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IU researchers develop model for predicting landslides caused by earthquakes

A model developed by researchers at Indiana University can help experts estimate the likelihood of landslides that will be caused by earthquakes anywhere in the world. The estimates can be available within minutes.

6h

New study suggests Shroud of Turin a fake, supporting study retracted

A pair of Italian researchers, one a forensic anthropologist, the other a chemist, has conducted tests to determine the authenticity of the Shroud of Turin and report that their analysis indicates that the shroud is a forgery. In their paper published in the Journal of Forensic Sciences, Matteo Borrini and Luigi Garlaschelli describe the tests they conducted and what they found. A separate paper p

9h

Ny forskning: Rådet om at svømme til siden giver langt fra størst chance for at overleve livsfarlige revlehuller

Ved hjælp af bøjer med GPS har forskere påvist, at det i de fleste tilfælde giver højest sadsynlighed for at overleve, hvis badegæster, der bliver fanget i strømmen fra et revlehul, lader sig drive med ud i stedet for at følge det officielle råd om at svømme langs stranden.

18h

LATEST

Studie af 74.567 samlejer slår fast: Hiv-positive i behandling kan ikke smitte

Nyt, banebrydende studie betyder, at vi én gang for alle kan ryste fortidsbillederne af hiv af os, jubler AIDS-Fondet.

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Blood test can predict optimal treatment for advanced prostate cancer, study finds

Scientists have demonstrated that a blood test can predict how patients with advanced prostate cancer will respond to specific treatments, leading to improved survival.

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Widespread connections among neurons help the brain distinguish smells

Organization — or lack of it — in brain's piriform cortex allows us to differentiate one smell from another.

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Omega-3s help keep kids out of trouble

Something as simple as a dietary supplement could reduce disruptive, even abusive behavior, according to newly released research.

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Intractable hiccups may be more common than we think

Everyone gets hiccups, but some people suffer intractable hiccups that last longer than a month. Intractable hiccups can occur more often than we realize and present to multiple medical disciplines, Loyola Medicine neurologists reported in the journal Current Neurology and Neuroscience Reports.

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How the Little Ice Age affected South American climate

For the first time, scientists reconstruct the rainfall distribution in Brazil during the climate changes that marked the Middle Ages using isotopic records from caves.

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The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Cash Crops

Written by Elaine Godfrey ( @elainejgodfrey ) and Olivia Paschal (@ oliviacpaschal ) Today in 5 Lines The Department of Agriculture announced $12 billion in emergency relief for farmers facing losses as a result of tariffs imposed by the Trump administration. More than 450 migrant parents may have been deported without their children after being separated at the U.S.-Mexico border, according to a

20min

R. Kelly's Empty Confessions, Meet Black Twitter's Wrath

"I Admit" is a brazen and sickening piece of pop art—and Black Twitter spared no time in calling out its hypocrisy.

23min

Endangered whale seen off Iceland, 3rd there in 30 years

A New England ocean science center says whale watchers off Iceland caught an extremely rare glimpse of an endangered right whale near their country.

50min

Young galaxy's halo offers clues to its growth and evolution

A team of astronomers has discovered a new way to unlock the mysteries of how the first galaxies formed and evolved.

50min

'Killer' wasps, giant spiders critters that won't kill you but look like they might

They are the stuff of nightmares—huge, creepy, crawling (and flying) bugs—and this is the time of year when you'll find them in large numbers.

50min

Certification standards, education critical for social workers in school safety efforts

Tragedies at schools have become far too common and schools, community leaders and parents all are focused on finding ways to ensure schools are safe. Aaron Thompson, associate professor of social work at the University of Missouri and a former school social worker and principal, says that school social workers play a key role in helping at-risk children. In a new study, he found that high-perform

50min

Twitter curbs access for 143,000 apps in new crackdown

Twitter said Tuesday it had removed more than 143,000 apps from the messaging service since April in a fresh crackdown on "malicious" activity from automated accounts.

56min

A Major Victory for the Impossible Burger, the Veggie ‘Meat’ That Bleeds

The highly engineered food with GM yeast finally makes its way through an FDA maze. Not everyone is jazzed, though.

59min

Young galaxy's halo offers clues to its growth and evolution

A team of astronomers has tested a new way of studying the properties of the gaseous halo surrounding a galaxy using W. M. Keck Observatory's new instrument, the Keck Cosmic Web Imager. The analysis is the first of its kind and could offer clues about galaxy formation and evolution.

1h

Certification standards, education critical for social workers in school safety efforts

Aaron Thompson, associate professor of social work at the University of Missouri and a former school social worker and principal, says that school social workers play a key role in helping at-risk children. In a new study, he found that high-performing school social workers were more likely to have graduate degrees and work in a state with certification standards. The findings provide guidance to

1h

Latest stevia research published in Journal of Nutrition

The Journal of Nutrition recently published a comprehensive review of the latest stevia science in its July 2018 issue. Authored by several eminent scientists including members of the PureCircle Stevia Institute (PCSI) advisory board, the article 'Stevia Leaf to Stevia Sweetener: Exploring Its Science, Benefits, and Future Potential' details the current state of the science for stevia, stevia's sa

1h

Tremors shove Washington state west, offer clues to next big earthquake

Thousands of tiny tremors over the past few months have moved parts of Washington state and Vancouver Island westward. It's a near-annual event that backs expectations by some scientists that a big earthquake may hit the Seattle area harder than their previous models suggested.

1h

Trump’s Space Force Will Have to Wait

In mid-June, President Donald Trump gave one of his generals a new assignment. “I’m hereby directing the Department of Defense and Pentagon to immediately begin the process necessary to establish a space force as the sixth branch of the Armed Forces,” the president declared , during a speech at a meeting of the National Space Council at the White House. “We are going to have the Air Force and we

1h

What leech gut bacteria can tell us about drug resistance

A bacteria found in leeches becomes drug resistant after only a small exposure to common antibiotics.

1h

Genes Explain About 11 Percent of Differences in Years of Education

The influence of genetic variants tops that of socioeconomic status.

1h

The Fight for $15: Why workers must fight back in the war on the poor

One of the most important battles being waged today among working people is the fight to raise the minimum wage. This is an excerpt from the book, Class War, USA, by Brandon Weber. Read More

1h

Here’s the fastest rotor humans have ever built: 60 billion revolutions per minute.

Built in a vacuum, this little dynamo is challenging the boundaries of physics. Read More

1h

Unless we spot changes, most life experiences are fabricated from memories

We may not be able to change recent events in our lives, but how well we remember them plays a key role in how our brains model what's happening in the present and predict what is likely to occur in the future, finds new research in the Journal of Experimental Psychology: General.

1h

Bad dogs die young, many from euthanasia, British study says

Bad dogs tend to die young, according to a British study that says aggression, excessive barking and disobedience are among behaviors that can doom canine pets to an early demise.

1h

This map shows where commercial fishing boats and sharks butt heads

Animals An interactive chart shows the journeys of open-ocean sharks, and where they could run into trouble. Oceana, an ocean advocacy group, released an interactive map this week which tracked 45 ocean-faring sharks, and showed how often they overlap with human fishing…

1h

Studies Unveil Hidden Ties Between Epilepsy Gene and Autism

Scientists are finding patterns in symptoms among a handful of people with mutations in HNRNPU.

1h

Yelp expands efforts to add health inspection scores for restaurant reviews nationwide

Yelp is planning to bring more than just user-generated reviews to your screen.

2h

How to stop swiping and find your person on dating apps | Christina Wallace

Let's face it, online dating can suck. So many potential people, so much time wasted — is it even worth it? Podcaster and entrepreneur Christina Wallace thinks so, if you do it right. In a funny, practical talk, Wallace shares how she used her MBA skill set to invent a "zero date" approach and get off swipe-based apps — and how you can, too.

2h

Cord-cutting accelerates with millions more expected to leave pay TV for Netflix, Hulu, Amazon

More bad news for pay-TV providers: there's another sign that cord cutting—consumers departure from pay TV for broadband-delivered video—is accelerating.

2h

The World's 1st Computer Algorithm, Written by Ada Lovelace, Sells for $125,000 at Auction

A book with Ada Lovelace's first 'computer algorithm' has sold for $125,000 at auction.

2h

Global Health: Ebola Outbreak in Congo Has Ended, W.H.O. Says

The outbreak, the first in which a new vaccine was quickly rolled out, was extinguished in less than three months, with 33 deaths.

2h

Volunteers find 560,000-year-old milk tooth in France

The fossil was discovered on Monday evening in the Arago Cave, a vast prehistoric grotto at Tautavel on the French side of the Pyrenees mountains bordering Spain.

2h

Mars making closest approach to Earth in 15 years

Now's the time to catch Mars in the night sky.

2h

Jamestown: Facts & History

Jamestown, founded in 1607, was the first successful permanent English settlement in what would become the United States.

2h

Scientists link more than 1,000 gene variants to educational attainment

Genetics experts have determined that a combination of more than 1,000 genetic variants across the genome can predict the length of a person's formal education to a degree comparable with the usual demographic predictors.

2h

Fitness trackers prove helpful in monitoring cancer patients

Fitness trackers can be valuable tools for assessing the quality of life and daily functioning of cancer patients during treatment, a new study has found. The trackers, also known as wearable activity monitors, include commercial devices worn on the wrist that log a wearer's step counts, stairs climbed, calories, heart rate and sleep.

2h

Intractable hiccups may be more common than we think

Everyone gets hiccups, but some people suffer intractable hiccups that last longer than a month. Intractable hiccups can occur more often than we realize and present to multiple medical disciplines, Loyola Medicine neurologists reported in the journal Current Neurology and Neuroscience Reports.

2h

What Problems? Facebook Stock Has Never Been More Valuable

As Facebook prepares to report its most recent financial results, investors are looking past the company's plan to spend more money, which could dent profits.

2h

How a Map of Your Brain Can Trick Your Brain

Scientific papers are colorful and pretty — too colorful and pretty, some researchers say. And it's a surprisingly important problem for science.

2h

FACT CHECK: Trump's made-in-US (and Europe) spacecraft

One of the star products of President Donald Trump's Made in America showcase this year, NASA's Orion crew capsule, will ride through space thanks to Europe.

3h

A car-sized spacecraft will blast off towards the sun in August

Space The Parker Solar Probe is our first mission to "touch" the Sun Just like beachgoers looking to get a tan, NASA has its own date with the Sun this summer. This August, the agency will launch the Parker Solar Probe on a seven-year…

3h

UK Guardian group's digital revenues surpass print

The British newspaper group that owns The Guardian said Tuesday that its digital revenues had outstripped print for the first time.

3h

Spatial pooling inherent to intrinsic signal optical imaging might cause V2 to resemble a solution to the stereo correspondence problem [Biological Sciences]

Using intrinsic signal optical imaging, Chen et al. (1) show that disparity information in visual area V2 is decodable from correlated random dot stereograms (cRDSs), but not from anticorrelated RDSs (aRDSs). The authors conclude that “V2 is the initial locus of false matching elimination,” indicating that the correspondence problem is…

3h

Reply to Doi et al.: Functional architecture matters in the formation of perception [Biological Sciences]

We agree that elimination of false matches is a multistep process and show that V2 is an important step in the process. Below, we further show that by integrating disparity domain neuron responses (Fig. 1A, large red circle) with similar preferred disparity but across different preferences of other visual features…

3h

Observation of highly stable and symmetric lanthanide octa-boron inverse sandwich complexes [Chemistry]

While boron forms a wide range of metal borides with important industrial applications, there has been relatively little attention devoted to lanthanide boride clusters. Here we report a joint photoelectron spectroscopy and quantum chemical study on two octa-boron di-lanthanide clusters, Ln2B8− (Ln = La, Pr). We found that these clusters…

3h

1.1-billion-year-old porphyrins establish a marine ecosystem dominated by bacterial primary producers [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

The average cell size of marine phytoplankton is critical for the flow of energy and nutrients from the base of the food web to higher trophic levels. Thus, the evolutionary succession of primary producers through Earth’s history is important for our understanding of the radiation of modern protists ∼800 million…

3h

Confinement transition of Z2 gauge theories coupled to massless fermions: Emergent quantum chromodynamics and SO(5) symmetry [Physics]

We study a model of fermions on the square lattice at half-filling coupled to an Ising gauge theory that was recently shown in Monte Carlo simulations to exhibit Z2 topological order and massless Dirac fermion excitations. On tuning parameters, a confining phase with broken symmetry (an antiferromagnet in one choice…

3h

Diffusion in networks and the virtue of burstiness [Social Sciences]

Whether an idea, information, or infection diffuses throughout a society depends not only on the structure of the network of interactions, but also on the timing of those interactions. People are not always available to interact with others, and people differ in the timing of when they are active. Some…

3h

Systems genetic analysis of inversion polymorphisms in the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae [Applied Biological Sciences]

Inversion polymorphisms in the African malaria vector Anopheles gambiae segregate along climatic gradients of aridity. Despite indirect evidence of their adaptive significance, little is known of the phenotypic targets of selection or the underlying genetic mechanisms. Here we adopt a systems genetics approach to explore the interaction of two inversions…

3h

Unrestrained markerless trait stacking in Nannochloropsis gaditana through combined genome editing and marker recycling technologies [Applied Biological Sciences]

Robust molecular tool kits in model and industrial microalgae are key to efficient targeted manipulation of endogenous and foreign genes in the nuclear genome for basic research and, as importantly, for the development of algal strains to produce renewable products such as biofuels. While Cas9-mediated gene knockout has been demonstrated…

3h

Fully human agonist antibodies to TrkB using autocrine cell-based selection from a combinatorial antibody library [Applied Biological Sciences]

The diverse physiological roles of the neurotrophin family have long prompted exploration of their potential as therapeutic agents for nerve injury and neurodegenerative diseases. To date, clinical trials of one family member, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), have disappointingly failed to meet desired endpoints. Contributing to these failures is the fact…

3h

Out-of-the-groove transport of lipids by TMEM16 and GPCR scramblases [Biochemistry]

Phospholipid scramblases externalize phosphatidylserine to facilitate numerous physiological processes. Several members of the structurally unrelated TMEM16 and G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) protein families mediate phospholipid scrambling. The structure of a TMEM16 scramblase shows a membrane-exposed hydrophilic cavity, suggesting that scrambling occurs via the ‟credit-card” mechanism where l

3h

Hsp70-Bag3 complex is a hub for proteotoxicity-induced signaling that controls protein aggregation [Biochemistry]

Protein abnormalities in cells are the cause of major pathologies, and a number of adaptive responses have evolved to relieve the toxicity of misfolded polypeptides. To trigger these responses, cells must detect the buildup of aberrant proteins which often associate with proteasome failure, but the sensing mechanism is poorly understood….

3h

Affinity switching of the LEDGF/p75 IBD interactome is governed by kinase-dependent phosphorylation [Biochemistry]

Lens epithelium-derived growth factor/p75 (LEDGF/p75, or PSIP1) is a transcriptional coactivator that tethers other proteins to gene bodies. The chromatin tethering function of LEDGF/p75 is hijacked by HIV integrase to ensure viral integration at sites of active transcription. LEDGF/p75 is also important for the development of mixed-lineage leukemia (MLL), where…

3h

Protein moonlighting elucidates the essential human pathway catalyzing lipoic acid assembly on its cognate enzymes [Biochemistry]

The lack of attachment of lipoic acid to its cognate enzyme proteins results in devastating human metabolic disorders. These mitochondrial disorders are evident soon after birth and generally result in early death. The mutations causing specific defects in lipoyl assembly map in three genes, LIAS, LIPT1, and LIPT2. Although physiological…

3h

Solute movement in the t-tubule system of rabbit and mouse cardiomyocytes [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Cardiac transverse (t-) tubules carry both electrical excitation and solutes toward the cell center but their ability to transport small molecules is unclear. While fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) can provide an approach to measure local solute movement, extraction of diffusion coefficients is confounded by cell and illumination beam geometries….

3h

N6-Furfuryladenine is protective in Huntington’s disease models by signaling huntingtin phosphorylation [Cell Biology]

The huntingtin N17 domain is a modulator of mutant huntingtin toxicity and is hypophosphorylated in Huntington’s disease (HD). We conducted high-content analysis to find compounds that could restore N17 phosphorylation. One lead compound from this screen was N6-furfuryladenine (N6FFA). N6FFA was protective in HD model neurons, and N6FFA treatment of…

3h

Scleral hypoxia is a target for myopia control [Cell Biology]

Worldwide, myopia is the leading cause of visual impairment. It results from inappropriate extension of the ocular axis and concomitant declines in scleral strength and thickness caused by extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling. However, the identities of the initiators and signaling pathways that induce scleral ECM remodeling in myopia are unknown….

3h

Polymerization pathway of mammalian nonmuscle myosin 2s [Cell Biology]

The three mammalian nonmuscle myosin 2 (NM2) monomers, like all class 2 myosin monomers, are hexamers of two identical heavy (long) chains and two pairs of light (short) chains bound to the heavy chains. The heavy chains have an N-terminal globular motor domain (head) with actin-activated ATPase activity, a lever…

3h

GC content elevates mutation and recombination rates in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae [Genetics]

The chromosomes of many eukaryotes have regions of high GC content interspersed with regions of low GC content. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, high-GC regions are often associated with high levels of meiotic recombination. In this study, we constructed URA3 genes that differ substantially in their base composition [URA3-AT (31%…

3h

Targeting cancer addiction for SALL4 by shifting its transcriptome with a pharmacologic peptide [Medical Sciences]

Sal-like 4 (SALL4) is a nuclear factor central to the maintenance of stem cell pluripotency and is a key component in hepatocellular carcinoma, a malignancy with no effective treatment. In cancer cells, SALL4 associates with nucleosome remodeling deacetylase (NuRD) to silence tumor-suppressor genes, such as PTEN. Here, we determined the…

3h

Different roles of myocardial ROCK1 and ROCK2 in cardiac dysfunction and postcapillary pulmonary hypertension in mice [Medical Sciences]

Although postcapillary pulmonary hypertension (PH) is an important prognostic factor for patients with heart failure (HF), its pathogenesis remains to be fully elucidated. To elucidate the different roles of Rho-kinase isoforms, ROCK1 and ROCK2, in cardiomyocytes in response to chronic pressure overload, we performed transverse aortic constriction (TAC) in cardiac-specific…

3h

Superinfection and cure of infected cells as mechanisms for hepatitis C virus adaptation and persistence [Medical Sciences]

RNA viruses exist as a genetically diverse quasispecies with extraordinary ability to adapt to abrupt changes in the host environment. However, the molecular mechanisms that contribute to their rapid adaptation and persistence in vivo are not well studied. Here, we probe hepatitis C virus (HCV) persistence by analyzing clinical samples…

3h

Recognition of conserved antigens by Th17 cells provides broad protection against pulmonary Haemophilus influenzae infection [Microbiology]

Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is a major cause of community acquired pneumonia and exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. A current effort in NTHi vaccine development has focused on generating humoral responses and has been greatly impeded by antigenic variation among the numerous circulating NTHi strains. In this study, we…

3h

Rhinovirus induces an anabolic reprogramming in host cell metabolism essential for viral replication [Microbiology]

Rhinoviruses (RVs) are responsible for the majority of upper airway infections; despite their high prevalence and the resulting economic burden, effective treatment is lacking. We report here that RV induces metabolic alterations in host cells, which offer an efficient target for antiviral intervention. We show that RV-infected cells rapidly up-regulate…

3h

Integration of cell cycle signals by multi-PAS domain kinases [Microbiology]

Spatial control of intracellular signaling relies on signaling proteins sensing their subcellular environment. In many cases, a large number of upstream signals are funneled to a master regulator of cellular behavior, but it remains unclear how individual proteins can rapidly integrate a complex array of signals within the appropriate spatial…

3h

Genome-wide fitness assessment during diurnal growth reveals an expanded role of the cyanobacterial circadian clock protein KaiA [Microbiology]

The recurrent pattern of light and darkness generated by Earth’s axial rotation has profoundly influenced the evolution of organisms, selecting for both biological mechanisms that respond acutely to environmental changes and circadian clocks that program physiology in anticipation of daily variations. The necessity to integrate environmental responsiveness and circadian programming…

3h

Role of sodium channel subtype in action potential generation by neocortical pyramidal neurons [Neuroscience]

Neocortical pyramidal neurons express several distinct subtypes of voltage-gated Na+ channels. In mature cells, Nav1.6 is the dominant channel subtype in the axon initial segment (AIS) as well as in the nodes of Ranvier. Action potentials (APs) are initiated in the AIS, and it has been proposed that the high…

3h

PICK1 inhibits the E3 ubiquitin ligase activity of Parkin and reduces its neuronal protective effect [Neuroscience]

Parkin functions as a multipurpose E3 ubiquitin ligase, and Parkin loss of function is associated with both sporadic and familial Parkinson’s disease (PD). We report that the Bin/Amphiphysin/Rvs (BAR) domain of protein interacting with PRKCA1 (PICK1) bound to the really interesting new gene 1 (RING1) domain of Parkin and potently…

3h

Gradual progression from sensory to task-related processing in cerebral cortex [Neuroscience]

Somewhere along the cortical hierarchy, behaviorally relevant information is distilled from raw sensory inputs. We examined how this transformation progresses along multiple levels of the hierarchy by comparing neural representations in visual, temporal, parietal, and frontal cortices in monkeys categorizing across three visual domains (shape, motion direction, and color). Representations…

3h

Genetic selection of athletic success in sport-hunting dogs [Population Biology]

Modern dogs are distinguished among domesticated species by the vast breadth of phenotypic variation produced by strong and consistent human-driven selective pressure. The resulting breeds reflect the development of closed populations with well-defined physical and behavioral attributes. The sport-hunting dog group has long been employed in assistance to hunters, reflecting…

3h

Positional specificity of different transcription factor classes within enhancers [Systems Biology]

Gene expression is controlled by sequence-specific transcription factors (TFs), which bind to regulatory sequences in DNA. TF binding occurs in nucleosome-depleted regions of DNA (NDRs), which generally encompass regions with lengths similar to those protected by nucleosomes. However, less is known about where within these regions specific TFs tend to…

3h

{alpha}-Synuclein oligomers induce early axonal dysfunction in human iPSC-based models of synucleinopathies [Neuroscience]

α-Synuclein (α-Syn) aggregation, proceeding from oligomers to fibrils, is one central hallmark of neurodegeneration in synucleinopathies. α-Syn oligomers are toxic by triggering neurodegenerative processes in in vitro and in vivo models. However, the precise contribution of α-Syn oligomers to neurite pathology in human neurons and the underlying mechanisms remain unclear….

3h

RalA controls glucose homeostasis by regulating glucose uptake in brown fat [Physiology]

Insulin increases glucose uptake into adipose tissue and muscle by increasing trafficking of the glucose transporter Glut4. In cultured adipocytes, the exocytosis of Glut4 relies on activation of the small G protein RalA by insulin, via inhibition of its GTPase activating complex RalGAP. Here, we evaluate the role of RalA…

3h

Separation of circadian- and behavior-driven metabolite rhythms in humans provides a window on peripheral oscillators and metabolism [Physiology]

Misalignment between internal circadian rhythmicity and externally imposed behavioral schedules, such as occurs in shift workers, has been implicated in elevated risk of metabolic disorders. To determine underlying mechanisms, it is essential to assess whether and how peripheral clocks are disturbed during shift work and to what extent this is…

3h

Transcripts from downstream alternative transcription start sites evade uORF-mediated inhibition of gene expression in Arabidopsis [Plant Biology]

Plants adapt to alterations in light conditions by controlling their gene expression profiles. Expression of light-inducible genes is transcriptionally induced by transcription factors such as HY5. However, few detailed analyses have been carried out on the control of transcription start sites (TSSs). Of the various wavelengths of light, it is…

3h

Correction for Fregel et al., Ancient genomes from North Africa evidence prehistoric migrations to the Maghreb from both the Levant and Europe [Corrections]

GENETICS Correction for “Ancient genomes from North Africa evidence prehistoric migrations to the Maghreb from both the Levant and Europe,” by Rosa Fregel, Fernando L. Méndez, Youssef Bokbot, Dimas Martín-Socas, María D. Camalich-Massieu, Jonathan Santana, Jacob Morales, María C. Ávila-Arcos, Peter A. Underhill, Beth Shapiro, Genevieve Wojcik, Morten Rasmussen, André…

3h

Correction to Supporting Information for Hayashi et.al., Distinct requirements for energy metabolism in mouse primordial germ cells and their reprogramming to embryonic germ cells [SI Correction]

DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY Correction to Supporting Information for “Distinct requirements for energy metabolism in mouse primordial germ cells and their reprogramming to embryonic germ cells,” by Yohei Hayashi, Kei Otsuka, Masayuki Ebina, Kaori Igarashi, Asuka Takehara, Mitsuyo Matsumoto, Akio Kanai, Kazuhiko Igarashi, Tomoyoshi Soga, and Yasuhisa Matsui, which was first published…

3h

In This Issue [This Week in PNAS]

Genome analysis of dog breeds reveals insights into athleticism Hunting dog flushes a game bird. Image courtesy of iStock/JMichl. The American Kennel Club, an authority on purebred dog registration in the United States, sorts 189 of more than 450 worldwide dog breeds into seven major groups along a spectrum of…

3h

QnAs with Lia Addadi [QnAs]

Lia Addadi has spent her career studying biomineralization: the formation of crystals in organisms. She has explored a wide variety of questions about the formation and structure of crystals in organisms in both physiological and pathological contexts. Her research on crystal formation in gout, atherosclerosis, and osteoporosis could lead to…

3h

QnAs with Dean H. Roemmich [QnAs]

The world’s oceans play a profound role in the global climate system. Dean Roemmich, a professor of oceanography at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego, has dedicated his career to studying the ocean. Roemmich is particularly interested in ocean circulation and the influence of oceans on Earth’s…

3h

Lipids surf the groove in scramblases [Biochemistry]

Lipid membranes have many fundamental roles in biology because they establish amphipathic and highly dynamic boundaries around cellular compartments. The plasma membrane and intracellular membranes are primarily composed of phospholipids that have a hydrophilic headgroup and a hydrophobic tail, enabling them to assemble into lipid bilayers (Fig. 1). Phospholipids differ…

3h

RalA signaling may reveal the true nature of 3T3-L1 adipocytes as a model for thermogenic adipocytes [Physiology]

In PNAS, Skorobogatko et al. (1) report that RalA signaling regulates glucose homeostasis in mice by regulating GLUT4 translocation to the plasma membrane and glucose uptake in brown adipose tissue, but not in white adipose tissue. Interestingly, the foundational work leading to this paper was carried out in 3T3-L1 adipocytes….

3h

Shedding some blue light on alternative promoter usage in plants [Plant Biology]

The sessile nature of plants forces them to adopt a variety of mechanisms for regulating gene expression in response to numerous environmental factors and stresses. Light is one of the most important environmental factors that plants must respond to for initiation and maintenance of proper growth, photosynthesis, and metabolism. Because…

3h

Subsistence practices, past biodiversity, and anthropogenic impacts revealed by New Zealand-wide ancient DNA survey [Anthropology]

New Zealand’s geographic isolation, lack of native terrestrial mammals, and Gondwanan origins make it an ideal location to study evolutionary processes. However, since the archipelago was first settled by humans 750 y ago, its unique biodiversity has been under pressure, and today an estimated 49% of the terrestrial avifauna is…

3h

Monitoring disease activity noninvasively in the mdx model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy [Applied Biological Sciences]

Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a rare, muscle degenerative disease resulting from the absence of the dystrophin protein. DMD is characterized by progressive loss of muscle fibers, muscle weakness, and eventually loss of ambulation and premature death. Currently, there is no cure for DMD and improved methods of disease monitoring…

3h

Confinement generates single-crystal aragonite rods at room temperature [Applied Physical Sciences]

The topic of calcite and aragonite polymorphism attracts enormous interest from fields including biomineralization and paleogeochemistry. While aragonite is only slightly less thermodynamically stable than calcite under ambient conditions, it typically only forms as a minor product in additive-free solutions at room temperature. However, aragonite is an abundant biomineral, and…

3h

Giant and explosive plasmonic bubbles by delayed nucleation [Applied Physical Sciences]

When illuminated by a laser, plasmonic nanoparticles immersed in water can very quickly and strongly heat up, leading to the nucleation of so-called plasmonic vapor bubbles. While the long-time behavior of such bubbles has been well-studied, here, using ultrahigh-speed imaging, we reveal the nucleation and early life phase of these…

3h

Oscillatory inertial focusing in infinite microchannels [Applied Physical Sciences]

Inertial microfluidics (i.e., migration and focusing of particles in finite Reynolds number microchannel flows) is a passive, precise, and high-throughput method for microparticle manipulation and sorting. Therefore, it has been utilized in numerous biomedical applications including phenotypic cell screening, blood fractionation, and rare-cell isolation. Nonetheless, the applications of this techn

3h

Inner Workings: Unlocking the molecular mechanisms behind our sense of touch [Biochemistry]

Molecular biologists don’t typically conduct their research knee deep in muck, checking underground traps for an elusive mole. But Diana Bautista needed those moles to help her understand the mysterious underpinnings of humans’ sense of touch. “The mechanisms that drive mechanical hypersensitivity and mechanical sensing have been really, a big…

3h

Template and primer requirements for DNA Pol {theta}-mediated end ȷoining [Biochemistry]

DNA Pol θ-mediated end joining (TMEJ) is a microhomology-based pathway for repairing double-strand breaks in eukaryotes. TMEJ is also a pathway for nonspecific integration of foreign DNAs into host genomes. DNA Pol θ shares structural homology with the high-fidelity replicases, and its polymerase domain (Polθ) has been shown to extend…

3h

A random first-order transition theory for an active glass [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

How does nonequilibrium activity modify the approach to a glass? This is an important question, since many experiments reveal the near-glassy nature of the cell interior, remodeled by activity. However, different simulations of dense assemblies of active particles, parametrized by a self-propulsion force, f0, and persistence time, τp, appear to…

3h

Personalized disease signatures through information-theoretic compaction of big cancer data [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Every individual cancer develops and grows in its own specific way, giving rise to a recognized need for the development of personalized cancer diagnostics. This suggested that the identification of patient-specific oncogene markers would be an effective diagnostics approach. However, tumors that are classified as similar according to the expression…

3h

Virion structure and genome delivery mechanism of sacbrood honeybee virus [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Infection by sacbrood virus (SBV) from the family Iflaviridae is lethal to honey bee larvae but only rarely causes the collapse of honey bee colonies. Despite the negative effect of SBV on honey bees, the structure of its particles and mechanism of its genome delivery are unknown. Here we present…

3h

Two polymorphic cholesterol monohydrate crystal structures form in macrophage culture models of atherosclerosis [Chemistry]

The formation of atherosclerotic plaques in the blood vessel walls is the result of LDL particle uptake, and consequently of cholesterol accumulation in macrophage cells. Excess cholesterol accumulation eventually results in cholesterol crystal deposition, the hallmark of mature atheromas. We followed the formation of cholesterol crystals in J774A.1 macrophage cells…

3h

Size-dependent dynamic structures of supported gold nanoparticles in CO oxidation reaction condition [Chemistry]

Gold (Au) catalysts exhibit a significant size effect, but its origin has been puzzling for a long time. It is generally believed that supported Au clusters are more or less rigid in working condition, which inevitably leads to the general speculation that the active sites are immobile. Here, by using…

3h

Local magnetism in MnSiPt rules the chemical bond [Chemistry]

Among intermetallic compounds, ternary phases with the simple stoichiometric ratio 1:1:1 form one of the largest families. More than 15 structural patterns have been observed for several hundred compounds constituting this group. This, on first glance unexpected, finding is a consequence of the complex mechanism of chemical bonding in intermetallic…

3h

Science and Culture: Sentient architecture promises insight into our evolving relationship with AI [Computer Sciences]

As the sun set on April 11, 2018, around 400 people gathered in Indiana University’s Luddy Hall, anticipating a sort of birth. There, in the home of the School of Informatics, Computing, and Engineering, all eyes pointed to Amatria, a woven cloud of white Mylar and clear acrylic plastics, wire,…

3h

NADPH oxidase-generated reactive oxygen species in mature follicles are essential for Drosophila ovulation [Developmental Biology]

Ovarian reactive oxygen species (ROS) are believed to regulate ovulation in mammals, but the details of ROS production in follicles and the role of ROS in ovulation in other species remain underexplored. In Drosophila ovulation, matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2) is required for follicle rupture by degradation of posterior follicle cells…

3h

Transient surface ocean oxygenation recorded in the ~2.66-Ga Jeerinah Formation, Australia [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

Many paleoredox proxies indicate low-level and dynamic incipient oxygenation of Earth’s surface environments during the Neoarchean (2.8–2.5 Ga) before the Great Oxidation Event (GOE) at ∼2.4 Ga. The mode, tempo, and scale of these redox changes are poorly understood, because data from various locations and ages suggest both protracted and…

3h

Role of elemental carbon in the photochemical aging of soot [Environmental Sciences]

Soot, which consists of organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC), is a significant component of the total aerosol mass in the atmosphere. Photochemical oxidation is an important aging pathway for soot. It is commonly believed that OC is photoactive but EC, albeit its strong light absorption, is photochemically inert….

3h

Integrative analysis of single-cell genomics data by coupled nonnegative matrix factorizations [Genetics]

When different types of functional genomics data are generated on single cells from different samples of cells from the same heterogeneous population, the clustering of cells in the different samples should be coupled. We formulate this “coupled clustering” problem as an optimization problem and propose the method of coupled nonnegative…

3h

Genome instability is a consequence of transcription deficiency in patients with bone marrow failure harboring biallelic ERCC6L2 variants [Genetics]

Biallelic variants in the ERCC excision repair 6 like 2 gene (ERCC6L2) are known to cause bone marrow failure (BMF) due to defects in DNA repair and mitochondrial function. Here, we report on eight cases of BMF from five families harboring biallelic variants in ERCC6L2, two of whom present with…

3h

CD52 glycan binds the proinflammatory B box of HMGB1 to engage the Siglec-10 receptor and suppress human T cell function [Immunology and Inflammation]

CD52, a glycophosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored glycoprotein, is released in a soluble form following T cell activation and binds to the Siglec (sialic acid-binding Ig-like lectin)-10 receptor on T cells to suppress their function. We show that binding of CD52-Fc to Siglec-10 and T cell suppression requires the damage-associated molecular pattern (DAMP)…

3h

Circadian misalignment induces fatty acid metabolism gene profiles and compromises insulin sensitivity in human skeletal muscle [Medical Sciences]

Circadian misalignment, such as in shift work, has been associated with obesity and type 2 diabetes. However, direct effects of circadian misalignment on skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity and the muscle molecular circadian clock have never been studied in humans. Here, we investigated insulin sensitivity and muscle metabolism in 14 healthy…

3h

Picture perception reveals mental geometry of 3D scene inferences [Neuroscience]

Pose estimation of objects in real scenes is critically important for biological and machine visual systems, but little is known of how humans infer 3D poses from 2D retinal images. We show unexpectedly remarkable agreement in the 3D poses different observers estimate from pictures. We further show that all observers…

3h

Anomalous diffusion, spatial coherence, and viscoelasticity from the energy landscape of human chromosomes [Physics]

The nucleus of a eukaryotic cell is a nonequilibrium system where chromatin is subjected to active processes that continuously rearrange it over the cell’s life cycle. Tracking the motion of chromosomal loci provides information about the organization of the genome and the physical processes shaping that organization. Optical experiments report…

3h

Enhanced brain activity associated with memory access in highly superior autobiographical memory [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

Brain systems underlying human memory function have been classically investigated studying patients with selective memory impairments. The discovery of rare individuals who have highly superior autobiographical memory (HSAM) provides, instead, an opportunity to investigate the brain systems underlying enhanced memory. Here, we carried out an fMRI investigation of a group…

3h

Plasticity based on compensatory effector use in the association but not primary sensorimotor cortex of people born without hands [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

What forces direct brain organization and its plasticity? When brain regions are deprived of their input, which regions reorganize based on compensation for the disability and experience, and which regions show topographically constrained plasticity? People born without hands activate their primary sensorimotor hand region while moving body parts used to…

3h

Urban mobility and neighborhood isolation in America’s 50 largest cities [Social Sciences]

Influential research on the negative effects of living in a disadvantaged neighborhood assumes that its residents are socially isolated from nonpoor or “mainstream” neighborhoods, but the extent and nature of such isolation remain in question. We develop a test of neighborhood isolation that improves on static measures derived from commonly…

3h

River-discharge effects on United States Atlantic and Gulf coast sea-level changes [Sustainability Science]

Identifying physical processes responsible for historical coastal sea-level changes is important for anticipating future impacts. Recent studies sought to understand the drivers of interannual to multidecadal sea-level changes on the United States Atlantic and Gulf coasts. Ocean dynamics, terrestrial water storage, vertical land motion, and melting of land ice were…

3h

Unanswered Questions Trail a Trump DOJ Official With a Russia Tie

On October 31, 2016, just eight days before the presidential election, my colleague Franklin Foer reported that computer servers for Russia’s biggest private bank appeared to have been pinging servers registered to the Trump Organization during the election, raising questions about potential collusion. The Trump campaign , the Trump Organization , and Alfa Bank all issued denials in response, and

3h

Uber resumes testing for autonomous cars in 'manual mode'Uber Self Pittsburgh

Uber said Tuesday it was taking the first step toward restarting its autonomous ridesharing program, putting its self-driving cars back on the road in "manual mode," with a driver at the wheel at all times.

3h

Food Writer Becomes A Butcher To Better Understand The Value Of Meat

Camas Davis wanted to learn about conscientious farming, slaughtering and eating, so she moved to France and became an apprentice at a small, family-run slaughterhouse. Her memoir is Killing it. (Image credit: Cheryl Juetten/Penguin Random House)

3h

Facebook is setting up shop in ChinaFacebook China Subsidiary

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3h

Researchers characterize 'mutational burden' of human induced pluripotent stem cells

In a new study, published in this week's issue of Cell Reports, researchers at the University of California San Diego School of Medicine scrutinized the whole genome sequences of 18 induced pluripotent stem cell lines derived from skin cells that they had reprogrammed to identify and characterize somatic mutations.

3h

Alzheimer's disease risk impacted by the liver, diet

Reduced levels of plasmalogens are associated with an increased risk of Alzheimer's Disease, according to new research presented this week at AAIC 2018.

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Advances along the gut-liver-brain axis in Alzheimer's disease

Four new studies reported at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference (AAIC) 2018 in Chicago investigated how the digestive system, including gut and liver functions, may be related to changes in the brain, and to brain disorders such as Alzheimer's disease and other dementias.

3h

Twitter Continues Cleanup and Cracks Down on Malicious Apps

The move is part a wider push to make Twitter “healthier,” which includes ridding the platform of spam and abuse.

3h

Report: Russian hackers infiltrated hundreds of U.S. electric utilitiesDHS Russian Hackers US

Hackers working for Russia have gained access to hundreds of U.S. electric utilities in 2017, according to new reports from federal officials. Read More

3h

Why humanitarian aid is a powerful foreign policy strategy

Humanitarian aid increases human welfare on a global scale, but it can also be one of the greatest ways of spreading influence and diplomatic power. Read More

3h

A domestic electron ion collider would unlock scientific mysteries of atomic nuclei: report

The science questions that could be answered by an electron ion collider (EIC) – a very large-scale particle accelerator—are significant to advancing our understanding of the atomic nuclei that make up all visible matter in the universe, says a new report by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Beyond its impact on nuclear science, the advances made possible by an EIC cou

3h

NASA examines brightness temperatures of Tropical Cyclone 15W

Brightness temperatures are one of the things that scientists look at when analyzing a tropical cyclone. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided a view of Tropical Cyclone 15W using brightness temperatures that helped show where the strongest storms were occurring within 15W.

3h

Research shows how the Little Ice Age affected South American climate

For the first time, scientists reconstruct the rainfall distribution in Brazil during the climate changes that marked the Middle Ages using isotopic records from caves.

3h

Intestinal virus study shows major changes associated with inflammatory bowel disease

Study comparing healthy and diseased mouse intestinal tracts shows unexpected changes in viral communities.

3h

Averting toxic chats: Computer model predicts when online conversations turn sour

The internet offers the potential for constructive dialogue and cooperation, but online conversations too often degenerate into personal attacks. In hopes that those attacks can be averted, Cornell University researchers have created a model to predict which civil conversations might take a turn and derail.

3h

New study: Omega-3s help keep kids out of trouble

Something as simple as a dietary supplement could reduce disruptive, even abusive behavior, according to newly released research by a team led by a UMass Lowell criminal justice professor who specializes in the intersection of biology and behavior.

3h

Diabetic-level glucose spikes seen in healthy people, Stanford study finds

A device that keeps extra-close tabs on the ups and downs of blood glucose levels reveals that most people see only a partial picture of the sugar circulating in their blood, according to a study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine.

3h

Decline in heat-related deaths in Spain despite rising summer temperatures

Contrary to expectations, global warming has not given rise to an increase in heat-related mortality in Spain.

3h

High glucose spikes are common in 'healthy' people

It is well known that glucose levels above or below certain thresholds can cause damage to organs; however, a new study publishing July 24 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by researchers at Stanford University reveals that 'normal' blood glucose levels are often not normal at all — they stray much farther from the healthy ranges than we assumed.

3h

Estimated prevalence of neurodevelopmental disorders is nearly 1 in 8 among children in India

Almost one in eight children aged 2-9 years living in India may have at least one neurodevelopmental disorder (NDD), according to prevalence estimates published this week in PLOS Medicine.

3h

Living systematic review describes the epidemiology of sexual transmission of Zika virus

Zika virus (ZIKV) may be sexually transmissible for a shorter period than previously estimated, according to a systematic review published this week in PLOS Medicine by Michel Counotte and Nicola Low of the University of Bern in Switzerland, and colleagues.

3h

Recycling provides manufacturers with real competitive and economic advantages, study says

In addition to being environmentally friendly, recycling can help manufacturers develop new, strategic sources of raw materials—particularly rare and precious metals—giving them a competitive advantage, according to research co-authored by an Indiana University Kelley School of Business professor.

3h

Geese Fly to Exhaustion in Race Against Climate Change

These exhausted flyers are running out of time.

3h

Rare 'Lunar Bible' That Visited the Moon Is Up for Auction

Would you pay $50,000 for a Bible that flew to the moon?

3h

3h

SpaceX Preps for Three Block 5 Launches in Just Two Weeks

The company is slated to loft three payloads in just 12 days with its new and improved Falcon 9 rocket.

3h

Endocrinologist Ann Nardulli Dies

The University of Illinois professor studied the role of estrogen in breast cancer.

4h

NASA examines brightness temperatures of Tropical Cyclone 15W

Brightness temperatures are one of the things that scientists look at when analyzing a tropical cyclone. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided a view of Tropical Cyclone 15W using brightness temperatures that helped show where the strongest storms were occurring within 15W.

4h

A domestic electron ion collider would unlock scientific mysteries of atomic nuclei

The science questions that could be answered by an electron ion collider (EIC) — a very large-scale particle accelerator — are significant to advancing our understanding of the atomic nuclei that make up all visible matter in the universe, says a new report by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.

4h

To Remember, the Brain Must Actively Forget

Decades of research have focused on how the brain acquires information, resulting in theories that suggest short-term memories are encoded in the brain as patterns of activity among neurons, while long-term memories reflect a change in the connections between neurons. What hasn’t received nearly as much attention from memory researchers is how the brain forgets. “The vast majority of the things t

4h

Mophie's Powerstation power packs charge via lightning for a price

Gadgets If you forget your cables a lot, the extra cash might be worth it. You'll pay extra to lug fewer cables.

4h

ISIS Is Shaking Britain’s Anti–Death Penalty Resolve

The death penalty has been outlawed for more than 50 years in the United Kingdom—and not just within its borders. Even abroad, the U.K. has boasted a legacy of opposing capital punishment, going so far as to refuse to extradite individuals to countries where the death penalty is still enforced without assurances that it won’t be used. But Britons’ staunch opposition to capital punishment may be w

4h

New study finds police-related fatalities may occur twice as often as reported

According to a new study led by a Cornell University researchers, an average of nearly three men in the United States are killed by police use of deadly force every day. This accounts for 8 percent of all homicides with adult male victims — twice as many as identified in official statistics.

4h

Skin's immune 'alarm' may explain light-induced rashes in lupus patients

U-M researchers are studying an overabundant signaling protein tied to UV light sensitivity in patients with lupus. Their finds also hint at a possible treatment.

4h

Recycling provides manufacturers with real competitive and economic advantages, study says

In addition to being environmentally friendly, recycling can help manufacturers develop new, strategic sources of raw materials — particularly rare and precious metals — giving them a competitive advantage, according to research co-authored by an Indiana University Kelley School of Business professor.

4h

Pictish coppersmith's 1,000-year-old handprint found in Orkney

Metalworker would have plied his trade from small, half-buried circular stone structure, say archaeologists The grimy handprint of a sweaty metalworker and the smeared track of his dirty knees have been uncovered by archaeologists more than 1,000 years after the fires went out in his copper workshop on an island in Orkney . It would have been a hot, uncomfortable workspace: a small circular stone

4h

A fight for sight that we all need to join | Letters

Betty Boothroyd , former Speaker of the House of Commons, calls for more research funding for eye health Re your article on age-related macular degeneration ( G2, 16 July ), this week the eye research charity Fight for Sight is launching a campaign to raise awareness of eye health and the desperate need for more research funding. This is an issue close to my heart. Many people of my age are start

4h

Aging lookout towers still key during fire season in US West

Fire-lookout towers perched atop remote, craggy peaks across the U.S. West may seem like quaint reminders of an era before satellites, smartphones and jet-propelled air tankers.

4h

Harley-Davidson: no US sales hit from offshoring dustup

Harley-Davidson executives said Tuesday they had seen no US sales hit so far over its decision to relocate some American manufacturing overseas as it navigates amid trade conflicts.

4h

Revisiting the Grim Heroism of Saving Private Ryan, 20 Years Later

Not long into the central mission of Saving Private Ryan , which is set in the days after the Normandy landings in World War II, the group led by Captain Miller (played by Tom Hanks) comes across a French family in a bombed-out house. The civilians plead for the soldiers to take their crying daughter to safety. Miller warns them away, but Private Caparzo (Vin Diesel) grabs her, saying the “decent

4h

Pets at home: do cats and dogs really fight like cats and dogs?

Study finds the species generally live under the same roof in harmony – although cats are far more antagonistic There are times when living under the same roof can test even the most patient among us. When favourite chairs are already taken, and food mysteriously disappears, it is no wonder that tempers start to fray – and that’s just the pets. In a rare study, researchers set out to explore the

4h

Google Chrome Now Labels HTTP Sites as 'Not Secure'Chrome HTTP Secure

The world's biggest browser now lets you know when you're visiting an unencrypted site.

4h

Apple's MacBook Pro Heating Problem Gets a Software Fix

Apple acknowledges its newest laptops have been suffering from heat-related performance issues. The company also says a fix is on the way.

4h

Widespread connections among neurons help the brain distinguish smells

Organization–or lack of it–in brain's piriform cortex allows us to differentiate one smell from another.

5h

Blood test can predict optimal treatment for advanced prostate cancer, study finds

An international collaborative study between Lawson Health Research Institute, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, the Royal Marsden and Epic Sciences is one of the first to demonstrate that a blood test can predict how patients with advanced prostate cancer will respond to specific treatments, leading to improved survival.

5h

Secrets to a 90-Year Marriage

“We ought to believe in marriage as in the immortality of the soul,” wrote Honore De Balzac in The Physiology of Marriage . For Karim and Kartari Chand, this maxim rang especially true. “I stumbled across their story about having one of the longest marriages in the world in a local newspaper,” said Glen Milner, who directed Elders, a documentary about the couple, both centenarians at the time of

5h

Were We Destined to Live in Facebook’s World?

More than 2 billion people have come to accept that Facebook is, more or less, what a social network is. Its highly particular and historically contingent bundle of features and applications has become the yardstick by which all other networks (outside China) are measured. But was this Facebook inevitable, or have the company and its users simply fallen into this particular configuration? For exa

5h

Urbanisation of Spain's coast doubled in 30 years: Greenpeace

The amount of coastal land that has been built on in Spain has more than doubled since the introduction of a law in 1988 designed to limit development along its shores, Greenpeace said Tuesday.

5h

New video game teaches teens about electricity

A new video game, designed by researchers at the University of Cambridge, gives teenagers an understanding of electricity by solving a series of puzzles in a bid to encourage more of them to study engineering at university.

5h

53% of millennials expect to be millionaires. The data suggest that’s delusional.

Reports show that millennials are making and saving less than previous generations, likely setting them up to retire later in life—or not at all. Read More

5h

Why Bertrand Russell was not a Christian

It can be hard to understand why a person would be an atheist. Bertrand Russell is here to help. Read More

5h

A Breakthrough Way to See Distant Planets

On a cloudless night, stars provide a breathtaking view: hundreds, thousands, of milky-white specks, draped over the Earth like a sparkling quilt. But stars can be annoying for astronomers trying to observe distant planets. Because stars are so luminous, it’s extremely difficult for even the most powerful telescopes to make out the tiny planets around them, says Henriette Schwarz , an astronomer

5h

Greek wildfires: dry winter and strong winds led to tinderbox conditions

Experts call for better forest management and focus on prevention after blaze that killed more than 70 people An unusually dry winter, with less than average rainfall interspersed with localised flooding in some areas, is emerging as a major contributing factor to the wildfires that are ravaging the mainland of Greece . Lack of the expected steady rainfall in the winter months meant groundwater s

5h

Netflix to open in Spain its first European production hub

Netflix says it's establishing in Spain its first content production hub on European soil as the online video entertainment platform tries to expand in different languages.

5h

Wildfire management designed to protect Spotted Owls may be outdated

Forest fires are not a serious threat to populations of Spotted Owls, contrary to current perceptions and forest management strategies. According to a new study, mixed-severity fires actually are good for Spotted Owl populations, producing more benefits than costs to the species, which acts as an indicator of biological health to the old-growth forests where they live. The study, which analyzed al

5h

Where Martian dust comes from

The dust that coats much of the surface of Mars originates largely from a single thousand-kilometer-long geological formation near the Red Planet's equator.

5h

More mysteries of metallic hydrogen

Liquid metallic hydrogen is not present naturally on Earth and has only been created in a handful of places. Now scientists are researching the properties of liquid metallic hydrogen to understand how planets both inside and outside our solar system form magnetic shields.

5h

Danmark slipper umiddelbart for luftforurening fra svenske skovbrande

Hvis vinden vender, kan partikler fra de svenske skovbrande blæse til Danmark.

5h

Russia Can’t Control What Happens in Syria

Israel’s military said Tuesday it fired two Patriot missiles and shot at a Syrian fighter jet that entered Israeli airspace. The Israel Defense Forces said on their Twitter account that they monitored the Russian-made Sukhoi fighter jet, which they said was a mile inside Israeli airspace when it was shot down. Sky News Arabia reported that the Syrian jet crashed into the Yarmouk basin inside Syri

5h

Photos of the Devastating Wildfires Outside Athens, Greece

Strong winds drove wildfires across the villages, hills, and forests around Athens, Greece, starting on July 23, with authorities blaming the fires for at least 74 deaths . More than 300 firefighters were quickly mobilized to the area, but many residents scrambled to safety on their own—with hundreds racing to the shore to evacuate in small boats, or to try to swim away from advancing flames. Whi

5h

Link found between resilience to dyslexia and gray matter in the frontal brain

A new joint Tel Aviv University and University of California San Francisco study identifies the brain mechanism that accounts for the discrepancy between low decoding skills and high reading comprehension in some children with dyslexia.

5h

Scientists warn that proposed US-Mexico border wall threatens biodiversity, conservation

Writing in BioScience, a group of scientists led by Robert Peters, William J. Ripple, and Jennifer R. B. Miller highlight ecological harm that could result from the construction of a wall along the US-Mexico border. The authors offer recommendations to policymakers.

5h

Border wall threatens biodiversity

Federal plans to complete a continuous wall along the US-Mexico boundary would threaten the existence of numerous plant and animal species, according to a new study.

5h

Scientists warn of border wall's impacts on biodiversity

A continuous wall on the border between the United States and Mexico would harm a multitude of animal species by fragmenting their geographic ranges, thousands of scientists say.

5h

Research shows climate change affects recreational behavior

Whether it's casting a fishing line, launching a boat, or taking a dip to cool off, most people heading to a lake rarely think about how climate change is impacting their overall recreation experience. However, more often than not, it does. Research at the University of New Hampshire shows that as unfavorable water quality conditions in lakes continue to rise, anglers, boaters and beach goers are

5h

Athens fires among the deadliest in Europe this century

The wildfires raging near Athens, which have claimed at least 50 lives, are among the deadliest in Europe this century, with Portugal and Russia also suffering heavy losses.

5h

Treating non-cognitive symptoms of people with dementia

New research focuses on the recent successes and ongoing challenges of drug and non-drug treatments for the non-cognitive symptoms experienced by people living with Alzheimer's dementia.

5h

Hydrogen and plastic production: New catalyst with a dual function

Chemists have developed a new, low-cost catalyst for plastic production. It turns a biorefinery product into a starting material for the synthesis of plastics, which could represent a sustainable alternative to widespread PET. At the same time, the potential energy source hydrogen can also be formed during the reaction.

5h

Promising new class of antibodies protects against HIV-1 infection

A group of scientists have zeroed in on a new defense against HIV-1, the virus that causes AIDS. The team used an animal model to show for the first time that an antibody called Immunoglobulin M (IgM) was effective in preventing infection after mucosal AIDS virus exposure.

5h

Study shows EU pesticide ban failing to protect suburban bees

Bees living in suburban habitats are still being exposed to significant levels of pesticides despite the EU ban on the use of neonicotinoid pesticides on flowering crops, new research shows.

5h

New application of blue light sees through fire

Researchers have demonstrated that ordinary blue light can be used to significantly improve the ability to see objects engulfed by large, non-smoky natural gas fires — like those used in laboratory fire studies and fire-resistance standards testing.

5h

How dying neurons control eating behaviors of the brain microglia

A new study provides important insight into how microglia, cells that form a branch of the immune system inside the brain, go about their job of clearing out dying and non-functional neurons — and how they sometimes mistakenly attack healthy neurons, an event that can play a role in neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases.

5h

Natural chromium sources threaten California groundwater

Natural sources of the toxic form of chromium appear in wells that provide drinking water to a large population in California, offering a new perspective on California's groundwater management challenges.

5h

The U.S. protects alpha predators, but its most famous shark hunter isn't out of business yet

Animals Sportsmen like Mark the Shark adjust to the era of catch-and-release deep-sea fishing. Hunters like Mark the Shark kill less and tag more as we move to protect big sea predators. The big ones get away more often now that we value sharks’ role in marine…

5h

Military spending did not 'crowd out' welfare in Middle East prior to Arab Spring

Research casts doubt on the widely-held view that spiralling military expenditure across the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) "crowded out" investment in healthcare and public services, leading to civil unrest that eventually exploded in the Arab Spring revolutions.

5h

Facebook sets up China subsidiaryFacebook China Subsidiary

Facebook has opened a subsidiary in mainland China, records show, a long-awaited step for the social networking giant and its Mandarin-speaking founder Mark Zuckerberg.

5h

Not Just Tech Bros: E-Scooter Fans Are Surprisingly Diverse

A new report shows shared electric scooters are a valued way of getting around for a diverse swath of city folk, including women and low-income populations.

5h

Headless Body Might Be One of America's 1st Politicians … and Slave Owners

Archaeologists digging in a 400-year-old church in Jamestown, Virginia, have found a headless body that might be that of Sir George Yeardley, one of the first politicians — and slave owners — in the American colonies.

6h

GM launches peer-to-peer car sharing service on rental platformGM Maven Peer Car Sharing

General Motors said Tuesday it was launching a peer-to-peer car rental service to allow owners to make money by listing them as shared vehicles.

6h

Netflix effect: Cord-cutting accelerates in US market

US households are dropping their traditional pay TV packages at a faster rate than in the past amid a rise in streaming video services like Netflix, a survey showed Tuesday.

6h

Scientists warn that proposed US-Mexico border wall threatens biodiversity, conservation

Borderlands are synonymous with desolation, but the Mexico-U.S. divide is something altogether different. The nearly 2,000-mile-long border traverses some of the continent's most biologically diverse regions, including forests, grasslands and salt marshes—home to more than 1,500 native animal and plant species, according to an analysis published in BioScience on July 24.

6h

NASA analyzes tropical storm Wukong's strawberry-shape

Infrared satellite imagery provides temperature data, and when NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Storm Wukong, the coldest cloud tops circling the center resembled a strawberry and leaf.

6h

Satellite tracking reveals Philippine waters are important for endangered whale sharks

A new scientific study has tracked juvenile whale sharks across the Philippines emphasizing the importance of the archipelago for the species. The study is the most complete tracking study of whale sharks in the country, with satellite tags deployed on different individuals in multiple sites.

6h

Made-to-measure silicon building blocks

Silicones are synthetic materials used in a broad range of applications. Thanks to the stability of the silicon-oxygen bond, they are resistant to chemicals and environmental influences and also harmless from a physiological point of view. As a result, silicones contribute to making everyday life easier in almost all areas.Chemists have now described a new way to produce long-awaited silicon build

6h

Ytterbium: The quantum memory of tomorrow

Researchers have discovered a new material that can be used to store and repeat quantum signals rapidly — a promising step toward a global quantum network.

6h

Blindness gene discovered

Researchers have investigated a recessive genetic disorder that destroys the eyes from developing and results in childhood blindness. After analyzing the genomes of each member of a consanguineous family with affected children, the geneticists pinpointed pathogenic mutations in a new gene, MARK3, as being the cause. They subsequently confirmed their findings by modifying the homologous gene in dro

6h

14,000-Year-Old Piece Of Bread Rewrites The History Of Baking And Farming

Breadcrumbs found at an excavation in Jordan reveal that humans were baking thousands of years earlier than previously believed. It may have even prompted them to settle down and plant cereals. (Image credit: Amaia Arranz-Otaegui)

6h

Researchers use nanotechnology to improve the accuracy of measuring devices

Scientists from Higher school of economics and the Federal Scientific Research Centre 'Crystallography and Photonics' have synthesized multi-layered nanowires in order to study their magnetoresistance properties. Improving this effect will allow scientists to increase the accuracy of indicators of various measuring instruments, such as compasses and radiation monitors. The results of the study hav

6h

NASA analyzes tropical storm Wukong's strawberry-shape

Infrared satellite imagery provides temperature data, and when NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Storm Wukong, the coldest cloud tops circling the center resembled a strawberry and leaf.

6h

A protein that promotes compatibility between chromosomes after fertilization

A research team from the Center for Biomedical Research, at the University of Algarve, and Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciência, led by Rui Gonçalo Martinho and Paulo Navarro-Costa has identified the mechanism by which the fertilized egg balances out the differences between chromosomes inherited from the mother and the father. The study, now published in the scientific journal EMBO reports, may pave th

6h

Where Martian dust comes from

The dust that coats much of the surface of Mars originates largely from a single thousand-kilometer-long geological formation near the Red Planet's equator.

6h

NASA satellite shows Son-Tinh's swan song

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite found Tropical Depression Son-Tinh over southern China early on July 24.

6h

Coldwater streams may provide refuge against changing climate

Coldwater stream habitats are vulnerable to effects of climate change, particularly to changes in precipitation and air temperatures that alter their hydrology. Some of these streams are expected to diminish in size, permanently transition to warmer habitats, or possibly go dry. However, streams in deep canyons, poleward-facing slopes, thick canopy cover, groundwater-fed areas, and with fewer anth

6h

Researchers develop model for predicting landslides caused by earthquakes

The 2008 Wenchuan earthquake in Sichuan, China, killed tens of thousands of people and left millions homeless. About 20,000 deaths—nearly 30 percent of the total—resulted not from the ground shaking itself but from the landslides that it triggered.

6h

Singapore may use drones to deliver medicine, for security

Drones could be used across hi-tech Singapore to deliver life-saving medical supplies to a patient during an emergency or to respond to a security breach under a new system in development, a private consortium said Tuesday.

6h

Where Martian dust comes from

The dust that coats much of the surface of Mars originates largely from a single thousand-kilometer-long geological formation near the Red Planet's equator, scientists have found.

6h

R. Kelly Is the Hero of His Own Disingenuous Epic

On Monday morning, the R&B singer R. Kelly shared his first new solo song since the release of his 2016 holiday album, 12 Nights of Christmas . The 19-minute confessional “I Admit” plumbs the 51-year-old artist’s personal and professional history, taking listeners on a lengthy, convoluted thematic journey that affirms Kelly’s positioning as its (and our ) hero. It is a difficult, dissonant track;

6h

Weird Paradox Says 2 Losses Equals a Win. And It Could Lead to Fast Quantum Computers.

Parrondo's paradox takes losing odds and turns them into a win.

6h

Researchers see positive policing changes after cannabis legalization

Washington State University researchers have found that marijuana legalization in Colorado and Washington has not hurt police effectiveness. In fact, clearance rates for certain crimes have improved.

6h

NASA satellite shows Son-Tinh's swan song

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite found Tropical Depression Son-Tinh over southern China early on July 24.

6h

Study explores risk factors linked to chikungunya and dengue outbreaks

In one of the largest studies of its kind, researchers analyzed chikungunya and dengue outbreak data from 76 countries over a period of 50 years, focusing on regions across the Indian Ocean. The analysis of 1959-2009 data revealed that population density and proximity to a country already experiencing an outbreak were the factors most closely associated with a country's own likelihood of experienc

6h

Wildfire management designed to protect spotted owls may be outdated

According to a new study, forest fires are not a serious threat to populations of spotted owls, a species that acts as an indicator of biological health to the old-growth forests where they live. These findings suggest that management strategies for this species are outdated.

6h

Research shows climate change affects recreational behavior

Research at the University of New Hampshire shows that as unfavorable water quality conditions in lakes continue to rise, anglers, boaters and beach goers are using various coping mechanisms that can alter their behavior, from switching to a different location or activity to simply abandoning the experience altogether.

6h

Bigger eyes but reduced brain power in nocturnal fishes

How does living life in darkness influence the way nocturnal fishes see? A new study finds out.

6h

Turmeric-derived eye drops could treat glaucoma: study

A derivative of turmeric could be used in eye drops to treat the early stages of glaucoma, a new study finds.

6h

Antibiotic resistance in a leech's gut

Plastic surgery patients were getting infections with antibiotic resistant bacteria, and no one knew why. Microbiologists found the answer in a leech's gut. Their research provides proof that tiny levels of antibiotics found in the environment can encourage bacterial resistance.

6h

World-first quantum computer simulation of chemical bonds using trapped ions

Simulation of chemical bonds and reactions is expected to be one of the first applications for at-scale quantum computers. Physicists have now demonstrated the world-first simulation of a chemical bond using trapped ion qubits, one of the most promising pathways to full-scale quantum computing.

6h

Plenty of habitat for bears in Europe

A new study shows that there are still many areas in Europe where bears are extinct but with suitable habitat for hosting the species. An effective management of the species has the potential to help these animals come back in many of these areas, according to the head of the study.

6h

Empathetic dogs lend a helping paw

Many dogs show empathy if their owner is in distress and will also try to help rescue them. Scientists have just tested whether there is truth in the notion that dogs have a prosocial and empathetic nature.

6h

Digital transformation—challenge and opportunity for migrant workers

As technology transforms the job market, migrant workers are in a more precarious position than others, according to a new study from the Joint Research Centre, the European Commission's science and knowledge service.

6h

4 Varieties of Goldfish Crackers Recalled for Salmonella Risk

Pepperidge Farm announced that it was voluntarily recalling several varieties of Goldfish Crackers yesterday (July 23) due to potential Salmonella contamination.

6h

This Shark Is Basically Wolverine | Shark News

A lemon shark literally swallowed a piece of steel, pushed it back out through its skin, and healed up like a comic-book superhero. Stream Shark Week Episodes: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/shark-week/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery https://www.facebook.com/SharkWeek Follow on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Disco

6h

Changes in bacterial mix linked to antibiotics increase risk for type 1 diabetes

A single course of antibiotics early in childhood may increase risk for Type 1 diabetes. This is the finding of a study in mice led by researchers from NYU Medical School.

6h

Researchers find new way to target flu virus

Researchers used an atom-level simulation to define one mechanism by which the flu virus infects cells. The Rice University and Baylor College of Medicine team said its work could provide a path toward a universal vaccine for viruses.

6h

Coldwater streams may provide refuge against changing climate

Coldwater stream habitats are vulnerable to effects of climate change, particularly to changes in precipitation and air temperatures that alter their hydrology. Some streams are more likely to act as coldwater refugia — areas buffered from climate change that enable persistence of the ecosystem and its resources — and may provide long-term habitat to ecologically and economically important speci

6h

Military spending did not 'crowd out' welfare in Middle East prior to Arab Spring

Findings dispute 'guns versus butter' narrative as a major factor behind the Arab Spring. Researchers caution against uncritically applying lessons from Western nations to interpret public policy decisions in the Middle East.

6h

Depression and antidepressants are associated with an increased risk of VTE

In the first review of its kind, new research has found that depression and the use of antidepressants are each associated with an increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE). The study led by academics from the Musculoskeletal Research Unit at the University of Bristol has also shown that each of the various classes of antidepressant medications are associated with an increased risk of VTE.

6h

Chance of being prescribed opioids for minor injury differs dramatically by where you live

Patients who sought care for a sprained ankle in states that were found to be 'high prescribers' of opioids were approximately three times more likely to receive a prescription for the drugs than those treated in 'low-prescribing' states, according to new research. Additional results of the study show that patients who received prescriptions for long courses of the drugs were five times more likel

6h

Bats harbor a gene swiped from an ancient Ebola-like virus — here's how they may use it

Some 18 million years ago, an ancestor of mouse-eared bats 'stole' genetic material from an ancient virus related to Ebola. The swiped genetic sequence — a gene called VP35 — has remained largely intact in the bats despite the passage of time, a new study finds. The research also sheds light on the gene's possible function in bats, suggesting that it may play a role in regulating the immune syst

6h

Blasting tiny craters in glass, creating material to miniaturize telecommunication devices

Modern communication systems often employ optical fibers to carry signals across or between devices, combining more than one function into a single circuit. However, signal transmission requires long optical fibers, which makes miniaturizing the device difficult. Instead of long optical fibers, scientists have started testing planar waveguides. In the Journal of Applied Physics, investigators repo

6h

New guidelines for treatment and prevention of HIV infection in adults

Experts have updated recommendations for the use of antiretroviral drugs in the treatment and prevention of HIV infection.

6h

Ebola virus gene stolen and preserved by myotis bats, study finds

A gene from the deadly Ebola virus that allows the virus to escape from the human immune system has been identified in the genome of a group of bats that is found worldwide, including North America. The gene appears to have been stolen from the virus by the bats and adapted to regulate their own immune response, according to a recent study led by Georgia State University.

6h

Updated recommendations for treating, preventing HIV infection

A volunteer panel of experts in HIV research and patient care evaluated new data and treatments to update recommendations from the International Antiviral Society-USA for the use of antiretroviral drugs in this special communication article. The updated recommendations encompass initiating therapy, monitoring individuals starting therapy, changing regimens and preventing HIV infection for individu

6h

Can treatment for depression after a heart attack reduce the long-term risk of another cardiac event

Depression has been associated with poorer medical outcomes for patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS), including heart attack and unstable angina. This randomized clinical trial of 300 patients in South Korea examined whether antidepressant treatment after ACS improved long-term cardiac outcomes.

6h

Sepsis kills — prompt care saves kids' lives

More than one in 10 children hospitalized with sepsis die, but when a series of clinical treatments and tests is completed within an hour of its detection the odds of death shrink 40 percent, according to the largest ever analysis of pediatric sepsis. The study supports an initially controversial New York State mandate, likely encouraging it's expansion to other states.

6h

Enzyme AEP's importance to immunity discovered

AEP has been identified as a key regulator of the immune system in new research from Newcastle University, UK.

6h

Bats may have co-opted viral proteins produced by Ebola for immune function

Approximately 18 million years ago, genes encoding viral proteins 35 (VP35s) integrated into the genomes of Myotis (mouse-eared) bats. Produced by the highly deadly Ebola and Marburg viruses, VP35s suppress the host immune system and play a critical role in the efficient replication and virulence of these filoviruses. A study publishing July 24 in Cell Reports sheds light on the potential function

6h

Fermilab gets ready to upgrade accelerator complex for more powerful particle beams

Fermilab's accelerator complex has achieved a major milestone: The U.S. Department of Energy formally approved Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory to proceed with its design of PIP-II, an accelerator upgrade project that will provide increased beam power to generate an unprecedented stream of neutrinos—subatomic particles that could unlock our understanding of the universe—and enable a broad pro

6h

World-first quantum computer simulation of chemical bonds using trapped ions

An international group of researchers has achieved the world's first multi-qubit demonstration of a quantum chemistry calculation performed on a system of trapped ions, one of the leading hardware platforms in the race to develop a universal quantum computer.

6h

Study of genetic relationships in grasshopper family Acrididae points to South American origin

Grasshoppers are one of the most ubiquitous groups of insects in the world, found everywhere from grasslands to tropical rainforests to isolated mountain ranges to sandy deserts. And now, thanks to a decade-long analysis of grasshoppers' genetic relationships, scientists have the clearest picture yet of the evolutionary pathways grasshoppers have followed to attain such diversity—and the findings

6h

Common painkillers triple harmful side effects in dementia

Two new studies highlight a significant increase in harmful side effects related to the use of commonly prescribed opioid painkillers in people with dementia. Researchers also identified a mechanism that may be causing the problem.

6h

Paleontologists discover largest dinosaur foot ever

The dinosaur foot known as 'Bigfoot,' described in a new scientific paper recently published in the open-access journal PeerJ — the Journal of Life and Environmental Sciences, was excavated in 1998 by an expedition from the University of Kansas, with Anthony Maltese, lead author of the study, as member of the crew. After detailed preparation and study, Maltese and his international team of resear

6h

Tracing the history of farming in the Amazon

A geographer from Northumbria University, Newcastle is leading on a £340,000 research project to examine how ancient civilisations in one of the most remote and inhospitable areas of the Amazon farmed their land.

6h

Ocean acidification a challenge for science, governments & communities

A new IMAS-led paper published in the science journal Nature Climate Change has highlighted the challenges faced by scientists, governments and communities as rising levels of CO2 are absorbed by the world's oceans.

6h

A vicious online propaganda war that includes fake news is being waged in Zimbabwe

Fake news is on the upsurge as Zimbabwe gears up for its watershed elections on 30 July. Mobile internet and social media have become vehicles for spreading a mix of fake news, rumour, hatred, disinformation and misinformation. This has happened because there are no explicit official rules on the use of social media in an election.

6h

Trump to Curb Protections as Warming Endangers Species

Proposed changes to Endangered Species Act could stymie species listings — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

Why do paper cuts hurt so much?

Health The injury itself is minor, but the resulting pain and emotional response are not. A variety of physiological and emotional factors make paper cuts more painful and traumatic than they should be.

6h

Pot For Pain Relief

Pot For Pain Relief Marijuana has been increasingly used as an alternative for pain relief, but is it safe? Pot For Pain Relief Video of Pot For Pain Relief Human Tuesday, July 24, 2018 – 11:00 Karin Heineman, Executive Producer (Inside Science) — Chronic pain can be a debilitating condition, impacting everything from mood and health to overall well-being. Unfortunately, many treatment options a

7h

Hot Take: Tree Shrews Love Chili Peppers

Most mammals shun the painful heat in spicy chili peppers, but not the Chinese tree shrew.

7h

China fossil tells new supercontinent story

Scientists have uncovered a new dinosaur in China… and it's older than expected.

7h

Blasting tiny craters in glass, creating material to miniaturize telecommunication devices

Modern communication systems often employ optical fibers to carry signals across or between devices. The integrated optics in these devices combine more than one function into a single circuit. However, signal transmission requires long optical fibers, which makes it difficult to miniaturize the device. Instead of long optical fibers, scientists have started testing planar waveguides.

7h

New research collection targets insect pests of pulse crops

Around the world, pulse crops—such as beans, peas, chickpeas, and lentils—are an important staple in the modern food supply, and their cultivation is growing in the United States and many other Western countries. As in any agricultural system, though, pulse crops can fall victim to a wide range of insect pests.

7h

Bats harbor a gene swiped from an ancient Ebola-like virus—here's how they may use it

Some 18 million years ago, an ancestor of mouse-eared bats "stole" genetic material from an ancient virus related to Ebola.

7h

What's the value of a clean beach? Here's how economists do the numbers

Millions of Americans head outdoors in the summer, whether for a day at a nearby lake or a month-long road trip. For environmental economists like me, decisions by vacationers and outdoor recreators offer clues to a challenging puzzle: estimating what environmental resources are worth.

7h

Study finds how sex gives life meaning

The afterglow of sex can lead to a greater sense of well-being, show researchers. Read More

7h

Habitually barefoot kids have better motor skills

A quarter-million years of evolution can't be wrong. Read More

7h

Surrey develops new crime fighting algorithm that could predict reoccurring illegal activity

A new algorithm developed by the University of Surrey and Georgia Tech could give police departments the upper hand in their fight against crime.

7h

How to stop rape: ground-breaking work in Nairobi by a group of Stanford statisticians

The NGO No Means No Worldwide approached Stanford researchers to assess the impact of its programs. By randomly assigning some schools to training and others to being delayed in receiving the training, Stanford's Micchael Baiocchi and collaborators could estimate the overall impact of the program. The first trial involved 5,000 girls in 28 schools in Nairobi's slums. The result was striking, the t

7h

Turmeric eye drops could treat glaucoma

A derivative of turmeric could be used in eye drops to treat the early stages of glaucoma, finds a new study led by UCL and Imperial College London researchers.

7h

Ancient Tooth Tartar Traps Clues to Iron Age Diet

By analyzing the proteins in ancient dental plaque, archaeologists determined that British menus almost three millennia ago featured milk, oats and peas. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

Kemorobot på Herlev Hospital

Robotten på Herlev Hospital skal fremstille kemobehandlinger af cytostatica. Teknikere fodrer maskinen med præparater og emballage, som maskinen fremstiller de færdige behandlinger af. Derfor kan man heller ikke tale om en totalt automatiseret fremstilling.

7h

Her er robotten, der håndterer hospitalets giftige kemo-blandinger

Herlev Hospital er netop begyndt at blande behandlingerne til kræftpatienter i kemoterapi med en robot. Det har krævet tæt samarbejde med fabrikanten, videreudvikling og ekstremt høj hygiejne.

7h

'Unprecedented' Japan heatwave kills 65 in one week

An "unprecedented" heatwave in Japan has killed at least 65 people in one week, government officials said Tuesday, with the weather agency now classifying the record-breaking weather as a "natural disaster."

7h

Chinese mobile phone tower operator plans $8.7B IPO

The state-owned monopoly that operates China's vast network of mobile phone towers plans to raise up to $8.7 billion in the biggest global stock offering in four years.

7h

Mexican anti-poverty program targeting poor women may help men most, study finds

Economic empowerment programs that target women may have an unintended effect: They help men instead.

7h

Bin the bug spray: Study shows EU pesticide ban failing to protect suburban bees

Bees living in suburban habitats are still being exposed to significant levels of pesticides despite the EU ban on the use of neonicotinoid pesticides on flowering crops, new research from University of Sussex scientists shows.

7h

A Writer’s Fixation on Sound

Doug McLean It’s not that it was easy for R. O. Kwon to write The Incendiaries , her debut novel. The book took 10 years to finish, and along the way she faced many of the challenges first-time authors do: self-doubt, creative failure, awkward questions from friends and family about her progress. But, in a conversation for this series, Kwon explained that she was able to weather the struggles of

7h

Understanding insects

Salt may play a key role in thriving grasshopper, locust and other bug populations that can cause close to a billion dollars in damage to crops annually when left unchecked, according to new research led by University of Dayton ecologist Chelse Prather.

7h

Redefining 'small-scale' fishing to support English fisheries

Researchers at the University of York are calling for a re-evaluation of the definition of 'small-scale' fishing vessels, following a study that shows the impact of these vessels are underestimated.

7h

Lindsey Vonn Prepares To Face Oceanic Whitetip Sharks | Monster Tag

The fastest woman in the world needs to stay in top shape before taking on the most notorious shark in the ocean. Stream Monster Tag on Discovery GO: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/shark-week/full-episodes/monster-tag Stream Shark Week Episodes: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/shark-week/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com

7h

How AI is making it easier to diagnose disease | Pratik Shah

Today's AI algorithms require tens of thousands of expensive medical images to detect a patient's disease. What if we could drastically reduce the amount of data needed to train an AI, making diagnoses low-cost and more effective? TED Fellow Pratik Shah is working on a clever system to do just that. Using an unorthodox AI approach, Shah has developed a technology that requires as few as 50 images

7h

Protein discovery may explain why patients develop resistance to new anti-cancer drugs

A team of researchers at the University of Cambridge has identified a protein complex that might explain why some cancer patients treated with the revolutionary new anti-cancer drugs known as PARP inhibitors develop resistance to their medication.

7h

Made-to-measure silicon building blocks

Silicones are synthetic materials used in a broad range of applications. Thanks to the stability of the silicon-oxygen bond, they are resistant to chemicals and environmental influences and also harmless from a physiological point of view. As a result, silicones contribute to making everyday life easier in almost all areas. In the Journal of the American Chemical Society, chemists at Goethe Univer

7h

Transplanted kidney survives longer

The lifespan of a transplant kidney has significantly improved over the last thirty years. Between 1986 and 1995, 75 percent of the transplanted kidneys still functioned five years after the transplant. Between 2006 and 2015, this number had already risen to 84 percent. However, an international study lead by kidney specialist Maarten Naesens of KU Leuven shows that the progress is stagnating.

7h

Teenage boys to be vaccinated against cancer-causing HPV

Inoculation programme will be expanded to cover 12- and 13-year-old boys in England Boys aged 12 and 13 in England are to be vaccinated against the cancer-causing human papilloma virus (HPV), the government has said. The decision, announced on Tuesday, comes after the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI) recommended last week that the HPV vaccination, which protects girls agains

7h

Scientists uncover formula for box office movie success

‘Man in a hole’ story arc – a fall followed by a rise – found to be most commercially successful A team of UK scientists believe they have found the formula for box office success. After analysing data from 6,147 movie scripts and filtering it through a series of algorithms, the researchers have identified the emotional arc that makes the most money, called the “man in a hole” arc. Continue readi

7h

Researchers find new way to target flu virus

There's a hitch in the swing of a protein that delivers the flu virus. Rice University and Baylor College of Medicine researchers believe this mechanism may be a useful target to stop the virus from infecting cells.

7h

5 Ways to Keep Cities Cooler During Heat Waves

Heat waves are America’s deadliest natural disaster. Here are some strategies that cities around the world are pursuing to try to beat the heat.

7h

Improving biosensors for implantable use

EPFL scientists have developed new nanotube biosensors using synthetic biology, which improves their sensing capabilities in complex biofluids, such as blood and urine. The study is published in the Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters.

7h

New crime fighting algorithm could predict reoccurring illegal activity

A new algorithm developed by the University of Surrey and Georgia Tech could give police departments the upper hand in their fight against crime, thanks to its ability to quickly process real-time data and predict where illegal activity could reoccur.

7h

Designer molecule kills malarial parasites

A research team from ANU and The University of Queensland has designed and made a molecule derived from a human protein that kills the parasite which causes malaria.

7h

DNA from threatened sharks turns up in fin scraps

Genetic analysis of 9,200 shark fin byproducts in Hong Kong reveals that several threatened shark species are still common in the fin trade. Hong Kong is one of the world’s largest importers of shark fins, which make the delicacy shark fin soup. The study in Conservation Letters is the first assessment of the species composition of the fin trade after CITES (Convention on International Trade in E

7h

Russian hackers could switch America’s lights offDHS Russian Hackers US

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7h

No sign of symmetrons yet, physicists report

A high-precision experiment led by TU Wien has set its sights on pinpointing the so-far hypothetical "symmetron fields" using the PF2 ultra-cold neutron source at the Institut Laue-Langevin in France. For the existence of symmetrons could provide an explanation for the mysterious dark energy.

7h

Western Australia researcher discovers a new species of sunfish

How social media and books about mythical creatures helped a WA researcher track the world's heaviest bony fish.

7h

No sign of symmetrons

One of the candidates for 'dark energy' is the symmetron field. At the TU Vienna researchers have developed an experiment capable of measuring extremely small forces with the help of neutrons. The measurements were taken at the Institut Laue-Langevin. They could have provided pointers to the mysterious symmetrons, but the particles didn't show up. This excludes the possibility of symmetrons in a b

7h

Regulation of cell orientation and shape for tissue morphogenesis

A collaborative research group led by Kumamoto University has developed a new control system for regulating the morphology and orientation of cells that constitute animal tissues.

7h

WSU Researchers see positive policing changes after cannabis legalization

Washington State University researchers have found that marijuana legalization in Colorado and Washington has not hurt police effectiveness. In fact, clearance rates for certain crimes have improved.

7h

Les efforts pour préserver la population de loris se montrent efficaces

Un programme à long terme visant à préserver les loris de Kuhl en rétablissant une population disparue de l'espèce sur une île voisine de Rimatara, sur laquelle il n'y a pas de rats noirs prédateurs, révèle l'importance de ce type de programme de protection pour la durabilité des espèces d'oiseaux en voie d'extinction.

7h

World-first quantum computer simulation of chemical bonds using trapped ions

Simulation of chemical bonds and reactions is expected to be one of the first applications for at-scale quantum computers. Here a University of Sydney physicist, Dr Cornelius Hempel, demonstrates the world-first simulation of a chemical bond using trapped ion qubits, one of the most promising pathways to full-scale quantum computing.

7h

New research collection targets insect pests of pulse crops

Around the world, pulse crops — such as beans, peas, chickpeas, and lentils — are an important staple in the modern food supply, and their cultivation is growing in the United States and many other Western countries. Pulse crop growers facing insect pest challenges will soon have a new set of resources to tap into with the July issue of the Annals of the Entomological Society of America, featuri

7h

Environment key battle ground in fight to tackle antibiotic resistance

The environment could be as important a battle ground as the clinic in the global fight against the spread of antibiotic resistance, new research has shown.

7h

Rise of the grasshoppers: New analysis redraws evolutionary tree for major insect family

Thanks to a decade-long analysis of grasshoppers' genetic relationships, scientists now have the clearest picture yet of the evolutionary pathways grasshoppers have followed to attain their incredible diversity — and the findings put the birthplace of the broadest lineage of grasshoppers in South America, not Africa, as previously thought.

7h

Unwrapping the brewing secrets of barley

University of Adelaide researchers have uncovered fundamental new information about the malting characteristics of barley grains. They say their finding could pave the way to more stable brewing processes or new malts for craft brewers.

7h

Ocean acidification a challenge for science, governments & communities

A new IMAS-led paper published in the science journal Nature Climate Change has highlighted the challenges faced by scientists, governments and communities as rising levels of CO2 are absorbed by the world's oceans.Researchers have found that in recent centuries surface ocean pH has fallen ten times faster than in the past 300 million years and that impacts are being felt on ecosystems, economies

7h

How the 'yeah-but' mentality stalls progress on bag bans and other green issues

The debacle over the removal of single-use plastic bags from supermarkets has been analysed from a range of different perspectives. Supermarkets have been described as breaking a psychological trust contract with their customers and cynically using environmental concerns to reduce their costs and increase their profits. The pushback by Australian shoppers has been the cause of much amusement and b

7h

What Sorry to Bother You Gets Right About Memes

If a single movie could encapsulate the fever-dream days that we’re living through, it is Sorry to Bother You , the breathtaking debut film from Boots Riley. Set in present-day Oakland, the movie follows the, umm, career trajectory of Cassius Green from bottom-of-the-rung telemarketer to “ power caller,” as his friends and lover attempt to organize the shop he’s working in … and a company that

8h

Environment key battle ground in fight to tackle antibiotic resistance

The environment could be as important a battle ground as the clinic in the global fight against the spread of antibiotic resistance, new research has shown.

8h

Tiny robot could be game-changer in fight against tuberculosis

A Brock University research team has created a microscopic robot that has the potential to identify drug resistance to tuberculosis faster than conventional tests.

8h

Empathetic dogs lend a helping paw

Many dogs show empathy if their owner is in distress and will also try to help rescue them. This is according to Emily M. Sanford, formerly of Macalester College and now at Johns Hopkins University in the US. She is the lead author of a study in Springer's journal Learning & Behavior that tested whether there is truth in the notion that dogs have a prosocial and empathetic nature.

8h

Fake science: Tidsskrifter præmierer det rene volapyk

400.000 forskere betaler for at få udgivet deres studier i videnskabelige tidsskrifter, der udfører pseudo-peer review og belønner det skinbarlige vås. Det viser en afdækning foretaget af undersøgende journalister i 18 lande.

8h

Could anti-speciesism and veganism form the basis for a rational society?

Anti-speciesism and veganism are presented today as projects for society as a whole. Several political parties have even recently structured themselves under this banner, such as DierAnimal in Belgium and Rassemblement des écologistes pour le vivant in France. For an ethical system to become more than just a simple mind game and instead a social project, it must at the very least not be built on a

8h

Death by yeast infection, and other strange ways to go

Science People pass away in some weird ways, and a national database lets us seem all of them. People pass away in some weird ways, and a national database lets us seem all of them.

8h

The Private Worlds of Parents Raising Children Radically Different From Themselves

To what extent should parents be held responsible for who their children grow up to be? That’s the question raised by the new documentary Far From the Tree, which explores the lives of children who are somehow radically different from their parents . The movie is an adaptation of Andrew Solomon’s 2012 nonfiction book of the same name, and features him prominently. Solomon’s reporting, including t

8h

Digital transformation: challenge and opportunity for migrant workers

As technology transforms the job market, migrant workers are in a more precarious position than others, according to a new study from the Joint Research centre, the European Commission's science and knowledge service.

8h

Common painkillers triple harmful side effects in dementia

Two studies at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference 2018 (AAIC) highlight a significant increase in harmful side effects related to the use of commonly prescribed opioid painkillers in people with dementia. Researchers also identified a mechanism that may be causing the problem.

8h

Painkiller used for dementia 'could make symptoms worse'

Buprenorphine linked to an increase in side-effects including sedation and confusion, scientists find A painkiller commonly used by people living with dementia could make symptoms worse, according to researchers who found it was linked to an increase in problematic side-effects including sedation and confusion. The painkiller buprenorphine is an opioid that is available in several forms, includin

8h

Study shows fin trade still trafficking in threatened sharks

Genetic analysis of 9,200 shark fin by-products in Hong Kong reveals that several threatened shark species are still common in the fin trade after being listed on the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES). Hong Kong is one of the world's largest importers of shark fins, which are used to make the delicacy shark fin soup. The study, published in Con

8h

New purification techniques for healthier aquatic ecosystems

Even tiny amounts of toxins in rivers and lakes can endanger aquatic organisms. The public has become more aware of this environmental problem in recent years. Trace amounts of toxins found in our waterways are included in many of the things we use every day – dishwasher tablets, washing powder and shower gel – as well as pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, and pesticides. These substances are in househol

8h

Thousands more suicides are ‘likely’ as temperatures rise

Projected temperature increases through 2050 could lead to an additional 21,000 suicides in the United States and Mexico, new research finds. By comparing historical temperature and suicide data, researchers found a strong correlation between warm weather and increased suicides. They estimate climate change could lead to suicide rate increases across the US and Mexico. “Surprisingly, these effect

8h

New material for solid oxide fuel cells

Chemists from Ural Federal University and the Institute of High-Temperature Electrochemistry of the Ural Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences together with colleagues from Greece proposed new materials for the cathodes of solid oxide fuel cells.

8h

Bin the bug spray: Study shows EU pesticide ban failing to protect suburban bees

Bees living in suburban habitats are still being exposed to significant levels of pesticides despite the EU ban on the use of neonicotinoid pesticides on flowering crops, new research from University of Sussex scientists shows.

8h

Plenty of habitat for bears in Europe

A new study spearheaded by the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) and the Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) shows that there are still many areas in Europe where bears are extinct but with suitable habitat for hosting the species. An effective management of the species has the potential to help these animals come back in many of these areas, according to the h

8h

Hydrogen and plastic production: New catalyst with a dual function

Chemists at Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB) have developed a new, low-cost catalyst for plastic production. It turns a biorefinery product into a starting material for the synthesis of plastics, which could represent a sustainable alternative to widespread PET. At the same time, the potential energy source hydrogen can also be formed during the reaction.

8h

New research focuses on treating non-cognitive symptoms of people with dementia

New research presented at the Alzheimer's Association InternationalConference (AAIC) 2018 in Chicago focuses on the recent successes and ongoing challenges of drugand non-drug treatments for the non-cognitive symptoms experienced by people living withAlzheimer's dementia.

8h

Host antibodies shape gut microbiome by changing bacteria gene expression

Researchers at the RIKEN Center for Integrative Medical Science in Japan have discovered how antibodies secreted in the gut promote the growth of beneficial bacteria. Their study, which will be published July 24 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, shows that immunoglobulin A (IgA) antibodies can alter the expression of bacterial genes, allowing different bacterial species to cooperate with ea

8h

New catalyst with a dual function for hydrogen and plastic production

Chemists at Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB) have developed a new, low-cost catalyst for plastic production. It turns a biorefinery product into a starting material for the synthesis of plastics, which could represent a sustainable alternative to widespread PET. At the same time, the potential energy source hydrogen can also be formed during the reaction. During the study, the team surrounding Dr. St

8h

Orca vs. Great White | Shark Week's The Daily Bite

On today's episode of The Daily Bite, we learn about sustainable fishing and dive deep into the story of one of the best seafood spots in New York! Also, a preview of Air Jaws: The Hunted. Stream The Daily Bite on Discovery GO: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/the-daily-bite/ Stream Shark Week Episodes: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/shark-week/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/Subscri

8h

Climate change will only affect the economic growth of the poorest nations

Climate change looks set to slow productivity only in the world's poorest nations, according to new research from University of Sussex and La Sapienza economists.

8h

Search engine for 'smart wood'

The enzyme laccase is able to alter the chemical structure of wood on its surface and thus facilitate biochemical modifications without changing the structure of the material. By attaching functional molecules, Empa researchers develop waterproof or antimicrobial wood surfaces, for instance. Also it is possible to make adhesive wood fibers, which can be pressed to fiberboards without any chemical

8h

The world's fastest rotation

Researchers at ETH have made a nanoparticle turn around its own axis a billion times per second. From such measurements of rotating particles, the scientists hope to obtain new insights into the behaviour of materials under extreme stress.

8h

Researchers find quantum 'Maxwell's demon' may give up information to extract work

Thermodynamics is one of the most human of scientific enterprises, according to Kater Murch, associate professor of physics in Arts & Sciences at Washington University in St. Louis.

8h

A clever way to recover weather balloon radiosondes

The meteorological sensors carried into the upper atmosphere by weather balloons are often lost as they return to earth. As part of their Bachelor's project, five EPFL students worked on a system to recover this equipment.

9h

A Rage to Master the Universe

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9h

Are these Danish cities older than previously thought?

Odense, birth place of Hans Christian Andersen, is at least 100 years older than previously thought, say two Danish archaeologists.

9h

Violent crime is like infectious disease – and we know how to stop it spreading

Usually, facial trauma doesn't kill you, but it can cause significant disfigurement. Working as a maxillofacial surgeon in Glasgow in the early 2000s, Christine Goodall treated hundreds, if not thousands, of patients with injuries to the neck, face, head and jaw.

9h

Population declines of mammals and birds linked to rapid warming of climate

The rate at which our planet is warming has been found to be a critical factor in explaining the decline of bird and mammal species, reveals new research by UCL and ZSL (Zoological Society of London).

9h

Trace amounts of isotope from Fukushima disaster found in California wine

A pair of researchers with CNRS/Université de Bordeaux has found trace amounts of the isotope cesium-137 in wines produced in California shortly after the Fukushima nuclear disaster. Michael Pravikoff and Philippe Hubert have written a paper describing their study and have posted it on the arXiv preprint server.

9h

Understanding the Psychological Effects of Childhood Cancer

We must do more to help — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9h

There’s No Brain in the World Like Yours

Guest post by Kayt Sukel Image: Shutterstock In the beloved children’s book, Happy Birthday to You! , Dr. Seuss writes, “Today you are YOU, that is TRUER than true. There is NO ONE alive who is YOUER than YOU.” Those who study the brain understand that the complex interplay of genetics and environment give rise to that “you-ness” of which Dr. Seuss spoke. And, as it turns out, it also makes for u

9h

Five foods to improve your heart health—and two to absolutely avoid

Health If it feels hard to keep up with nutritional advice, don't worry—cardiologists are here to help. Nutritional advice can feel overwhelming. It seems, at least from some headlines, like the advice is constantly changing. Even though the science hasn’t actually changed…

9h

NASA launches X-ray telescope on sounding rocket to study star wreckage

NASA launched a prototype telescope and instrument to observe the X-rays emitted by Cassiopeia A, the expanding debris of an exploded star. The High-Resolution Microcalorimeter X-ray Imaging Rocket (Micro-X) launched July 22 aboard a sub-orbital launch vehicle called a sounding rocket and successfully tested its detector technology.

9h

Aaron Rodgers Suits Up To Tag A Blue Shark | Monster Tag

NFL quarterback Aaron Rodgers is going to need more than shoulder pads when he comes face-to-face with a blue shark. Stream Monster Tag on Discovery GO: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/shark-week/full-episodes/monster-tag Stream Shark Week Episodes: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/shark-week/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.

9h

Kilauea eruption an opportunity for undersea scrutiny

Rice University researchers joined a team of scientists placing seismometers under the ocean off the coast of Hawaii, where the ongoing eruption of Kilauea has already claimed more than 700 homes and added to the island's landmass. The researchers hope for new insight about the landscape under the ocean floor.

9h

Next-Gen Nuclear Is Coming—If Society Wants It

Scores of nuclear startups are aiming to solve the problems that plague nuclear power.

9h

Are Universities Training Socially Minded Programmers?

Vicki Niu arrived at her freshman orientation at Stanford, in 2014, with dreams of changing the world with technology. At Stanford, professors consulted for Facebook and Google, and students took classes in buildings named for Gates, Hewlett, and Packard. Google, Yahoo, and Snapchat had been started by students while they were on campus. “I remember before coming here, I looked up a list of Stanf

10h

The Planck satellite’s picture of the infant universe gets its last tweaks

Scientists have released the last big result from the cosmic microwave background experiment Planck.

10h

Image of the Day: Lit Up

Researchers have updated a method to look at biochemical activities inside living cells.

10h

Is Mars' soil too dry to sustain life?

Life as we know it needs water to thrive. Even so, we see life persist in the driest environments on Earth. But how dry is too dry? At what point is an environment too extreme for even microorganisms, the smallest and often most resilient of lifeforms, to survive? These questions are important to scientists searching for life beyond Earth, including on the planet Mars. To help answer this question

10h

Bacteria 'translator' allows bugs to talk to each other for first time

Scientists have designed a type of translator that allows different types of bacteria to 'talk' to each other.

10h

Big Bang Telescope Finale Marks End of an Era in Cosmology

With the end of Europe’s major Planck mission, researchers are moving to smaller projects studying different aspects of the cosmic microwave background — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

10h

Exploring the chemistry of nuclear explosions

To understand fallout formation from a nuclear explosion, it's important to look at the gas phase of metal oxides within the device.

10h

Think you can tell what others are thinking? Think again

submitted by /u/burtzev [link] [comments]

10h

A mathematical view on cell packing

A key challenge in the embryonic development of complex life forms is the correct specification of cell positions so that organs and limbs grow in the right places. To understand how cells arrange themselves at the earliest stages of development, an interdisciplinary team of applied mathematicians at MIT and experimentalists at Princeton University identified mathematical principles governing the

10h

Scientists revise the Rio Scale for reported alien encounters

A team of international researchers, led by scientists from the University of St Andrews and the SETI Institute in Mountain View, California, redefines alien detection scale.

10h

D-Wave CEO on Future of Quantum Simulations

submitted by /u/trot-trot [link] [comments]

10h

Unwrapping the brewing secrets of barley

University of Adelaide researchers have uncovered fundamental new information about the malting characteristics of barley grains. They say their finding could pave the way to more stable brewing processes or new malts for craft brewers.

10h

Radiation maps of Jupiter's moon Europa—key to future missions

New comprehensive mapping of the radiation pummeling Jupiter's icy moon Europa reveals where scientists should look—and how deep they'll have to go—when searching for signs of habitability and biosignatures.

10h

Twenty years of planetary defense

On March 11, 1998, asteroid astronomers around the world received an ominous message: new observational data on the recently discovered asteroid 1997 XF11 suggested there was a chance that the half-mile-wide (nearly one kilometer) object could hit Earth in 2028.

10h

Insekter skruer op for tempoet: Varmen gør dem vilde og tørstige

Sommervarmen får insekterne til at tørste, og nogle arter mister levesteder. Men ifølge insektforsker kan varmen faktisk også have fordele for de seksbenede.

10h

How Old Is My Pet in Dog Years or Cat Years?

"Just how old do you think my dog is in dog years?" is a question I hear on a regular basis. People love to anthropomorphize pets, attributing human characteristics to them.

10h

Scientists introduce new way to mimic 'machine of machines'

Like small-scale Legos clicking into place, nature autonomously puts together microscopic building blocks. Living systems are biochemical machines that excel at building and moving their parts. Just as machines need energy in some form to operate, living systems are energized by consuming "fuel"—substances or food—reliably. The human body, for example, contracts muscles by the motion of tiny nanom

10h

NASA's 'space botanist' gathers first data

Just days after its successful installation on the International Space Station, NASA's newest Earth-observing mission, the ECOsystem Spaceborne Thermal Radiometer Experiment on Space Station (ECOSTRESS), has collected its first science data on Earth's surface temperature.

10h

Possible breakthrough in understanding how antibiotics treat bacteria

Scientists from Newcastle University and the UK's ISIS Neutron and Muon research facility have worked together on a new project that is increasing our understanding of how antibiotics treat bacteria.

10h

Satellite tracking reveals Philippine waters are important for endangered whale sharks

A new scientific study published in PeerJ – the Journal of Life and Environmental Sciences has tracked juvenile whale sharks across the Philippines emphasising the importance of the archipelago for the species. The study is the most complete tracking study of whale sharks in the country, with satellite tags deployed on different individuals in multiple sites.

10h

Paleontologists discover largest dinosaur foot to date

As it turns out, 'Bigfoot' was a dinosaur — a giant, plant-eating one. A new study based on fossils excavated in Wyoming reveals the largest dinosaur foot ever found and identifies it as a brachiosaur, a type of sauropod dinosaur that was among the largest land animals on Earth. The work, published today in the journal PeerJ, also confirms that 150 million years ago brachiosaurs called a huge swa

10h

Bigfoot was a dinosaur

The dinosaur foot known as 'Bigfoot,' described in a new scientific paper recently published in the open-access journal PeerJ — the Journal of Life and Environmental Sciences, was excavated in 1998 by an expedition from the University of Kansas, with Anthony Maltese, lead author of the study, as member of the crew. After detailed preparation and study, Maltese and his international team of resear

10h

What's your idea to 3-D print on the moon – to make it feel like home?

A new ESA-led project is investigating the ways that 3-D printing could be used to create and run a habitat on the Moon. Everything from building materials to solar panels, equipment and tools to clothes, even nutrients and food ingredients can potentially be 3-D printed. But if you were headed to the Moon, what would you want to 3-D print, to turn a lunar base into a place that feels like home? T

10h

Real-time imaging of chemical processes

National University of Singapore scientists observe the real-time formation of hollow structures in the galvanic replacement (GR) reaction between silver and gold with nanometre resolution, gaining insights on the mechanisms behind the structural transformations.

10h

Practicum students unearth a mammoth ancestor

While studying ancient soils in the Bograd region, students of the Biological Institute performing a practicum in the Republic of Khakassia discovered large bone remnants that supposedly belong to the ancestor of woolly mammoths—the trogontherium elephant. These mammals lived in the early Pleistocene—from 800 to 400 thousand years ago. Such findings are much less common than bones of woolly mammot

10h

Antibiotic resistance in a leech's gut: Even trace amounts of antibiotics boost resistant bacteria

Plastic surgery patients were getting infections with antibiotic resistant bacteria, and no one knew why. UConn microbiologists found the answer in a leech's gut. Their research, published today in mBio, provides proof that tiny levels of antibiotics found in the environment can encourage bacterial resistance.

10h

How to Supercharge Instagram Stories: Ask Questions, Use Stickers, Save Highlights

Using Instagram's "creative tools" for Stories, you can flaunt your personality and tell a story all your own.

11h

That Purple Kush You're Toking Might Be a Genetic Imposter

ACDC and Lamb's Bread and Ghost OG, oh my: Researchers compare the genetics of cannabis strains and find … irregularities.

11h

Maybe Bigfoot Was a Dinosaur, If These Fossils Are Any Indication

This titanosaur sported feet that were three times bigger than those of the famous Lakers basketball player.

11h

11h

'Good' Cholesterol May Be Bad for Some People

Having high levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, the so-called good cholesterol, is usually considered positive. But that might not be true for everyone.

11h

Paleontologists have ID’d the world’s biggest known dinosaur foot

Bigfoot has been found in Wyoming. It’s not a hairy, apelike creature; it’s a dinosaur.

11h

Paleontologists discover largest dinosaur foot to date

As it turns out, "Bigfoot" was a dinosaur—a giant, plant-eating one. A new study based on fossils excavated in Wyoming reveals the largest dinosaur foot ever found and identifies it as a brachiosaur, a type of sauropod dinosaur that was among the largest land animals on Earth. The work, published today in the journal PeerJ, also confirms that 150 million years ago brachiosaurs called a huge swath

11h

Satellite tracking reveals Philippine waters are important for endangered whale sharks

A new scientific study published in PeerJ—the Journal of Life and Environmental Sciences has tracked juvenile whale sharks across the Philippines emphasising the importance of the archipelago for the species. The study is the most complete tracking study of whale sharks in the country, with satellite tags deployed on different individuals in multiple sites.

11h

Gronk Wants You to Save Tiger Sharks | Monster Tag

NFL tight end Rob Gronkowski learns about the craziest things tiger sharks have eaten. Stream Monster Tag on Discovery GO: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/shark-week/full-episodes/monster-tag Stream Shark Week Episodes: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/shark-week/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery https://www.face

11h

Of Gods and Platypuses: Is There a Science of Culture?

Welcome to the idea of cultural epidemiology — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

Social Media's Stepped-Up Crackdown on Terrorists Still Falls Short

YouTube, Facebook and other sites are working together to find and delete extremist propaganda and recruiting videos, but a new study says they can do better — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

Markets Punish Behavior That Reflects A CEO's Lack Of Integrity

A recent study finds companies whose CEOs committed a personal indiscretion — such as infidelity, substance abuse and dishonesty — experienced a decline in shareholder value.

11h

Eleven babies die after Dutch women given Viagra in drug trial

Research halted as 10 to 15 other participants wait to see if their children affected The death of 11 babies born to women who were given Viagra during a drug trial has led to the termination of the experiment – and an anxious wait for other mothers involved. The trial was designed to test whether sildenafil, a medication sold under the brand name Viagra, could help boost babies’ growth in the wo

11h

It's rockettime – følg opsendelsen af hollandsk stearin-raket

Indehaverne af europarekorden for amatørraketter, hollandske Dare, vil tirsdag bryde nye grænser med en ny hybridraket, Stratos III.

11h

Report from the leech's gut: Even trace amounts of antibiotics boost resistant bacteria

An international team of researchers recently took a deep dive into the microbiome of blood-sucking medicinal leeches and made a surprising observation: low levels of antibiotics in the animal's environment improved the survival of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in its gut. Those resistant bacteria, in turn, displaced healthy bacteria. The findings, published this week in mBio, could help explain w

11h

Antibiotic resistance in a leech's gut

Plastic surgery patients were getting infections with antibiotic resistant bacteria, and no one knew why. UConn microbiologists found the answer in a leech's gut. Their research, published today in mBio, provides proof that tiny levels of antibiotics found in the environment can encourage bacterial resistance.

11h

Computing power solves molecular mystery

Chemical reactions take place around us all the time—in the air we breathe, the water we drink, and in the factories that make products we use in everyday life. And those reactions are unexpectedly fast. Given optimal conditions, molecules can react with each other in a quadrillionth of a second.

11h

Google parent Alphabet sees record highs despite EU fine

Google parent Alphabet shares lifted Monday on a stronger-than-expected earnings report for the past quarter, as the tech giant's results eased concerns over huge fines imposed by the European Union for antitrust actions.

11h

Materials scientists propose a novel approach for obtaining films for solar cells

Materials scientists from Lomonosov Moscow State University explained the laws of dissolution and crystallization of hybrid perovskites and have proposed a novel approach for obtaining films for solar cells. They have explained the key mechanisms of interaction of hybrid perovskites with solvents and suggested new approaches to obtain perovskite light-absorbing layers for thin-film solar cells fro

11h

Chemists develop fast technique to identify the products of poisonous substance

Researchers of MSU Chemistry Department have patented a speedy method to determine compounds remaining after application of phosphorus-containing poisons. Phosphorus-containing compounds are organic molecules containing the carbon-phosphorus chemical bond. The organic compounds of phosphorus are used as insecticides, as medications and as motor oil antioxidants . But some organophosphorous substan

11h

Rise in vehicle ramming attacks a 'social virus' spread through media networks

Researchers at the University of Kent and Copenhagen University sought to understand why vehicle attacks, such as in Nice in July 2016, Finsbury Park in 2017 or Charlottesville also in 2017, have become so prominent in the last few years, having previously been a rarity. In their analysis, Dr. Vincent Miller from the School of Social Policy, Sociology and Social Research at the University of Kent

11h

Physicists design a nano-resonator with strong nonlinear response

An international research team has found a way to make light frequency conversion at the nanoscale 100 times more efficient. The new method is based on isolated dielectric nanoparticles supporting bound states in the continuum. Such states form when radiating field oscillations in the particle suppress each other. This way, the electromagnetic energy inside the particle can be locked securely. The

11h

Slowdown of North Atlantic circulation rocked the climate of ancient northern Europe

Major abrupt shifts occurred in the climate of ancient northern Europe, according to a new study from University of Helsinki, Finland. The research reports that sudden cold spells lasting hundreds of years took place in the middle of the warm Eemian climate period, about 120,000 years ago. These cold intervals saw a fall in temperature of a few degrees, and replacement of forests by tundra at the

11h

Artificial intelligence saves water for water users associations

Agriculture uses 70 percent of the water in the world, and this appears to be an upward trend regarding water needs. As the demand in other industry sectors is also increasing, and the effects of climate change exacerbate water shortages, water saving measures have become an unavoidable challenge for maintaining the sector and preserving life.

11h

A new 'periodic table' for nanomaterials

A new approach could help materials scientists identify the appropriate molecules to use in order to synthesize target nanomaterials. The method was developed by Daniel Packwood of Kyoto University's Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences (iCeMS) and Taro Hitosugi of the Tokyo Institute of Technology. It involves connecting the chemical properties of molecules with the nanostructures that

11h

Scientists present metamaterial for solar cells and nano-optics

A research team from the NUST MISIS Laboratory of Superconducting Metamaterials led by Alexey Basharin, Senior Lecturer and Candidate of Technical Sciences, has developed a metamaterial-dielectric that has unique characteristics and is easy to manufacture. This ease of access will allow researchers to use it to create the latest optical devices. The research results were published in Laser & Photo

12h

Fixing America’s Forgotten Places

FRESNO , Calif.—Census tract 06019000100 has a lot going for it. Locals cheer the melting-pot atmosphere, the arts scene, the nearby nature, and the affordable housing—affordable in national terms , which feels all the more amazing given that it is a quick drive both to the grandeur of Yosemite and to the tech hub of the Bay Area. Start your car up and grab a coffee here at 9 a.m., and you could

12h

The Political Education of Silicon Valley

How the anti-government tech-libertarianism of John Perry Barlow gave way to enthusiasm for wealth redistribution and a Berniecrat named Ro Khanna.

12h

Dansk professor: Gør som i Shanghai og bekæmp skadedyr med randafgrøder og færre pesticider

Professor fra Københavns Universitet har deltaget i 15-årigt forskningsprojekt i Shanghai, som viser, at rismarker omgivet af soja, majs og aubergine havde færre skadedyr og derfor mindre brug for kemisk bekæmpelse.

12h

Datatilsynet: Fra næste år bør også private virksomheder kryptere emails

Efter GDPR henstiller Datatilsynet private til at kryptere emails med følsomme personoplysninger. Det har været et krav i det offentlige siden år 2000.

12h

Stigningen i angreb med køretøjer er et ’socialt virus’, der spredes gennem medienetværk

Forskere på University of Kent og Københavns Universitet har undersøgt hvorfor antallet…

12h

Why we shouldn’t blame the world’s woes on the stupidity of others

It's easy to think the world is gripped by a collective failure of human intelligence. But the facts don't bear that out – and we should beware our own biases

12h

Japanese computers may go haywire when the emperor abdicates next year

Japanese computers could go haywire next year when the emperor steps down. The calendar is based on the emperor’s reign and most tech is not ready for the change

12h

There are more suicides in US and Mexico when the temperature rises

Hikes in average monthly temperatures are linked to higher suicide rates, which means climate change may lead to thousands of extra suicide deaths

12h

Ocean acidification could leave fish unable to smell their prey

As the climate warms and carbon dioxide levels rise in the oceans, odours that help fish meet mates and hunt prey will be harder to smell

12h

We could find life on Europa by just scratching its surface

It might be possible to find evidence of life just a few centimetres below the surface of Jupiter’s moon Europa

12h

We're Drowning In Plastic Trash. Jenna Jambeck Wants To Save Us

The engineer views a landfill as a living ecosystem, and the plastic that clogs it as a serious threat that crowds out life and never goes away. Can we eliminate the waste before it smothers us? (Image credit: Courtesy of Amy Brooks)

12h

Iris scanner can distinguish dead eyeballs from living ones

In theory, an iris scanner can be hacked using an eyeball plucked from the victim. Now researchers have trained a machine-vision system to tell the difference between dead irises and live ones.

13h

Carboxylic acids behave as superacids on the surface of water

Atmospheric particles with high water content also known as aerosol droplets are widely found on Earth and play a significant role in the planetary chemistry and meteorology. These particles are generally produced in relatively clean air after emissions of gases that nucleate and condense. Many times this process is dominated by organic acids that have been observed in heavily polluted cities. A c

13h

207 miljø- og klimaaktivister blev dræbt sidste år

Rapport fra britisk miljø- og klimaorganisation viser en stigning i antallet af drab på miljøaktivister. Især i Sydamerika.

13h

First randomized trial of 'kick and kill' approach to HIV cure leaves puzzles to be solved

Researchers have reported the results of the first randomized clinical trial to test a novel strategy involving waking up and then killing the 'sleeping' HIV that is hiding in the body using an experimental approach known as 'kick and kill.'

13h

Randers Kommune blev flere gange advaret om hovsa-mails med borgernes persondata

En almindelig borger har på sit domæne Anders.dk modtaget mange mails fra medarbejdere i Randers Kommune, som ved en slåfejl har sendt med CPR-numre og andre personlige oplysninger.

13h

NES Health: Tooth Fairy Marketing

NES Health claims to scan the human biofield, detect imbalances, and correct them with infoceuticals. It's not science, it's clever marketing based on fantasy.

15h

Academic writes 270 Wikipedia pages in a year to get female scientists noticed

Researcher Jess Wade says efforts to attract girls into science are not evidence-based – and are not working Jess Wade is a scientist on a mission. She wants every woman who has achieved something impressive in science to get the prominence and recognition they deserve – starting with a Wikipedia entry. “I’ve done about 270 in the past year,” says Wade, a postdoctoral researcher in the field of p

15h

Det amerikanske forsvar investerer i fly med tiltrotorer

Tiltrotorfly har længere rækkevidde og højere topfart end konventionelle helikoptere. De vinder i øjeblikket frem i det amerikanske forsvar, hvor også de første store kampdroner med tiltrotor er på vej.

15h

What would your dog do to help if you were upset? Quite a bit, study finds

Dogs are thought to be very aware of people's emotions, but if a pup's owner was really upset, would it actually go out of its way to offer help and comfort? Some not only will, but they'll also overcome obstacles in a hurry to do it.

17h

Few young women with PID screened for HIV or syphilis in emergency departments

Although women who have pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) are at heightened risk for also being infected with syphilis and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), few adolescent females diagnosed with PID in the nation's pediatric emergency departments undergo laboratory tests for HIV or syphilis, according to a retrospective cohort study published online July 24, 2018, in Pediatrics.

17h

Hordes of research robots could be hijacked for fun and sabotage

As more robots are connected to the internet, they will become targets for cybercrime and mischief.

18h

Monarch Butterfly Conservationist Dies

Lincoln Brower, an American entomologist famous for his work to conserve the monarch populations of Mexico and the US, has passed away at age 86.

20h

It’s time for the July Marathon!

Aw yiss. No doubt you’ve been waiting all month, and now it’s here! Take a break from the summer sun (or the winter chill, if you’re down under) and relax with hundreds upon hundreds of cubes! The July Marathon has come. Starting at 8 PM EDT on 7/25 you’ll have 24 hours to grow and complete 1-2 cells! Bonus points and cell naming details are in your competition notification on eyewire.org. If the

22h

River flow over ancient rocks hints when Earth got oxygen

A new study supports the theory that oxygen first appeared in Earth’s lower atmosphere 2.7 billion years ago—making life as we know it possible. The sulfur record hidden in ancient rock marks the dramatic change in the planet’s atmosphere that gave rise to complex life—but rocks are local indicators. For the big picture, biogeochemists used water that flows over and erodes the rocks as a proxy. T

22h

What does new info mean for the Mueller investigation?

Special Prosecutor Robert Mueller’s investigation into ties between Russia and Donald Trump’s 2016 presidential campaign seems to be gathering steam with the recent indictment of twelve Russian military intelligence officers for hacking into Hillary Clinton’s campaign and the Democratic Party. “It’s an open question whether a sitting president can be criminally prosecuted.” This week the New York

22h

We project our own sense of emotions onto others’ faces

How we perceive the emotion on someone else’s face depends on how we understand these emotions, research finds. A new study, which appears in the journal Nature Human Behaviour , offers insights into how we recognize facial expressions of emotion, which is critical for our social lives, as well as for business and diplomacy. “Perceiving other people’s facial emotion expressions often feels as if

22h

Diamond Company Plans To Move 200 Elephants From South Africa To Mozambique

De Beers Group said Monday that it is transporting them from an overcrowded reserve to "help secure their future." (Image credit: Godong.UIG via Getty Images)

22h

The Atlantic Daily: Prodigal in Expression

What We’re Following Fighting Words: President Donald Trump responded to a speech by Iranian President Hassan Rouhani with an all-caps tweet that warned of “CONSEQUENCES THE LIKES OF WHICH FEW THROUGHOUT HISTORY HAVE EVER SUFFERED BEFORE” if Iran should ever threaten the United States. While political and economic conditions in the two countries make it unlikely that these comments will lead to w

23h

Managerial support for depressed employees linked to fewer days off work

The provision of managerial support and help for employees with depression is linked to lower rates of workplace absenteeism, finds an international survey study of practice in 15 countries in different regions of the world, published in the online journal BMJ Open.

23h

How tons of dust from Africa tamp down storms in Texas

Although dust from the Sahara Desert in Africa—totaling a staggering 2 to 9 trillion pounds worldwide—has been almost a biblical plague on Texas and much of the Southern United States in recent weeks, it also appears to be a severe storm killer. Bowen Pan, Tim Logan, and Renyi Zhang in the Texas A&M University’s department of atmospheric sciences analyzed recent NASA satellite images and computer

23h

Global Health: For the First Time, a Female Ebola Survivor Infects Others

A Liberian woman recovered after tending to her dying brother, but infected her family a year later. Being pregnant may have reignited the virus in her.

23h

Dr. Seuss might have written the Lorax after seeing these creatures in Kenya

Animals Seeing these mustachioed monkeys during an episode of writer’s block gave Theodor Seuss Geisel the inspiration he needed to write his memorable ecological fable New research reports that the Lorax's tubby poise was inspired by a real animal—the patas monkey—and the monkey’s bond with a real tree, the whistling thorn acacia. In…

23h

Pediatricians warn against chemical additives in food for kids

Common food additives found in meats, plastic packaging or metal cans may contain chemicals that harm children’s health.

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Why Trump Won't Stop Talking About the Carter Page Wiretap

The FISA court's secrecy and complexity make it a perfect punching bag for Trump and his defenders.

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The Year the Walls Came Down at Comic-Con

The convention has taken on a new subtext than it has in previous years—and that's probably for the best.

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The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: THE WAR ON TWITTER

Written by Elaine Godfrey ( @elainejgodfrey ), Maddie Carlisle ( @maddiecarlisle2 ), and Olivia Paschal (@ oliviacpaschal ) Today in 5 Lines In a late-night tweet, President Trump warned Iranian President Hassan Rouhani to “NEVER, EVER THREATEN THE UNITED STATES AGAIN.” Trump was apparently responding to earlier remarks by Rouhani, who said a U.S. war with Iran would be the “mother of all wars.”

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I squeezed through a 7-inch passage to find ancient humans

Science Excavating a long-hidden cemetery in a cave. In 2013, an anthropologist traveled to South Africa to excavate the remains of ancient humans. To reach them, she had to squeeze through a narrow, winding cave system.

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Muzzling the Talking Heads of the ‘Deep State’

The concept of a “deep state” anti-Trump conspiracy among intelligence and law-enforcement officials has been a long-running theme of the Trump administration and the conservative media, repeated nearly nightly on Fox News’ opinion programs. On Monday, the White House acted on that impulse, threatening to revoke the security clearances of several former intelligence and law-enforcement officials

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Shortage Of Large-Animal Vets Leaves Markets Vulnerable To Disease Outbreaks

Large-animal vets ensure the health of cows, pigs and horses, but they're also the first line of defense against diseases that can spread from animals to humans — so a shortage leaves producers, and global markets, vulnerable to devastating outbreaks.

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Matter: Years of Education Influenced by Genetic Makeup, Enormous Study Finds

More than a thousand variations in DNA were involved in how long people stayed in school, but the effect of each gene was weak, and the data did not predict educational attainment for individuals.

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Burton Richter, a Nobel Winner for Plumbing Matter, Dies at 87

He shared the 1976 physics prize for the discovery of an unexpected particle, a building block of the universe, in a high-speed accelerator he had designed.

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Hip fracture patients recover from operations faster with enhanced care recovery program

The use of an Enhanced Recovery After Surgery (ERAS) approach for hip fracture operations allows patients to return home faster and get back to normal activities sooner, according to new findings presented today by researchers at the American College of Surgeons 2018 Quality and Safety Conference.

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Two quality improvement programs lead to fewer postoperative complications

Two presurgery checklists from the American College of Surgeons (ACS) Strong for Surgery (S4S) program that incorporate best practices for engaging patients in preparing for their upcoming operations significantly improved lifestyle factors that pose an increased risk for postoperative complications or help support healing and postoperative recovery.

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Mysterious Substance and 'Devilry' Blamed for 3-Hour 'Solar Eclipse' in Russia

The summer sun can shine nearly 24 hours a day in this part of Siberia. On July 20, it was blotted out for 3 hours by a nightmarish cloud.

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Robert Blizzard, Who Gave Children Hormones to Grow, Dies at 94

A pediatric pioneer, he liked to say he had added 11 miles to the height of the U.S. population. But growth hormones were later banned and replaced.

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Americans Think Pot Is Healthy, But Scientists Still Have Questions

Have you been fooled by marijuana marketing?

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Researchers say this 5-minute technique could help you fall asleep more quickly

To get a good night's sleep, is it better to write down your achievements or the to-do list for the next day? Researchers tested the two different sleep techniques in the lab. Read More

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Discovery reveals how obesity causes disease — and two ways to stop it

New research explains why obesity causes harmful inflammation that can lead to diabetes, clogged arteries and other health problems. Doctors may be able to use this knowledge to battle these chronic diseases and others driven by damaging inflammation.

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Generation of random numbers by measuring phase fluctuations from a laser diode with a silicon-on-in

Researchers have shown that a chip-based device measuring a millimeter square could be used to generate quantum-based random numbers at gigabit per second speeds. The tiny device requires little power and could enable stand-alone random number generators or be incorporated into laptops and smart phones to offer real-time encryption.

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Liquid microscopy technique reveals new problem with lithium-oxygen batteries

Using an advanced, new microscopy technique that can visualize chemical reactions occurring in liquid environments, researchers have discovered a new reason lithium-oxygen batteries — which promise up to five times more energy than the lithium-ion batteries that power electric vehicles and cell phones — tend to slow down and die after just a few charge/discharge cycles.

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Accredited bariatric center reduces postop complications while increasing surgical volume

Bariatric surgical team lowers rates of rehospitalization, surgical site and urinary tract infections, and bleeding during a five-year quality improvement project.

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Qiagen: Microbiome Awards 2018

Studying the microbiome? Tell us about it!

1d

What in the Whirled? Tiny, Floating Dumbbell Rotates 60 Billion Times Per Minute

An object that can rotate 60 billion times per minute? It's enough to make your head spin.

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