatment. A new study indicates that many patients feel that such 'financial toxicity' is not adequately addressed by their doctors and other clinicians. The findings are published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society
16h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
11
Curing breast cancer but at what cost? Patients report heavy financial toll
A new study led by researchers at the University of Michigan Rogel Cancer Center finds many breast cancer patients are concerned about the financial impact of their diagnosis and treatment, and that they feel their doctor's offices are not helping with these concerns.
16h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Mandate patient access to primary care medical records
Canada's provincial governments should mandate patient access to their electronic medical records, argue authors of a commentary in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).
16h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
5
New health calculator can help predict heart disease risk, estimate heart age
A new online health calculator can help people determine their risk of heart disease, as well as their heart age, accounting for sociodemographic factors such as ethnicity, sense of belonging and education, as well as health status and lifestyle behaviors. The process to build and validate the tool is published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).
16h
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
200+
LIVE with Ronda Rousey | Shark After Dark: Even Darker
Join our guests WWE wrestler Ronda Rousey, shark advocate Paul DeGelder and underwater cinematographer Joe Romerio for even more Shark After Dark! Stream Ronda Rousey Uncaged: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/shark-week/full-episodes/ronda-rousey-uncaged Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery https://www.facebook.com/Shar
16h
NYT > Science
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Chemicals in Food May Harm Children, Pediatricians’ Group Says
Eat more fruits and vegetables, don’t put plastic containers in the microwave or dishwasher and check recycling codes to reduce exposure to chemicals.
16h
Ingeniøren
Uklar fremtid for regionernes udviklingsprojekter på giftige testgrunde
Fri adgang til test af ny teknologi har gennem flere år hjulpet både Danske Regioner og virksomhederne. Fra nytår mister regionerne dog opgaven med vækstfremme, og det kan måske få en betydning.
16h
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
12
"Shaquille O'Seal" Meets a Sea Lion | Shaq Does Shark Week
To help prepare for his shark cage dive, Shaq meets one of the great white shark's favorite meals! Stream "Shaq Does Shark Week" on Discovery GO: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/shark-week/full-episodes/shaq-does-shark-week Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery https://www.facebook.com/SharkWeek Follow on Twitter: https
17h
Futurity.org
5
This ALS treatment extends survival in rats
An investigational therapy for an inherited form of ALS extends survival and reverses signs of neuromuscular damage in mice and rats, according to new research. About 20,000 people in the United States are living with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease. The invariably fatal disease kills the nerve cells that control walking, eating, and breathing. Few people s
20h
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
11
Bear Grylls' Top 3 Shark Survival Tips | Shark Week 2018
If anyone knows how to avoid becoming chum, it's survival expert Bear Grylls! Stream Shark Week Episodes: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/shark-week/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery https://www.facebook.com/SharkWeek Follow on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Discovery https://twitter.com/SharkWeek We're on Instagram!
20h
Futurity.org
7
Prostate tumor DNA reveals gene problems in common
Using genetic sequencing, scientists have revealed the complete DNA makeup of more than 100 aggressive prostate tumors. The research pinpoints important genetic errors these deadly tumors have in common. “…the new information could help doctors find ways to identify which patients may develop aggressive tumors…” “This study could aid the search for better therapies to treat aggressive prostate ca
21h
Big Think
2K
The 4-day work week works. So why aren't we using it?
A New Zealand study shows a 24% increase in productivity… by working less. Read More
21h
Futurity.org
10
Insurance and pregnancy are barriers to opioid treatment
In areas of the country where the opioid crisis has a disproportionate effect, treatment programs are less likely to accept patients paying through insurance of any type or accept pregnant women, a new study finds. Only 53% of outpatient buprenorphine programs would treat pregnant women. While the opioid crisis has escalated across the US, there has been growing concern that treatment capacity ha
21h
Futurity.org
4
Expert: Trump-Putin summit raises big questions
On Monday, July 16, President Donald Trump met with Russian President Vladimir Putin for a summit in Helsinki, Finland. This meeting came just days after a summit with NATO allies in Brussels and a visit to the UK for a meeting with British Prime Minister Theresa May. In this Q&A, international law expert Allen Weiner, a senior lecturer in law and director of the international and comparative law
21h
The Atlantic
27
What It Means for Kawhi Leonard to Join the Raptors
Last week, the San Antonio Spurs swapped their disgruntled forward Kawhi Leonard to the Toronto Raptors for DeMar DeRozan in a trade that involved a package of players and a protected first-round pick. It brought to an end the tenure of two franchise players on teams that have strived to establish an identity of stability through continuity. The Spurs have won five championships since 1999 and ha
21h
Futurity.org
32
Jellyfish have evolved eyes at least 8 times
Eyes originated at least eight separate times among the cnidnarians, a group that includes jellyfish. The findings help illuminate how evolution produces complex visual organs. “Eyes are one of the most complicated organs that scientists study,” explains coauthor Todd Oakley, a professor in the University of California, Santa Barbara’s department of ecology, evolution, and marine biology. “Other
21h
Science : NPR
1K
How Soon Is Soon Enough To Learn You Have Alzheimer's?
Only about half the people with Alzheimer's symptoms get a diagnosis, partly out of fear of an incurable decline, doctors suspect. But Jose Bolardo says facing the future allows him to plan for it. (Image credit: Alex Smith/KCUR)
23h
Science | The Guardian
400+
Starwatch: red marvel that is a lunar eclipse
Most of the world has a chance to see the moon change colour at the end of the week A total lunar eclipse will be visible over most of Europe, Asia, Australia and South America on 27 July. Only North America misses the show this time. During a total lunar eclipse, the moon passes through the Earth’s shadow. Once totally immersed, it turns to a deep red colour. This glorious sight occurs because o
23h
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
5
Bear vs. Shark! | Shark Week's The Daily Bite
Learn on today's episode how to make the perfect shark themed quesadillas with our friends at the Food Network. In this episode you'll also get a sneak preview of upcoming Shark Week episode Bear vs. Shark! Shark Week begins tonight 9p! Stream The Daily Bite on Discovery GO: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/the-daily-bite/ Stream Shark Week Episodes: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/shark-wee
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