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Nyheder2018juli25

 

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Scientists Discover the First Large Body of Liquid Water on Mars

"Going from zero bodies of water to one is a big change, for sure, but the full extent of this discovery depends on what we find next."

6h

Bundvendinger, dødt ålegræs og lugten af svovlbrinte: Danske fjorde nærmer sig en katastrofe

Danske forskere er alvorligt bekymrede for situationen i de indre danske farvande med usædvanligt tidligt og kraftigt iltsvind. Holder vejrudsigten, så går det helt galt, lyder det.

16h

Forskere har fundet en sø på Mars

Forskere har præsenteret fund af en saltvandssø på Mars 1,5 kilometer under isen.

5h

LATEST

Feel lightheaded when standing up? You may have a greater risk of dementia

People who feel faint, dizzy or lightheaded when standing up may be experiencing a sudden drop in blood pressure called orthostatic hypotension. Now a new study says middle-aged people who experience such a drop may have a greater risk of developing dementia or stroke decades later. The study is published in the July 25, 2018, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy

2min

New study: There’s a body of water at Mars' Southern pole. But it's c-c-c-o-l-d.Liquid Water Lake Mars

If confirmed by future observations, this would be the most significant discovery of liquid water on Mars yet. Read More

9min

Artificial intelligence will both disrupt and benefit the workplace, Stanford scholar says

Visiting scholar James Timbie says that the artificial intelligence revolution will involve humans and machines working together, with the best results coming from humans supported by intelligent machines. Read More

9min

Sky's no limit: Japan firm to fly wedding plaques into space

The sky is no longer the limit for lovers looking for unusual ways to commemorate their nuptials, with a Japanese company now offering to blast commemorative wedding plaques into space.

11min

16min

Border Wall Will Deliver A Huge Blow To Biodiversity

Thousands of scientists around the world sign a statement that warns the existence of 1,500 species will be imperiled if President Donald Trump’s wall is erected.

17min

Ten-Minute Sabbatical

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17min

The weirdest things we learned this week: Curing syphilis with malaria, ejecting bears from planes, and discovering new beer yeasts

Science Our editors scrounged up some truly bizarre facts. What’s the weirdest thing you learned this week? Well, whatever it is, we promise you’ll have an even weirder answer if you listen to PopSci’s newest podcast.

25min

Amphibians face many challenges in Brazilian rain forest

Deforestation remains the biggest threat to animals that call the rain forest "home." However, even measured, sensible development projects can have unforeseen effects because there's no model to follow.

31min

Test dig selv: Hvor meget ved du om hiv og aids?

Hiv-positive i behandling smitter ikke, fastslår et nyt studie. Hvor meget ved du om sygdommen, der stadig er underlagt mange myter?

32min

30 Years Ago: A Look Back at 1988

Three decades ago, the Winter Olympics took place in Calgary and the Summer Olympics were held in Seoul, candidates Michael Dukakis and George Bush competed for the 1988 U.S. presidential election, the Soviet Union withdrew its troops from Afghanistan, NASA’s Space Shuttle program resumed launches following the 1986 Challenger disaster, a passenger aircraft was brought down by a terrorist bomb ov

43min

A Better Prosthetic Foot for the Developing World

A Better Prosthetic Foot for the Developing World A new approach to prosthetic design allows for quick and easy fitting while keeping the costs low. ProstheticFoot_topNteaser.jpg Image credits: Courtesy of the researchers. Technology Wednesday, July 25, 2018 – 14:30 Marcus Woo, Contributor (Inside Science) — Losing a leg can be profoundly debilitating. And it's especially so for those in develop

44min

Assault during pregnancy can lead to low birth weight and pre-term babies

Physical assault during pregnancy, especially in the third trimester, can significantly increase the rates of babies born at very low birth weights (under 3.3 pounds) and very pre-term (fewer than 34 weeks gestation), according to a study published by researchers at Princeton University, Stanford University and the University of Michigan.

45min

Life on Mars: What do we know?

Victoria Gill takes a looks at four key moments in the search for life on the red planet.

1h

NASA's most technically complex space observatory requires precision

The James Webb Space Telescope is of one the most ambitious and technically complex missions NASA has ever set its focus upon. Building an infrared observatory of this magnitude, power and complexity has never been attempted before. In order to ensure seamless operation in space, the cutting-edge technology incorporated into Webb must be rigorously tested prior to launch.

1h

Kissing up to the boss can increase employees' bad behavior in the workplace, study shows

Kissing up to the boss at work may help boost employees' careers but it also depletes the employees' self-control resources, leaving them more susceptible to behaving badly in the workplace, a new study has found.

1h

The Roots of Pompeo’s Declaration in Support of Crimea

U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said Wednesday the United States would never recognize Russia’s annexation in 2014 of Ukraine’s Crimea. “As we did in the Welles Declaration in 1940, the United States reaffirms as policy its refusal to recognize the Kremlin’s claim of sovereignty over territory seized by force in contravention of international law … [T]he United States rejects Russia’s attempt

1h

Smokers hazy on actual benefits of lung cancer screenings

Patients seem to be confused about the actual benefits and limitations of lung cancer screenings, according to a study by the Veterans Affairs Center of Innovation for Veteran-Centered and Value-Driven Care in Seattle.

1h

A Crack in the Ivanka Trump Brand

On Tuesday night, a visit to the website of the Ivanka Trump brand turned up a sharply cut floral dress and a pair of suede sandals on broad, three-inch heels. “Bring on the heat” unspooled in elegant italics across the site’s landing page. By then, the message had acquired an awkward dual meaning. Earlier in the day, Ivanka Trump had acknowledged that she would be closing her apparel-and-accesso

1h

Is Hillsdale College Gaining the World and Losing Its Soul?

Hillsdale College was founded in 1844 by Christian abolitionists who refused to discriminate on the basis of race, gender, or nationality. Today the small liberal arts school boasts a net worth approaching $1 billion, a monthly opinion digest that reaches more than 3.8 million subscribers, alumni in high-ranking positions in the Trump administration, significant influence among members of the con

1h

Biocatalysis Brief: Identifying Novel Biocatalyst Candidates via High-throughput Stability Monitoring

NanoTemper Technologies invites you to join them for an educational webinar.

1h

NASA's most technically complex space observatory requires precision

The James Webb Space Telescope is of one the most ambitious and technically complex missions NASA has ever set its focus upon. Building an infrared observatory of this magnitude, power and complexity has never been attempted before. In order to ensure seamless operation in space, the cutting-edge technology incorporated into Webb must be rigorously tested prior to launch.

1h

Amphibians face many challenges in Brazilian rain forest

Deforestation remains the biggest threat to animals that call the rain forest 'home.' However, even measured, sensible development projects can have unforeseen effects because there's no model to follow. Now, thanks to new research published in Ecological Applications, there's a guide to help land-use development and efforts to conserve amphibians, which are rapidly declining worldwide.

1h

Newly identified target may help with drug discovery for chronic inflammatory diseases

In a study published online July 25 in the journal Nature, University of California San Diego School of Medicine researchers identified a signaling pathway that activates the NLRP3 inflammasome implicated in several severe chronic inflammatory disorders.

1h

Kissing up to the boss can increase employees' bad behavior in the workplace, study shows

Kissing up to the boss at work may help boost employees' careers but it also depletes the employees' self-control resources, leaving them more susceptible to behaving badly in the workplace, a new study has found.

1h

Scientists identify biomarkers to detect and prevent stillbirth

New biomarkers found in maternal blood may allow doctors to prevent stillbirth, according to new research at the University of Alberta.

1h

Better clinical trials must address 'critically low' dementia research shortfall

Against a backdrop of a number of high-profile clinical trial failures, research by the University of Exeter, presented in posters at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference (AAIC) 2018, highlights the importance of conducting more targeted trials.

1h

This Man Says a 'Rare Gene' Cured His Type 1 Diabetes. Experts Are Skeptical.

Did a man in England really get cured from an incurable disease?

1h

These animals will self-amputate arms, legs, and even sex organs to survive

Animals And for other weird reasons, too. Whether it’s fluorescent lights at work or actual danger, escape is in our DNA. But some animals take escape to an extreme. Yes, we’re talking about self-amputation.

1h

Possible death of the Universe scenario proposed

Some catastrophic scenarios may include the Big Rip during which matter of the Universe and the spacetime are progressively torn apart through the expansion. Odintsov and Oikonomou devoted one of their previous works to demonstrating how the Big Rip models are linked with the accelerating expansion of the Universe. Dark energy, which is theorized to be the force of expansion, is still a major myst

1h

Contact sports associated with Lewy body disease, Parkinson's disease symptoms, dementia

There is mounting evidence that repetitive head impacts from contact sports and other exposures are associated with the neurodegenerative disease chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) and dementia. A new study suggests that contact sports athletes may also be at increased risk for Lewy Body Disease, which can cause Parkinson's disease, a brain disorder that leads to problems with movement and thi

1h

Zika viruses show potential as treatment for high-risk childhood cancer

Zika virus may hold potential as a cancer treatment for neuroblastoma, a rare-but-deadly childhood cancer, according to early findings from basic research published today in PLOS ONE.

1h

An insect-inspired drone deforms upon impact

An origami-like drone developed at EPFL is flexible enough to absorb shocks without breaking before returning to its initial shape. This new type of drone, which was inspired by insect wings, draws on the advantages of both stiff and flexible structures.

1h

Are boys more cliquey than girls?

Children's friendship groups in secondary school remain consistent over time and are often structured around gender, with boys forming the most tight-knit bands, according to new research published in PLOS ONE. The findings suggests boys might be more 'cliquey' than girls, and that factors such as location and timetable may have an impact on the social networks that children develop.

1h

Soil bugs munch on plastics

Thin mulch films made of polyethylene are used in agriculture in numerous countries, where they cause extensive soil contamination. Researchers at ETH Zurich and Eawag have now identified an alternative: films made of the polymer PBAT biodegrade in soils.

1h

Turbo-charging chemotherapy for lung cancer

Lung cancer, the leading cause of cancer death, is often treated with chemotherapy – but its effectiveness is limited by cancer cell resistance and by a harmful side effect: kidney damage.In mouse models of lung cancer, Australian researchers have shown that the naturally occurring hormone follistatin makes chemotherapy much more effective, while also preventing kidney injury.If successful in huma

1h

Direct evidence of biodegradation of polymers in agricultural soil

Scientists studying a polyester called PBAT widely used in agriculture have demonstrated its biodegradation in soil — a process that has been suspected to occur, though not conclusively proven, they say.

1h

Mapping mountaintop coal mining's yearly spread in Appalachia

A new mapping tool shows, in more detail than ever before, the land laid bare by mountaintop coal mining in central Appalachia each year, going back more than three decades. The tool uses satellite imagery to identify and map the annual extent of mining activity across portions of Kentucky, Tennessee, Virginia and West Virginia. The researchers say the updated maps will make it easier to assess an

1h

Something fishy on the high seas

In two new groundbreaking studies, researchers from Dalhousie University, Global Fishing Watch and SkyTruth have applied cutting-edge technology to map exactly where fishing boats may be transferring their catch to cargo vessels at sea. Known as transshipment, the practice increases the efficiency of fishing by eliminating trips back to port for fishing vessels. However, as it often occurs out of

1h

Parkinson's treatments being developed could benefit most people with the disease

A gene linked to 3 to 4 percent of people with Parkinson's disease could play an important role in most, if not all, people with the disease, according to a new study. The findings suggest that treatments being developed for this small group of people may benefit many more patients than previously thought.

1h

Protein affected by rare Parkinson's mutation may lurk behind many cases of the disease

Mutations in the gene LRRK2 have been linked to about three percent of Parkinson's disease cases. Researchers have now found evidence that the activity of LRRK2 protein might be affected in many more patients with Parkinson's disease, even when the LRRK2 gene itself is not mutated. The study was published in Science Translational Medicine and was supported in part by the National Institute of Neur

1h

Immune response likely culprit in eyelid gland condition that causes dry eye

Immune cells that normally rush in to protect the eyes from infection might actually be disrupting moisturizing glands and causing dry eye, a disease that afflicts more than 30 million people in the United States.

1h

Diamond doves do not optimize their movements for flexible perches

The diamond dove may preferentially select large, stiff materials for takeoff and landing sites, according to a study published on July 25 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE. The unexpected findings, reported by Kristen Crandell of the University of Montana and colleagues, suggest that the diamond dove does not adjust its takeoff or landing behavior depending on the flexibility of the perch.

1h

Archeological plant remains point to southwest Amazonia as crop domestication center

The remains of domesticated crop plants at an archaeological site in southwest Amazonia supports the idea that this was an important region in the early history of crop cultivation, according to a study published July 25, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Jennifer Watling from the Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology at the University of São Paulo, Brazil and colleagues.

1h

Stoner study: Regular marijuana use contributes to lack of motivation, foresight

There's a reason you're not motivated when you smoke weed: it ruins your episodic memory. Read More

1h

Study: Students infected with ‘cat parasite’ more likely to major in business

A new study shows that U.S. students infected with the Toxoplasma gondii parasite are more likely to be business managers and entrepreneurs. Read More

1h

Heat Waves: A Global Sweat

Is this just a particularly hot summer? Or are we experiencing a natural disaster? (Image credit: BORIS HORVAT/AFP/Getty Images)

2h

Mars Has a Lake of Liquid Water: Study

Radar data indicate that the Red Planet's southern polar ice sheets cover a 20-kilometer-wide body of water.

2h

Nanotemper Sept. 20

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2h

How to Watch the Century's Longest Lunar Eclipse from Anywhere in the World

The longest lunar eclipse of the 21st century is coming Friday (July 27). Here's how you can avoid missing out.

2h

Students find foundations for massive stars

For three years, Jenny Calahan led fellow undergraduate students at the University of Arizona (UA) in research to help unravel the mystery of how the galaxy's most massive stars are born.

2h

Here’s why wounds heal faster in the mouth than in other skin

Wounds in the mouth heal speedily thanks to some master regulators of immune reactions.

2h

Unisexual salamander evolution: A long, strange trip

The reproductive history of the unisexual, ladies-only salamander species is full of evolutionary surprises.

2h

Diamond doves do not optimize their movements for flexible perches

The diamond dove may preferentially select large, stiff materials for takeoff and landing sites, according to a study published on July 25th in the open-access journal PLOS ONE. The unexpected findings, reported by Kristen Crandell of the University of Montana and colleagues, suggest that the diamond dove does not adjust its takeoff or landing behavior depending on the flexibility of the perch.

2h

Archeological plant remains point to southwest Amazonia as crop domestication center

The remains of domesticated crop plants at an archaeological site in southwest Amazonia supports the idea that this was an important region in the early history of crop cultivation, according to a study published July 25, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Jennifer Watling from the Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology at the University of São Paulo, Brazil and colleagues.

2h

Researchers map hot spots of transfer of fish catch at sea

It could be considered the global CSI for high seas fisheries. In two new groundbreaking studies, researchers from Dalhousie University, Global Fishing Watch and SkyTruth have applied cutting-edge technology to map exactly where fishing boats may be transferring their catch to cargo vessels at sea.

2h

Soil bugs munch on plastics

The world is drowning in a flood of plastic. Eight million tons of plastic end up in the oceans every year. Agricultural soils are also threatened by plastic pollution. Farmers around the world apply enormous amounts of polyethylene (PE) mulch films onto soils to combat weeds, increase soil temperature and keep the soil moist, thereby increasing overall crop yields.

2h

Mapping mountaintop coal mining's yearly spread in Appalachia

The coal industry may have declined in the last decade because of the rise of cheap natural gas, but a coal mining method called mountaintop removal is still taking place, particularly in central Appalachia.

2h

Are boys more cliquey than girls?

Children's friendship groups in secondary school remain consistent over time and are often structured around gender, with boys forming the most tight-knit bands, according to new research published in PLOS ONE. The findings suggests boys might be more 'cliquey' than girls, and that factors such as location and timetable may have an impact on the social networks that children develop.

2h

A Watery Lake Is Detected on Mars, Raising the Potential for Alien LifeLiquid Water Lake Mars

The discovery suggests that watery conditions beneath the icy southern polar cap may have provided one of the critical building blocks for life on the red planet.

2h

Nikon is officially working on a full-frame mirrorless camera with a new lens mount

Gadgets One of the world's biggest camera makers is crafting a whole new camera system. Starting a new mirrorless camera line is tough, mostly because of the lenses.

2h

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2h

Scientists Definitely Have Not Found Life on the Moon

Earth’s Moon may have once been habitable—but that does not mean it was ever inhabited — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

2h

The Art of Failing Upward

On Tuesday evening, denizens of Donald Trump’s Washington, D.C., gathered at a tavern on the capital’s southwest waterfront to toast one of the most widely ridiculed White House press secretaries in history. The official occasion for the night’s festivities was the release of Sean Spicer’s new memoir, The Briefing . But the event doubled as a more general celebration of Spicer’s lucrative return

2h

GM cuts 2018 profit forecast, says trade war hit to car sales

General Motors cut its full-year profit forecast on Wednesday, in part due to higher commodity costs as it amplified its warning that mushrooming trade conflicts could dent US and global car sales.

2h

Why Grave Robbers Missed This Ancient, Gold-Filled Burial

Grave robbers had about 1,800 years to find and pilfer the precious gold jewelry buried with a noblewoman on the Greek island of Sikinos. So, what allowed this noblewoman, named Neko, to rest in peace for so long?

2h

Unisexual salamander evolution: A long, strange trip

The reproductive history of the unisexual, ladies-only salamander species is full of evolutionary surprises. In a new study, a team of researchers at The Ohio State University traced the animals' genetic history back 3.4 million years and found some head-scratching details — primarily that they seem to have gone for millions of years without any DNA contributions from male salamanders and still h

2h

Uber, Cabify halt Barcelona services after striking drivers assaulted

Uber and Cabify suspended their services in Barcelona on Wednesday after some of their drivers were attacked during a taxi strike, the association representing the ride-hailing companies said.

2h

New endangered Puget Sound orca dies soon after birth (Update)

The first calf born in three years to the endangered orcas that spend time in Pacific Northwest waters died Tuesday, the latest troubling sign for a population already at its lowest in more than three decades.

2h

Typhoon Wukong opens an Eye to NASA's Terra satellite

When NASA's Terra satellite passed over the Northwestern Pacific Ocean it found that Typhoon Wukong developed an eye.

2h

Tropical Storm Jongdari more organized in NASA's Terra satellite imagery

Tropical Storm Jongdari appeared much more organized in visible imagery from NASA's Terra satellite when passed over the Northwestern Pacific Ocean.

2h

Harvey samples saddled with antibiotic-resistant genes

Rice University scientists have released the first results of extensive water sampling in Houston after the epic flooding caused by Hurricane Harvey. They found widespread contamination by E. coli, likely the result of overflow from flooded wastewater treatment plants.

2h

Talent Dispersal: The Story of Epic and Erie

Two years ago at this time, when my wife, Deb, and I were in our fourth year of travel across the country to report on smaller towns , we found ourselves increasingly drawn to the lakefront city of Erie, Pennsylvania. The initial attraction was a primal sense of topophilia on Deb’s part, or fondness for a particular landscape. She had grown up in a small town on the shores of Lake Erie, 150 miles

2h

Multiple pregnancies might make women's cells 'age' faster

Multiple pregnancies might make women's cells age more quickly, a new Northwestern University study suggests. Led by Calen Ryan and Christopher Kuzawa of Northwestern and Dan Eisenberg at the University of Washington, the research could help explain why women with many children tend to show signs of accelerated aging.

3h

Brain discovery could block aging's terrible toll on the mind

Aging vessels connecting the brain and the immune system play critical roles in both Alzheimer's disease and the decline in cognitive ability that comes with time, new research reveals. By improving the function of the lymphatic vessels, scientists have dramatically enhanced aged mice's ability to learn and improved their memories. The work may provide doctors an entirely new path to treat or prev

3h

Tropical Storm Jongdari more organized in NASA's Terra satellite imagery

Tropical Storm Jongdari appeared much more organized in visible imagery from NASA's Terra satellite when passed over the Northwestern Pacific Ocean.

3h

A new milestone in laboratory grown human brain tissue

A cutting-edge laboratory technique that turns human stem cells into brain-like tissue now recapitulates human brain development more accurately than ever, according to a new study from Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. The study, published in Nature Methods, demonstrates how to grow brain 'organoids'–self-organizing mini spheres that now contain all the major cell types found i

3h

A new roadmap for repairing the damage of multiple sclerosis

Research published today in the journal Nature provides new understanding about how drugs can repair damaged brain cells that cause disability in patients with multiple sclerosis. Led by researchers at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, the study suggests new drug targets and potent early-stage drug candidates could lead to regenerative medicines for multiple sclerosis and other d

3h

Heart disease and cancer kill more people in developing nations than in Western countries

Diseases such as cancer, heart disease and stroke are deadlier in the developing world than in rich nations.

3h

Unconventional connections: How inhibition hones cortical selectivity

Understanding how neural circuits build response selectivity poses an enormous challenge since a single neuron receives thousands of synaptic inputs derived from other neurons and these inputs can differ in their response properties. Researchers at the Max Planck Florida Institute for Neuroscience have uncovered a fundamentally new role for inhibition in the visual cortex, refining how circuits em

3h

New method adds missing functionality to brain organoids

In a collaborative study between Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, the New York Stem Cell Foundation (NYSCF) Research Institute, and George Washington University, researchers have developed a new procedure for generating miniature 3D versions of the brain called 'organoids' from human stem cells. The new technique, published online today in Nature Methods, creates the first organ

3h

Study identifies possible treatment target for Alzheimer's, age-related cognitive decline

The study, published this week in Nature, demonstrated that meningeal lymphatic vessels in the brain play an essential role in maintaining a healthy homeostasis in aging brains and could be a new target for treatment.

3h

Tropical forests may soon hinder, not help, climate change effort

Forests in tropical regions could soon become a source of greenhouse gases, contributing to global warming and hampering efforts to meet the main goal in the Paris Agreement of 2015.

3h

The blueprint for El Niño diversity

A new research study isolates key mechanisms that cause El Niño events to differ amongst each other. The team found that the complexity and irregular occurrence of El Niño and La Niña events can be traced back to the co-existence of two coupled atmosphere-ocean oscillations, with different spatial characteristics and different frequencies.

3h

New class of materials could be used to make batteries that charge faster

Researchers have identified a group of materials that could be used to make even higher power batteries. The researchers, from the University of Cambridge, used materials with a complex crystalline structure and found that lithium ions move through them at rates that far exceed those of typical electrode materials, which equates to a much faster-charging battery.

3h

Discovery of a new potential treatment for visceral leishmaniasis

A new preclinical candidate drug with the potential to treat visceral leishmaniasis, one of the world's major neglected diseases, has been discovered through a close collaboration between the University of Dundee, GSK and Wellcome.Visceral leishmaniasis is a disease which kills tens of thousands of people every year, mainly among the poorest in the world.

3h

EPFL uses excitons to take electronics into the future

EPFL researchers have developed a transistor based on excitons — a type of particle most people have not heard of — that is able to function at room temperature. This breakthrough could lead to a new breed of faster, more energy efficient and smaller electronics.

3h

Time is running out in the tropics — researchers warn of global biodiversity collapse

A global biodiversity collapse is imminent unless we take urgent, concerted action to reverse species loss in the tropics, according to a major scientific study in the prestigious journal Nature.

3h

NE Australian marine heatwave shakes up coral reef animal populations

Research published today in Nature describes upheaval among fish and invertebrate communities after a marine heatwave hit Australia's Great Barrier Reef and Coral Sea in early 2016.The IMAS-led study analysed data collected across these areas by the Reef Life Survey (RLS) citizen science program.It identified important changes in reef-animal communities that may affect the resilience of coral reef

3h

Leggy lizards don't survive the storm

Biologists at Washington University in St. Louis have published a first-of-its-kind look at the physical characteristics of lizards that seem to make the difference between life and death in a hurricane, as reported in the July 25 issue of the journal Nature.

3h

Great Barrier Reef reveals rapid changes of ancient glaciers

New analysis of the first Great Barrier Reef samples covering the time 22,000 years ago to 19,000 years ago finally adds detail to the poorly understood Last Glacial Maximum (27,000 to 20,000 years ago), providing valuable insights for models of climate and ice sheet dynamics. 'Current models of glacier dynamics may be too conservative. The possibility of rapid increases or decreases in sea level

3h

The Ganges River Shark Is Unextinct | Shark News

A shark previously thought to be extinct has turned up in a peculiar place — for sale in a Mumbai fish market. Stream Shark Week Episodes: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/shark-week/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery https://www.facebook.com/SharkWeek Follow on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Discovery https://twitter

3h

Cheap material could radically improve battery charging speed, say scientists

Discovery could accelerate adoption of electric cars and solar energy, as well as helping to recharge your smartphone in minutes A newly identified group of materials could help recharge batteries faster, raising the possibility of smartphones that charge fully in minutes and accelerating the adoption of major clean technologies like electric cars and solar energy, say researchers. The speed at w

3h

Professor: Ekstreme skovbrande bliver mere almindelige

Skov- og naturbrande udleder massive mængder CO2 og forværrer klimaproblemer.

3h

After Last Year's Hurricanes, Caribbean Lizards Are Better at Holding on for Dear Life

The lizards didn’t see the hurricanes coming. Neither did Colin Donihue. Last summer, Donihue , a researcher from Harvard University, traveled to the Caribbean islands of Turks and Caicos to study a local species of anole lizard . Conservationists were set to exterminate the introduced rats from two islands to preserve their native wildlife, and Donihue wanted to see how the lizards might evolve

3h

Great Barrier Reef reveals rapid changes of ancient glaciers

Graphs of global sea levels around the time of the poorly understood Last Glacial Maximum (27,000 to 20,000 years ago) previously showed stable ice sheets for about 10,000 years before the ice slowly started to melt. New analysis of the first Great Barrier Reef samples covering the time 22,000 years ago to 19,000 years ago finally adds detail to that period, providing valuable insights for models

3h

Tropical forests may soon hinder, not help, climate change effort

Forests in tropical regions could soon become a source of greenhouse gases, contributing to global warming rather than helping to counteract it, according to research.

3h

The blueprint for El Nino diversity

A new research study, published this week by an international team of climate scientists in the journal Nature, isolates key mechanisms that cause El Niño events to differ. The team found that the complexity and irregular occurrence of El Niño and La Niña events can be traced back to the co-existence of two coupled atmosphere-ocean oscillations, with different spatial characteristics and different

3h

Time is running out in the tropics—researchers warn of global biodiversity collapse

A global biodiversity collapse is imminent unless we take urgent, concerted action to reverse species loss in the tropics, according to a major scientific study in the prestigious journal Nature.

3h

New class of materials could be used to make batteries that charge faster

Researchers have identified a group of materials that could be used to make even higher power batteries. The researchers, from the University of Cambridge, used materials with a complex crystalline structure and found that lithium ions move through them at rates that far exceed those of typical electrode materials, which equates to a much faster-charging battery.

3h

NE Australian marine heatwave shakes up coral reef animal populations

Research published today in Nature describes upheaval among fish and invertebrate communities after a marine heatwave hit Australia's Great Barrier Reef and Coral Sea in early 2016.

3h

Leggy lizards don't survive the storm

Nobody knows exactly what happens at the eye of the storm. But biologists at Washington University in St. Louis have published a first-of-its-kind look at the physical characteristics of lizards that seem to make the difference between life and death in a hurricane, as reported in the July 25 issue of the journal Nature.

3h

Research team uses excitons to take electronics into the future

Excitons could revolutionize the way engineers approach electronics. A team of EPFL researchers has created a new type of transistor—one of the components of circuits—using excitons instead of electrons. Notably, their exciton-based transistor functions effectively at room temperature, a hitherto insurmountable obstacle. They achieved this by using two 2-D materials as semiconductors. Their study,

3h

Third Retraction for Harvard Cancer Biologist

The move follows two major corrections to a 2011 Nature paper, in which researchers demonstrated that a natural compound selectively kills cancer cells.

3h

Harvey samples saddled with antibiotic-resistant genes

High levels of fecal bacteria as well as genes associated with antibiotic resistance were found in Houston floodwaters and sediment after Hurricane Harvey. The Rice University study showed that residents and remediation workers must be extra cautious when they encounter standing water in closed homes.

3h

Typhoon Wukong opens an Eye to NASA's Terra satellite

When NASA's Terra satellite passed over the Northwestern Pacific Ocean it found that Typhoon Wukong developed an eye.

3h

Closed Loophole Confirms the Unreality of the Quantum World

The theoretical physicist John Wheeler once used the phrase “great smoky dragon” to describe a particle of light going from a source to a photon counter. “The mouth of the dragon is sharp, where it bites the counter. The tail of the dragon is sharp, where the photon starts,” Wheeler wrote. The photon, in other words, has definite reality at the beginning and end. But its state in the middle — the

3h

Space-age tech offers timely crop data relief

An ambitious collaboration project to harness space technology and bring sustainable productivity to rice and oil palm farmers in Colombia entered a crucial phase this month with the start of technical training workshops in Cali, the country's second largest city and Pacific gateway.

3h

Boeing earnings up, but reports higher costs on tanker

Boeing reported a jump in second-quarter profits on Wednesday due to higher commercial airplane deliveries but said costs on a closely-watched Air Force tanker contract had risen again.

3h

Marines Who Fired Rocket Launchers Now Worry About Their Brains

The military is trying to figure out whether troops can sustain brain injuries from firing certain powerful weapons. Two Marines who used to shoot these weapons think they already know. (Image credit: Sarah Gonzales for NPR)

3h

Greek fires a tragedy, but not a suprise

Homes built haphazardly among the pines, no evacuation plan, poorly organised emergency services hit hard by austerity: the deadly wildfires around Athens this week may have shocked Greece but few environment experts are surprised.

3h

'Battery of Asia': Laos's controversial hydro ambitions

Mountainous and landlocked Laos, known as the "Battery of Asia", is building dozens of dams at breakneck speed so it can sell energy to power-hungry neighbours as a fast track out of poverty.

3h

Facebook nixes Brazil pages, profiles that spread fake news

Facebook has removed a network of pages and profiles in Brazil that the social media company says were used to spread misinformation and foment divisiveness.

3h

New film reveals experiences of LGBTQ young people in care

Experiences of lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans and questioning (LGBTQ) young people coming out in the care system are revealed in a new film premiering this weekend.The six-minute animation promotes the findings of SpeakOut — a national study led by researchers at the University of East Anglia's (UEA) Centre for Research on Children and Families (CRCF).

3h

Vibrations at an exceptional point

A team of international researchers led by engineers at Washington University has developed a way to use a light field to trigger a mechanical movement that will generate an acoustic wave.

3h

Men Are Freaking Out About Sperm Counts

A study suggests that sperm counts have been dropping for decades. Is this how the big dystopia begins? Probably not! Still, Silicon Valley is at hand to help men get their mojo back.

3h

A breath test for early-stage Parkinson's

Symptoms of Parkinson's disease include tremor, loss of smell and neuropsychiatric problems. However, many people aren't diagnosed until their disease is well-advanced, which could limit their treatment options. Now, researchers have tested a sensor to detect early-stage Parkinson's disease from the breath of patients. They report their results in ACS Chemical Neuroscience.

3h

Pregnant again! April the giraffe's calf is due in March

You don't need to stick your neck out to predict that this bundle of joy is going to get some attention.

3h

Fiat Chrysler shares plunge in MilanSergio Marchionne Fiat

Fiat Chrysler's shares plummeted on the Milan stock exchange Wednesday, after the Italian auto giant published disappointing quarterly results.

3h

Liquid water is buried beneath Martian landscape, study saysLiquid Water Lake Mars

A massive underground lake has been detected for the first time on Mars, raising the possibility that more water—and maybe even life—exists there, international astronomers said Wednesday.

3h

Greater market liquidity actually increases risk: study

Contrary to most common theories that greater liquidity is necessarily better for financial markets overall, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU) researchers contend in a new paper that liquidity comes at cost: it increases market risk.

3h

Manure slipping through (soil) cracks

Add just enough fertilizer, and crops thrive. Add too much, and you may end up with contaminated surface and groundwater.

3h

Team shatters theoretical limit on bio-hydrogen production

A bacterium engineered at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln produced 46 percent more hydrogen per cell than a naturally occurring form of the same species. The team's highest reported yield — 5.7 units of hydrogen for every unit of glucose fed to the bacterium — easily surpassed the longstanding theoretical limit of 4 units.

3h

New strategy for cancer therapy spells double trouble for tumors

The study, published recently in Nature Communications, shows that a molecule in cells, called Rad52, repairs special kinds of damaged DNA that accumulate in some cancers.

3h

Demon in the details of quantum thermodynamics

Researcher in physics in Arts & Sciences at Washington University in St. Louis are working out a theory of thermodynamics in quantum physics and finding some interesting results, including 'negative information.'

3h

New study offers hope of recovery from spinal cord injury

A new Tel Aviv University study finds the intravenous injection of a potent enzyme, just hours after an accident, has the potential to diminish a cascade of pathological events responsible for neuronal death, such as inflammation and scarring.

3h

Sounds of the Sun

Data from ESA (European Space Agency) and NASA's Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) has captured the dynamic movement of the Sun's atmosphere for over 20 years. Today, we can hear the Sun's movement—all of its waves, loops and eruptions—with our own ears.

4h

Waste not, want not—new approaches to forsaken food

Australians love their food. Cooking shows have us spellbound and are rating juggernauts for TV networks, celebrity cooks and judges are treated like rock stars, and we're spending billions eating out … and in.

4h

Searing Summer Heat Follows Killer Floods in Japan

The extreme weather has planners concerned about conditions during the 2020 Tokyo Olympics — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

Artificial intelligence outperforms the repetitive animal tests in identifying toxic chemicals

Most consumers would be dismayed with how little we know about the majority of chemicals. Only 3 percent of industrial chemicals – mostly drugs and pesticides – are comprehensively tested. Most of the 80,000 to 140,000 chemicals in consumer products have not been tested at all or just examined superficially to see what harm they may do locally, at the site of contact and at extremely high doses.

4h

Cannabidiol: Hope or hype?

Cannabidiol (CBD), one of the major phytochemicals in marijuana, has become a popular ingredient in dietary supplements, beauty products and beverages, with claims that the compound improves health and treats ailments ranging from insomnia to cancer. Although research on CBD is accelerating, medical evidence is still lacking for many of these claims, reports an article in Chemical & Engineering Ne

4h

Artificial enzymes perform reactions on living cells

Nature has evolved thousands of enzymes to facilitate the many chemical reactions that take place inside organisms to sustain life. Now, researchers have designed artificial enzymes that sit on the surfaces of living cells and drive reactions that could someday target drug therapies to specific organs. They report their results in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

4h

University researchers discover new species of venomous snake

Researchers at Swansea University's College of Science are part of an international team that has discovered a new species of venomous snake in Australia.

4h

How number crunching can optimise crisp frying

Optimising the frying time of crisps may not be an obvious application of mathematics, but this is one of the problems delegates to the 138th European Study Group with Industry (ESGI) were asked to solve last week.

4h

Homing pigeons use local natural odors to find their way

Homing pigeons use familiar smells to navigate their way across hundreds of kilometers of unfamiliar territory. Researchers have now confirmed that artificial odors cannot be used to stimulate or trigger a pigeon's navigation system. This means that the so-called olfactory activation hypothesis—which has been proposed by some researchers—should be disregarded, argues Anna Gagliardo of the Universi

4h

A century-old model for life's origin gets significant substantiation

In 1924, Russian biochemist Alexander Oparin claimed that life on Earth developed through gradual chemical changes of organic molecules, in the "primordial soup" which likely existed on Earth four billion years ago. In his view, the complex combination of lifeless molecules, joining forces within small oily droplets, could assume life faculties—self-replication, selection and evolution. These idea

4h

A breath test for early-stage Parkinson's

Symptoms of Parkinson's disease include tremor, loss of smell and neuropsychiatric problems. However, many people aren't diagnosed until their disease is well-advanced, which could limit their treatment options. Now, researchers have tested a sensor to detect early-stage Parkinson's disease from the breath of patients. They report their results in ACS Chemical Neuroscience.

4h

Half of female students experience psychological distress, CAMH study shows

For the first time, just over 50 per cent of female students in Ontario, Canada show signs of moderate to serious psychological distress, according to the latest Ontario Student Drug Use and Health Survey (OSDUHS), released by the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH).

4h

Neural link between depression and bad sleep identified

The neural link between depression and sleep problems has been identified for the first time in a new study by researchers at the University of Warwick (UK) and Fudan University (China).

4h

Cognitive and motor training combined may slow dow progress of dementia or even reverse it

York University study shows Those in the early stages of dementia who were exposed to 30 minutes a week to a game which used rules to make visually-guided movements, were able to slow down the progress of dementia and for some, even reverse their cognitive function to healthy status.

4h

Sounds of the Sun

NASA heliophysicist Alex Young explains how this simple sound connects us with the Sun and all the other stars in the universe.

4h

Lame Advice for Female Professionals

Suggestions offered at a recent workshop were focused mostly on the superficial — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

The 'Guerrilla' Wikipedia Editors Who Combat Conspiracy Theories

Susan Gerbic's team of over 100 editors are responsible for some of Wikipedia’s most trafficked pages about UFOs and other pseudoscience.

4h

Can a scientific name save one of Earth's most iconic freshwater fish from extinction?

The mahseers are an iconic group of fish found throughout the fast-flowing rivers of South and South-East Asia. Characterised by their large scales, attractive appearance and potentially vast size, the mahseers have long been afforded saintly status as "God's fishes". They are also known to anglers as some of the world's hardest fighting freshwater game fish, earning them the reputation of "tigers

4h

Chemicals that keep drinking water flowing may also cause fouling

Many city drinking water systems add softening agents to keep plumbing free of pipe-clogging mineral buildup. According to new research, these additives may amplify the risk of pathogen release into drinking water by weakening the grip that bacteria—like those responsible for Legionnaires' disease—have on pipe interiors.

4h

Fires, floods and satellite views: Modeling the Boreal forest's future

The 2014 megafires in Canada's Northwest Territories burned 7 million acres of forest, making it one of the most severe fire events in Canadian history.

4h

Despite negative consequences, benevolent sexism helps in search for mate

Some women may like it when a man opens the door on a first date or offers to pay the bill at dinner, while others may find the gestures insulting.

4h

The Importance Of Shark Conservation | Fin Frenzy

Shark Week has given people front row access to the world of sharks, helping explain the crucial role of these predators within the ecosystem. Stream Fin Frenzy on Discovery GO: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/fin-frenzy/ Stream Shark Week Episodes: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/shark-week/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.

4h

First catalogue of X-ray sources in overlapping observations published

Members of the X-ray astronomy working group at the Leibniz Institute for Astrophysics (AIP) and an international team have published the first catalogue of X-ray sources in multiply observed sky regions. The catalogue comprises almost 72,000 objects, partly of exotic nature, which were observed with the space-based X-ray telescope XMM-Newton. It provides information on the physical properties of

4h

Why are there so many suckers? A neuropsychologist explains

If you have a mailbox, you probably get junk mail. If you have an email account, you probably get spam. If you have a phone, you probably get robocalls.

4h

Plastic pollution—could we clean up the ocean with technology?

Our oceans are threatened by three major challenges: climate change, overfishing and pollution. Plastic pollution is of growing concern, and has gained international attention from governments, media and large sections of the public, partly fuelled by last year's BBC documentary Blue Planet II and its images of sperm whales and seabirds entangled or ingesting plastic debris.

4h

To understand fossils, scientists are baking their own

Science How to condense a 10,000 year cooking time into 24 hours. You’ll need an organism—preferably one with hard bones or a shell. Add fine-grained sediment and rapid burial and in 10,000 years or so, you’ll be well on your way to a…

4h

Spiraling wildfire fighting costs are largely beyond the Forest Service's control

Just six months after the devastating Thomas Fire – the largest blaze in California's history – was fully contained, the 2018 fire season is well under way. As of mid-July, large wildfires had already burned over 1 million acres in a dozen states. Through October, the National Interagency Fire Center predicts above-average wildfire activity in many regions, including the Northwest, Interior West a

4h

If you think this summer's heat waves are bad, just wait for the future

A killer combination of high heat and high humidity is gripping much of the midwestern and northeastern U.S., Canada, and the U.K., and producing disturbing headlines. Among them: some 70 deaths are attributed to the recent Canadian heat wave, and roads in Pennsylvania are said to be melting; meanwhile, new research suggests prolonged heat exposure can create measurable declines in cognitive abili

4h

12-Mile-Wide Lake May Be Hiding Beneath Martian Surface

The Red Planet just got quite a bit bluer, with scientists announcing the discovery of what they believe is a lake that's about 12 miles across and hidden below a mile of ice at the south pole of Mars.

4h

‘Castle Rock’ Proves Netflix’s Sci-Fi Push Into Genre Is Spreading

Netflix’s foray into sci-fi has resulted in a now-common sight: its competitors following suit. Hulu's new show is only the first King-sized salvo.

4h

Despite negative consequences, benevolent sexism helps in search for mate

Some women may like it when a man opens the door on a first date or offers to pay the bill at dinner, while others may find the gestures insulting. New research provides an alternative explanation as to why some women respond positively.

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All the President’s Hush Money

Not since Richard Nixon discussed paying off E. Howard Hunt for the Watergate burglary has a president been caught on tape seeking to muffle the emergence of negative stories with cash. But in a recording released Monday evening, the then-candidate Donald Trump is heard speaking with his former personal attorney Michael Cohen about making a payment to prevent the story of an extramarital affair w

4h

How a Soccer Star Sparked a Ferocious Debate in Germany

The soccer star Mesut Özil, a midfielder who now plays for Arsenal and helped Germany win the 2014 World Cup, was born in 1988 in Gelsenkirchen, an industrial city in West Germany, a grandchild of Turkish immigrants, and rose to national prominence in a country where few products of immigration do. When he announced in a letter posted on Twitter on Sunday that he was quitting Germany’s national t

4h

Blood test could spot traumatic brain injury

A new blood test will help doctors determine if someone has a traumatic brain injury after suffering a blow to the head. Until now, physicians have had to rely on subjective markers—mainly patient-reported symptoms such as headaches, nausea, or light sensitivity—to make an educated “guess” on the possibility of brain trauma and the need for a head CT scan. Particularly among athletes who may hide

5h

Fires, floods and satellite views: Modeling the Boreal forest's future

The 2014 megafires in Canada's Northwest Territories burned 7 million acres of forest, making it one of the most severe fire events in Canadian history.

5h

Curbs on legal highs cut need for hospital care, study suggests

Fewer people sought hospital treatment for the toxic effects of so-called legal highs following temporary restrictions, a study based at an Edinburgh hospital suggests.

5h

New data show dramatic progress in Namibia toward HIV epidemic control; gaps elsewhere

The Government of the Republic of Namibia, PEPFAR, the CDC, and ICAP at Columbia University released new data today at the 2018 International AIDS Conference demonstrating that the HIV epidemic iscoming under control in Namibia. Results from the Namibia Population-based HIV Impact Assessment (NAMPHIA) show that 77percent of all HIV-positive adults in Namibia have achieved viral load suppression.

5h

Greater market liquidity actually increases risk, according to Ben-Gurion University researchers

'The model we developed is richer than the classic theory because, among other reasons, it takes into account a more realistic treatment of financial markets in which various investors have different investment strategies,' the researchers say. 'Investors differ in the amount of risk they are willing to assume, and therefore choose different proportions of investments in risky assets, such as equi

5h

The dark side of antibiotic ciprofloxacin

Researchers have found that ciprofloxacin, a widely prescribed antibiotic, increases the risk of tears and rupture on the main artery of the body, the aorta, in a mouse model of human aortic aneurysms and dissections, a disease that carries high risk of death from aortic rupture.

5h

Sunless tanning may not be the answer to preventing skin cancer

In the study 'Characteristics and Skin Cancer Risk Behaviors of Adult Sunless Tanners in the United States,' published in JAMA Dermatology, Mansh and fellow University of Minnesota Medical School researchers sought to assess the demographic characteristics and skin cancer risk behaviors of adult sunless tanners in the United States. They wanted to find out if adults who used sunless tanning produc

5h

Bacterial communities use sophisticated strategy to communicate over long distances

A concept known as 'percolation' is helping microbiologists at UC San Diego explain how communities of bacteria can effectively relay signals across long distances. Once regarded as a simple cluster of microorganisms, communities of bacteria have been found to employ a strategy we use to brew coffee and extract oil from the sea. Percolation helps the microscopic community thrive and survive threat

5h

How was Mediterranean diet associated with severity of psoriasis?

Adherence to a Mediterranean diet, an eating plan filled with fruits and vegetables, legumes, cereals, bread, fish, fruit, nuts and extra-virgin olive oil, may be associated with the severity of the skin condition psoriasis.

5h

Underground Lake Found On Mars Beneath A Mile Of IceLiquid Water Lake Mars

Scientists say they've found what appears to be a briny lake near the south pole on Mars. It's possible that some kind of microbial life once lived in the lake. (Image credit: NASA/JPL/MSSS,)

5h

Can a cat-poo parasite turn you into a millionaire?

Scientists have discovered that people infected with toxoplasmosis are more go-getting. But that doesn’t mean we should all be trying to catch it Name: Toxoplasma gondii. Location: All over the place. Continue reading…

5h

Soldiers find skeleton of Saxon warrior on Salisbury Plain

Afghanistan war veterans helping out with archaeological dig on military grounds found scores of Saxon burials complete with weapons and jewellery On the last day of an excavation by soldiers within the military training lands on Salisbury Plain, they found a comrade in arms: the grave of a 6th century Saxon warrior, buried with his spear by his side and his sword in his arms. His bones and posse

5h

Richard Milner discusses new U.S. particle accelerator project

The case for an ambitious new particle accelerator to be built in the United States has just gotten a major boost.

5h

Video: Denmark scorched

With temperatures soaring and no rain to speak of, Europe is the grip of a heatwave. As well as the havoc that wildfires have caused in countries such as the UK, Sweden and Greece, the current heat is scorching our land and vegetation. These two images from the Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission show agricultural fields around the town of Slagelse in Zealand, Denmark. The image from July 2017 shows lus

5h

SpaceX launches 10 more Iridium Communications satellites

Ten more satellites for Iridium Communications have been successfully launched into orbit.

5h

No day at the beach as toxic algae hit Baltic coast

Polish health authorities said Wednesday they had closed scores of beaches along the country's Baltic Sea coast due to a massive toxic algae bloom triggered by a heat wave.

5h

Ukonventionelle metoder: Gripenfly bomber skovbrand væk

Sverige har set sig nødsaget til at forsøge med bomber imod speciel del af den huserende skovbrand. Vældig god effekt, siger brandchef.

5h

Waymo launching pilot program with WalmartWaymo Walmart Avis

Google spinoff Waymo says it's launching a pilot program with Walmart later this week that will allow customers to use its self-driving car service to pick up groceries at Walmart stores.

5h

Saudi Arabia receives four bids for $500 mn wind farm

Saudi Arabia has received bids from four consortiums competing to build a $500 million Saudi wind farm project, officials said Wednesday, as the world's top oil exporter pushes to diversify its energy sector.

5h

Bacterial communities use sophisticated strategy to communicate over long distances

It's the way we end up with a fresh cup of coffee from a clump of beans. It's how ocean oil rigs extract petroleum from dense rock formations beneath the seafloor. It even helps explain how forest fires spread.

5h

Artificial enzymes perform reactions on living cells

Nature has evolved thousands of enzymes to facilitate the many chemical reactions that take place inside organisms to sustain life. Now, researchers have designed artificial enzymes that sit on the surfaces of living cells and drive reactions that could someday target drug therapies to specific organs. They report their results in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

5h

This cat-borne parasite might just make you more entrepreneurial

Infection from the globally prevalent parasite Toxoplasma gondii may increase a person's likelihood of pursuing entrepreneurial and business-related activities, new University of Colorado Boulder research finds.

5h

Manure slipping through (soil) cracks

A new study shows water infiltrates deeper into cracking clay when liquid hog manure is applied. The study also showed that even though water infiltration went deeper in the presence of manure, it did not reach depths of tile drains designed to remove excess subsurface water.

5h

Fake videos of real people — and how to spot them | Supasorn Suwajanakorn

Do you think you're good at spotting fake videos, where famous people say things they've never said in real life? See how they're made in this astonishing talk and tech demo. Computer scientist Supasorn Suwajanakorn shows how, as a grad student, he used AI and 3D modeling to create photorealistic fake videos of people synced to audio. Learn more about both the ethical implications and the creative

5h

Pulling Security Clearances Is Just the Start

It will not be surprising if, in the next few weeks, Sarah Huckabee Sanders says that the president never had the intention of pulling the security clearances of the former director of the CIA and the former director of national intelligence. With the deadpan mendacity that she has raised from a mere survival skill in this White House to an art form, she will insist that it is all a hoax planted

5h

Benefits of early antiretroviral therapy in HIV-infected children

The initial findings of the ANRS CLEAC study coordinated by Pierre Frange (Hôpital Necker — AP-HP), help define the immunological and virological benefits of early antiretroviral therapy in HIV-infected children living in France. The results of this study will be presented by Florence Buseyne (Oncogenic Virus Epidemiology & Pathophysiology Team — Institut Pasteur) this Wednesday, July 25 at the

5h

Survey: Nearly two-thirds of Americans oppose cuts to SNAP program

A majority of registered voters oppose recent efforts to scale back Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) food benefits and believe the government should be doing more to meet the needs of people facing food insecurity and other challenges, according to a new survey commissioned by the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health's Center for a Livable Future (CLF).

5h

First-time observation of genetic/physiological damage caused by nanoplastics in mussels

Researchers at the UAB, in collaboration with the University of Aveiro, Portugal, were able to confirm for the first time that small concentrations of nanoplastics cause genetic and physiological damage in the Mediterranean mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis. The research was recently published in Science of the Total Environment.

5h

Brain activity cautions against buying stocks

Despite long-term profit expectations, many Germans shy away from investing their money in supposedly riskier forms of investment. Why? Together with colleagues from the USA and Switzerland, scientists at the University of Bonn have now developed a model that makes real-life stock buying behavior comprehensible for the first time. The researchers combined socioeconomic, psychological and neuroscie

5h

Switching sides: The betrayal of an anti-cancer gene

Reeducating cells in the tumor microenvironment reverses some of the malignancy.

5h

University researchers discover new species of venomous snake

Researchers at Swansea University's College of Science are part of an international team that has discovered a new species of venomous snake in Australia.

5h

Homing pigeons use local natural odors to find their way

Homing pigeons use familiar smells to navigate their way across hundreds of kilometers of unfamiliar territory. Researchers have now confirmed that artificial odors cannot be used to stimulate or trigger a pigeon's navigation system. This means that the so-called olfactory activation hypothesis — which has been proposed by some researchers — should be disregarded, argues Anna Gagliardo of the Un

5h

A century-old model for life's origin gets significant substantiation

A century-old model for life's origin gets significant substantiation.

5h

3,000 scientists: Border wall threatens local animals

Biologists warn that federal plans to build a wall along the US-Mexico border could severely threaten some of the unique species that live there—and even push some to extinction in the US. Borderlands are synonymous with desolation, but the Mexico-US divide is something altogether different, researchers say. The nearly 2,000-mile-long border traverses some of the continent’s most biologically div

5h

Se billederne: Sjælland er tør og brun set fra rummet

Det europæiske rumagentur ESAs Sentinel-satellitter har taget nærbilleder af tørken i Danmark. Og det ser ikke godt ud.

5h

Bilfabrikkerne igen fanget i at fifle med test: Nu blæser de forbruget op

EU-Kommissionen har taget bilindustrien i nye krumspring: Nu øges bilernes forbrug i test bevidst. Dermed kan de slippe lettere gennem fremtidige krav om at reducere det igen.

5h

Cat Parasite May Make People More Entrepreneurial

People infected with Toxoplasma gondii are more likely to be entrepreneur, according to new research.

5h

‘Mirror’ analyzes your personality to show dangers of A.I.

A new artificial intelligence system detects and displays people’s personality traits from only a photo of their face. The system, called Biometric Mirror, investigates a person’s understanding of AI and their response to information about their unique traits—which may or may not be correct. When someone stands in front of Biometric Mirror, the system detects a range of facial characteristics in

5h

Combined approach offers hope to lung cancer patients who become resistant to drugs

Three drugs together block growth from without and within.

5h

Chemicals that keep drinking water flowing may also cause fouling

Many city drinking water systems add softening agents to keep plumbing free of pipe-clogging mineral buildup. According to new research, these additives may amplify the risk of pathogen release into drinking water by weakening the grip that bacteria — like those responsible for Legionnaires' disease — have on pipe interiors.

5h

Researchers upgrade organic solar cells to be used in roof tiles generating power

An international team of materials scientists from France, Russia and Kazakhstan found a way to boost the efficiency of organic solar cells several times. The new study, published in the Journal of Materials Chemistry A, has shown that ordered structures based on organic molecules can be used to produce solar power.

5h

Huge reservoir of liquid water detected under the surface of Mars

Providing resolution to a decades-long debate over whether liquid water is present on Mars, researchers using radar to probe the planet's polar ice caps have detected a lake of liquid water under the Martian ice.

5h

New evidence supports radical treatment of widespread form of malaria

A team of malaria experts from a large international research collaboration has published results supporting the need for a radical cure strategy to tackle one of the most debilitating forms of malaria caused by the Plasmodium vivax parasite.

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Mars has tons of newly discovered water in a 12-mile-wide reservoirLiquid Water Lake Mars

Space Buried under an ice cap, the water is so deep scientists couldn't probe to the bottom. Mars is now a dry and dusty world, but at some point in the past it had water on it and it may still run at times today. For the first time, though, new research…

6h

Gene-edited plants and animals are GM foods, EU court rules

Landmark decision means gene-edited plants and animals will be regulated under the same rules as genetically modified organisms Plants and animals created by innovative gene-editing technology have been genetically modified and should be regulated as such, the EU’s top court has ruled. The landmark decision ends 10 years of debate in Europe about what is – and is not – a GM food, with a victory f

6h

Mars: huge underground lake raises prospects of life on planet, astronomers say

Scientists have spotted a 12 mile-wide stretch of water underneath a slab of ice at the Martian south pole Astronomers have found compelling evidence that there is a huge reservoir of liquid water buried a mile under the ice near the south pole on Mars. Radar measurements taken from the European Space Agency’s Mars Express orbiter spotted the 12 mile-wide stretch of water at the base of a thick s

6h

Revealed: loopholes that let addicts buy hundreds of opioid pills online

Regulator wants stricter rules in place to stop multiple orders linked to same address People with addiction problems are able to order hundreds of powerful opioid painkillers by taking advantage of a lack of proper checks with registered online pharmacies, the Guardian can reveal. A number of online pharmacies that are regulated and operating legally have no alert system in place to identify whe

6h

New Evidence for a Hidden Lake on Mars

On the surface, Mars is the picture of desolation. A barren land unchanged for hundreds of millions of years, motionless except for the scattering of powdery dust by a faint breeze, or the slow crawl of a rover . But perhaps just beneath the Martian soil, the picture is very different. New evidence suggests the presence of a lake one mile beneath the ice-coated surface of Mars’s south pole, accor

6h

The Deleted WeChat Post That Fueled China's Vaccine Scandal

A vaccine scandal in China began building slowly and then suddenly, this weekend, it was everywhere at once. The story began back in November, when a large vaccine manufacturer called Changsheng Biotechnology Co. was forced to recall 252,600 ineffective doses of vaccines for DPT (diphtheria, pertussis, and tetanus). Then earlier this July, a government investigation caught Changsheng falsifying d

6h

Microsoft's Xbox Adaptive Controller Gets an Accessible Box Design

Microsoft prioritizes accessibility with an innovative package design for its new Xbox controller for disabled gamers.

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Coupled with light—two particles are better than one

So often in life we hear that size matters, in the world of quantum physics it really does.

6h

Mars (probably) has a lake of liquid water

A 15-year-old Mars orbiter has spotted signs of a salty lake beneath the Red Planet’s south polar ice sheets.

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Deep within Mars, Liquid Water Offers Hope for Life

Radar observations have revealed what appears to be a buried lake on Mars, the first-ever stable reservoir of liquid water found on the Red Planet — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

Traffic jams in the brain

'Traffic jams' can also occur in the brain and they can be damaging. Researchers at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) have been able to confirm that this is the case. They have been able to prove that disrupted transportation routes in nerve cells are a significant cause of Parkinson's disease.

6h

Tokyo Tech Hosono's story of IGZO TFT development features in Nature Electronics

Each issue of the journal Nature Electronics contains a column called 'reverse engineering,' which examines the development of an electronic device now in widespread use from the viewpoint of the main inventor. The July 2018 column tells the story of the IGZO thin film transistor (TFT) through the eyes of Professor Hideo Hosono of Tokyo Tech's Institute of Innovative Research (IIR), who is also di

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Liquid water 'lake' revealed on MarsLiquid Water Lake Mars

Researchers believe they have found the first existing body of liquid water on the Red Planet.

6h

Pieces of mantle found rising under north and south ends of Cascadia fault

With four years of data from 268 seismometers on the ocean floor and several hundred on land, researchers have found anomalies in the upper mantle below both ends of the Cascadia Subduction Zone. They may influence the location, frequency and strength of earthquake events along the U.S. Pacific Northwest.

6h

Communicating with drones using facial expressions and gestures could help save lives

With first responders beginning to use robots and drones to assist in search and rescue operations, having simple and easy to use ways of communicating with them can save precious moments and could help save lives.

6h

Faulty cytoskeleton impairs immune cells

The rearrangement of the cell´s inner scaffold, the cytoskeleton, is a vital process for immune cells. In a new collaborative study, led by scientists from LBI-RUD/CeMM, a rare inherited disease revealed a hitherto unknown role of a cytoskeleton-regulating factor for the proper functioning of the adaptive immune system. The study was published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

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Multi-disease health fairs, 'test and treat' help E. African communities achieve HIV goals

People living with HIV in rural East African communities that hosted annual community health campaigns initiated antiretroviral therapy (ART) earlier and had higher levels of overall survival and viral suppression than communities receiving standard HIV care, according to study data presented today at a press conference at the 22nd International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2018) in Amsterdam. The NIH-su

6h

How to design better clinical trials to address 'critically low' dementia research shortfall

New research gives insights into how the design of clinical trials can improve to address the 'critically low' research pipeline and improve the chances of finding effective dementia therapies.

6h

Visualizing chemical reactions on bimetal surfaces

Professor Park's research team identified that the formation of metal-oxide interfaces is the key factor responsible for the synergistic catalytic effect in bimetal catalysts. The team confirmed this fundamental reaction mechanism through in situ imaging of reaction conditions. This is the first visualization of bimetal surfaces under reaction conditions, signifying the role of metal-oxide interfa

6h

Experts band together to eradicate prostate cancer

A multidisciplinary consortium has developed a more accurate way to test new treatments for the most aggressive form of prostate cancer. The team has developed a new way to grow tumors in the lab, derived from donor patient tumors. Just as exotic plants are grown in greenhouses, these complex tumors are able to be kept alive in the lab, enabling researchers to test the efficacy of a variety of dru

6h

Pieces of mantle found rising under north and south ends of Cascadia fault

With four years of data from 268 seismometers on the ocean floor and several hundred on land, researchers have found anomalies in the upper mantle below both ends of the Cascadia Subduction Zone. They may influence the location, frequency and strength of earthquake events along the US Pacific Northwest.

6h

UCLA biologist works to create a new field, merging the sciences and architecture

UCLA biologist leads effort to create a new field of study addressing collective behavior and physical spaces.

6h

EU top court rules new breeding techniques count as GMOs

The European Union's top court ruled Wednesday that food produced by a series of new biotechnology breeding techniques should be considered genetically modified organisms, thus falling under the EU's strict regulations of the products.

6h

EU carmakers 'inflating' emissions to skew carbon targets

Authorities are currently switching over from an older emissions testing procedure known as NEDC to a new one called WLTP.

6h

Holographic image of a black hole proposed in a graphene flake

Physicists have theoretically shown that, by applying a magnetic field to a small, irregularly shaped graphene flake, the flake becomes a quantum hologram of a black hole. This means that the graphene flake recreates the spatial structure and characteristic properties of a black hole, but in a much smaller, lower-dimensional system.

6h

Mission: Impossible—Fallout Doubles Down on the Ridiculousness of Its Hero

If America has a James Bond, it is Ethan Hunt (Tom Cruise), the persistently bouncy hero of the Mission: Impossible franchise, whose sixth entry, Fallout , hits theaters this week. Bond was framed as a paragon of British upper-class smoothness, a tuxedo-clad man’s man who felt most at home at a Monégasque casino, ordering martinis and killing bad guys with equal suaveness. Hunt is none of these t

6h

Image: Model binary asteroids

The smaller model asteroid seen here atop a rover that slowly wheels around another larger model asteroid, a practical recreation of the kind of binary asteroid system to be visited by ESA's proposed Hera mission.

6h

Fauci: HIV remission free of antiretroviral therapy is a feasible goal

Long-lasting control of HIV infection without antiretroviral therapy (ART) is a feasible goal that deserves vigorous pursuit, Anthony S. Fauci, M.D., will assert during a lecture on Wednesday, July 25 at the 22nd International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2018) in Amsterdam. Dr. Fauci directs the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of NIH. His lecture is titled, 'Durable Control o

7h

'All-star' team of molecules could be key to improving cancer therapy

The molecules, called microRNAs, could potentially be combined with chemotherapy to more effectively block cancer growth. The teamwork was discovered by systems biology research, which applies mathematical and computational science to study complex regulatory networks within cells.

7h

New enzyme discovery may help improve drugs against cancer, diabetes and obesity

A new study reveals that several drugs for treating haematological cancers are less effective than expected in inhibiting a special enzyme. Researchers have also identified new lead compounds that could potentially improve existing treatments and pave the way for new drugs against diabetes and obesity.

7h

It's time to 3D sketch with air scaffolding

People often use their hands when describing an object, while pens are great tools for describing objects in detail. Taking this idea, a KAIST team introduced a new 3D sketching workflow, combining the strengths of hand and pen input. This technique will ease the way for ideation in three dimensions, leading to efficient product design in terms of time and cost.

7h

Study: Intensive blood pressure control reduces risk of mild cognitive impairment

Significant reductions in the risk of mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and the combination of MCI and dementia, have been shown for the first time through aggressive lowering of systolic blood pressure in new research results from the federally funded SPRINT MIND Study reported at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference (AAIC) 2018 in Chicago.

7h

Agricultural & urban habitat drive long-term bird population changes

Land use changes are a major driver of species declines, but in addition to the habitat to which they're best adapted, many bird species use 'alternative' habitats such as urban and agricultural land. A new study from The Condor: Ornithological Applications documents a century of land use change in Illinois and shows that species' long-term fate can depend on the availability and suitability of th

7h

Shark Attack Punch | Shark Week's The Daily Bite

The crew at the Food Network stops by to teach us how to make Shark Attack Punch that will take your Shark Week party to the next level. Also, find out what Shark Cam would be like as a Romcom and a sneak peek at Shark Week on Snapchat. Stream The Daily Bite on Discovery GO: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/the-daily-bite/ Stream Shark Week Episodes: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/shark-wee

7h

Google searches reveal cross-cultural desire to order food delivery at specific times

A pair of researchers at the University of Aberdeen in the U.K. has found that people across cultures have a desire for delivery food at two particular times: 7 p.m. and 2 a.m. In their paper published in the journal Royal Society Open Science, Nicolas Alvarado and Tyler Stevenson describe their study of Google searches as it relates to food delivery requests by people living in various countries

7h

3-D printers may reshape recoveries for shark bite victims

A trauma victim is wheeled into an emergency room, his thigh caked with blood-soaked bandages.

7h

Test dig selv: Hvor meget ved du om sæd?

Hvor længe har en orne sædafgang, og i hvilken film bruges sæd som hårvoks? Test din viden om sæd her.

7h

How Silicon Valley Has Disrupted Philanthropy

Mega Pixel / Stas Malyarevsky / Shutterstock / Paul Spella / The Atlantic For more than a century, the Boys & Girls Club of America has had a pretty simple mission: providing somewhere for kids to go after school so they stay out of trouble. A 1982 PSA put it simply: “It’s a place to go besides the streets,” a man sings, as a video plays of (mostly black) boys running into a club. But in 2018, th

7h

Maglite ML300L: The Illuminating Origins of This Tough Flashlight

An itch to build a better flashlight birthed a brilliant companion for cops and outdoorsy types alike.

7h

iLife V8s Review: Far From a Clean Sweep

A budget robot vacuum that can get around, but doesn’t do much else.

7h

Lowering blood pressure may help the brain

Aggressively treating high blood pressure had a modest positive effect on the development of an early form of memory loss.

7h

Bombe under planteforædling: Gensaksen Crispr skal reguleres lige så strengt som GMO

At benytte genredigeringsteknikker som Crispr/Cas9 til planteforædling er at betragte som genmodicering og skal reguleres derefter, mener EU-domstolen i overraskende udmelding.

7h

Ejer af fake science-tidsskrift om peer review: Min kone har en baggrund inden for medicin

Mange pseudo-videnskabelige udgivere har hjemme i Indien og et alternativt syn på videnskabens bedømmelse af fagfæller. De udnytter presset på forskere for at publicere ved at oprette tusindvis af digitale tidsskrifter efter mottoet: Pay, publish, profit.

7h

Agricultural and urban habitat drive long-term bird population changes

Land use changes are a major driver of species declines, but in addition to the habitat to which they're best adapted, many bird species use "alternative" habitats such as urban and agricultural land. A new study from The Condor: Ornithological Applications documents a century of land use change in Illinois and shows that species' long-term fate can depend on the availability and suitability of th

7h

Why people love to hate on do-gooders, especially at work

A new study finds that people who do good are often ridiculed and punished by their co-workers and friends. Read More

7h

Team shatters theoretical limit on bio-hydrogen production

In 1977, researcher Rudolf Thauer proposed a theoretical ceiling on the amount of hydrogen that bacteria could produce via fermentation, the sugar-converting process also responsible for yogurt, beer and cheese.

7h

Nearly forgotten 'dinosaur' bone found to belong to ancient hippo-like creature

A team of researchers from several institutions in Japan and one in the U.S. has identified a fossilized bone, long believed to be from a dinosaur, as belonging to a Paleoparadoxia. In their paper published in the journal Royal Society Open Science, the group describes the history of the bone and how it was finally correctly identified.

7h

Researchers develop a framework to encode mechanical memory in a featureless elastic shell

When Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix was translated into Braille, it spanned 1,000 pages over 14 volumes of thick Braille paper. Tolstoy's War and Peace weighs in at 21 volumes. But what if there was a way to store whole books in just a few pages of Braille?

7h

Why do dingoes attack people, and how can we prevent it?

The case of Debbie Rundle, who was attacked by dingoes at a mine site in Telfer, in Western Australia's Pilbara region, evokes our instinctive horror at the idea of being attacked by wild animals.

7h

Multiple takes on how we can measure our species' intelligence

submitted by /u/Shred77 [link] [comments]

7h

Five amazing female scientists you’ve probably never heard of | Suw Charman-Anderson

Jess Wade’s work to add women in science to Wikipedia demonstrates the importance of Stem role models for young people As Dr Jess Wade, postdoctoral researcher in plastic electronics at Imperial College London, continues her mission of adding women in science to Wikipedia , she highlights a key problem with many “women into science” projects: a lack of evidence that they work. “There’s so much ene

7h

Why bats stole a gene from an Ebola ancestor

Scientists think they know what bats are doing with genetic material they stole some 18 million years ago from an ancient virus related to Ebola. The swiped genetic sequence—a gene called VP35— has remained largely intact in the bats despite the passage of time, with few changes since it was co-opted, according to a new study suggesting that the gene may play a role in regulating the immune syste

7h

Should You Exercise in the Morning, Afternoon, or Evening?

The optimal time to exercise is when your body temperature is at its highest — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

7h

Toxoplasma gondii parasite linked to risky business behavior

An international team of researchers has found a possible link between a parasitic infection and risky business behavior. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the group outlines an experiment they carried out to test possible behavioral changes due to Toxoplasma gondii parasitic infections and what they found.

7h

The hidden hazards of antibiotic resistance genes in air

People are often notified about poor air quality by weather apps, and this happens frequently in urban areas, where levels of outdoor pollution containing particulates and soot are high. But now scientists are reporting in ACS' Environmental Science & Technology that there is another type of air contaminant that they say isn't receiving enough attention: antibiotic-resistance genes.

8h

A new catalyst for water splitting that is the best of both worlds

Taking water and ripping it apart into hydrogen and oxygen could form the basis of artificial photosynthetic devices that could ultimately power homes and businesses. However, catalysts, including those used to 'split' water, have either worked well but are expensive and unstable, or are affordable and stable, but don't work as well. Now, researchers report in ACS Central Science a new catalyst th

8h

Working four-day weeks for five days' pay? Research shows it pays off

Employees at a New Zealand company behind an innovative trial of a four-day working week have declared it a resounding success, with 78% saying they were better able to manage their work-life balance.

8h

Why can't I use my dog's tick prevention medicine?

Ask Us Anything The treatment isn't toxic to us, but it still wouldn't work very well. Tick season is in full swing. For furry hiking companions, though, there’s a simple strategy: products like Frontline and Advantix go on once and protect against pests…

8h

Business students more likely to have a brain parasite spread by cats

A study of students found that those who have a brain parasite linked to outbursts of explosive rage are more likely to be majoring in business studies

8h

‘Amazing dragon’ find in China rewrites evolution of massive dinosaurs

Fossils discovered in China may change the story of the evolution of sauropods like Diplodocus and how they spread around the world

8h

New Scientist Live: should we zap our brains to boost our abilities?

At our festival of science this September, Nick Davis will be exploring how we can make our brains work better – and whether we know what we’re getting ourselves into

8h

We might only see time because we can’t think in quantum physics

Humans need much more information to study a problem backwards in time than forwards, but a quantum computer can ignore the flow of time all together

8h

HPV vaccine to be offered to all children in England, not just girls

Following similar decisions in Scotland and Wales, boys in England will now be offered the HPV vaccine, which protects against several types of cancer

8h

Thousands dead or homeless after hydroelectric dam collapses in Laos

The dam in Laos has collapsed, releasing large amounts of water and sweeping away houses and leaving more than 6000 homeless

8h

Warming Arctic could be behind heatwave sweeping northern hemisphere

Deadly heatwaves could continue for weeks, and possibly months, across much of the northern hemisphere, meteorologists predicted this week

8h

At least 49 people killed in Greece’s deadliest wildfires in a decade

The deadliest blazes to hit Greece in more than a decade have seen wildfires fanned by high winds rage through resorts

8h

In support of 'organic' management, more living than digital

One of the main features of continuing digitalisation and the development of artificial intelligence – currently claimed to be the only and inevitable means of "progress" in the future – is the desire to conquer and "ideologically" transform managers and organisations that are portrayed as "ill-adapted," or even obsolete.

8h

Beryllium-7 atom helps to check inconsistencies in the Big Bang theory

Shortly after the Big Bang, radioactive atoms of the type beryllium-7, among others, came into being. Today, throughout the universe, they have long since decayed and do not occur naturally, in contrast to their decay product lithium. Now researchers at the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI have helped to better understand the first minutes of the universe: They collected artificially produced beryllium

8h

Sløve sædceller og gamle æg bremser danskernes babydrømme

15 procent af danskerne bliver ramt af ufrivillig barnløhed. Her er fire bud på hvorfor.

8h

Equifax's Security Overhaul, a Year After Its Epic Breach

Nearly a year after hackers stole the personal data of 147 million people from Equifax, the company details how it's overhauling security.

8h

We Trained Like Tom Cruise for the Wild *Mission: Impossible* Helicopter Stunt

To see how Cruise pulled off the gut-twisting corkscrew dive, we went to Airbus' helicopter flight school for our own training time.

8h

Marijuana Beliefs Outstrip Evidence

There is a lot of hype surrounding medical marijuana, but the clinical science is very preliminary. The risks and benefits have not been researched enough to make science-based recommendations.

8h

Artificial Mouse Embryo Made in a Laboratory

The embryo, grown in a dish from several types of stem cells, went through gastrulation, a significant stage in development.

8h

Image of the Day: Deep Blue Sea

Researchers have tracked whale sharks’ trips off the coast of the Philippines.

8h

A Gut–and Liver–Check to Get a Bead on Alzheimer's

Areas outside the brain may play a role in a chain reaction related to dementia, but the path from gut to head remains elusive — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

The hidden hazards of antibiotic resistance genes in air

People are often notified about poor air quality by weather apps, and this happens frequently in urban areas, where levels of outdoor pollution containing particulates and soot are high. But now scientists are reporting in ACS' Environmental Science & Technology that there is another type of air contaminant that they say isn't receiving enough attention: antibiotic-resistance genes.

8h

A new catalyst for water splitting that is the best of both worlds

Taking water and ripping it apart into hydrogen and oxygen could form the basis of artificial photosynthetic devices that could ultimately power homes and businesses. However, catalysts, including those used to "split" water, have either worked well but are expensive and unstable, or are affordable and stable, but don't work as well. Now, researchers report in ACS Central Science a new catalyst th

8h

Most of the dust on Mars comes from this one spotLiquid Water Lake Mars

The dust that coats much of the surface of Mars mostly comes from a single thousand-kilometer-long geological formation near the Red Planet’s equator, scientists say. As reported in Nature Communications , researchers found a chemical match between dust in the Martian atmosphere and the surface feature, called the Medusae Fossae Formation. “Mars wouldn’t be nearly this dusty if it wasn’t for this

8h

Happy 40th Birthday IVF. Now let’s discuss your dirty secret | Zeynep Gurtin

As the world’s first IVF baby turns 40, it’s time to make fertility treatment more widely available in the UK and abroad Today marks the 40th anniversary of the first IVF birth . Louise Brown, born in Oldham General Hospital in 1978, was heralded by the world’s press as a British medical marvel and a beacon of hope for people with fertility problems. Forty years later, IVF has unquestionably trans

8h

Study finds Nemo's bright colours protect it from predators

The colourful stripes of coral reef-dwelling clownfish may serve to warn predators about their poisonous anemone hosts, according to a new study by The University of Western Australia.

8h

How to turn the waste crisis into a design opportunity

You might never have heard of expanded polystyrene, but you've definitely used it. It's the lightweight white foam used for everything from packing peanuts to holding boxes of veggies at the supermarket.

8h

A catalytic support material takes a leading role

Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory, in collaboration with DOE's Ames Laboratory, have reported an important and unexpected reaction mechanism—called "redox behavior"—on the surface of catalyst support materials that have application in the chemical industry.

8h

Scientists set out to explore microbial life in glacier streams

EPFL scientists will spend at least the next four years studying some of the world's biggest glacier-fed streams. By collecting microorganisms from the streams and extracting their DNA, they hope to better understand how these creatures have adapted to their extreme environments. The project, slated to start on 1 August 2018, will be the inaugural research program for the Alpine and Polar Environm

8h

Chemists analyze air pollution

To the uninitiated, the back corner of ISC 1233 might be mistaken for a moonshiner's still. A series of plastic tubes corkscrew into an oversized glass jug resting inside a ventilated hood. But instead of making bootleg whiskey, Rachel O'Brien is cultivating aerosols.

8h

Biologist works to merge the sciences and architecture

How do spaces affect us, and animals? UCLA biologist Noa Pinter-Wollman had the idea that we can learn from the way animals use space, and, with several colleagues from the U.S., England and France, she is launching an effort to create a new field of study. Her goals are ambitious.

8h

Apple erkender fejl, som gør topmodeller varme og langsomme

Ifølge Apple er en softwarefejl skyld i, at selskabets Macbooks med de nyeste og dyreste i9-processorer falder i ydeevne, mens temperaturen buldrer opad. Nu kommer en rettelse.

8h

Easy-Bake fossils

Scientists have discovered a new way to simulate the fossilization process in a lab in about 24 hours. They take materials like feathers, lizard feet, and leaves and cook them in a lab oven under heat and pressure conditions that mimic what real fossils undergo. These 'Easy-Bake fossils' give us a better idea of how fossilization works and what kinds of biological materials can become fossils.

8h

Creating 'synthetic' fossils in the lab sheds light on fossilization processes

A newly published experimental protocol, involving University of Bristol scientists, could change the way fossilization is studied.

8h

Billions of dollars on AIDS prevention: Did any of it work?

Researchers studied the effects of varying levels of PEPFAR funding for PMTCT — prevention of mother-to-child transmission — of AIDS among the Kenyan provinces over time, along with trends in local infant mortality, and then compared them to other provinces with similar demographics that did not have PMTCT programs — or had them but with less financial support. 'The results were quite dramatic,

8h

Aeolus—preparing to fly the wind mission

The launch of Aeolus—ESA's mission to map Earth's wind in real-time—is getting tantalisingly close, with the satellite due for lift-off on 21 August from Europe's Spaceport in Kourou, French Guiana. With the wind in their sails, mission teams are busily preparing this unique satellite for its upcoming journey.

9h

Chicken plastic and wine leather – giving waste new life

A fashion collection made from the remains of grapes from the wine industry and plastic made from chicken feathers are two new twists on the practice of making new products from waste, and a growing demand for sustainability from consumers mean there could be a ready market for this type of innovation.

9h

Lionfish Ceviche | Guy Fieri’s Feeding Frenzy

It doesn't get any more fresh than this! Join Guy Fieri aboard the Bimini Blue for some lionfish ceviche. Stream Guy Fieri’s Feeding Frenzy: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/shark-week/full-episodes/guy-fieris-feeding-frenzy Stream Shark Week Episodes: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/shark-week/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.faceboo

9h

Copycats and Contrarians review – should we follow the herd?

What’s behind our tendency to go with the crowd, sensible thinking or emotion? And what are its dangers? No one likes to think of themselves as one of life’s sheep. And yet, Michelle Baddeley suggests, there are many circumstances where following the herd is the smart option, because it saves you the bother of decision-making from scratch. Say you’re after a new fridge freezer. Instead of exhaust

9h

Gene editing is GM, says European Court

The European Court of Justice has ruled that altering living things using the relatively new technique of genome editing counts as genetic engineering.

9h

Ro Khanna Says Silicon Valley Libertarianism Is Dead

The congressman from the heart of tech-land says Democrats must appeal to voters on voters' self-interest.

9h

Google Glass Is Back–Now With Artificial Intelligence

An app for Glass aimed at factory workers can understand spoken language and respond with oral responses. Next up: image recognition.

9h

Congress May Love Flying Cars, But the Skies Still Need Traffic Cops

The House Committee on Science, Space, and Technology loved what they heard from Uber, but experts wonder if flying taxis are really ready for takeoff.

9h

Inside the 23-Dimensional World of Your Car’s Paint Job

Hue. Saturation. Luminance. Sparkle. Fixing a door ding is about way more than color. (Also: Why the sky is blue and clouds are white.)

9h

Making Personalized Cancer Vaccines Takes an Army—of Robots

Take a look inside the new manufacturing plant for Moderna Therapeutics, the Boston area-based biotech valued at $7 billion.

9h

Iran Isn’t Taking Trump’s Twitter Bait—For Now

Just hours after Secretary of State Mike Pompeo delivered an address billed as a show of friendship to the Iranian people, President Donald Trump offered up a late-night chaser: an all-caps tweet warning that any Iranian threats would precipitate “CONSEQUENCES THE LIKES OF WHICH FEW THROUGHOUT HISTORY HAVE EVER SUFFERED BEFORE.” Tehran’s response came hours later, in the form of a tweet written b

9h

Why Don’t More Men Take Their Wife’s Last Name?

In the run-up to marriage, many couples, particularly those of a more progressive bent, will encounter a problem: What is to be done about the last name? Some have attempted work-arounds: the Smiths and Taylors who have become Smith-Taylors, Taylor-Smiths, or—more creative— Smilors . But there just isn’t always a good, fair option. (While many straight couples fall back on the option of a woman t

9h

Why Is it So Hard to Find an Umpire Uniform for Women?

About 20 years ago, an attorney named Kitty Grubb saw an advertisement in her local paper that said the basketball referees’ association in Pinellas County, Florida, was looking for officials. Grubb, 65 years old, had first hoped to become a referee in 1977, having played basketball in high school and college. By the time she saw the advertisement, she had a successful career as a lawyer and extr

9h

An Incomplete Portrait of Baseball and America

When my brother was 12, the traveling baseball team he played on competed at a tournament in Cooperstown, New York. This place, he and his teammates were told, was baseball mecca—not just the home of Major League Baseball’s Hall of Fame, but also the site where the future Union general Abner Doubleday had organized the sport’s first-ever game in 1839. You won’t find any mention of Doubleday at th

9h

Billions of dollars on AIDS prevention: Did any of it work?

In January 2003, President George W. Bush asked Congress to back the President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) with a $15 billion commitment "to turn the tide against AIDS." Congress agreed, and the program—which was continued by the Obama and Trump administrations—has, as noted in The New England Journal of Medicine, "had an unprecedented impact on the pandemic of HIV and AIDS."

9h

Creating 'synthetic' fossils in the lab sheds light on fossilization processes

A newly published experimental protocol, involving University of Bristol scientists, could change the way fossilisation is studied.

9h

Brain Gain: A Person Can Instantly Blossom into a Savant–and No One Knows Why

Some people suddenly become accomplished artists or musicians with no previous interest or training. Is it possible innate genius lies dormant within everyone? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9h

This Blood Test Can Detect Brain Injuries, But Some Doctors Say It Might Be Pointless

A new blood test approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to detect brain injuries might reduce the number of potentially unnecessary brain scans, according to a new study.

9h

Your Sunscreen Isn't Protecting You As Much As You Think: Here's Why

This isn't due to any fault of the product, but rather to the way people apply sunscreen.

9h

World First: Chinese Physicists Made a Cold Atomic Clock Work in Space

Atomic clocks have traveled to space before. But no one has ever managed to make one this accurate tick up there before.

9h

Science Career Ads Are Disproportionately Seen by Men

Marketing algorithms prevent many women from seeing the advertising, even though it’s illegal to target jobs to one gender — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9h

Research shows how the Little Ice Age affected South American climate

A new study published in Geophysical Research Letters shows that the so-called Little Ice Age—a period stretching from 1500 to 1850, during which mean temperatures in the northern hemisphere were considerably lower than present—exerted effects on the climate of South America.

9h

A protein that promotes compatibility between chromosomes after fertilization

A research team from the Center for Biomedical Research (CBMR), at the University of Algarve (UAlg), and Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciência (IGC), led by Rui Gonçalo Martinho (UAlg) and Paulo Navarro-Costa (UAlg and IGC) has identified the mechanism by which the fertilized egg balances out the differences between chromosomes inherited from the mother and the father. The study, now published in the sc

9h

Udbredt iltsvind skyldes først og fremmest landbruget – ikke vejret

Usædvanlig stille og varm sommer samt våd april har skabt perfekte betingelser for iltsvind, men den bagvedliggende årsag er landbrugets udledninger af kvælstof, fastslår forskere.

9h

Regulation of cell orientation and shape for tissue morphogenesis

A collaborative research group led by Kumamoto University has developed a new control system for regulating the morphology and orientation of cells that constitute animal tissues.

10h

Plenty of habitat for bears in Europe

Great opportunity for European brown bears: A new study spearheaded by the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) and the Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) shows that there are still many areas in Europe where bears are extinct, but with suitable habitat for hosting them. Effective management of the species, including a reduction of direct pressures by humans (lik

10h

Researchers use nanotechnology to improve the accuracy of measuring devices

Scientists from National Research University Higher School of Economics and collaborators have synthesized multi-layered nanowires in order to study their magnetoresistance properties. Improving this effect will allow scientists to increase the accuracy of indicators of various measuring instruments such as compasses and radiation monitors. The results of the study have been published in a paper t

10h

Made-to-measure silicon building blocks

The broad spectrum of applications for silicones includes medical implants, cosmetics, hydraulic oils, sealants and corrosion protection—an important topic, in view of global corrosion damage to the tune of about US$ 3.3 trillion per year. To optimize silicon-based synthetic materials for specific applications, made-to-measure chlorosilane building blocks are required in order to produce and cross

10h

The Centauro: A new disaster response robot to assist rescue workers to operate safely

Researchers at IIT-Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia developed, assembled and tested a new disaster response robot called the Centauro, a Centaur-like robot consisting of a four-legged base and an anthropomorphic upper body. The robot is capable of robust locomotion, high strength manipulation and harsh interactions that may be necessary during the execution of disaster relief tasks. Centauro is 1.5

10h

40 years after the first IVF baby, a look back at the birth of a new era

Like many scientific breakthroughs, IVF took persistence and luck in the lab.

10h

Is This Fungus Using a Virus to Control an Animal's Mind?

The story of the misplaced virus—a discovery that Michael Eisen describes as one of the wackiest of his career—began with some plates of fruit. In the summer of 2015, Carolyn Elya, a member of Eisen’s team at the University of California, Berkeley, began leaving fruit out in her backyard, in a deliberate attempt to attract flies. Predictably, the insects arrived. Unpredictably, some of them died

10h

'How Much More Merit Do You Need Than Saving American Lives?'

M att Zeller doesn’t remember the moment when a Taliban rocket-propelled grenade knocked him down. He only recalls seeing a cherry-red motorcycle—a Taliban spotter—approaching his unit and suddenly finding himself lying on the desert floor, watching the sand jump as bullets hit the ground around him. It was the start of a 12-hour firefight. I’m sitting with Zeller at a Starbucks in the suburbs of

10h

Sydkoreanske ejere opdagede revner i katastrofedæmning dagen før kollaps

Laos satser på at blive strømleverandør til sine nabolande, men ulykken mandag var ikke den første.

10h

Tusindvis af danskere kæmper mod barnløshed

Verdens første reagensglasbarn fylder 40 år. I dag er otte millioner mennesker lavet på glas, og stadig flere ufrivilligt barnløse får behandling af lægerne.

11h

North Korea Talks Have Entered the Realm of Small Victories

Once upon a time, a couple months ago, National-Security Adviser John Bolton predicted how Donald Trump’s summit with Kim Jong Un would go down. The U.S. president would swiftly assess how serious the North Korean leader was about giving up his nuclear weapons. And assuming Kim was serious, U.S. authorities would “very quickly” swoop in, take apart North Korea’s nukes, and ship them off to Tennes

11h

Facebook klar med machine learning-baseret faktatjek klar inden midtvejsvalg

Facebook vil bruge machine-learning til at stoppe spredningen af falske informationer på det sociale medie op til amerikansk valg i november.

11h

EPA chief: US needs a single standard for fuel efficiency

The acting head of the Environmental Protection Agency said Tuesday that the United States needs a single standard for fuel efficiency for cars and trucks, signaling a possible showdown with California and other states that could throw the car market into turmoil.

11h

Facebook must end discriminatory ad practice under deal with Washington attorney generalFacebook Washington

Facebook will be legally required to end its practice of allowing businesses to block certain groups like blacks, gays and immigrants from viewing ads under an agreement reached with the Washington State Attorney General's Office.

12h

Why do we twitch in our sleep?

submitted by /u/Darkroe [link] [comments]

12h

German post office delivers electric car surprise

On German streets plied by hulking SUVs and roaring combustion engines, the small, toy-like electric vehicles driven by postmen stand out by their silence and their bright yellow livery.

12h

Red planet and 'blood moon' pair up to dazzle skygazers

The longest "blood moon" eclipse this century will coincide with Mars' closest approach in 15 years to offer skygazers a thrilling astronomical double bill on Friday, astronomers say.

12h

Efterretningstjeneste: Hospitalernes livs-kritiske udstyr er sårbart over for cyberangreb

Center for Cybersikkerhed under FE advarer om, at for eksempel CT-scannere på de danske hospitaler ikke er tilstrækkeligt sikre over for hackerangreb. Det kan koste menneskeliv, hvis hackerne får adgang til hospitalers udstyr, siger konsulent.

12h

Thinking about quitting Facebook? There's a demographic analysis for thatM. Zuckerberg Facebook US

People are either Facebook users or they are not.

12h

New clues to origins of mysterious atmospheric waves in Antarctica

Two years after a CIRES and CU Boulder team discovered a previously unknown class of waves rippling continuously through the upper Antarctic atmosphere, they've uncovered tantalizing clues to the waves' origins. The interdisciplinary science team's work to understand the formation of "persistent gravity waves" promises to help researchers better understand connections between the layers of Earth's

12h

Among golden-crowned sparrows, a false crown only fools strangers

Scientists studying winter flocks of golden-crowned sparrows at the UC Santa Cruz Arboretum have discovered surprisingly complex social behavior in these small migratory birds. A new study reveals that the sparrows have different ways to assess dominance status depending on whether the interaction is with a familiar bird or a stranger.

12h

A blood moon is coming! Here's what you need to know – video

On Friday 27 July the longest lunar eclipse of the century (so far) will take place. Also known as a blood moon, this occurs when the sun, Earth and moon align perfectly, putting the moon in the Earth's shadow. The moon will be totally eclipsed by the Earth for one hour and 43 minutes. The red colouring is a result of sunlight refracting through the Earth's atmosphere • Starwatch: red marvel that

13h

Among golden-crowned sparrows, a false crown only fools strangers

Scientists studying winter flocks of golden-crowned sparrows at the UC Santa Cruz Arboretum have discovered surprisingly complex social behavior in these small migratory birds. A new study reveals that the sparrows have different ways to assess dominance status depending on whether the interaction is with a familiar bird or a stranger.

13h

Queensland trial giving Viagra to pregnant women halted after Netherlands deaths

Researchers pause to gather information after 11 babies died in similar Dutch trial A Queensland study on reducing foetal distress during childbirth through the use of Viagra has been paused after the death of 11 babies in a clinical trial in the Netherlands using the same drug. Mater Research Institute professor Sailesh Kumar said the study at the Mater Mother’s hospital used a much lower dosage

13h

Artificial Intelligence Shows Why Atheism Is Unpopular

submitted by /u/everbeta [link] [comments]

14h

You're not applying sunscreen right, scientists warn

Researchers urge people to use higher-SPF products to compensate for tendency to apply protection too thinly The typical way most of us apply sunscreen leaves our skin with less than half the expected protection from damaging ultraviolet rays, say scientists. New research has revealed that when sunscreen is applied in a typical way, it provides only 40% of the protection they might expect based o

14h

Fish body shape holds key to make fishery management cheaper, easier

A simple body-shape analysis can reveal what part of the ocean a fish came from, according to a new study from Smithsonian scientists working to develop better tools for managing small-scale fisheries. The researchers found that body-shape analysis reliably discriminated between yellowtail snapper caught at Caribbean fishing grounds just 5 kilometers apart — and it did so more accurately than two

15h

Cold is the new hot: how cooling down became summer’s hottest trend

For a long time the world of wellness was obsessed with heat. But now, ​with the rise of​ cold yoga ​and cryochambers​, it’s cool to be ice cold​ If you’re reading this, it’s probably because you’re hot. In which case, as concepts go, this one will be music to your ears. Or rather balm for your sunburn. The heatwave has created a need for cooling off that extends beyond a cold shower – and so the

15h

Fish body shape holds key to make fishery management cheaper, easier

A simple body-shape analysis can reveal what part of the ocean a fish came from, according to a new study from Smithsonian scientists working to develop better tools for managing small-scale fisheries. The researchers found that body-shape analysis reliably discriminated between yellowtail snapper caught at Caribbean fishing grounds just 5 kilometers apart—and it did so more accurately than two mo

15h

15h

Se vores nye kryb: Klimaforandringer lokker insekter til Danmark

Farverige arter af tæger, græshopper og guldsmede invaderer landet i takt med, at vejret bliver varmere.

15h

New clues to origins of mysterious atmospheric waves in Antarctica

CU Boulder team finds link between gravity waves in the upper and lower Antarctic atmosphere, helping create a clearer picture of global air circulation.

15h

Women and older people under-represented in drug trials for heart disease

In the US, it's estimated the number of people aged 65 and older will double over the next 30 years. With the first baby boomers now turning 73, the demand for cardiac care is expected to skyrocket, not just in the US but elsewhere as well. Even though they have more cardiovascular problems, fewer women and people over 65 are recruited for randomized clinical trials than men and younger people.

15h

LIVE with Ruby Rose | Shark After Dark: Even Darker

Join “The Meg” star Ruby Rose, Jack Osbourne and shark cinematographer Andy Casagrande for even more Shark After Dark! Stream Shark Week Episodes: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/shark-week/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery https://www.facebook.com/SharkWeek Follow on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Discovery https://

16h

Thinking about quitting Facebook? There's a demographic analysis for that

New research by Eric P.S. Baumer of Lehigh University shows that current Facebook use is more common among respondents who are: middle aged (40 to 60), female, not seeking employment, of Asian descent, or currently married. Deactivation is more common among respondents who are younger, seeking employment, or not married. Respondents most likely to have never had an account are older, male, from a

16h

WATCH: Why It's Usually Hotter In A City

The way we design and inhabit cities is making them retain heat. (Image credit: Becky Harlan/NPR)

18h

Intestinal virus study shows major changes associated with inflammatory bowel disease

A new study comparing healthy and diseased mouse intestinal tracts shows unexpected changes in viral communities.

18h

Fitness trackers prove helpful in monitoring cancer patients

Fitness trackers can be valuable tools for assessing the quality of life and daily functioning of cancer patients during treatment, a new study has found. The trackers, also known as wearable activity monitors, include commercial devices worn on the wrist that log a wearer's step counts, stairs climbed, calories, heart rate and sleep.

18h

Scientists develop new materials that move in response to light

Researchers have developed magnetic elastomeric composites that move in different ways when exposed to light, raising the possibility that these materials could enable a wide range of products that perform simple to complex movements, from tiny engines and valves to solar arrays that bend toward the sunlight.

18h

Abnormal gene copying seen in tauopathy fruit fly models

A phenomenon by which genes clone themselves and paste their copies into other parts of DNA is drawing the attention of Alzheimer's disease researchers. Scientists discovered an uptick in this activity in fruit fly models of tauopathy. Alzheimer's is one of about 20 tauopathies.

18h

Rise of the grasshoppers: New analysis redraws evolutionary tree for major insect family

Thanks to a decade-long analysis of grasshoppers' genetic relationships, scientists now have the clearest picture yet of the evolutionary pathways grasshoppers have followed to attain their incredible diversity — and the findings put the birthplace of the broadest lineage of grasshoppers in South America, not Africa, as previously thought.

18h

After the Fatal Crash, Uber Revamps Its Robo-Car Testing

The new program will put two safety drivers in each car, and the company will deploy a system that watches to see if they’re actually paying attention.

18h

Sunscreen users receive less than half the sun protection they think, study finds

Researchers have assessed just how much sun protection people actually receive, based on typical use. It is well known that people don't receive the full ultraviolet radiation blocking benefit of sunscreen, because they are applying it more thinly than manufacturers recommend.

18h

Averting toxic chats: Computer model predicts when online conversations turn sour

The internet offers the potential for constructive dialogue and cooperation, but online conversations too often degenerate into personal attacks. In hopes that those attacks can be averted, researchers have created a model to predict which civil conversations might take a turn and derail.

18h

Sepsis kills: Prompt care saves kids' lives

More than one in 10 children hospitalized with sepsis die, but when a series of clinical treatments and tests is completed within an hour of its detection the odds of death shrink 40 percent, according to the largest ever analysis of pediatric sepsis. The study supports an initially controversial New York State mandate, likely encouraging it's expansion to other states.

18h

Bats harbor a gene swiped from an ancient Ebola-like virus — here's how they may use it

Some 18 million years ago, an ancestor of mouse-eared bats 'stole' genetic material from an ancient virus related to Ebola. The swiped genetic sequence — a gene called VP35 — has remained largely intact in the bats despite the passage of time, a new study finds. The research also sheds light on the gene's possible function in bats, suggesting that it may play a role in regulating the immune syst

18h

Alzheimer's disease risk impacted by the liver, diet

Reduced levels of plasmalogens are associated with an increased risk of Alzheimer's Disease, according to new research.

18h

Chance of being prescribed opioids for minor injury differs dramatically by where you live

Patients who sought care for a sprained ankle in states that were found to be 'high prescribers' of opioids were approximately three times more likely to receive a prescription for the drugs than those treated in 'low-prescribing' states, according to new research. Additional results of the study show that patients who received prescriptions for long courses of the drugs were five times more likel

18h

Scientists warn that proposed US-Mexico border wall threatens biodiversity, conservation

Scientists highlight ecological harm that could result from the construction of a wall along the US-Mexico border.

19h

Link found between resilience to dyslexia and gray matter in the frontal brain

A new joint study identifies the brain mechanism that accounts for the discrepancy between low decoding skills and high reading comprehension in some children with dyslexia.

19h

Blasting tiny craters in glass, creating material to miniaturize telecommunication devices

Modern communication systems often employ optical fibers to carry signals across or between devices, combining more than one function into a single circuit. However, signal transmission requires long optical fibers, which makes miniaturizing the device difficult. Instead of long optical fibers, scientists have started testing planar waveguides. Investigators now report on a laser-assisted study of

19h

Risk factors linked to chikungunya and dengue outbreaks

In one of the largest studies of its kind, researchers analyzed chikungunya and dengue outbreak data from 76 countries over a period of 50 years, focusing on regions across the Indian Ocean. The analysis of 1959-2009 data revealed that population density and proximity to a country already experiencing an outbreak were the factors most closely associated with a country's own likelihood of experienc

19h

Coldwater streams may provide refuge against changing climate

Coldwater stream habitats are vulnerable to effects of climate change, particularly to changes in precipitation and air temperatures that alter their hydrology. Some streams are more likely to act as coldwater refugia — areas buffered from climate change that enable persistence of the ecosystem and its resources — and may provide long-term habitat to ecologically and economically important speci

19h

New way to target flu virus

Researchers used an atom-level simulation to define one mechanism by which the flu virus infects cells. The team said its work could provide a path toward a universal vaccine for viruses.

19h

Liquid microscopy technique reveals new problem with lithium-oxygen batteries

Using an advanced, new microscopy technique that can visualize chemical reactions occurring in liquid environments, researchers have discovered a new reason lithium-oxygen batteries — which promise up to five times more energy than the lithium-ion batteries that power electric vehicles and cell phones — tend to slow down and die after just a few charge/discharge cycles.

19h

Generation of random numbers by measuring phase fluctuations from a laser diode with a silicon-on-in

Researchers have shown that a chip-based device measuring a millimeter square could be used to generate quantum-based random numbers at gigabit per second speeds. The tiny device requires little power and could enable stand-alone random number generators or be incorporated into laptops and smart phones to offer real-time encryption.

19h

Ocean acidification a challenge for science, governments, and communities

A new paper highlights the challenges faced by scientists, governments and communities as rising levels of carbon dioxide are absorbed by the world's oceans. Researchers have found that in recent centuries surface ocean pH has fallen ten times faster than in the past 300 million years and that impacts are being felt on ecosystems, economies and communities worldwide.

19h

New crime fighting algorithm could predict reoccurring illegal activity

A new algorithm developed by researchers could give police departments the upper hand in their fight against crime. The approach is similar to that used in weather forecasting and the Apollo space missions.

19h

Unwrapping the brewing secrets of barley

Researchers have uncovered fundamental new information about the malting characteristics of barley grains. They say their finding could pave the way to more stable brewing processes or new malts for craft brewers.

19h

First randomized trial of 'kick and kill' approach to HIV cure leaves puzzles to be solved

Researchers have reported the results of the first randomized clinical trial to test a novel strategy involving waking up and then killing the 'sleeping' HIV that is hiding in the body using an experimental approach known as 'kick and kill.'

19h

Positive policing changes after cannabis legalization

Researchers have found that marijuana legalization in Colorado and Washington has not hurt police effectiveness. In fact, clearance rates for certain crimes have improved.

19h

Regulation of cell orientation and shape for tissue morphogenesis

A collaborative research group has developed a new control system for regulating the morphology and orientation of cells that constitute animal tissues.

19h

Dark energy? No sign of symmetrons

One of the candidates for 'dark energy' is the symmetron field. Researchers have developed an experiment capable of measuring extremely small forces with the help of neutrons. The measurements could have provided pointers to the mysterious symmetrons, but the particles didn't show up. This excludes the possibility of symmetrons in a broad parameter range. 'Dark energy' is going to have to be expla

19h

Protein discovery may explain why patients develop resistance to new anti-cancer drugs

Researchers have identified a protein complex that might explain why some cancer patients treated with the revolutionary new anti-cancer drugs known as PARP inhibitors develop resistance to their medication.

19h

Depleting microbiome with antibiotics can affect glucose metabolism

A new study has found that mice that have their microbiomes depleted with antibiotics have decreased levels of glucose in their blood and better insulin sensitivity. The research has implications for understanding the role of the microbiome in diabetes. It also could lead to better insight into the side effects seen in people who are being treated with high levels of antibiotics.

19h

A scientific study characterizes our circles of friendships

The organisation of our friendships is guided to a large degree by our cognitive capacity when it comes to managing them, that is, by the amount of time and mental effort we can devote to them. This is one of the conclusions of a study which analyzed these relationships from a mathematical perspective.

19h

Right-sided colon cancer patients have poorer survival than those with left-sided disease

Surgeons report that patients with tumors on the right side may benefit from greater lymph node harvest during their operations.

19h

A 3-D model of a human heart ventricle

Researchers have bioengineered a three-dimensional model of a human left heart ventricle that could be used to study diseases, test drugs and develop patient-specific treatments for heart conditions such as arrhythmia.

19h

Model fuses social media, remote sensing data with goal of identifying nuclear threats

A new computational model allows researchers to draw on normally incompatible data sets, such as satellite imagery and social media posts, to answer questions about what is happening in targeted locations. The researchers developed the model to serve as a tool for identifying violations of nuclear nonproliferation agreements.

19h

Enzyme lays the foundations for allergic immune response

While in search of the causes of allergies and asthma, a chance discovery has yielded new clues: researchers have ascertained that the enzyme guanylate cyclase in cells lays the foundations for the type of immune response. Allergic symptoms are more or less pronounced depending on which immune response gains the upper hand.

19h

Was It Ethical for Dropbox to Share Customer Data with Scientists?

The data was anonymized, but academics are still concerned about the ethics of the analysis.

19h

Novel intervention for anxiety symptoms among people with Bipolar Disorder

Psychologists have devised a novel psychological intervention to address Anxiety in Bipolar Disorder (AIBD). Anxiety is common in Bipolar Disorder (BD) and associated with worse clinical outcomes including increased suicidality. Despite effective psychological treatments for anxiety, research into treating anxiety in BD is underdeveloped.

20h

Breast cancer fuelled by mysterious Yin Yang protein

Scientists have unveiled clues about a mysterious molecule called Yin Yang1 — and revealed it may fuel tumor growth in breast cancer.

20h

Mutated gene is likely cause of 3-year-old girl's severe disorder

A young girl with severe neurological symptoms finally has a diagnosis, following the discovery of a genetic mutation that likely caused the girl to experience a cascade of symptoms. Like a train hitting a missing section of rail, a mutated copy of the gene FBXO28 is suspected of causing one of the girl's chromosomes to go off track — a frameshift mutation — leading to a host of neurological and

20h

New scholarly focus needed to help solve global food crisis

The global food system is unsustainable and urgently needs an overhaul. Yet current approaches to finding solutions through applied academic research are too narrow and treat the food system as a collection of isolated components within established disciplines such as agronomy, sociology or nutritional science.

20h

First dementia prevalence data in lesbian, gay and bisexual older adults

The first dementia prevalence data from a large population of lesbian, gay and bisexual older adults was reported today.

20h

Saliva test could improve diabetes control and treatment

A simple saliva sample could replace blood tests to assess and monitor diabetes, finds a new study. The most comprehensive analysis of proteins in saliva to date finds that these proteins reflect high blood sugar and associated disease processes in children and adolescents with uncontrolled type 1 diabetes, long before the appearance of clinical symptoms. This could lead to better prediction and p

20h

The short, tumultuous working life of a major league baseball pitcher

There are pitchers in Major League Baseball (MLB) who have had 30-year careers, but as a demographer points out, these are extreme outliers and often the stars of the game who receive most of the media's attention. The reality for most pitchers in baseball is that their professional working lives are surprisingly short — 3.99 years on average — according to a new method of calculating working li

20h

The great NFL practice conundrum: How much should you train to avoid injury?

Researchers studied whether there were any sudden changes in injuries after the NSF implemented practice restrictions in 2011, while adjusting for the fact that more attention has been paid to NFL injuries over time, which means the number of reported injuries had been going up even before the new CBA. In a nutshell, we they didn't seem to go up or down on balance.

20h

Why did home runs surge in baseball? Statistics provides twist on hot topic

Around the middle of the 2015 season, something odd started happening in Major League Baseball (MLB): Home runs surged. They surged again in 2016 and then again in 2017. Statisticians now provide an explanation. The quality of pitching between 2015 and 2017 had gotten worse if one breaks a pitch down into measurable components and then measured pitching quality over time. Wilson called this measur

20h

Are star players over-rated in MLB? A key statistic doesn't stand up to scrutiny

Assessing play quality In baseball is complicated. "Wins above replacement player" (WARP) aggregate a player's total contribution to their team — offense and defense and primary position — into one easily understood statistics. But does it actually measure — or even roughly estimate — player value?

20h

Exercise cuts risk of chronic disease in older adults

People who engaged in the highest levels of total physical activity were twice as lively to avoid stroke, heart disease, angina, cancer and diabetes, and be in optimal physical and mental shape 10 years later, experts found.

20h

'Hijacked' cell response to stress reveals promising drug targets for blood cancer

A signaling pathway that helps promote normal cell growth worsens a form of leukemia by taking control of another pathway better known for protecting cells from biological stress, a new study shows.

20h

Cognitive consequences of age-related increase in brain activity

Increased frontal brain activity in healthy older adults reflects reduced efficiency rather than a way to maintain cognitive function, finds a study of two human samples. The findings contradict a leading theory in the neuroscience of aging.

20h

1 Hen, 76 Ducklings: What’s the Deal With This Picture?

“It’s an extraordinary sighting.” An amateur wildlife photographer captured dozens of ducklings following a single hen on a lake in Minnesota.

20h

Organic Mega Flow Battery transcends lifetime, voltage thresholds

Researchers have demonstrated a new organic molecule that outlives and outperforms its predecessors, offering the longest-lasting high-performance organic flow battery to date. Nicknamed the Methuselah quinone — after the longest-lived Biblical figure — this molecule could usefully store and release energy many tens of thousands of times over multi-year periods.

20h

Researchers explore popular food trends in nutritional review

What's the bottom line on the potential heart health benefits of popular health foods? Researchers discuss nutritional "hypes" and controversies around dairy products, added sugar, legumes, coffee and tea, alcohol, energy drinks, mushrooms, fermented foods, Omega-3s and vitamin B12.

20h

Cat-Borne Parasite May Prompt People to Start Businesses

Cat-Borne Parasite May Prompt People to Start Businesses People infected with Toxoplasma gondii are more likely to be entrepreneurs, according to new research. toxoplasmic-entrepreneur-cropped.jpg Image credits: funkyfrogstock/ Shutterstock Human Tuesday, July 24, 2018 – 19:00 Nala Rogers, Staff Writer (Inside Science) — A parasite that infects some 30 to 50 percent of the world's human populati

20h

Brontosaurus Relatives Unearthed in East Asia for the First Time

Brontosaurus Relatives Unearthed in East Asia for the First Time The newly dubbed "Amazing Dragon of Lingwu" may have weighed more than 10 metric tons and boasted a dangerous "whiplash tail." Dinosaur_topNteaser.jpg An artist's rendering of Lingwulong shenqi Image credits: Zhang Zongda Creature Tuesday, July 24, 2018 – 11:00 Charles Q. Choi, Contributor (Inside Science) — The largest, heaviest a

20h

Scientists unlock the properties of new 2D material

A new two-dimensional material has become a reality, thanks to a team of Danish and Italian scientists.The research, led by physicists at Aarhus University, succeeded in the first experimental realisation and structural investigation of single-layer vanadium disulphide (VS2).

20h

Rice with fewer stomata requires less water and is better suited for climate change

Study finds engineered rice lines with low stomatal density used just 60 percent of the normal amount of water and were able to survive drought and high temperatures for longer than unaltered plants.

20h

Research finds that sunscreen users receive less than half the sun protection they think

Researchers from King's College London have assessed just how much sun protection people actually receive, based on typical use. It is well known that people don't receive the full ultraviolet radiation blocking benefit of sunscreen, because they are applying it more thinly than manufacturers recommend.

20h

Treatments for cancer and sickle cell disease deplete germ cells in young boys

Scientists have discovered that some treatments for cancer and sickle cell disease can destroy the germ cells that go on to develop into sperm in the testes of young boys. In some pre-pubescent boys, the treatment for sickle cell disease results in complete destruction of all their germ cells, which are called spermatogonia. The study is published in Human Reproduction and is the first to describe

20h

Blood moon: all you need to know about this week's lunar eclipse

The longest celestial event of its kind this century so far will be visible in most parts of the world on Friday and Saturday The longest lunar eclipse of the century (so far) will take place across Friday night and Saturday morning , as the moon is totally eclipsed by the Earth for one hour and 43 minutes. During this time, people around the world will be able to see a “blood moon”, as the Earth

21h

Rice with fewer stomata requires less water and is better suited for climate change

Rice plants engineered to have fewer stomata—tiny openings used for gas exchange—are more tolerant to drought and resilient to future climate change, a new study has revealed.

21h

Laser blasts turn hydrogen into a shiny liquid

New research on the conductivity of metallic hydrogen clarifies the dynamo effect—a process in which the kinetic energy of conducting moving fluids converts to magnetic energy. Metallic hydrogen is one of the rarest materials on Earth, yet more than 80 percent of planets—including Jupiter, Saturn, and hundreds of extrasolar planets—are composed of this exotic form of matter. Its abundance in our

21h

Math shapes our primal ‘number system,’ not vice-versa

Scientists have long believed that our ability to solve symbolic math problems such as 3+2=5 depends on an imprecise, primal brain function called the Approximate Number System. A new study suggests otherwise. “Our study shows that gaining expertise with symbolic math, which is a human cultural invention, actually refines this evolutionarily ancient system of quantity representation, not the othe

21h

Scientists unlock the properties of new 2-D material

A new two-dimensional material has become a reality, thanks to a team of Danish and Italian scientists.

21h

Dogs bust through boundaries to comfort their people

Dogs not only go out of their way to comfort their upset owner, but will overcome obstacles to do it quickly, experiments show. In the journal Learning & Behavior , researchers show that dogs with strong bonds to their owners hurried to push through a door when they heard their person crying. “We found dogs not only sense what their owners are feeling, if a dog knows a way to help them, they’ll g

21h

Why winter air in the Eastern U.S. is still so dirty

Despite overall lower levels of harmful emissions from power plants and vehicles throughout the year, winter air pollution in the Eastern United States remains high. A new study explains why. Summer used to be the poster child for haze-containing particles that cause asthma, lung cancer, and other illnesses, researchers say. “In the past 10 years or so, the summer air pollution levels have decrea

21h

The Atlantic Daily: Fierce Opposition

What We’re Following Israel and Syria: Israel shot down a Russian-made Syrian fighter jet that the country’s military officials said had entered Israeli airspace. (Syria claims the plane was still in its own airspace when shot.) The clash illustrates how difficult it will be for Russia to fulfill its recent promise to negotiate protections for Israel against the spillover of the Syrian conflict.

21h

Study supports blood test to help diagnose brain injury

For the first time in the US, a blood test will be available to help doctors determine if people who've experienced a blow to the head could have a traumatic brain injury such as brain bleeding. Until this point, physicians have relied on subjective markers — mainly patient-reported symptoms — to make an educated 'guess' on who has brain trauma. The test provides an objective indicator of injury

21h

Blood test might help reduce unnecessary CT scans after traumatic brain injury

Peer reviewed / Observational study / HumansA high sensitivity blood test might help doctors rule out traumatic intracranial injuries like brain haemorrhage and contusion before resorting to CT scanning, according to a large, multicentre observational trial published in The Lancet Neurology journal.

21h

Young galaxy's halo offers clues to its growth and evolution

A team of astronomers has tested a new way of studying the properties of the gaseous halo surrounding a galaxy using W. M. Keck Observatory's new instrument, the Keck Cosmic Web Imager. The analysis is the first of its kind and could offer clues about galaxy formation and evolution.

21h

Rare coral found off the west coast of Ireland

Rare coral has been found in a deep sea research mission off the west coast of Ireland.

21h

Fish Will Start Losing Sense of Smell as Carbon Dioxide Levels Rise, Study Finds

Rising carbon dioxide levels will impair the animals’ ability to sense odors, change their behavior and alter gene expression, the study showed.

21h

Popular Grain-Free Dog Foods May Be Linked to Heart Disease

A small but concerning number of dogs on diets heavy in lentils, chickpeas and other legumes have developed enlarged hearts. Researchers are investigating.

21h

'Mutational burden' of human induced pluripotent stem cells

In a new study researchers have scrutinized the whole genome sequences of 18 induced pluripotent stem cell lines derived from skin cells that they had reprogrammed to identify and characterize somatic mutations.

22h

Unless we spot changes, most life experiences are fabricated from memories

We may not be able to change recent events in our lives, but how well we remember them plays a key role in how our brains model what's happening in the present and predict what is likely to occur in the future, finds new research.

22h

Writer Maria Konnikova played poker for book research. Then she won $84,600 and went pro.

Maria Konnikova, best-selling author and former Big Think columnist, will be speaking with poker legend Erik Seidel and Big Think president Peter Hopkins at a New York City event on August 1. Read More

22h

Study: Dogs as adept at empathy as young humans

Score another point for man's best friend. Read More

22h

A female Ebola survivor infected her family more than a year after she had the illness

Health A case study in how viruses are sneakier than we sometimes think. A 33-year-old woman in Liberia harbored the Ebola virus for more than a year before transmitting the infection to family members—the first evidence scientists have that…

22h

Do Spicy Snacks Really Cause Gallbladder Problems?

A Tennessee teen needed gallbladder surgery after consuming large amounts of spicy snacks.

22h

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