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Nyheder2018juli26

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Lunar eclipse: Skygazers await century's longest 'blood moon'

During this total eclipse, Earth's natural satellite will turn a striking shade of red or ruddy brown.

7h

Image of the Day: Hanging Around

Hurricanes drive evolution in anole lizards, finds a new study.

4h

Københavns skrappeste dieselforbud kan fjerne knap halvdelen af trafikkens skadelige NOx-udslip

Beregninger viser, at hvis Købehavn forbyder dieselpersonbiler i 2025 og stiller skrappere krav til tunge køretøjer, så vil 43 procent af de sundhedsskadelige kvælstofilter forsvinde fra udstødningen.

12h

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First contact or false alarm? New Richter-like scale for alien signals

Rio 2.0 rates potential signs of extraterrestrial life from 0 to 10, with 10 equivalent to ‘an alien shaking your hand’ When a team of Russian astronomers reported in 2015 that a telescope in the Caucasus region had intercepted a mysterious signal from a distant star, talk of extraterrestrials was not far behind. As some asked : was this proof aliens were trying to contact us? The answer came soo

6min

Flere ingeniører på vej: Universiteter øger igen optaget af studerende

Samlet bliver der optaget færre end sidste år på de videregående uddannelser i år, men for ingeniøruddannelserne fortsætter fremgangen. Der starter 311 ingeniørstuderende flere efter sommerferien end sidste år.

8min

What Rereading Childhood Books Teaches Adults About Themselves

When I return to my parents’ house and the neighborhood where I grew up, the tension between sameness and difference is disorienting. The gym is still there, but the bookstore where I hung out after school is now a Target. There are new neighbors renovating the house next door. My parents might turn one of our childhood bedrooms into a study. I see versions of my old self in local kids, running a

13min

U of G study is first to find evidence that leopard geckos can make new brain cells

University of Guelph researchers have discovered the type of stem cell allowing geckos to create new brain cells. This finding provides evidence that lizards may also be able to regenerate parts of the brain after injury.

26min

Who Should Pay for the Mistakes on NASA’s Next Big Telescope?

If everything had gone according to plan, the most powerful space telescope would be in orbit right now, perched about 1 million miles from Earth, peering deep into the universe, and returning home mesmerizing photos of glittering stars and galaxies. Instead, it’s still in a factory in California, waiting to receive more money so engineers can finish building it. The James Webb Space Telescope, N

34min

Indian warrior king's rocket cache found in abandoned well

Archaeologists find corroded shells stored by powerful 18th-century ruler Tipu Sultan More than 1,000 rockets belonging to an 18th-century Muslim warrior king have been found by excavators in an abandoned well in southern India, according to authorities. The excavation of the open well in the Shimoga district of Karnataka state led to the unearthing of rockets and shells stored by Tipu Sultan for

36min

Is the Great Indian Bustard About to Go Extinct?

Only one male has turned up at the birds’ breeding grounds this year—and he’s too young to breed — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

43min

Lille Vildmose er en knastør svamp, der brænder som papir

Det brænder under jorden i Nordjylland. Tørken har gjort Lille Vildmoses porøse undergrund af spagnum til en knastør krudttønde.

43min

Look Up This Weekend for Closest Mars Views Since 2003

Will the weather cooperate for you to get a good look at Mars at its best during its closest approach this week?

46min

Who Discovered Mars, Anyway? A Look Back at the History of the Red Planet

Just because we'll never be able to give one sharp-eyed human a name doesn't mean there's nothing interesting to learn about the history of observing Mars.

47min

Star Zooms Past Monster Black Hole, Confirms Relativity

For the first time ever, researchers have watched a star race past the supermassive black hole at the heart of the Milky Way, verifying that its motion showed the effects of general relativity, as predicted by Albert Einstein.

47min

Hollow trees host massive moth slumber parties

Moths are generally loners. So, when Florida Museum of Natural History lepidopterist Andrei Sourakov spotted a dozen glossy black Idia moths inside a hollow tree, he made a mental note. When their numbers jumped to more than 400, he was astounded.

47min

Breastfeeding support services 'failing mothers' due to cuts

Campaign group finds at least 44% of local authority areas in England affected by recent cuts to breastfeeding services New mothers across England are being failed as a result of cuts to local breastfeeding support services, campaigners say. Breastfeeding is known to reduce the risk of infections and allergies as well as future obesity and diabetes for the baby, while benefits to mothers include

54min

Can #MeToo Fix Spain’s Language Problem?

MADRID—As they were sworn into office on June 7, 2018, most of the ministers of the new Spanish government didn’t recite the exact text placed in front of them. Instead of uttering the prescribed consejo de ministros , or council of ministers, almost all of the leaders pledged to keep secret the deliberations of the consejo de ministras y ministros . It was a small but significant rebellion. Seve

56min

Hot Weather Spells Trouble For Nuclear Power Plants

Multiple nuclear power facilities in Europe have reduced their electricity production because seawater, which is used to keep the reactors cool, has been warmer than usual. (Image credit: Kimmo Mantyla/AP)

1h

EU may give UK unique Galileo deal after Brexit

Police and armed forces could be guaranteed uninterrupted access to satellite signal British police and armed forces could be guaranteed uninterrupted access to the encrypted signal of the European Union’s Galileo satellite system , it has emerged, as Brussels negotiators consider a unique deal for the UK on the project after Brexit. The EU’s chief Brexit negotiator, Michel Barnier, is mulling an

1h

Lennon or McCartney? Can statistical analysis solve an authorship puzzle?

Stylometry—the use of statistical techniques to determine authorship—is best known for identifying the Unabomber as Theodor Kaczynski and revealing that Shakespeare collaborated with Christopher Marlowe on the Henry IV play cycle. In textual analysis, it is not the unusual word choice that betrays the hidden voice, but the habitual—the recurring patterns of common words, such as prepositions, that

1h

Trade agreement with Japan is crucial for US beef industry

University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture projections indicate that the signing of the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP) in March 2018 could disadvantage U.S. beef exports to Japan, a stumbling block that U.S. beef producers can ill afford.

1h

'Nudging' doctors to prescribe cholesterol-lowering statins triples prescription rates

Pairing an online patient dashboard with 'nudges' to doctors tripled statin prescribing rates in a clinical trial led by Penn Medicine researchers. The study used two nudges, active choice framing to prompt physicians to make a decision on prescriptions, and peer comparison feedback which provided physicians with information on their performance relative to other physicians.

1h

Association between firearm caliber and likelihood of death from gunshot

The caliber of a firearm was associated with the likelihood of death from a gunshot, with shootings by large-caliber handguns likely to be more deadly than small-caliber guns.

1h

At 60, NASA shoots for revival of moon glory days

Sixty years ago, spurred by competition with the Soviet Union, the United States created NASA, launching a journey that would take Americans to the moon within a decade.

1h

These are the best bird photographs of 2018

Animals Audubon Photography Awards announces the winners of their annual competition. Knowing the history and habitat of the birds you are photographing will up your chances at capturing stunning images.

1h

$11,500 reward for killer of pregnant dolphin in Mississippi

A reward of up to $11,500 is being offered for information leading to the capture of the person who shot and killed a pregnant dolphin on the US Gulf Coast, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) said.

1h

Fires spark biodiversity criticism of Sweden's forest industry

The ferocity of wildfires in Sweden has sparked criticism against the powerful forest industry, which is being accused of having rolled out a "red carpet" for blazes and sacrificing the nation's biodiversity for the sake of profit.

1h

The week in wildlife – in pictures

A new species of spider, frolicking hares and migratory sea turtles are among this week’s pick of images from our overheated natural world Continue reading…

1h

Michael Cohen’s Word Is Not Enough

If substantiated, Michael Cohen’s new assertion—that Donald Trump knew in advance about a 2016 meeting at Trump Tower with Kremlin-connected individuals—would prove that the Trump campaign sought to aid a Russian-influence operation aimed at putting Trump in office. But Cohen’s word on its own is not enough to prove anything. “A Cohen assertion by itself is not hefty evidence. If he made a note o

1h

Roseanne, Hannity, and the One Joke That Reveals So Much

One of the many pieces of advice on offer on the instructional website WikiHow concerns a matter of perennial usefulness: How to Apologize . “A good apology,” the site notes, before going on to share tips like “give up the idea of being ‘right,’” “avoid justifying your actions,” and “use excuses cautiously,” will “communicate three things: regret, responsibility, and remedy. Apologizing for a mis

1h

Announcing The Atlantic Festival—Previously Washington Ideas—Renamed and Expanded in its 10th Year

A decade after the Washington Ideas Forum was first held in the nation’s capital, the multi-day marquee event is being reintroduced this fall as The Atlantic Festival . Taking place the first week of October, The Atlantic Festival will animate downtown D.C. with newsmaker interviews and conversations, film screenings, topical forums, book talks, and social events. The new name and expanded progra

1h

Here’s How Colleges Are Spending Money From the Koch Foundation

On Tuesday, the Charles Koch Foundation announced that it would be making a significant change: The philanthropic behemoth would begin publishing details about the multiyear contracts that it makes with universities. The contracts, known as “grant agreements,” lay out the “term, scope, and purpose” of the funds the foundation gives to organizations. The effort at transparency was big news, not le

1h

Bad week in social media gets worse; Twitter hammeredFacebook Twitter Users

Cracking down on hate, abuse and online trolls is also hurting Twitter's standing with investors.

1h

July Marathon: Results!

How marvelous! You finished this first 2712-cube cell in 18 hours 35 minutes, and the second 1072-cube cell in 11 hours 55 minutes! In recognition of players’ hard work on these cells, we will be renaming the cells according to your votes; join us next week after Happy Hour to find out the new names! Players qualified to nominate a name or vote will receive notification(s) between now and Monday.

1h

EPA Move to Weaken Carbon Rules Won't Spur New Coal Power

Cheap natural gas and subsidized renewables make coal plants an expensive prospect — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

It's a girl,girl,boy,girl…! Baby boom at two-zoo partnership

About a year after moving into spacious new digs in New Orleans, African animals are doing just what officials from two zoos had hoped when they created the forested paddocks: being fruitful and multiplying. Seven antelope have given birth, at least one more female is pregnant and others may be.

1h

Got an environmental problem? Beavers could be the solution

A new book shows how important beavers have been in the past — and how they could improve the landscape of the future.

1h

A cooler ocean predator than sharks? Consider the mantis shrimps

When you think about fearsome predators in the ocean, the first thing that pops into your mind is probably a shark. Sure, sharks are OK, with their sleek, menacing shape and their gaping jaws with rows of jagged teeth. But if you were a fish living on a coral reef or cruising along the shore over the sands of a tropical island, you would fear a far more terrifying predator.

1h

Japan website offers anonymity for variety of grievances

A cartoon cat in a purple robe brandishes a tiny gavel as it comforts another cat yowling from abuse: The images welcoming visitors to Sorehara, a Japanese website for anonymous complaints about harassment and other grievances, are deceptively endearing.

1h

Petrichor: why does rain smell so good?

There's some chemistry to the pleasant smell of rain after a long, dry spell.

1h

Scientists discover neurodegenerative disease in monkeys

OHSU scientists have discovered a naturally occurring disease in monkeys that mimics a deadly childhood neurodegenerative disorder in people — a finding that holds promise for developing new gene therapies to treat Batten disease. Scientists confirmed through genetic analysis that a small population of Japanese macaque monkeys carry a mutation in the CLN7 gene that causes one form of the disease.

1h

You are fluent in this language (and don't even know it) | Christoph Niemann

Without realizing it, we're fluent in the language of pictures, says illustrator Christoph Niemann. In a charming talk packed with witty, whimsical drawings, Niemann takes us on a hilarious visual tour that shows how artists tap into our emotions and minds — all without words.

2h

A calmer horse is just a sniff away

How many ways can you think of to stress out a horse? Trailering, bathing, clipping, vet visits, hoof trims, bridling, saddling—the possibilities are endless. Unfortunately, calming options are not. Thanks to research conducted at the University of Arizona, horsemen and horsewomen have a new tool to help manage equine stress, and it's as simple as a sniff. A sniff of lavender, that is.

2h

What is bioluminescence and how is it used by humans and in nature?

The sea was luminous in specks and in the wake of the vessel, of a uniform slightly milky colour. When the water was put into a bottle, it gave out sparks…

2h

Heatwaves from the Arctic to Japan: A sign of things to come?

Intense heatwaves like the one which fuelled Greece's deadly wildfires are set to become increasingly frequent around the world due to climate change, experts warn.

2h

Nyt studie: Sandsynlighed for hedebølge i Danmark er firedoblet

Det varme vejr, vi sveder os igennem i disse dage, bliver fire gange så almindeligt, som før den menneskeskabte opvarmning af klimaet startede.

2h

Chip lights up optical neural network demo

Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have made a silicon chip that distributes optical signals precisely across a miniature brain-like grid, showcasing a potential new design for neural networks.

2h

How radio can empower women in Niger

Mariama is 23. At the age of 15, she was married to a local religious leader twice her age. She now has two babies, is a second wife, and stays at home doing "nothing". Her childhood dream of becoming a doctor faded many years ago.

2h

China dodges blame for Qualcomm-NXP merger demise

China on Friday sought to deflect blame after US chipmaker Qualcomm dropped a merger with Dutch rival NXP over its failure to receive Chinese regulatory blessing, with Beijing saying it was still open to discussions.

2h

Floods force thousands from homes in Myanmar

Floodwaters have forced thousands from their homes in southeast Myanmar, local police said Friday, as authorities and volunteers scrambled to provide food and aid to the victims.

2h

Life on Mars: Japanese astronaut dreams after lake discovery

Japanese astronaut Norishige Kanai came back to earth last month but is still dreaming of space, especially after the discovery of an underground lake brought mankind one step closer to unravelling the mystery of life on Mars.

2h

Dense breast notification and insurance legislation analysis

Increased awareness of breast tissue density masking cancer and thus decreasing the diagnostic sensitivity of mammography has brought about relevant state-level policies. This new study by Harvey L. Neiman Health Policy Institute examines which characteristics of breast density state-level policies were associated with increased use of downstream breast ultrasound for enhancing earlier detection o

2h

Luxembourgish researchers predict cell conversion factors

Thanks to a newly developed computational method, Luxembourg researchers can accurately predict how one subpopulation of cells can be converted into another. "The method has great potential for regenerative medicine when it comes to replacing cell subpopulations that have been lost in the course of disease, for example," explains Prof. Dr Antonio del Sol, head of the Computational Biology group of

2h

Forgotten 'Dinosaur' Fossil Actually Belongs to a Weird, Hippo-Like Beast

In the early 1950s, a mysterious so-called dinosaur fossil sat on display in the village hall in Fukushima, Japan. But a new analysis of the ancient bone reveals that it belonged to a weird, hippo-like creature that lived nearly 16 million years ago.

2h

Meet the joke party that wants to 'Make Hungary Smaller Again'

Hungary's Two-Tailed Dog Party campaigns on an 'anti-anti-immigration platform, with slogans such as: “Sorry about our Prime Minister”, and “Feel free to come to Hungary, we already work in England anyway!” Read More

2h

Can pollution alter wildlife behaviour?

A team of scientists from the University of Portsmouth have developed new scientific tests to better understand the effects of pollution on wildlife behaviour.

2h

The Trump Administration Convenes the ‘Super Bowl’ of Religious Freedom

The Trump administration made an announcement Thursday that perfectly captured the direction—and foibles—of foreign policy in Washington. At the State Department’s first-ever “ministerial to advance religious freedom,” Vice President Pence revealed that the U.S. would impose “significant sanctions” on Turkey until Andrew Brunson, an American pastor who has been detained there for nearly two years

2h

Why Did 11 Babies Die in a Generic Viagra Trial?

The story goes that Viagra began as a drug for chest pains . It didn’t work very well. But men in those clinical trials noticed a curious side effect of erections—and lo, a blockbuster drug was born . Since then, the uses of Viagra, or its non-brand counterpart sildenafil, have continued to morph. Clinicaltrials.gov currently lists 60 planned and ongoing sildenafil trials, and it’s already a comm

2h

SEC again rejects Winkelvoss twins Bitcoin fund

US market regulators on Thursday again rejected a proposal to allow trading in the first Bitcoin-based exchange-traded fund created by noted tech entrepreneurs Cameron and Tyler Winklevoss.

2h

A new classification of symmetry groups in crystal space proposed by Russian scientists

The mutual arrangement of atoms in crystal space is known to correspond to the minimum of the potential energy of interaction of all crystal atoms. The principle of potential energy minimum can be implemented in a number of geometric ways for approximate description of the atomic arrangement in crystals.

2h

Lennon or McCartney? Can statistical analysis solve an authorship puzzle?

Mark Glickman, senior lecturer in statistics at Harvard, and Jason Brown, professor of mathematics at Dalhousie University, apply a stylometric approach to help answer who wrote the Beatles' songs for which it's not known whether it was John Lennon or Paul McCartney.

2h

Scientists create 'impossible' materials in simple way

Scientists from NUST MISIS and colleagues from the University of Bayreuth, the University of Münster (Germany), the University of Chicago (US), and Linköping University (Sweden) have created nitrides, a material previously considered impossible to obtain. More amazing, they have shown that the material can be obtained using a very simple method of direct synthesis. Articles about the revolutionary

2h

Russian scientists discovered a new mineral

A group of scientists from Ural Federal University, together with colleagues from Novosibirsk and Ulan-Ude, discovered a new mineral of uakitite in the iron meteorite Uakit, found in Buryatia in the summer of 2016. The researchers made a report today at the congress of the meteorite society, which is taking place in Moscow.

2h

Medical errors in the emergency room: Understanding why

Medical errors are estimated to cause 250,000 deaths per year in the US. Previously, research on admitted patients suggested that errors are due to the way doctors process the data they have about patients — in other words, doctors have the right information, but might not act on it in the best way.

2h

Amazon powers up profits as footprint grows

Amazon delivered better-than-expected profits Thursday, helping the online colossus shake off the stock market gloom produced by tech rival Facebook.

2h

Mass spectrometry technique helps identify forged Robert Burns manuscripts

A team of researchers at the University of Glasgow has developed a mass spectrometry technique to identify forged manuscripts. In their paper published in the journal Scientific Reports, the group describes their technique and how well it worked when testing known forged Robert Burns manuscripts.

2h

Why I’m Deleting All My Old TweetsTrump Facebook Twitter

If you want to delete yours too, here's how.

2h

X-ray technology reveals never-before-seen matter around black hole

In an international collaboration between Japan and Sweden, scientists clarified how gravity affects the shape of matter near the black hole in binary system Cygnus X-1. Their findings, which were published in Nature Astronomy this month, may help scientists further understand the physics of strong gravity and the evolution of black holes and galaxies.

2h

The structure of the Milky Way

For thousands of years, people have been puzzling over the milky strip that extends across the entire firmament. In the modern era, Galileo Galilei discovered that this Milky Way consists of countless stars. However, it was not until the 20th century that astronomers succeeded in deciphering its form and its true nature.

2h

Forest fires, barbecue bans: heatwave scorches Europe

Firefighters battled forest blazes and authorities banned barbecues,warning citizens of near-record temperatures as a heatwave scorched much of Europe on Friday.

2h

The Stars of Puzzle Are Too Good for This Drab Inspirational Drama

Puzzle is, at its heart, a sports movie. Yes, it presents as an intimate domestic drama about a housewife named Agnes (played Kelly Macdonald) who discovers that her passion for completing jigsaw puzzles offers a way out of her humdrum life. But Marc Turtletaub’s remake of a 2010 Argentine film has the three-act structure of so many athletic narratives—of someone realizing the extent of their ski

2h

How to build a solar microscope

DIY Project tiny specimens onto the walls of your own home. We take for granted the instruments that let us look at tiny things in great detail. But the solar microscope turns this ability into a party trick.

2h

After a hurricane, surviving lizards sport different toes

Lizards that survived a tough hurricane season have larger toe pads, on both front and back limbs, report researchers. The work is first to demonstrate the effects of hurricane-induced natural selection. The hyperactive 2017 season was one of the worst that the Atlantic Ocean region ever experienced. Hurricane Harvey hit in mid-August 2017, followed just a few weeks later by Hurricane Irma, and H

2h

New prey for wolf spiders could be good news for climate

Under warming conditions, arctic wolf spiders’ tastes in prey might be changing, research shows. This could initiate a new cascade of food web interactions that could potentially alleviate some impacts of global warming. There are so many wolf spiders that they outweigh real wolves in the Alaskan Arctic by several orders of magnitude. Their sheer numbers make them one of the important predators o

2h

55- to 70-year-old women and men with prediabetes get stronger bones with football training

Football scores from all angles for untrained middle-aged and elderly women and men with prediabetes. This is the conclusion from a study carried out in the Faroe Islands by football researchers and physiologists from the Department of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics at the University of Southern Denmark and the University of the Faroe Islands.

3h

Can pollution alter wildlife behavior?

A team of scientists from the University of Portsmouth have developed new scientific tests to better understand the effects of pollution on wildlife behavior.

3h

The best spies in the skies analyze Mellaria

The University of Cordoba HUM-882 Archaeology research group has used an Italian radar network to analyze the territory of the ancient Roman city near the Upper Guadiato River.

3h

Copper stearate proved to be promising for heavy oil oxidation

Copper salts have found place in many industries, from pharmaceutics to agriculture, but they are rarely seen in petrochemistry and petroleum extraction. But not for long, it seems, now that Kazan Federal University scientists showed that copper stearate can be a great catalyst for in-situ combustion and even improve oil quality under certain conditions.

3h

Artificial intelligence can predict your personality … simply by tracking your eyes

It's often been said that the eyes are the window to the soul, revealing what we think and how we feel. Now, new research reveals that your eyes may also be an indicator of your personality type, simply by the way they move.

3h

X-ray technology reveals never-before-seen matter around black hole

In an international collaboration between Japan and Sweden, scientists clarified how gravity affects the shape of matter near the black hole in binary system Cygnus X-1. Their findings, which were published in Nature Astronomy this month, may help scientists further understand the physics of strong gravity and the evolution of black holes and galaxies.

3h

Susceptible genes identified for childhood chronic kidney disease

Childhood nephrotic syndrome is the most frequently occurring chronic kidney disease among children. A Japanese research team has identified a group of genes that are strongly related to the development of childhood nephrotic syndrome. The results of this study could shed light on the underlying mechanism for this disease. These findings were published on July 16 in the online edition of Journal o

3h

Key to artery health lies in LYVE-1 macrophage

NUS Medicine researchers have discovered that a population of macrophages associated with blood vessels actively protects our arteries from detrimental changes to their structure and function. They also uncovered the novel mechanism by which these macrophages exert their protective effects. The work has clinical implications for both aging and cardiovascular diseases, in which arterial stiffness p

3h

New ceria nanoparticles attack Parkinson's disease from three fronts

The IBS research team has developed a set of nanoparticles for Parkinson's disease treatment. Tested in mice and published in Angewandte Chemie as a 'hot paper', this study represents the first biomedical application of nanoparticles in the clearance of reactive oxygen by-products in Parkinson's, and gives new hints of therapeutic targets. In the future, the system is expected to be used in the id

3h

Ability to identify genuine laughter transcends culture, UCLA-led study finds

People across cultures are largely able to tell the difference between a fake laugh and a real one, according to a new study led by UCLA's Greg Bryant. Across all societies, listeners were able to tell better than chance whether a laugh was 'real' or 'fake' with some variation. For example, Samoan listeners only got the right answer 56 percent of the time whereas Japanese listeners were correct 69

3h

Germany thwarts China by taking stake in 50Hertz power firm

The German government said Friday it took a minority stake in electricity transmission firm 50Hertz for "national security" reasons, thwarting Chinese investors from buying into the strategic company.

3h

Researchers aim to catalogue global microbiomes—while there's still time

In any rapidly changing environment, there are winners and there are losers. The human microbiome—the vast community of microbes that live in and on the human body—is no exception. As scientists gain a deeper understanding of the microbiome's complex ecology, particularly in the gut, it is increasingly clear that our microbiome's diversity, globally speaking, is under threat. Spreading industriali

3h

How did genetic parasites overcome natural selection for billions of years?

Nearly half of the human genome is composed of genetic parasites—transposons, plasmids, viruses, and other genetic elements that have one thing in common: they don't make any beneficial contributions to their hosts, and can sometimes have harmful effects. Genetic parasites—sometimes called "selfish genes"—originated early in the history of life and today are present in nearly all living organisms.

3h

The Lost Ones

“He lives in a tiny mountain village by the river, on the border between two states in Honduras.” This was the scant information given to Clara Long, a researcher with Human Rights Watch, and her partner, a Honduran lawyer affiliated with the Justice in Motion defender network, as they embarked on a mission to correct one of the most serious mistakes of the Trump administration. The man in questi

3h

Are you walking your dog enough?

Australia has nearly five million dogs, with nearly 40% of Australian households owning one.

3h

Making love can make men sad too: QUT research

A world-first study by QUT researchers concludes men can and do suffer from postcoital dysphoria (PCD) which results in feelings of sadness, tearfulness or irritability following sex. Masters student Joel Maczkowiack and Professor Robert Schweitzer from QUT's School of Psychology and Counselling said that while the condition had been recognized in women, no studies had previously identified the ph

3h

Japan's iconic extinct mammal: A sleeping treasure in a university collection

After more than 60 years, the bone of an iconic extinct Japanese mammal has been rediscovered by a team of researchers led by the University of Tsukuba. With the help of an old label and local knowledge, two equally possible sites in the town of Tsuchiyu Onsen were identified. The 'dinosaur' bone was discovered during construction of a debris dam and identified as the 15.9-million-year-old femur o

3h

Obstacles limiting the preservation of global heritage by UNESCO revealed

A researcher at Kanazawa University explained normative and institutional factors behind the increasing contentiousness of UNESCO's 'Memory of the World' program. She analyzed the controversy over the recent inclusion of Chinese documents related to the Nanjing Massacre in the program, and identified a failure to resolve the tension between universal 'solidarist' forces based on human rights and '

3h

Portfolio diet lowers many risk factors for heart disease

University of Toronto researchers have found that the portfolio diet, a plant-based way of eating previously shown to lower cholesterol levels, reduces other risk factors for cardiovascular disease including blood pressure, triglycerides and inflammation.

3h

A calmer horse is just a sniff away

Research from the University of Arizona shows the calming benefits of lavender aromatherapy for horses.

3h

Researchers discover chemical reaction that uses a surprising molecule

UCLA researchers report in the journal Science they have discovered a chemical reaction that might someday be used to process petroleum into useful compounds.

3h

NIST chip lights up optical neural network demo

Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have made a silicon chip that distributes optical signals precisely across a miniature brain-like grid, showcasing a potential new design for neural networks.

3h

Genetic variation may increase risk of liver damage in patients with chronic hepatitis B

A new study has shown that genetic variation may increase the risk of severe liver damage in Caucasians with chronic hepatitis B infection.

3h

Facebook shares sink on perfect storm of bad news

It has turned into a brutal reality check for Facebook.

3h

Brainstem ‘black box’ contains giant, important neurons

New research sheds light on the roots on consciousness via an area of the brainstem so little understood that one of the researchers calls it the “black box.” First author Inna Tabansky of Rockefeller University coined this nickname, which is certainly simpler than the area’s actual name—the nucleus gigantocellularis (NGC), which is part of a structure called the medullary reticular formation. Th

3h

How Quantum Computers Could Kill the Arrow of Time

A new technique for quantum computing could bust open our whole model of how time moves in the universe.

3h

The Mako Speed Test | Shark Week's The Daily Bite

We clock how fast a Mako can swim, make shark pancake art and test your knowledge on all things shark. Stream The Daily Bite on Discovery GO: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/the-daily-bite/ Stream Shark Week Episodes: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/shark-week/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery https://www.facebo

3h

Researchers tap lasers to mimic shark skin, other natural surfaces

Honed by 450 million years of evolution, shark skin offers a near-perfect design for gliding effortlessly through water.

3h

How The Brain Helps You Sing Or Say What You Mean

The richness of human vocal communication turns partly on our ability to control pitch, scientists say. Consider the difference you hear between "Let's eat , Grandma" and "Let's eat Grandma ." (Image credit: Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images)

3h

Passagererne sveder, og Metroselskabet ved ikke, hvor varmt de har det

De københavnske metrotog har hverken aircon eller temperaturmåling, og metroselskabet beklager, at den 15 grader kølige luft i tunnelerne er utilstrækkelig til at køle passagerne under hedebølgen.

3h

Women and men get research grants at equal rates — if women apply in the first place

When women get research funding, they’ll stay funded as long as their male counterparts. But getting to the top of that heap is a challenge.

3h

Here's how to support quality teaching, with the evidence to back it

Increasing the quality of teaching in Australia is a political hot issue. Popular solutions include restricting entry to teaching courses to the "best and brightest" and reforming teacher education.

3h

The *Overwatch* League Finals Aren't the Only Thing Happening in Games

Steam also has a new update and there is an orphaned, yet still updating, game we need to talk about.

3h

Har du grill-stinenser? Derfor elsker din hjerne duften af grillbøffer

Når du griller, opstår en særlig kemisk reaktion. Og den udsender en duft, som hjernen lynhurtigt reagerer på.

3h

World's marine wilderness is dwindling

An international study led by University of Queensland scientists has found that only 13 per cent of the ocean can still be classified as wilderness.Researchers from UQ's School of Biological Sciences and international collaborators identified marine areas devoid of intense human impacts by analysing 19 stressors including commercial shipping, sediment runoff and several types of fishing.

3h

Is a Blue Wave on Its Way?

In a tweet earlier this week, President Donald Trump inadvertently suggested that he’s jittery about the midterm elections. He seems so unnerved that he’s prepared to pre-spin a blue wave as the rigged handiwork of Russia. “Russia will be fighting very hard to have an impact on the upcoming Election,” the president said . “Based on the fact that no President has been tougher on Russia than me, th

3h

Toronto shooting—the psychology of loss, fear and identity

Canada, July 22, 2018—"Greektown" in Toronto, another area of Canada affected by violence.

3h

Image: Sharm El Sheikh

The Copernicus Sentinel-2 satellite takes us over Sharm El Sheikh, Egypt. Famous as a resort on the southern tip of the Sinai Peninsula, this coastal strip along the Red Sea is peppered with bars, restaurants and hotels. The ancient Greeks and Romans are thought to have taken their holidays in Egypt as long ago as the 4th century BC.

4h

Technology is making cities smart, but it's also costing the environment

The Australian government has allocated A$50 million for the Smarter Cities and Suburbs Program to encourage projects that "improve the livability, productivity and sustainability of cities and towns across Australia".

4h

Gene edited crops are GMOs—initial thoughts on the recent court ruling

Yesterday (25 July), the Court of Justice of the European Union made a ruling that surprised many: organisms obtained by targeted mutagenesis techniques are considered in all aspects GM organisms and are subject to the rigid EU rules. The EU ruling comes in stark contrast with this year's announcement by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, stating that the Department does not plan to regulate "new

4h

Don't assume online students are more likely to cheat. The evidence is murky

More university students are choosing to study online rather than face-to-face, prompting concerns about academic integrity.

4h

What’s killing all the raccoons in Central Park?

Animals A real whodunnit, featuring 26 dead bandits. Rabies? Canine distemper? Follow the clues to determine what killed New York's raccoons.

4h

A novel antibiotic from weeds

Researchers working on an SNSF project have discovered novel, antibiotically active chemical substances in a previously rarely explored site: the leaf of a common field weed. The just published findings show that this microcosm contains many still unknown natural products that could lead to new drugs.

4h

Which Water Is Best For Health? Hint: Don't Discount The Tap

Scientists weigh in on whether Americans really need to pay for alkalinized, mineralized, or purified water from filters or bottles. (Image credit: PhotoAlto/Antoine Arraou/Getty Images)

4h

Study shows ocean acidification is having major impact on marine life

Carbon dioxide emissions are killing off coral reefs and kelp forests as heat waves and ocean acidification damage marine ecosystems, scientists have warned.

4h

Study reveals new geometric shape used by nature to pack cells efficiently

As an embryo develops, tissues bend into complex three-dimensional shapes that lead to organs. Epithelial cells are the building blocks of this process forming, for example, the outer layer of skin. They also line the blood vessels and organs of all animals.

4h

These Gummy Bear-looking things will inherit the earth

Tardigrades, also known as water bears, are microscopic animals that live basically everywhere on earth, from the hot springs atop the Himalayas to the icy tundra of Antarctica to —almost certainly —your backyard.

4h

The Podcasters of 'The Good Place’ Are Smart Motherforkers

And their show is part of NBC's ever-evolving experiment with digital engagement.

4h

Airstream's $40,000 Basecamp Gets an Off-Road Upgrade

The new "X-Package" gives the little trailer a 3-inch lift kit that increases ground clearance, plus all-terrain tires from Goodyear.

4h

Apple MacBook Pro (2018, 15-inch) Review: Fast but Flawed

The 2018 update to Apple's MacBook Pro has a speedy new Intel processor, but many of the same shortcomings of the previous model.

4h

Deglacial changes in western Atlantic Ocean circulation

A new study carried out by an international team of researchers, using the chemistry of ocean sediments has highlighted a widespread picture of Atlantic circulation changes associated with rapid climate change in the past.

4h

Following disturbance, most waterways improve but don't fully recover within the study period, researchers found

Conservation biologists are challenged to predict the pace and extent of river recovery following disturbances such as oil spills, wastewater contamination, and fires. A new global meta-analysis by researchers at the University of California, Santa Cruz, reveals patterns of responsiveness in these highly valued ecosystems.

4h

Surrendering to Rising Seas

Coastal communities struggling to adapt to climate change are beginning to do what was once unthinkable: retreat — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

Virgin Galactic Space Plane Reaches New Heights In Test Flight

Billionaire Richard Branson wants to be on the "first official flight" to see space as a tourist by the end of 2018. His company's latest test flight reached heights of more than 32 miles. (Image credit: Virgin Galactic)

4h

Dressed to Kill: Chilean Mummies' Clothes Were Colored with Deadly Toxin

Fabric buried with two ancient Chilean mummies is to die for.

4h

Researchers generate optical skyrmions

Technion-Israel institute of Technology researchers have succeeded in generating minute "nano-hedgehogs of light" called optical skyrmions, which could make possible revolutionary advances in information processing, transfer and storage.

5h

Image: NASA satellite image shows lava flow from Hawaii volcano

New NASA satellite imagery captured a hot lava flow from fissure 8 of Hawaii's Kilauea volcano. The flow from fissure 8 extends from the Leilani Estates to the Pacific Ocean—with main ocean entry points near Ahalanui.

5h

App helps ecologists map vulnerable ecosystems within minutes

UNSW scientists have created a mapmaking app that can fast-track large-scale ecosystem analysis from months to minutes, giving conservationists a way to monitor decades of human impact, hotspots of biodiversity and vulnerable ecosystems.

5h

How to improve critical hurricane-related supply chains

Researchers from the MIT Humanitarian Supply Chain Lab have released a new report on critical supply chains during hurricanes and how they might be better managed in future U.S. disasters.

5h

Is Sleeping with a Fan On Actually Bad for Your Health?

Here's what you should know about sleeping with a fan on at night.

5h

5h

Scientists use computer vision and machine learning to predict plant growth

A group of scientists from the Space Center (SC) and the Center for Data-Intensive Science and Engineering (CDISE) at Skoltech have developed a method for predicting an increase in plant biomass using 2-D and 3-D images. Their findings will help improve the efficiency of precision farming, both on Earth and in space. The results of their research were presented at the IEEE Instrumentation and Meas

5h

Copper stearate promising for heavy oil oxidation, study says

Copper salts have found place in many industries from pharmaceuticals to agriculture, but they are rarely seen in petrochemistry and petroleum extraction. Now, Kazan Federal University scientists have showed that copper stearate can be a great catalyst for in-situ combustion and even improve oil quality under certain conditions.

5h

Researchers develop ion acceleration method for improved cancer treatment

In collaboration with their colleagues from Germany and the Czech Republic, researchers from the Institute for Laser and Plasma Technologies at the National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Russia) have developed a new method for generating superstrong quasistatic electric fields that result in the acceleration of ions in laser plasma.

5h

Climate change driven by humans made heatwave 'twice as likely'

The Europe-wide heatwave is an unambiguous signal of climate change, say researchers.

5h

UK heatwave: Britain facing thunderstorms and travel woes – live

Concerns over health as sweltering heat set to continue despite storm forecasts Thunderstorms may cloud blood moon Share your heatwave photos, videos and stories with us 5.22pm BST The Met Office updated it’s website today, predicting that the hot weather could return in August. When describing the outlook for Wednesday 1 August 2018 to Friday 10 August 2018, it said: “Temperatures around normal

5h

Enjoy the blood moon while you can. Donald Trump has plans for it | Philip Ball

While letting other space science wither, the US president is keen to open up a new American frontier on the moon There’s plenty that’s atavistic in the buzz about tonight’s lunar eclipse , which will turn the moon blood-red. It’s not just about the apocalyptic associations of this astronomical phenomenon itself, mentioned in the Book of Revelation ( 6:12, if you’re curious ). The whole business o

5h

Researchers discover chemical reaction that uses a surprising molecule

For more than a decade in the middle of the 20th century, chemists debated exactly what "carbocations"—molecules with a positively charged carbon atom—looked like. What is known as the "classical view," which was taught at the beginning of that century, stated that the carbon in these molecules held the charge; the "non-classical view" held that the charge could also be shared by other nearby atom

5h

Researchers develop new capability to evaluate human-driven change in Eastern U.S. streams

A stream classification system developed by researchers at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory can help assess physical changes to United States streams and rivers from human influences and aid in more effective management of water resources.

5h

pH-værdien i verdenshavene er den laveste i to millioner år

Hver dag opsuger verdenshavene 22 millioner tons CO2. Nu er havmiljøet så surt, at nogle dyr begynder at blive opløst, viser britisk forskning.

5h

Amerikansk politi bad tech-firmaer om persondata 130.000 gange sidste år

Ny rapport viser stor stigning i politiets anmodninger om at få adgang til de personoplysninger, som teknologifirmaer ligger inde med. 80 procent bliver imødekommet.

5h

Congress Has a $65 Million Proposal to Study Tech’s Effect on Kids

“Congress has a vital role to play on matters of public health, but we must act based on sound evidence."

5h

The Office-Messaging Wars Are Over. Slack Has Won.Slack HipChat Atlassian

As Atlassian transfers the intellectual property for Stride and HipChat to former rival Slack, Microsoft trails far behind as the last workplace messaging competitor.

5h

Is a Meme Born in a Private Account Still a Meme?

Meme creators are locking their accounts in a secret ploy to advertisers. But can memes, built to move through the web unhindered, adapt to a walled garden?

5h

New possibilities for using ozonized erythrocyte mass explored

Any bleeding results in a decrease of the amount of circulating blood, and the disruption of the adequate supply of tissues with oxygen can lead to death. An important measure aimed at correcting the pathological effects of acute blood loss is to restore the globular volume of blood. However, transfusion with erythrocyte mass is not always effective, since after prolonged storage, it can cause add

5h

New Uses for Old Medications

Even drugs whose development was stalled or canceled might show promise for illnesses they were never meant to treat — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

More Marijuana More Problems for Young Children

Young children explore their environment with their mouths. As more marijuana edibles make their way into homes, more potentially dangerous unintentional ingestions are going to happen.

5h

New two-dimensional material could revolutionize solar fuel generation

Following the isolation of graphene in 2004, a race began to synthesize new two-dimensional materials. These are single-layer substances with a thickness of between one atom and a few nanometers (billionths of a meter). They have unique properties linked to their reduced dimensionality and play a key role in the development of nanotechnology and nanoengineering.

5h

The $2.5 trillion reason we can’t rely on batteries to clean up the grid

Fluctuating solar and wind power require lots of energy storage, and lithium-ion batteries seem like the obvious choice—but they are far too expensive to play a major role.

5h

High-precision, on-site analysis of precious metals in metallurgical waste spills

Precious metals are finite resources in high demand. They are mainly obtained through mining, but researchers are exploring the possibility of recycling them from metallurgical waste leachates, water that has passed through the treated materials during mineral processing and thus contains some of their compounds. To this end, compact and portable instruments for rapid, on-site analysis of wastewat

5h

Engineering 3-D bio-printed scaffolds to regenerate damaged peripheral nervous systems

In the last decade or so, 3-D printing has experienced a surge in popularity as the technology has become more precise and accessible. Now, researchers from the University of Saskatchewan are looking at how we can use 3-D printing to help damaged nervous systems to regrow.

5h

Photo Gallery: How Kilauea–and Other Volcanoes–Produce Amazing and Frightful Weather

Volcanic tornadoes, choking fog, “laze,” lightning, hail, waterspouts and even frost are created above hot eruptions — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

The FISA Fiasco’s Silver Lining

Last Friday, the Justice Department released the 2016 request to the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court to monitor the former Trump campaign aide Carter Page, an extraordinary development in at least four different ways. Three of them should be reassuring and one is concerning, but all four taken together offer an unexpected reason for hope. Although President Donald Trump and his allies cla

6h

Some Screaming Albums for Summertime

Here’s a self-incriminating recommendation: Listen to heavy music at the beach. With a hellscape of gargled yells in the headphones, the senses stay wide open—you’ll feel the breeze, and the act of roasting in the sun will gain a neat layer of morbid irony. But here’s a self-incriminating confession: Extreme metal and hardcore punk often leave me feeling like a faker. Because really all I want fr

6h

Kan Trump og Juncker tvinge amerikansk skifergas ind i vores ledninger?

Præsident Trump og EU-kommissionsformand Juncker har givet hånd på, at Europa vil købe mere flydende naturgas fra USA. Men er det realistisk?

7h

Her 9 myter om at blive gravid – er du faldet for dem?

Kvindelig orgasme, missionærstilling og mindre alkohol øger chancen for graviditet. Eller gør det? Se hvilke myter, der ifølge forskningen holder stik.

7h

Deglacial changes in western Atlantic Ocean circulation

A new study carried out by an international team of researchers, using the chemistry of ocean sediments has highlighted a widespread picture of Atlantic circulation changes associated with rapid climate change in the past.

7h

Epithelial cells adopt a new geometric shape so that tissue can curve

This finding allows organs to acquire very complex yet very stable shapes. The experts state that these new and beautiful shapes, scutoids, are the solution that nature has found to fold and curve the epithelia.

7h

Study shows ocean acidification is having major impact on marine life

Carbon dioxide emissions are killing off coral reefs and kelp forests as heat waves and ocean acidification damage marine ecosystems, scientists have warned.

7h

Study reveals new geometric shape used by nature to pack cells efficiently

A multinational team of scientists have uncovered a previously undescribed shape — they call the 'scutoid' — adopted by epithelial cells during embryonic development that enables the cells to minimize energy use and maximize packing stability. The team's results will be published in a paper in Nature Communications.

7h

Fears of a Pakistani Strongman

ISLAMABAD , Pakistan—At long last, Imran Khan is the prime minister of Pakistan. After winning the highest number of seats in parliament in this week’s election, the former cricket legend and philanthropist is now set to form a national government and possibly rule two of Pakistan’s four provinces, making him the country’s most powerful civilian leader in decades. It’s a remarkable reversal of fo

7h

Slut med smadret mobilskærm: Samsungs nye OLED tåler fald fra 1,8 meter

Samsung klar med brudsikkert OLED, der kan erstatte det beskyttende glas i telefoner.

8h

Mutated HIV strains in Canada may cause quicker illness, study finds

Strains circulating in Saskatchewan, where nearly 80% of infected are indigenous, may lead to faster development of related viruses Mutated strains of HIV circulating in a Canadian province where HIV rates rank among the highest in North America could be leading to the more rapid development of Aids-related illnesses, according to new research. The research, published in the scientific journal Ai

8h

Share your blood moon photographs

We’d like to see your images as parts of the world experience the longest lunar eclipse of the century Friday’s moon will be a rare one to behold as Britain experiences a blood moon or, as astronomers term it, a total lunar eclipse. It will appear as a deep red and be the longest-lasting total lunar eclipse of the 21st century. Related: Blood moon: all you need to know about this week's lunar ecl

9h

Fem tidsplaner på fem år i Københavns Universitets kuldsejlede it-projekt

Københavns Universitet skrev i slutningen af 2013 kontrakt på et it-system, der skulle gå i produktion primo 2016. Siden blev tidsplanen ændret fire gange, inden systemet helt blev droppet. Universitetet hemmeligholder årsagen.

9h

In vitro fertilisation: 40 years on – Science Weekly podcast

This week, the world’s first IVF baby turned 40. The procedure has come a long way since 1978, and more than 6 million IVF babies have now been born. But should we be concerned about the rising numbers of fertility treatments? And are we becoming less fertile? Hannah Devlin investigates Subscribe and review on Acast , Apple Podcasts , Soundcloud , Audioboom and Mixcloud . Join the discussion on F

10h

Cost of flood losses in Maritimes could increase by up to 300 per cent

The financial costs of flooding in Canada's maritime region could spike by 300 per cent by the end of the century if steps are not taken to address the impacts of climate change.

10h

Michael Cohen's Astonishing Claim About the Trump Tower Meeting

Michael Cohen is reportedly ready to tell prosecutors that Donald Trump was aware of a June 2016 meeting between top campaign officials and Russians at Trump Tower before it occurred. It’s the sort of development that, if true, could upend what the public knows about the Trump administration, Russian involvement in the 2016 campaign, and allegations of obstruction of justice against the president

10h

Mars to track blood moon in double celestial treat on Friday

Longest total lunar eclipse of century coincides with Mars being unusually close to Earth Whether you are scrambling to pack for a holiday or swigging an ale in your local beer garden, take a moment on Friday evening to look up. The longest “blood moon” this century will be closely tracked by Mars through the sky in a double celestial treat of a kind that will not be repeated for decades. The moo

11h

Thunderstorms to ease UK heatwave but may cloud blood moon

Met offices issues heavy rain warning from Friday afternoon until midnight, with lunar eclipse starting at 8.49pm Rain clouds and thunderstorms could prevent skygazers from seeing the “blood moon” lunar eclipse in some parts of the country as forecasters warn of torrential downpours across eastern parts of Great Britain. The Met Office issued a thunderstorm warning from Friday afternoon due to la

11h

In vitro fertilisation: 40 years on – Science Weekly podcast

This week, the world’s first IVF baby turned 40. The procedure has come a long way since 1978, and more than 6 million IVF babies have now been born. But should we be concerned about the rising numbers of fertility treatments? And are we becoming less fertile? Hannah Devlin investigates

11h

Køleskabe under pres: Red din elektronik fra nedbrud i varmen

De høje temperaturer får elektronik til at bukke under. Men du kan selv gøre noget for at redde computeren, telefonen eller køleskabet.

12h

Cost of flood losses in Maritimes could increase by up to 300 per cent

The financial costs of flooding in Canada's maritime region could spike by 300 per cent by the end of the century if steps are not taken to address the impacts of climate change.

12h

Why US universities need better policies against workplace bullying

Higher education institutions in the United States should change their faculty codes of conduct to define bullying as a distinctive form of harassment, according to a new paper published in the National Communication Association's journal First Amendment Studies. Such codes also need to provide faculty and staff with clearer communications regarding bullying, and offer guidance for both targets an

12h

Cannabis does not improve breathlessness during exercise in patients with advanced COPD

Inhaled vaporized cannabis does not appear to improve or worsen exercise performance and activity-related breathlessness in patients with advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), according to a randomized controlled trial published online in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society.

12h

Checking phones in lectures can cost students half a grade in exams

Students perform less well in end-of-term exams if they are allowed access to an electronic device, such as a phone or tablet, for non-academic purposes in lectures, a new study in Educational Psychology finds.

12h

Checking phones in lectures can cost students half a grade in exams

Students perform less well in end-of-term exams if they are allowed access to an electronic device, such as a phone or tablet, for non-academic purposes in lectures, a new study in Educational Psychology finds.

12h

Cracking down on illegal cannabis with edible barcodes and blockchains

A start-up is tracing legal cannabis sold in the US to fight counterfeiting, using edible barcodes and a blockchain – the technology behind cryptocurrencies

13h

Only 13 per cent of the world’s oceans are considered a wilderness

Human activity touches almost 90 per cent of the ocean, which has left little of the ocean wild – and only a tiny fraction of that wilderness is protected

13h

DEEP study: Modelling persistent orofacial pain management's costs and benefits

At the 96th General Session of the International Association for Dental Research (IADR), held in conjunction with the IADR Pan European Regional (PER) Congress, Justin Durham, Newcastle University, England, gave a poster presentation titled 'DEEP Study: Modelling Persistent Orofacial Pain Management's Costs and Benefits.'

14h

Exploring the microbial dark matter of the human mouth

At the 96th General Session of the International Association for Dental Research (IADR), held in conjunction with the IADR Pan European Regional (PER) Congress, Alexandra Clark, Queen Mary University of London, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, England gave a poster presentation titled 'Exploring the Microbial Dark Matter of the Human Mouth.'

15h

Extinct vegetarian cave bear diet mystery unravelled

Until now, very little is known about the dietary evolution of the cave bear and how it became a vegetarian, as the fossils of the direct ancestor, the Deninger's bear (Ursus deningeri), are extremely scarce. However, a paper published in the journal Historical Biology, sheds new light on this.

16h

5 percent sodium fluoride varnish trial: 18-month results

At the 96th General Session of the International Association for Dental Research (IADR), held in conjunction with the IADR Pan European Regional (PER) Congress, Shiqian Gao, University of Hong Kong, SAR China, gave an oral presentation titled 'Silver Nitrate With Sodium Fluoride for Caries Arrest: 18-month Results.'

16h

Extinct vegetarian cave bear diet mystery unravelled

During the Late Pleistocene period (between 125,000 to 12,000 years ago) two bear species roamed Europe: omnivorous brown bears (Ursus arctos) and the extinct mostly vegetarian cave bear (Ursus spelaeus).

16h

How to Watch Friday’s Super-Long Lunar Eclipse Online

This so-called blood moon will be visible from every continent on Earth *except* North America.

16h

Native Americans shaped prairie by hunting bison with fire

Native American communities actively managed North American prairies for centuries before Christopher Columbus and his ilk arrived in the New World, according to a new study. Fire was an important indigenous tool for shaping North American ecosystems, but the relative importance of indigenous burning versus climate on fire patterns remains controversial in scientific communities, researchers say.

17h

Science behind the blood moon

Friday night's lunar eclipse will last longer than any in the 21st Century.

17h

Forest fires aren’t so bad for spotted owls

Forest fires aren’t a serious threat to spotted owls, and may, in some cases, benefit them, research finds. The work suggests management strategies for the species may need an overhaul. Mixed-severity fires result in more benefits than costs to the species, which acts as an indicator of biological health to the old-growth forests where they live, researchers say. “Current management strategies ta

17h

The Atlantic Daily: A Problem of Place

What We’re Following A Tale of Tariffs: U.S. President Donald Trump and European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker pledged to resolve their escalating trade war and to refrain from imposing new tariffs while they negotiate. The truce between the U.S. and Europe could make Trump’s tariffs against China more effective —yet it doesn’t necessarily avert the long-term costs of the European trad

17h

Flow battery for green energy doubles max voltage

A new type of flow battery that involves a liquid metal more than doubles the maximum voltage of conventional flow batteries and could lead to affordable storage of renewable power. The technology has long been considered as a likely candidate for storing intermittent renewable energy. However, until now the kinds of liquids that could produce the electrical current have either been limited by th

17h

Get a close-up look at the squishy, ageless hydra

Researchers have figured out how to track the neural activity and muscle movement of the tiny, squid-like hydra, an aquatic creature that seems to never age. If you cut one in two, you get hydrae. And each one can eat animals twice its size. These creatures are survivors—and that makes them worthy of study, says Jacob Robinson, an electrical and computer engineer at Rice University. Scientists us

17h

The longest lunar eclipse of the 21st century is coming on Friday: Here's what you need to know

The longest lunar eclipse of the 21st century is coming up, and you don't want to miss it.

17h

Link in brain connects bad sleep and depression

New research identifies the neural link between depression and sleep problems. The researchers found functional connectivity between the areas of the brain associated with short-term memory, self, and negative emotions, which cause sufferers to dwell on bad thoughts and lead to a poor quality of sleep. This research could lead to better sleep quality for people with depression, and opens up the p

17h

High-precision on-site analysis of precious metals in metallurgical waste spills

Researchers report the application of a portable and efficient method for the on-site analysis of wastewaters for the quantitative analysis of their gold, platinum and palladium content.

17h

A new catalyst for water splitting that is the best of both worlds

Taking water and ripping it apart into hydrogen and oxygen could form the basis of artificial photosynthetic devices that could ultimately power homes and businesses. However, catalysts, including those used to 'split' water, have either worked well but are expensive and unstable, or are affordable and stable, but don't work as well. Now, researchers report a new catalyst that is really the best o

17h

Bacterial communities use sophisticated strategy to communicate over long distances

A concept known as 'percolation' is helping microbiologists explain how communities of bacteria can effectively relay signals across long distances. Once regarded as a simple cluster of microorganisms, communities of bacteria have been found to employ a strategy we use to brew coffee and extract oil from the sea. Percolation helps the microscopic community thrive and survive threats, such as chemi

17h

Kissing up to the boss can increase employees' bad behavior in the workplace, study shows

'Kissing up to the boss' at work may help boost employees' careers but it also depletes the employees' self-control resources, leaving them more susceptible to behaving badly in the workplace, a new study has found.

17h

New class of materials could be used to make batteries that charge faster

Researchers have identified a group of materials that could be used to make even higher power batteries. The researchers used materials with a complex crystalline structure and found that lithium ions move through them at rates that far exceed those of typical electrode materials, which equates to a much faster-charging battery.

17h

Much of the US Electric Grid Could Go the Way of the Landline Phone

As renewable energy picks up and electricity demand drops, it's getting way more expensive for a large part of grid to produce electricity, and that's a problem for everyone.

18h

US sexual minorities less likely to be in work or insured than straight peers

Sexual minorities in the US are less likely to be in work or to have health insurance than their straight peers, reveal the results of a large survey, published in the online journal BMJ Open.

18h

Most Americans think it’s OK to tweak a baby’s genes to prevent disease

Americans generally favor tweaking a baby’s genes to reduce the chance of getting a disease, but think boosting intelligence is a step too far.

18h

Just Some Other Totally Legit Microbes That Will Definitely (Not) Make Your Tech Startup a Unicorn

A study this week got people thinking that infection by *Toxoplasma gondii*, a parasite found in cat poop, could be used to prime people for entrepreneurship. We’ve got some ~~better~~ equally terrible ideas.

18h

This cat-poop parasite can change your brain, but it probably won't make you an entrepreneur

Health Let's all say it together: correlations are not causations! The infamous parasite has been making headlines for supposedly making entrepreneurs less risk-averse. But does the science really bear that out?

18h

Gravity Waves Ripple Across Antarctica's Skies, and Researchers Think They Know Why

Scientists may finally have an explanation for the mysterious ripples skating high above Antarctica.

18h

Neurobiology: Finding one's way home

The otic placode gives rise to the inner ear in vertebrates. A new study shows that even when it is transplanted to ectopic positions, the nerve cells that grow out of the transplanted ear can form functional connections in the brain.

18h

Enduring 'radio rebound' powered by jets from gamma-ray burst

Astronomers using ALMA studied a cataclysmic stellar explosion known as a gamma-ray burst, or GRB, and found its enduring 'afterglow.' The rebound, or reverse shock, triggered by the GRB's powerful jets slamming into surrounding debris, lasted thousands of times longer than expected. These observations provide fresh insights into the physics of GRBs, one of the universe's most energetic explosions

18h

Glaciers in East Antarctica also 'imperiled' by climate change

Scientists have found evidence of significant mass loss in East Antarctica's Totten and Moscow University glaciers, which, if they fully collapsed, could add 5 meters (16.4 feet) to the global sea level.

18h

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Ag-itated

Written by Elaine Godfrey ( @elainejgodfrey ), Maddie Carlisle ( @maddiecarlisle2 ), and Olivia Paschal (@ oliviacpaschal ) Today in 5 Lines Special Counsel Robert Mueller is reportedly examining President Trump’s tweets as part of his investigation into potential obstruction of justice. House Speaker Paul Ryan said he opposes an attempt by the House Freedom Caucus to impeach Deputy Attorney Gene

18h

Animals can use muscle as an internal water source

A new study shows for the first time that animals may be able to use their own muscles to get water when it's not available. As our climate changes, the availability of water is also changing, leaving animals with limited or unreliable supplies of this critical resource. Understanding exactly how animals cope with resource restrictions will help scientists predict how the animals may be impacted b

18h

Gut bacteria byproduct protects against Salmonella, study finds

Researchers have identified a molecule that serves as natural protection against one of the most common intestinal pathogens, Salmonella.

18h

Adult fish 'predict' availability of food for their young

A recent study has revealed that fish parents 'predict' a beneficial environment for their offspring with populations 'adjusting' spawning time so that the young can meet their prey.

18h

Just 10 minutes of social interaction a day improves wellbeing in dementia care

The Improving Staff Attitudes and Care for People with Dementia e-Learning (tEACH) study involved 280 residents and care staff in 24 care homes over nine months. The intervention improved resident wellbeing and staff attitudes to person-centerd care. Skype support optimized sustained benefits.

18h

Removing malaria-carrying mosquitoes unlikely to affect ecosystems, says report

By combining studies on one species of malaria-carrying mosquito, researchers found that no other animals rely solely on them for food.

18h

Fish body shape holds key to make fishery management cheaper, easier

A simple body-shape analysis can reveal what part of the ocean a fish came from, according to a new study from scientists working to develop better tools for managing small-scale fisheries. The researchers found that body-shape analysis reliably discriminated between yellowtail snapper caught at Caribbean fishing grounds just 5 kilometers apart — and it did so more accurately than two more costly

18h

Mapping mountaintop coal mining's yearly spread in Appalachia

A new mapping tool shows, in more detail than ever before, the land laid bare by mountaintop coal mining in central Appalachia each year, going back more than three decades. The tool uses satellite imagery to identify and map the annual extent of mining activity across portions of Kentucky, Tennessee, Virginia and West Virginia. The researchers say the updated maps will make it easier to assess an

18h

Excitons: Taking electronics into the future

Researchers have developed a transistor based on excitons — a type of particle most people have not heard of — that is able to function at room temperature. This breakthrough could lead to a new breed of faster, more energy efficient and smaller electronics.

18h

Tropical forests may soon hinder, not help, climate change effort

Forests in tropical regions could soon become a source of greenhouse gases, contributing to global warming and hampering efforts to meet the main goal in the Paris Agreement of 2015.

18h

The blueprint for El Niño diversity

A new study isolates key mechanisms that cause El Niño events to differ. Researchers found that the complexity and irregular occurrence of El Niño and La Niña events can be traced back to the co-existence of two coupled atmosphere-ocean oscillations, with different spatial characteristics and different frequencies.

18h

Unconventional connections: How inhibition hones cortical selectivity

Researchers have discovered a fundamentally new role for inhibition in the visual cortex, refining how neurons encode object motion.

18h

Study: Omega-3 supplements reduce aggressive behavior in children

“This is a promising line of research because omega-3 fatty acids are thought to improve brain health in children and adults.” Read More

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Bile acids from the gut could help to treat cocaine abuse

Bile acids that aid fat digestion are also found to reduce the rewarding properties of cocaine use, according to a new study.

18h

Mosquito screening useful in monitoring lymphatic filariasis re-emergence

To ensure elimination of the Wuchereria bancrofti, a parasitic roundworm that causes lymphatic filariasis, public health workers must follow up mass drug administration with careful monitoring for recurrence. To that end, a new study analyzes the effectiveness of mosquito screening as a tool to gauge parasite presence.

18h

New screening approach reveals importance of microRNAs in papillomavirus life cycle

The discovery of microRNAs encoded by papillomaviruses supports the important role of these small molecules in persistent infection, according to new research. The discovery was made using a new approach that enables microRNA identification for the enormous range of pathogens that have genomic data but cannot be cultured in a laboratory setting.

18h

Osteoporosis, fracture risk predicted with new genetic screen

A new genetic screen may predict a person's future risk of osteoporosis and bone fracture, according to a new study.

18h

Night-time lighting changes how species interact

Night-time lighting from streetlights and other sources has complex and unexpected effects on communities of plants and animals, new research shows.

18h

Why sepsis from a staph infection causes organ failure

Scientists have known for some time that one of the reasons a staph infection is so deadly is that the bacteria send out a toxin, known as Alpha Toxin (AT), which quickly worsens sepsis. Scientists have discovered the most important target of the toxin and how to neutralize the danger.

18h

Black holes really just ever-growing balls of string

Black holes aren't surrounded by a burning ring of fire after all, suggests new research.

18h

Thin gap on stellar family portrait

A thin gap has been discovered on the Hertzsprung-Russell Diagram (HRD), the most fundamental of all maps in stellar astronomy, a finding that provides new information about the interior structures of low mass stars in the Milky Way Galaxy, according to a new study.

18h

Previously overlooked 'coral ticks' weaken degraded reefs

A previously overlooked predator — a thumbnail-sized snail — could be increasing the pressure on coral reefs already weakened by the effects of overfishing, rising ocean temperatures, pollution and other threats.

18h

Galaxy outskirts likely hunting grounds for dying massive stars and black holes

Findings from a new study provide further evidence that the outskirts of spiral galaxies host massive black holes. These overlooked regions are new places to observe gravitational waves created when the massive bodies collide, the authors report.

18h

Diamond doves do not optimize their movements for flexible perches

The diamond dove may preferentially select large, stiff materials for takeoff and landing sites, according to a new study. The unexpected findings suggest that the diamond dove does not adjust its takeoff or landing behavior depending on the flexibility of the perch.

18h

Faulty cytoskeleton impairs immune cells

The rearrangement of the cell´s inner scaffold, the cytoskeleton, is a vital process for immune cells. In a new collaborative study, a rare inherited disease revealed a hitherto unknown role of a cytoskeleton-regulating factor for the proper functioning of the adaptive immune system.

18h

Gender Letter: Getting Real About Periods, Childbirth, Menopause and More

There’s a growing wave of women speaking openly and unabashedly about their health issues, amid concern about increased restrictions on reproductive rights.

19h

The White House Quietly Corrects Its Putin Transcript

Nine days after The Atlantic first reported that part of a key exchange between a reporter and Vladimir Putin was missing from the official White House transcript of the Russian leader’s press conference with Donald Trump, the White House has corrected the error. It made the fix after facing repeated questions from reporters about the discrepancy over the past week and, most recently, allegations

19h

First mapping of global marine wilderness shows just how little remains

reporting in Current Biology on July 26 have completed the first systematic analysis of marine wilderness around the world. And what they found is not encouraging; only a small fraction — about 13 percent — of the world's ocean can still be classified as wilderness.

19h

How do jumping genes cause disease, drive evolution?

Researchers have developed new techniques to track the mobilization of jumping genes. They found that during a particular period of egg development, a group of jumping-genes called retrotransposons hijacks special cells called nurse cells that nurture the developing eggs. These jumping genes use nurse cells to produce invasive material (copies of themselves called virus-like particles) that move i

19h

Rewriting our understanding of gastric tumors

The immune system can be an important ally in the fight against cancer. A study suggests that the reverse may also be true — that abnormal inflammation triggered by the immune system may underlie the development of stomach tumors in patients with a hereditary cancer syndrome known as Peutz-Jeghers Syndrome (PJS).

19h

New family photos of Mars and Saturn from Hubble

In summer 2018 the planets Mars and Saturn are, one after the other, in opposition to Earth. During this event the planets are relatively close to Earth, allowing astronomers to observe them in greater detail. Hubble took advantage of this preferred configuration and imaged both planets to continue its long-standing observation of the outer planets in the solar system.

19h

New two-dimensional material could revolutionize solar fuel generation

Scientists have obtained from hematite a new material with application as a photocatalyst, christened 'hematene.' The three-atom thick hematene is a ferromagnetic material, as opposed to the iron ore from which it was created.

19h

A century-old model for life's origin gets significant substantiation

In 1924, Russian biochemist Alexander Oparin claimed that life on Earth developed through gradual chemical changes of organic molecules, in the "primordial soup" which likely existed on Earth four billion years ago. In his view, the complex combination of lifeless molecules, joining forces within small oily droplets, could assume life faculties — self-replication, selection and evolution. These i

19h

Homing pigeons use local natural odors to find their way

Homing pigeons use familiar smells to navigate their way across hundreds of kilometers of unfamiliar territory. Researchers have now confirmed that artificial odors cannot be used to stimulate or trigger a pigeon's navigation system. This means that the so-called olfactory activation hypothesis — which has been proposed by some researchers — should be disregarded, argues researchers.

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Celestial Lineup Makes For A Very Bright Mars

Mars, Earth and the sun have lined up, a celestial orientation known as opposition. This particular opposition occurs at a time when the orbit of Mars takes it closest to the sun. (Image credit: Alyson Hurt/NPR)

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Adherence to healthy diets associated with lower cancer risk

A diet that encourages both healthy eating and physical activity and discourages alcohol consumption was associated with a reduced overall cancer risk, as well as lower breast, prostate, and colorectal cancer risks.

19h

Ant study sheds light on the evolution of workers and queens

A new study in ants identifies a peptide that plays an important role in regulating reproduction. This research illuminates a potential trajectory for the evolution of distinct social castes — workers and queens.

19h

Lectins help social amoeba establish their own microbiome

The social amoeba, a soil-dwelling organism, also carries its own microbiome, and researchers have discovered that sugar-binding proteins called lectins are essential for amoebas and bacteria living together.

19h

A spin trio for strong coupling

To make qubits for quantum computers less susceptible to noise, the spin of an electron or some other particle is preferentially used. Researchers have now developed a method that makes it possible to couple such a spin qubit strongly to microwave photons.

19h

Making thread in Bronze Age Britain

Splicing technique identified on 3,800-year-old Cambridgeshire textiles made from plant fibers.

19h

Tropical treetops are warming, putting sensitive species at risk

New research shows that tropical forest canopies are warming significantly faster than air temperatures. That could mean major consequences for overall forest health.

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Chemicals that keep drinking water flowing may also cause fouling

Many city drinking water systems add softening agents to keep plumbing free of pipe-clogging mineral buildup. According to new research, these additives may amplify the risk of pathogen release into drinking water by weakening the grip that bacteria — like those responsible for Legionnaires' disease — have on pipe interiors.

19h

Amphibians face many challenges in Brazilian rain forest

Deforestation remains the biggest threat to animals that call the rain forest 'home.' However, even measured, sensible development projects can have unforeseen effects because there's no model to follow. Now, thanks to new research, there's a guide to help land-use development and efforts to conserve amphibians, which are rapidly declining worldwide.

19h

Artificial enzymes perform reactions on living cells

Nature has evolved thousands of enzymes to facilitate the many chemical reactions that take place inside organisms to sustain life. Now, researchers have designed artificial enzymes that sit on the surfaces of living cells and drive reactions that could someday target drug therapies to specific organs.

19h

Vibrations at an exceptional point

A team of researchers has developed a way to use a light field to trigger a mechanical movement that will generate an acoustic wave.

19h

Amazon's Facial Recognition System Mistakes Members of Congress for Mugshots

Amazon has marketed its Rekognition facial recognition system to law enforcement. But in a new ACLU study, the technology confused 28 members of Congress with publicly available arrest photos.

19h

Shark Week Tinder Shark Diving Date

Shark Week, Tinder and Pledgeling teamed up with Chris Harrison to send three lucky winner and their guests on shark diving trip in the Bahamas. See how everything went down, and take a moment to help save sharks. Text SHARK to 707070 to support Oceana’s hammerhead shark conservation efforts. From: Discovery

19h

Just 13 Percent of Ocean Is Wilderness: Study

An analysis of 15 types of stressors finds humans are heavily affecting most sea areas.

19h

The big picture: Mouse memory cells are about experience, not place

When it comes to memory, it's more than just 'location, location, location.' New research suggests that the brain doesn't store all memories in 'place cells,' the main type of neuron in the hippocampus, a structure crucial for navigation and memory. Instead, memories seem to be powered by a subset of hippocampal cells that have little to do with location and more with context or episodes.

19h

Discovery of a new potential treatment for visceral leishmaniasis

A new preclinical candidate drug with the potential to treat visceral leishmaniasis, one of the world's major neglected diseases, has been discovered. Visceral leishmaniasis is a disease which kills tens of thousands of people every year, mainly among the poorest in the world.

19h

Africa's Largest Mammal Is Terrified of This Tiny Insect

What's dangerous enough to scare an enormous elephant?

19h

Amazon quarterly profit jumps 12-fold to $2.5 bn

Amazon on Thursday reported profits in the past quarter jumped 12-fold to $2.5 billion as the online giant saw gains across its range of businesses.

20h

Court: Ban seafood caught with nets that harm tiny porpoises

A judge has ordered the U.S. government to ban imports of seafood caught by Mexican fisheries that use a net blamed for killing off the vaquita, the world's smallest and most-endangered porpoise.

20h

Engineers use Tiki torches in study of soot, diesel filters

Chemical engineers testing methods to improve efficiency of diesel engines while maintaining performance are getting help from a summer staple: Tiki torches.

20h

Heavy Weapons Training May Cause Brain Injuries, But The VA Doesn't Cover It

The Department of Veterans Affairs is trying to figure out how to deal with veterans who may have brain damage from firing powerful weapons. (Image credit: D. Gonzalez/1st Marine Division)

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Theorists find mechanism behind nearly pure nanotubes from the unusual catalyst

Growing a batch of carbon nanotubes that are all the same may not be as simple as researchers had hoped, according to Rice University scientists.

20h

Molecules from breast milk and seaweed suggest strategies for controlling norovirus

Norovirus is the most common cause of gastroenteritis worldwide; it causes tens hundreds of thousands of deaths each year and is particularly risky for children under 3 years old. If someone gets norovirus in a setting like a hospital, it's critically important to find a way to protect others from getting infected. New research from several universities in Germany, to be published in the Journal o

20h

Researchers discover thin gap on stellar family portrait

A thin gap has been discovered on the Hertzsprung-Russell Diagram (HRD), the most fundamental of all maps in stellar astronomy, a finding that provides new information about the interior structures of low mass stars in the Milky Way Galaxy, according to a study led by astronomers at Georgia State University.

20h

Study finds animals can use muscle as an internal water source

Water is vital for life. But as our climate changes, the availability of water is also changing, leaving animals with limited or unreliable supplies of this critical resource.

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Dr. Kimishige Ishizaka, Who Found Allergy Link, Dies at 92

Working with his wife, he identified an antibody that, in allergic individuals, produces excess amounts of histamine, which makes them sneeze.

20h

Hippocrates, We Have a Problem: Doctors Are Burning Out at Surprisingly High Rates

Almost two-thirds of doctors in the U.S. say they're burned out, depressed, or both. What do we do when the very people charged with safeguarding our health against the effects of burnout are themselves suffering from burnout? Read More

20h

The history of the KGB and its legendary methods

The Russian intelligence agency KGB was legendary for its spycraft, violent methods, and far-reaching influence on world affairs. Read More

20h

ASU study finds animals can use muscle as an internal water source

A new Arizona State University study shows for the first time that animals may be able to use their own muscles to get water when it's not available. As our climate changes, the availability of water is also changing, leaving animals with limited or unreliable supplies of this critical resource. Understanding exactly how animals cope with resource restrictions will help scientists predict how the

20h

Engineers use Tiki torches in study of soot, diesel filters

Chemical engineers are using the summer staple in testing methods to improve efficiency of diesel engines.

20h

How Coastal Communities Are Already Retreating from Rising Seas

When it comes to the unsustainable development of the American coastline, New Jersey owns the honor of being the first and worst. But one town in the state is experimenting with moving a cluster of… — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

20h

Juvenile Whale Shark Washes Ashore in Florida. But What Killed It?

Could toxic algae have killed this young whale shark?

20h

Grief-Stricken Orca Mom Pushes Dead Newborn Around in Puget Sound

These charismatic marine predators are fighting for survival as their food source disappears.

20h

Alzheimer's Drug Slows Symptoms, Reduces Plaques

In a clinical trial, patients on the highest injected dose had 30 percent less cognitive decline over time than people on a placebo.

20h

Millions of Americans are sleep-deprived, but stressing over it won’t help.

Health Even if you don’t get enough shut-eye, most fixes are easy Compared to historical norms, how have our contemporary expectations of sleep changed? What are the effects of inadequate sleep? What can be done to optimize the…

21h

Molecules from breast milk and seaweed suggest strategies for controlling norovirus

New research from several universities in Germany, to be published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry, suggests that it may be easier than anticipated to find a compound that could be used as a food supplement to stop the spread of norovirus in children's hospitals.

21h

Galaxy outskirts likely hunting grounds for dying massive stars and black holes

Findings from a Rochester Institute of Technology study provide further evidence that the outskirts of spiral galaxies host massive black holes. These overlooked regions are new places to observe gravitational waves created when the massive bodies collide, the authors report.

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Researchers discover thin gap on stellar family portrait

A thin gap has been discovered on the Hertzsprung-Russell Diagram (HRD), the most fundamental of all maps in stellar astronomy, a finding that provides new information about the interior structures of low mass stars in the Milky Way Galaxy, according to a study led by astronomers at Georgia State University.

21h

How does air conditioning work? (video)

Air conditioners pull off the seemingly magical feat of making the air inside a home, car or shopping mall deliciously chilly. The source of that sweet relief is chemistry. In this video, Reactions explains how refrigerants and physical chemistry combine to help you beat the summer heat.

21h

Trump's "Shadow Banning" Tweet Isn't Twitter’s Biggest Problem

Accusations of partisan bias come at an inconvenient moment for Twitter, which is trying to clean up its platform and avoid the mistakes of other tech companies.

21h

Trump Exposes the Holes in Campaign-Finance Laws

The release of a taped telephone conversation between Michael Cohen and Donald Trump has given rise to renewed questions about whether President Trump committed federal campaign-finance violations in hiding extramarital affairs. He had denied knowing of payments to Stormy Daniels and of American Media’s financial arrangements with Karen McDougal. In both instances, in an unusual turn of events, h

21h

Guide: Gør dig klar til århundredets længste måneformørkelse

Fredag er der total måneformørkelse. Det giver en rød måne, hvor der også vil være mulighed for at se planeten Mars.

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Viral Hoax Claims Mars Will Look As Large As the Moon This Weekend

No, Mars won't look as big as the moon this weekend.

21h

Theorists find mechanism behind nearly pure nanotubes from the unusual catalyst

Rice University scientists decode the unusual growth characteristic of carbon nanotubes that start out as one chirality but switch to another, resulting in nearly homogenous batches of single-walled nanotubes.

21h

Stent retriever thrombectomy effective for longer window after stroke

A new study shows promising real-world outcomes for patients receiving a stent retriever thrombectomy six hours after they experience an acute ischemic stroke (AIS). The study was presented today at the Society of NeuroInterventional Surgery's (SNIS) 15th Annual Meeting.

21h

AI Object Recognition System Operates at Speed of Light

Researchers have created a 3D-printed artificial neural network that uses light photons to rapidly process information.

21h

Researchers develop a new method to detect nucleation

As a solution evaporates, the dissolved chemicals concentrate until they begin forming a crystal through a process called nucleation. Industries that use small crystals in pharmaceuticals, food and microelectronics are seeking to understanding this nucleation event. Scientists studying nucleation often use microscopic droplets as miniature experiments that can run quickly, in parallel, and in a sm

21h

Photos: Made in China

Last year, China shipped more than $2 trillion worth of goods to ports around the world, while at home, Chinese manufacturers, processors, and producers have a potential customer base of 1.4 billion people. Every day in China, government entities, along with private factories, construction firms, artists, designers, developers, and an army of workers are creating billions of items, from stuffed t

21h

Trilobites: Worker Ants: You Could Have Been Queens

Whether an ant becomes a worker or colony royalty may depend on insulin metabolism.

21h

Clean, Sober and $41,000 Deep in Out-of-Pocket Addiction Recovery Costs

People recovering from opioid addiction and their families discuss the financial and emotional costs of treatment.

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New system can identify drugs to target 'undruggable' enzymes critical in many diseases

A new drug discovery system allows scientists to specifically target members of an important family of enzymes, called phosphatases, which were previously considered mostly 'undruggable'. The study, published in Cell, demonstrated the capabilities of the new system by identifying a molecule that could successfully target a phosphatase to reduce the accumulation of Huntington's disease-associated p

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Researchers develop a new method to detect nucleation

Scientists studying nucleation often use microscopic droplets as miniature experiments that can run quickly, in parallel, and in a small space. However, these experiments require high-resolution images, limiting the number of droplet images that can be simultaneously processed. Researchers recently overcame this challenge by focusing their measurements on the contrast between droplets and their su

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Conservative High Schoolers Want to ‘Own the Libs’

When hundreds of high-school students gathered on George Washington University’s campus this week, they may have expected to clash with protesters. After all, they were invited by Turning Point USA, the right-wing group that identifies faculty members who it perceives to be biased against conservative students and shames them on its “Professor Watchlist.” The organization also regularly decries t

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Cuba's pristine reefs are ideal for spotting great hammerhead sharks

Animals Relatively little research has been done in the country's waters. Scientists are studying Cuba’s pristine reefs as an exploratory trip to see if they could find any great hammerheads and document the reef’s condition. They want to go…

22h

Ultrasound Opens Blood-Brain Barrier in Alzheimer’s Patients

A Phase 1 clinical trial shows the noninvasive technique is safe and could aid in the delivery treatments to the brain.

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Tech titans jostle as Pentagon calls for cloud contract bids

US defense officials unveiled Thursday a much-anticipated final request for tech firms to bid on a massive contract to provide the Pentagon with a comprehensive cloud computing service.

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Sea turtle deaths spike in Florida waters with red tide

Researchers are reporting a spiking number of sea turtle deaths in Florida waters plagued by a red tide algae bloom.

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Facebook faces a day of reckoning, at least on Wall Street

There's a scratch in Facebook's Teflon coating.

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Just 10 minutes of social interaction a day improves wellbeing in dementia care

The Improving Staff Attitudes and Care for People with Dementia e-Learning (tEACH) study involved 280 residents and care staff in 24 care homes over nine months. The intervention improved resident wellbeing and staff attitudes to person-centerd care. Skype support optimized sustained benefits.

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Lectins help social amoeba establish their own microbiome

The social amoeba, a soil-dwelling organism, also carries its own microbiome, and researchers at Baylor College of Medicine have discovered that sugar-binding proteins called lectins are essential for amoebas and bacteria living together.

22h

Rewriting our understanding of gastric tumors

The immune system can be an important ally in the fight against cancer. A study from McGill scientists published today in Science suggests that the reverse may also be true — that abnormal inflammation triggered by the immune system may underlie the development of stomach tumors in patients with a hereditary cancer syndrome known as Peutz-Jeghers Syndrome (PJS).

22h

Ant study sheds light on the evolution of workers and queens

A new study in ants identifies a peptide that plays an important role in regulating reproduction. This research illuminates a potential trajectory for the evolution of distinct social castes — workers and queens.

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Reducing the uncertainty of climate projections

Errors in climate models due to inadequate calculations of radiative forcing undermine researchers' ability to address important climate-related questions, including how much the atmosphere will warm as more and more carbon dioxide (CO2) is released.

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The ultimate combination: A 3D-printed optical deep learning network

A newly developed, 3D-printed optical deep learning network allows computational problems to be executed at the speed of light, a new study reports.

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One gene to rule them all: Regulating eusociality in ants

A single gene associated with insulin signaling likely drove the evolutionary rise of an ant queen's reproductive royalty, researchers suggest.

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Osteoporosis, fracture risk predicted with Stanford-developed genetic screen

A new genetic screen may predict a person's future risk of osteoporosis and bone fracture, according to a study by a researcher at the Stanford University School of Medicine.

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Software recreates complex movements for medical, rehabilitation, and basic research

An open-source movement simulator that has already helped solve problems in medicine, paleontology, and animal locomotion has been expanded and improved, according to a new publication in the open-access journal PLOS Computational Biology.

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Non-invasive, ultrasound-based approach for pocket depth measurements

At the 96th General Session of the International Association for Dental Research (IADR), held in conjunction with the IADR Pan European Regional (PER) Congress, Jesse Jokerst, University of California, San Diego, USA gave an oral presentation titled 'Non-Invasive, Ultrasound-based Approach for Pocket Depth Measurements.'

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The big picture: Mouse memory cells are about experience, not place

When it comes to memory, it's more than just 'location, location, location.' New research suggests that the brain doesn't store all memories in 'place cells,' the main type of neuron in the hippocampus, a structure crucial for navigation and memory. Instead, memories seem to be powered by a subset of hippocampal cells that have little to do with location and more with context or episodes, as repor

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New screening approach reveals importance of microRNAs in papillomavirus life cycle

The discovery of microRNAs encoded by papillomaviruses supports the important role of these small molecules in persistent infection, according to a study published July 26 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens. Study author Rachel Chirayil of the University of Texas at Austin and colleagues made this discovery using a new approach that enables microRNA identification for the enormous range of

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Mosquito screening useful in monitoring lymphatic filariasis re-emergence

To ensure elimination of the Wuchereria bancrofti, a parasitic roundworm that causes lymphatic filariasis, public health workers must follow up mass drug administration with careful monitoring for recurrence. To that end, a study published this week in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases analyzes the effectiveness of mosquito screening as a tool to gauge parasite presence.

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Bile acids from the gut could help to treat cocaine abuse

Bile acids that aid fat digestion are also found to reduce the rewarding properties of cocaine use, according to a study publishing on July 26 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by India Reddy, Nicholas Smith, and Robb Flynn of Vanderbilt University, Aurelio Galli of the University of Alabama at Birmingham, and colleagues.

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Flood detection a surprising capability of microsatellites mission

Hurricanes bring heavy rainfall and strong winds to coastal communities, a potent combination that can lead to devastating damage. In 2016 NASA launched a set of eight satellites called the Cyclone Global Navigation Satellite System, or CYGNSS, mission to gather more data on the winds in these tropical cyclones as part of an effort to increase data coverage of hurricanes and aid forecasts. As the

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Glaciers in East Antarctica also 'imperiled' by climate change, researchers find

A team of scientists from the University of California, Irvine has found evidence of significant mass loss in East Antarctica's Totten and Moscow University glaciers, which, if they fully collapsed, could add 5 meters (16.4 feet) to the global sea level.

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Thousands of purple birds swarm Outer Banks bridge. NC lowers speed limit to protect them

Thousands of visitors cross the William B. Umstead Memorial Bridge—known locally as Old Manns Harbor Bridge—on their way to Roanoke Island and the Outer Banks every year.

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Previously overlooked 'coral ticks' weaken degraded reefs

A previously overlooked predator— a thumbnail-sized snail—could be increasing the pressure on coral reefs already weakened by the effects of overfishing, rising ocean temperatures, pollution and other threats. The snail attacks a key coral species that may offer the last hope for bringing back degraded Pacific reefs.

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PCR: Amplified To The End Point

In this eBook, learn the latest in PCR technology to achieve fast, accurate results every time.

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NASA-developed coating investigated for protecting Smithsonian specimens

A technology that has shielded some of NASA's highest-profile space observatories from potentially harmful molecular contamination is now being evaluated as a possible solution for protecting the Smithsonian Institution's cultural artifacts and natural-science specimens.

22h

A star and a black hole: Einstein’s general theory of relativity gets magnificent proof

A massive black hole at the center of the Milky Way and a single star did it. Read More

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Facebook loses $120 billion in value after poor Q2 earnings

It marks the company’s biggest stock market drop ever. Read More

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Airplanes Are Basically Sky Sharks | Shark News

It turns out, sharks and airplanes aren't all that different, and scientists are drawing inspiration from the shark's 400-million-year-old aerodynamic evolution. Stream Shark Week Episodes: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/shark-week/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery https://www.facebook.com/SharkWeek Follow on Twit

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News at a glance

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The trailblazer

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Nature's riverkeepers

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In vivo we trust

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Marvelous models

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The Earth Machine

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Toward a predictive theory of correlated materials

Correlated electron materials display a rich variety of notable properties ranging from unconventional superconductivity to metal-insulator transitions. These properties are of interest from the point of view of applications but are hard to treat theoretically, as they result from multiple competing energy scales. Although possible in more weakly correlated materials, theoretical design and spect

22h

Biophysical experiments and biomolecular simulations: A perfect match?

A fundamental challenge in biological research is achieving an atomic-level description and mechanistic understanding of the function of biomolecules. Techniques for biomolecular simulations have undergone substantial developments, and their accuracy and scope have expanded considerably. Progress has been made through an increasingly tight integration of experiments and simulations, with experime

22h

Inverse molecular design using machine learning: Generative models for matter engineering

The discovery of new materials can bring enormous societal and technological progress. In this context, exploring completely the large space of potential materials is computationally intractable. Here, we review methods for achieving inverse design, which aims to discover tailored materials from the starting point of a particular desired functionality. Recent advances from the rapidly growing fie

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Fundamentals of numerical relativity for gravitational wave sources

Einstein’s theory of general relativity affords an enormously successful description of gravity. The theory encodes the gravitational interaction in the metric, a tensor field on spacetime that satisfies partial differential equations known as the Einstein equations. This review introduces some of the fundamental concepts of numerical relativity—solving the Einstein equations on the computer—in s

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Use the beach

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Teaching an old carbocation new tricks: Intermolecular C-H insertion reactions of vinyl cations

Vinyl carbocations have been the subject of extensive experimental and theoretical studies over the past five decades. Despite this long history in chemistry, the utility of vinyl cations in chemical synthesis has been limited, with most reactivity studies focusing on solvolysis reactions or intramolecular processes. Here we report synthetic and mechanistic studies of vinyl cations generated thro

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Dirac-source field-effect transistors as energy-efficient, high-performance electronic switches

An efficient way to reduce the power consumption of electronic devices is to lower the supply voltage, but this voltage is restricted by the thermionic limit of subthreshold swing (SS), 60 millivolts per decade, in field-effect transistors (FETs). We show that a graphene Dirac source (DS) with a much narrower electron density distribution around the Fermi level than that of conventional FETs can

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The hippocampal engram maps experience but not place

Episodic memories are encoded by a sparse population of hippocampal neurons. In mice, optogenetic manipulation of this memory engram established that these neurons are indispensable and inducing for memory recall. However, little is known about their in vivo activity or precise role in memory. We found that during memory encoding, only a fraction of CA1 place cells function as engram neurons, dis

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Social regulation of insulin signaling and the evolution of eusociality in ants

Queens and workers of eusocial Hymenoptera are considered homologous to the reproductive and brood care phases of an ancestral subsocial life cycle. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the evolution of reproductive division of labor remain obscure. Using a brain transcriptomics screen, we identified a single gene, insulin-like peptide 2 ( ilp2 ), which is always up-regulated in ant repro

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Lectins modulate the microbiota of social amoebae

The social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum maintains a microbiome during multicellular development; bacteria are carried in migrating slugs and as endosymbionts within amoebae and spores. Bacterial carriage and endosymbiosis are induced by the secreted lectin discoidin I that binds bacteria, protects them from extracellular killing, and alters their retention within amoebae. This altered handling

22h

LKB1 deficiency in T cells promotes the development of gastrointestinal polyposis

Germline mutations in STK11 , which encodes the tumor suppressor liver kinase B1 (LKB1), promote Peutz–Jeghers syndrome (PJS), a cancer predisposition syndrome characterized by the development of gastrointestinal (GI) polyps. Here, we report that heterozygous deletion of Stk11 in T cells (LT het mice) is sufficient to promote GI polyposis. Polyps from LT het mice, Stk11 +/– mice, and human PJS pa

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Mediator and RNA polymerase II clusters associate in transcription-dependent condensates

Models of gene control have emerged from genetic and biochemical studies, with limited consideration of the spatial organization and dynamics of key components in living cells. We used live-cell superresolution and light-sheet imaging to study the organization and dynamics of the Mediator coactivator and RNA polymerase II (Pol II) directly. Mediator and Pol II each form small transient and large

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Let your stars shine

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Imaging dynamic and selective low-complexity domain interactions that control gene transcription

Many eukaryotic transcription factors (TFs) contain intrinsically disordered low-complexity sequence domains (LCDs), but how these LCDs drive transactivation remains unclear. We used live-cell single-molecule imaging to reveal that TF LCDs form local high-concentration interaction hubs at synthetic and endogenous genomic loci. TF LCD hubs stabilize DNA binding, recruit RNA polymerase II (RNA Pol

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Coactivator condensation at super-enhancers links phase separation and gene control

Super-enhancers (SEs) are clusters of enhancers that cooperatively assemble a high density of the transcriptional apparatus to drive robust expression of genes with prominent roles in cell identity. Here we demonstrate that the SE-enriched transcriptional coactivators BRD4 and MED1 form nuclear puncta at SEs that exhibit properties of liquid-like condensates and are disrupted by chemicals that pe

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Three-dimensional intact-tissue sequencing of single-cell transcriptional states

Retrieving high-content gene-expression information while retaining three-dimensional (3D) positional anatomy at cellular resolution has been difficult, limiting integrative understanding of structure and function in complex biological tissues. We developed and applied a technology for 3D intact-tissue RNA sequencing, termed STARmap (spatially-resolved transcript amplicon readout mapping), which

22h

Comment on "An excess of massive stars in the local 30 Doradus starburst"

Schneider et al . (Reports, 5 January 2018, p. 69) used an ad hoc statistical method in their calculation of the stellar initial mass function. Adopting an improved approach, we reanalyze their data and determine a power-law exponent of . Alternative assumptions regarding dataset completeness and the star formation history model can shift the inferred exponent to and , respectively.

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Response to Comment on "An excess of massive stars in the local 30 Doradus starburst"

Farr and Mandel reanalyze our data, finding initial mass function slopes for high-mass stars in 30 Doradus that agree with our results. However, their reanalysis appears to underpredict the observed number of massive stars. Their technique results in more precise slopes than in our work, strengthening our conclusion that there is an excess of massive stars (>30 solar masses) in 30 Doradus.

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Software recreates complex movements for medical, rehabilitation, and basic research

An open-source movement simulator that has already helped solve problems in medicine, paleontology, and animal locomotion has been expanded and improved, according to a new publication in the open-access journal PLOS Computational Biology. The software, called OpenSim, has been developed by a team at Stanford University, led by first authors Ajay Seth, Jennifer Hicks, and Thomas Uchida, with contr

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New screening approach reveals importance of microRNAs in papillomavirus life cycle

The discovery of microRNAs encoded by papillomaviruses supports the important role of these small molecules in persistent infection, according to a study published July 26 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens. Study author Rachel Chirayil of the University of Texas at Austin and colleagues made this discovery using a new approach that enables microRNA identification for the enormous range of

22h

Lectins help social amoeba establish their own microbiome

People are not the only living organisms that carry a microbiome, that is, good bacteria living on and in the body. The social amoeba, a soil-dwelling organism, also carries its own microbiome, and researchers at Baylor College of Medicine have discovered that sugar-binding proteins called lectins are essential for amoebas and bacteria living together. The study appears in the journal Science.

22h

Border Wall Could Disrupt Hundreds of Species

More than 2,500 scientists signed a letter saying that an expanded U.S.–Mexico border wall would threaten both biodiversity and scientific research. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Ant study sheds light on the evolution of workers and queens

Worker ants, despite their diligence, seldom encounter opportunities for social mobility. In many species, individuals adhere to strict caste roles: queens lay eggs and workers take care of almost everything else, including offspring.

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The Doomed Republican Attempt to Impeach Rod Rosenstein

Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein has many reasons to be concerned about his job security, but the articles of impeachment filed against him late Wednesday are probably not one. The documents were filed by Mark Meadows , the chair of the House Freedom Caucus, and are co-sponsored by 10 other members of the group. They argue that Rosenstein should be removed for withholding information from C

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The Guardian view on the heatwave: our climate is endangered | Editorial

Adapting to hotter temperatures is sensible – but ignoring their causes is dangerous The NHS is experiencing a “ summer crisis ”, with increased emergency admissions and uncomfortable conditions in buildings not equipped for the heat, while the Met Office has warned that the UK temperature record of 38.5C could be broken on Friday. Authorities in Greece are dealing with the aftermath of devastatin

22h

Previously overlooked 'coral ticks' weaken degraded reefs

A previously overlooked predator– a thumbnail-sized snail –could be increasing the pressure on coral reefs already weakened by the effects of overfishing, rising ocean temperatures, pollution and other threats.

23h

Lily Jan (UCSF / HHMI) 2: Calcium-Activated Chloride Channel (CaCC) in the Enigmatic TMEM16 Family

https://www.ibiology.org/neuroscience/ion-channels/ Dr. Lily Jan defines the physiological role of ion channels, like potassium channels and Calcium-Activated Chloride Channels, in the regulation of excitability in neurons. Ion channels are crucial for proper neuronal communication and cellular homeostasis. But, how do ion channels perform their work? In this seminar, Dr. Lily Jan defines the phy

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Lily Jan (UCSF / HHMI) 1: Introduction to Ion Channels: The role and function of potassium channels

https://www.ibiology.org/neuroscience/ion-channels/ Dr. Lily Jan defines the physiological role of ion channels, like potassium channels and Calcium-Activated Chloride Channels, in the regulation of excitability in neurons. Ion channels are crucial for proper neuronal communication and cellular homeostasis. But, how do ion channels perform their work? In this seminar, Dr. Lily Jan defines the phy

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A Neuroscience Perspective on the Lifelong Consequences of Detaining Kids at the Border

If you’ve been even partially tuned in to the news over the last few months, you’ve heard about the gut-wrenching separation of children from their parents at the United States border and the detainment centers where these children have been held. You may have seen pictures of young kids in cages, been watching when Rachel […]

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People are bad at spotting fake news. Can computer programs do better?

Fake news–finding algorithms could someday make up the front lines of online fact checking.

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Business this week

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KAL’s cartoon

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Politics this week

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Teens Are Debating the News on Instagram

It’s harder and harder to have an honest debate on the internet. Social-media platforms like Twitter, Reddit, and Facebook Groups are rife with trolls; forums are plagued by archaic layouts and spambots. Teenagers who are looking to talk about big issues face additional frustrations, like the fact that most adults on these platforms don’t take them seriously. Naturally, they’ve turned to Instagra

23h

Flood detection a surprising capability of microsatellites mission

Hurricanes bring heavy rainfall and strong winds to coastal communities, a potent combination that can lead to devastating damage.

23h

Teen Gets Hookworm from Florida Beach Sand

A Tennessee teen's summer trip to Florida turned nightmarish after he contracted hookworms from playing in sand at the beach.

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CRISPR-created Animal Models: The Technical Lowdown

Horizon Discovery invites you to join them for an educational webinar.

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The last wild ocean

The world's marine wilderness is dwindling, according to research from UCSB and the University of Queensland.

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Role of oral microbiota in the severity of chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis

At the 96th General Session of the International Association for Dental Research (IADR), held in conjunction with the IADR Pan European Regional (PER) Congress, Kai Soo Tan, National University of Singapore, gave a oral presentation titled 'Role of Oral Microbiota in the Severity of Chemotherapy-Induced Oral Mucositis.'

23h

Speeding Up Evolution to Save an Australian Marsupial from Toxic Toads

The strategy could also be used to aide Tasmanian devils and corals on the Great Barrier Reef — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

23h

Something Is Wrong at Facebook

Facebook stock was down over 20 percent in after-hours trading yesterday after the company announced earnings that missed expectations, along with expectations of slower growth in the future. The drop, which was the largest single decline in the firm’s history as a public company, wiped more than $100 billion from the company’s market value. It wasn’t the first time Facebook’s shares had plunged.

1d

Secretary of a State of Confusion

Mike Pompeo came to Congress on Wednesday to brief members of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee on Donald Trump’s recent summits with Vladimir Putin and Kim Jong Un. But the appearance turned into something far more fundamental and extraordinary: an investigation into whether, on foreign policy, the current president of the United States speaks for the U.S. government, and whether U.S. offic

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In the Land of Willful Amnesia

There may be no place cheerier, in the America of the present moment, than the Instagram feed of Sean Spicer . The former White House press secretary, embarking on the tour to promote his new book, The Briefing , has been, by all appearances, having a distinctly delightful time, and @seanmspicer has offered, post by post, evidence of all the delight. The feed is populated with various images of t

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Glaciers in East Antarctica also 'imperiled' by climate change, UCI researchers find

A team of scientists from the University of California, Irvine has found evidence of significant mass loss in East Antarctica's Totten and Moscow University glaciers, which, if they fully collapsed, could add 5 meters (16.4 feet) to the global sea level.

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Engineers track neural activity, muscle movement in ageless aquatic creatures

Rice University scientists developed microfluidics platforms to study the nervous system of the hydra, a squid-like creature with remarkable regenerative abilities.

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Tropical Storm Jongdari gearing up to become a Typhoon

NOAA/NASA's Suomi NPP satellite provided a visible look at Tropical Storm Jongdari in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean on July 26. The storm is increasing its organization and will most likely become a typhoon within the day.

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23andMe Is Sharing Its 5 Million Clients' Genetic Data with Drug Giant GlaxoSmithKline

Popular genetics company 23andMe is partnering up with drug giant GlaxoSmithKline to use people's DNA to develop medical treatments, the company announced in a blog post yesterday (July 25).

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The best water-resistant and waterproof gear for the pool or beach

Gadgets We love water, but most of our gadgets don't. The best water-resistant and waterproof gear for the pool or beach since we love water, but most of our gadgets don't.

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Milky Way's Black Hole Provides Long-Sought Test of Einstein's General Relativity

An observation decades in the making confirms predictions about how light behaves in an immense gravitational field — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Black holes really just ever-growing balls of string, researchers say

Black holes aren't surrounded by a burning ring of fire after all, suggests new research.

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Tropical Storm Jongdari gearing up to become a Typhoon

NOAA/NASA's Suomi NPP satellite provided a visible look at Tropical Storm Jongdari in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean on July 26. The storm is increasing its organization and will most likely become a typhoon within the day.

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Squishy hydra's simple circuits ready for their close-up

Just because an animal is soft and squishy doesn't mean it isn't tough. Experiments at Rice University show the humble hydra is a good example.

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Derfor er antibiotikaresistens en alvorlig trussel mod folkesundheden

Engang var antibiotika et mirakelmiddel, der fik bugt med selv de grimmeste bakterier. Men på grund af overforbrug dør vi i dag af infektioner, vi for få år siden kunne kurere.

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Black holes really just ever-growing balls of string, researchers say

Black holes aren't surrounded by a burning ring of fire after all, suggests new research.

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New two-dimensional material could revolutionize solar fuel generation

International group of researchers including Brazilian scientists obtain from hematite a new material with application as a photocatalyst, christened 'hematene.' The three-atom thick hematene is a ferromagnetic material, as opposed to the iron ore from which it was created from.

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Size is key in predicting how calcifying organisms will respond to ocean acidification

New research suggests size is the main factor that predicts how calcifying organisms will respond to ocean acidification.

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The scientific guide to stockpiling food for a ‘no deal’ Brexit

In a post-Brexit culinary landscape, lamb with turnips and tinned carrots could be on the menu. You probably also want to buy a chest freezer

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Our buildings make this heatwave worse – here’s how to cool them down

Many buildings in cool countries are poorly designed to cope with heat, and new homes and offices are even worse. Thousands will die if we don’t fix them

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Parasite fungus sends insects on sex spree by loading them up on drugs

A fungus that infects cicadas seems to pump the insects full of methamphetamine and the active ingredient in magic mushrooms before sending them on a marathon sex spree

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Starlight stretched by Milky Way’s black hole proves Einstein right

Albert Einstein’s theory of general relativity says a black hole’s gravity stretches the light waves of nearby stars – and we’ve seen it happen for the first time

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Self-healing graphene could make robots that fix themselves with water

Adding graphene to a gel makes a 3D-printable substance that dries to be strong and conductive and heals when wet

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Many chimps are active at night but we don’t know what they do

A study of 22 chimpanzee sites has found that they regularly wake up and move around in the night, but it’s not clear what the apes are up to

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Inside a nuclear inspector school: How I went on the hunt for uranium

How do nuclear inspectors find material that could be used to make a bomb? Chelsea Whyte visited Los Alamos National Laboratory to learn their techniques

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This mind-controlled robotic arm lets you do two things at once

Need a hand? Eight people have reliably used a mind-controlled robotic third arm to perform two tasks simultaneously

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Why cuts in your mouth heal 10 times faster than skin wounds

Wounds in the mouth really do heal much faster than cuts to the skin, and it may be because mouth cells are genetically primed for healing

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Galaxy outskirts likely hunting grounds for dying massive stars and black holes

Findings from a Rochester Institute of Technology study provide further evidence that the outskirts of spiral galaxies host massive black holes. These overlooked regions are new places to observe gravitational waves created when the massive bodies collide, the authors report.

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New materials undergo solid-liquid phase transitions at room temperature

Researchers have developed the first materials that can permanently change from solid to liquid, or vice versa, when exposed to light at room temperature, and remain in the new phase even after the light is removed. The researchers also demonstrated that the light can be used to draw liquid designs in a solid material or solid designs in a liquid material, creating stable materials that are part s

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10th endangered rhino dies in Kenya after botched transfer

A tenth critically endangered black rhino has died in Kenya after being moved to a new wildlife park and the sole survivor has been attacked by lions, wildlife authorities said Thursday in what some conservationists have called a national disaster.

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Size is key in predicting how calcifying organisms will respond to ocean acidification

New research suggests size is the main factor that predicts how calcifying organisms will respond to ocean acidification.

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Previously undiagnosed neurological disorder linked to gene IRF2BPL

Researchers discovered mutations of gene IRF2BPL that are associated with a previously undiagnosed neurological disorder.

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For spinal fusion surgery patients, taking opioids before surgery is major risk factor for long-term opioid use

Patients taking opioids for at least three months before spinal fusion surgery in the lower spine are much more likely to continue taking opioids one year after surgery, reports a study in Spine. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

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The Last of the Ocean Wilderness

Just 13 percent of the ocean remains largely untouched by human activity, and without strong action to preserve such areas, they will likely be lost forever — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Tweets prove to be reliable indicator of air quality conditions during wildfires

Tweets originating in California during the state's 2015 wildfire season suggest that social media can improve predictions of air quality impacts from smoke resulting from wildfires and have the potential to improve rescue and relief efforts, according to research by two USDA Forest Service scientists.

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Wildfires, volcanoes and climate change—how satellites tell the story of our changing world

The Environment Agency recently announced that the average rainfall for the first two weeks of July in England was 6mm, while only 15mm fell throughout all of June. To give some idea of how low this is, the definition of a desert is a place with an average rainfall of 21mm per month.

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Enduring 'radio rebound' powered by jets from gamma-ray burst

In the blink of an eye, a massive star more than 2 billion light-years away lost a million-year-long fight against gravity and collapsed, triggering a supernova and forming a black hole at its center.

1d

Swarming Bacteria Create an ‘Impossible’ Superfluid

Outside of the imaginations of physics teachers, frictionless devices are hard to come by. But putting a bunch of swimming bacteria into a drop of water achieves just that: a fluid with zero resistance to motion. Incredibly, that resistance (or viscosity, as it’s properly known) can even go negative, creating a self-propelling liquid that might, say, turn a motor in a way that seems to defy the l

1d

Private Schools Are Becoming More Elite

In 1925, the U.S. Supreme Court issued a ruling that cemented the country’s thinking on school choice: Families, the justices concluded in Pierce v. Society of Sisters , had the right to decide where to send their children to school and thus could choose private education. Catholic schools, which were the target of the lawsuit, rejoiced. They could continue serving as an alternative to the United

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Letter: The Long-Delayed Pursuit of Justice

Reopening the Emmett Till Case Is a Cynical Play In a recent article, Vann R. Newkirk II argued that it’s unclear what could possibly come of the Justice Department investigation into the country’s most infamous lynching case. The reopening of the Emmett Till case was announced on Thursday, July 12. While the case has in fact been open for quite some time, the public announcement offers the oppor

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Zebrafish interactions offer help in studying social behavior disorders

July 26, 2018—University of Oregon scientists have identified brain cells vital to how zebrafish socialize. When the neurons are disabled, their orientation to one another breaks down in ways similar to socialization problems seen in humans with autism spectrum disorders and schizophrenia.

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New family photos of Mars and Saturn from Hubble

In summer 2018 the planets Mars and Saturn are, one after the other, in opposition to Earth. During this event the planets are relatively close to Earth, allowing astronomers to observe them in greater detail. Hubble took advantage of this preferred configuration and imaged both planets to continue its long-standing observation of the outer planets in the Solar System.

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Facebook's reality check sends stock reeling

It has turned into a brutal reality check for Facebook.

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Naturalistic driving study investigates self-regulation behavior in early Alzheimer's disease

Driving is a complex task that involves perceptual, motor and cognitive abilities. These abilities may be affected in early Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. Nevertheless, they continue to drive for more years than people with other dementia syndromes perhaps because of a deficit in self-awareness that prevents them from perceiving their driving difficulties and adapting accordingly.

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DNA Test Identifies 9/11 Victim 17 Years After He Died

Scott Michael Johnson's remains had been among thousands unidentified following the attacks. Medical examiners managed to fix that using new DNA technology.

1d

Fruit Fly Males Woo Females with Three Songs, Not Two

Researchers show that Drosophila melanogaster males are capable of producing more modes of courtship song with their wings than previously thought.

1d

Different US Election Maps Tell ‘Different Versions of the Truth’

Self-proclaimed "cartonerd" Ken Field published a gallery of alternative election maps designed to reveal markedly different stories about the US.

1d

Are North Carolina's red wolves a real species? The answer could doom them

Changes to the Endangered Species Act proposed by the Trump administration could end federal protection of the three dozen remaining red wolves in North Carolina, wildlife advocates say.

1d

'Billy can live a normal life': families react to medicinal cannabis move

Families of children with epilepsy welcome easing of rules but warn there is work to do Charlotte Caldwell, whose son Billy became the symbol of the campaign to make cannabis-based medicinal products available on prescription, has welcomed Sajid Javid’s climbdown on the issue because Billy will now be able to live “a normal life”. But while families that have been campaigning for children living

1d

Airbnb’s Slow-Moving Mission to Win Over African Americans

One year in, Airbnb’s mission to expand service in black neighborhoods through a partnership NAACP, still holds tremendous potential—but it’s just getting started

1d

Plan to Weaken Car Emissions Rules Could Reopen Key Climate Case

The Supreme Court previously ruled the EPA had authority to regulate greenhouse gases — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

Why we sometimes hate the good guy

Everyone is supposed to cheer for good guys. We're supposed to honour heroes, saints and anyone who helps others, and we should only punish the bad guys. And that's what we actually do, right?

1d

Algae blooms force Poland to shut down 50 Baltic Sea beaches

Thinking of a dip in the Baltic Sea to cool off from the unusually scorching European summer? It's too hot for that.

1d

Just 13% of the Ocean Is Untouched by Humans

And even those patches of pristine ocean are unprotected.

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Enduring 'radio rebound' powered by jets from gamma-ray burst

Astronomers using ALMA studied a cataclysmic stellar explosion known as a gamma-ray burst, or GRB, and found its enduring 'afterglow.' The rebound, or reverse shock, triggered by the GRB's powerful jets slamming into surrounding debris, lasted thousands of times longer than expected. These observations provide fresh insights into the physics of GRBs, one of the universe's most energetic explosions

1d

IIASA researchers help EU states assess forestry's role in achieving climate commitments

IIASA researchers have led the development of new guidance for EU member states estimating greenhouse gas emissions and removals from their forests and developing plans to show how they will account for these emissions and removals in the future.

1d

Tweets prove to be reliable indicator of air quality conditions during wildfires

Whether it is caused by wildfire or prescribed fire, smoke can have serious health ramifications. USDA Forest Service scientists evaluated 39,000 tweets originating in California during the state's 2015 wildfire season to learn whether what people tweet can be used to predict air quality in areas affected by fire.

1d

Zebrafish interactions offer help in studying social behavior disorders

University of Oregon scientists have identified brain cells vital to how zebrafish socialize. When the neurons are disabled, their orientation to one another breaks down in ways similar to socialization problems seen in humans with autism spectrum disorders and schizophrenia.

1d

Reducing opioid prescriptions for one operation can also spill over to other procedures

Study results show revised recommendations resulted in about 17 fewer pills being dispensed per patient for four major operations.

1d

Dr. Jekyll, Mr. Hyde: Study reveals healing mesenchymal cells morph and destroy muscles in models of spinal cord injury, ALS and spinal muscular atrophy

Scientists at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute (SBP), in collaboration with the Fondazione Santa Lucia IRCCS in Rome, have discovered a new disease-specific role in FAP cells in the development of muscle tissue wasting, indicating a potential new avenue for treating motor neuron diseases including spinal cord injury, ALS and spinal muscular atrophy.

1d

Changes to small RNA in sperm may help fertilization

UMass Medical School Professor Oliver J. Rando, M.D., Ph.D., sheds new light on the processes of fertilization and epigenetic inheritance in mammals. New research provides important insight into how epigenetics — the study of inheritable traits that are carried outside the genome — work from father to offspring.

1d

Night-time lighting changes how species interact

Night-time lighting from streetlights and other sources has complex and unexpected effects on communities of plants and animals, new research shows.

1d

Risk of later death after donor blood, marrow transplant in childhood

Patients who had donor blood or marrow transplants during childhood continue to be at increased risk of premature death even years after the procedure compared with the general population, although the rate of later death among these transplant patients has decreased over the last three decades.

1d

End-of-life conversations with nonclinical worker bring patient satisfaction, lower costs

Patients with advanced cancer who spoke with a trained nonclinical worker about personal goals for care were more likely to talk with doctors about their preferences, report higher satisfaction with their care and incur lower health costs in their final month of life, Stanford University School of Medicine researchers report.

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Can scientists leverage mysterious mossy cells for brain disease treatments?

The scientists, who published their work in Neuron, showed that 'mossy cells' in the hippocampus regulate local stem cells to control their production of new neurons, which is important for normal learning and memory, stress response, and mood regulation. Such neurogenesis in the adult brain is disrupted in many common conditions including Alzheimer's disease, depression, anxiety, schizophrenia, t

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Electricity sparks neuronal diversity during brain development

To understand how neuronal circuits emerge during development, researchers from UNIGE investigated what enables neuronal stem cells to generate successive subtypes of neurons as the embryo grows. By measuring the electrical activity, they found that membrane voltage values increase as the embryo develops and new neurons are being created. To test the role of this electrical charge, neuroscientists

1d

Evolution of efflux pumps could yield important insights in fighting antibiotic resistance

Different types of efflux pump proteins might have evolved independently, instead of divergently as previously thought. This could yield insights in mediating antibiotic resistance.

1d

Fertilizer destroys plant microbiome's ability to protect against disease

Despite enthusiasm for spraying probiotics on crops to ensure healthy microbiomes, little is known about what a healthy above-ground biome, or phyllosphere, looks like. UC Berkeley experiments show that both natural microbiomes and synthetic biomes constructed from normal populations are protective against pathogens, though sometimes low doses work better than high doses. Surprisingly, fertilizing

1d

How do jumping genes cause disease, drive evolution?

Carnegie researchers developed new techniques to track the mobilization of jumping genes. They found that during a particular period of egg development, a group of jumping-genes called retrotransposons hijacks special cells called nurse cells that nurture the developing eggs. These jumping genes use nurse cells to produce invasive material (copies of themselves called virus-like particles) that mo

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Changes to sperm's small RNA in the epididymis may help ensure mouse embryos implant

This week, Louise Brown, the first person born after conception by in vitro fertilization (IVF), celebrates her 40th birthday. Thanks to assisted reproductive technologies like IVF and intracytoplasmic sperm injection and to new techniques developed in laboratory animals, researchers are able to uncover new details about the processes of fertilization and reproduction in mammals. This research is

1d

Europe may thrive on renewable energy despite unpredictable weather

Researchers have shown how long-term weather patterns affect wind and solar renewable energy technologies across Europe. The work suggests that despite the unpredictable nature of wind and solar energy, the European power system can comfortably generate at least 35 percent of its electricity using these renewables alone without major impacts on prices or system stability. The paper appears July 26

1d

To keep more carbon on the ground, halting farmland expansion is key

The conversion of forests to farmland is recognized as a major contributor to rising levels of greenhouse gases. And yet it hasn't been clear how to best minimize the loss of sequestered carbon into the atmosphere. Researchers reporting in Current Biology on July 26 say that, based on their extensive studies of agricultural operations on three continents, the best course in all cases is to limit t

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First mapping of global marine wilderness shows just how little remains

Researchers reporting in Current Biology on July 26 have completed the first systematic analysis of marine wilderness around the world. And what they found is not encouraging; only a small fraction — about 13 percent — of the world's ocean can still be classified as wilderness.

1d

Fat production and burning are synchronized in livers of mice with obesity

Mice fed a fattening diet develop new liver circadian rhythms that impact the way fat is accumulated and simultaneously burned. The team found that as liver fat production increases, surprisingly, so does the body's ability to burn fat. These opposing physiological processes reach their peak activity each day around 5 p.m., illustrating an unexpected connection between overeating, circadian rhythm

1d

Gut bacteria byproduct protects against Salmonella, Stanford study finds

Researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have identified a molecule that serves as natural protection against one of the most common intestinal pathogens, Salmonella.

1d

Why restricting social media is not a solution to dangerous behaviours in India

Earlier this month, in the Indian state of Rajasthan, bystanders took selfies while three men lay dying after a road accident. The week before, two men were beaten to death by a mob in the state of Assam after false rumours of their involvement in a kidnapping were spread on WhatsApp. And a study recently found that India is the world leader when it comes to selfie-related accidents.

1d

Unions hail mobilisation in unprecedented Ryanair strike

Unions representing Ryanair cabin crews said Thursday their strike in four European countries had been successful, defying the no-frills airline which has threatened job cuts.

1d

Americans have some really mixed feelings about editing human embryos

Health Curing diseases is mostly fine, but increasing intelligence? That's another story. According to a recent poll taken by the Pew Research Foundation this past May, the American public is okay, on the whole with gene editing human embryos, as long as the…

1d

Google unveils new virtual reality experience at SIGGRAPH 2018

Google has unveiled a new virtual reality (VR) immersive experience based on a novel system that captures and renders high-quality, realistic images from the real world using light fields. Created by a team of leading researchers at Google, Welcome to Light Fields is the tech giant's splash into the nascent arena of light fields VR experiences, an exciting corner of VR video technology gaining tra

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Flow chemistry technique offers faster, safer way to screen, study and optimize industrial chemical reactions

Researchers have developed a flow-based high-throughput screening technology that offers a faster, safer and less expensive means of identifying optimum conditions for performing high-pressure/high-temperature catalytic chemical reactions. The technique focuses on hydroformylation reactions, which are used to create a variety of commercial products.

1d

You will probably hang out in 25 places this year—here's why

You have virtually unlimited choices of where to spend your time, but you always hang out in the same few places. Are you boring? No, you are a human.

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Daimler earnings hit by trade tensions, emissions rules

German automaker Daimler AG said Thursday that its net profit fell 27 percent in the second quarter as the company confronted multiple challenges including trade tensions, weak pricing for its luxury cars, and recalls and product delays related to diesel emissions.

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Researchers develop tool to reduce slavery in seafood supply chains

A new screening tool developed at the University of British Columbia is giving seafood companies the ability to pinpoint the highest risks of forced labour in their supply chain.

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Video: How does air conditioning work?

Air conditioners pull off the seemingly magical feat of making the air inside a home, car or shopping mall deliciously chilly. The source of that sweet relief is chemistry.

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Tropical treetops are warming, putting sensitive species at risk

The vaulted canopies that tower above Earth's rich tropical forests could be especially vulnerable to climate change-related temperature increases, according to a new report from Florida State University researchers.

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The U.S.-EU Trade Breakthrough That Wasn’t

After months of transatlantic sparring, the United States and the European Union seem to have pulled themselves back from the brink of a trade war. President Donald Trump and European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker announced Wednesday that they had reached a breakthrough deal on trade—one with fewer threats of tariffs on European automakers, and more soybeans. “I had the intention to ma

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You may be accidentally investing in cigarette companies | Bronwyn King

Tobacco causes more than seven million deaths every year — and many of us are far more complicit in the problem than we realize. In a bold talk, oncologist Dr. Bronwyn King tells the story of how she uncovered the deep ties between the tobacco industry and the entire global finance sector, which invests our money in cigarette companies through big banks, insurers and pension funds. Learn how Dr.

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Researchers report unraveling the immune recognition of nucleic acid nanoparticles

An extensive experiment testing the immune effects of a broad group of lab-designed nucleic acid nanoparticles did not find a strong, uniform immune response, as had been predicted. Instead, the tests found varying and specific responses from different immune cells, depending on each particle's shape and formulation, a finding that may encourage further study of the particles' therapeutic use.

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Making thread in Bronze Age Britain

A new study published this week in the journal Archaeological and Anthropological Sciences has identified that the earliest plant fibre technology for making thread in Early Bronze Age Britain and across Europe and the Near East was splicing not spinning.

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After fires, floods hit Greek capital

Heavy rains led to flash flooding Thursday in the north of Athens, three days after devastating wildfires killed scores of people in the region around the Greek capital.

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How do jumping genes cause disease, drive evolution?

Almost half of our DNA sequences are made up of jumping genes—also known as transposons. They jump around the genome in developing sperm and egg cells and are important to evolution. But their mobilization can also cause new mutations that lead to diseases, such as hemophilia and cancer. Remarkably little is known about when and where their movements occur in developing reproductive cells, the key

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Fertilizer destroys plant microbiome's ability to protect against disease

A new study of the role microbial communities play on the leaves of plants suggests that fertilizing crops may make them more susceptible to disease.

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Evolution of efflux pumps could yield important insights in fighting antibiotic resistance

Different types of efflux pump proteins—which are the key focus of Gram-negative bacteria antibiotic resistance—might have evolved independently instead of, as previously thought, all from a common ancestor, according to a new study led by a University of Kansas computational biologist.

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Night-time lighting changes how species interact

Night-time lighting from streetlights and other sources has complex and unexpected effects on communities of plants and animals, new research shows.Previous studies have shown that artificial lighting affects a wide variety of individual species, including many moths and bats.

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Mind-body therapies can help teens with anxiety — The Nurse Practitioner presents review and update

Mind-body therapies — biofeedback, mindfulness, yoga, and hypnosis — provide a promising approach to the very common problem of anxiety in adolescents, according to a review in the March issue of The Nurse Practitioner. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

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New family photos of Mars and Saturn from Hubble

In summer 2018 the planets Mars and Saturn are, one after the other, in opposition to Earth. During this event the planets are relatively close to Earth, allowing astronomers to observe them in greater detail. Hubble took advantage of this preferred configuration and imaged both planets to continue its long-standing observation of the outer planets in the solar system.

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Neurobiology: Finding one's way home

The otic placode gives rise to the inner ear in vertebrates. A new study shows that even when it is transplanted to ectopic positions, the nerve cells that grow out of the transplanted ear can form functional connections in the brain.

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Researchers develop model on how brain reward response may impact anorexia nervosa

Researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus have found that the brain's response to taste stimuli is linked to high anxiety and a drive for thinness that could play a role in driving anorexia nervosa.

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Ocean wilderness 'disappearing' globally

Researchers have found that only 13% of the world's oceans remain mostly undisturbed by humans.

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Changes to small RNA in sperm may help fertilization

Two papers by UMass Medical School Professor Oliver J. Rando, MD, Ph.D., shed new light on the processes of fertilization and epigenetic inheritance in mammals. Together, the research provides important insight into how epigenetics—the study of inheritable traits that are carried outside the genome—work from father to offspring. The studies appear in the journal Developmental Cell and provide new

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To keep more carbon on the ground, halting farmland expansion is key

The conversion of forests to farmland is recognized as a major contributor to rising levels of greenhouse gases. And yet it hasn't been clear how to best minimize the loss of sequestered carbon into the atmosphere. Is it better to maximize farm yields so as to use less land area over all? Or should farms be operated so as to retain more carbon on site, even at the expense of crop yields? Researche

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Fighting offensive language on social media with unsupervised text style transfer

Online social media has become one of the most important ways to communicate and exchange ideas. Unfortunately, the discourse is often crippled by abusive language that can have damaging effects on social media users. For instance, a recent survey by YouGov.uk discovered that, among the information employers can find online about job candidates, aggressive or offensive language is the most profess

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That's cold: Japan tech blasts snoozing workers with AC

Japanese office workers hoping to nod off on the job may need to sleep with one eye open thanks to a new system that can detect snoozers and blast them with cold air.

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First mapping of global marine wilderness shows just how little remains

Researchers reporting in the journal Current Biology on July 26 have completed the first systematic analysis of marine wilderness around the world. And what they found is not encouraging; only a small fraction—about 13 percent—of the world's ocean can still be classified as wilderness.

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Insurers turn to technology to woo drivers

Americans love technology, and we expect companies to deliver delightful digital experiences.

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Citizen science helps detect sharks earlier

When Darren Porter obtained his commercial weir license eight years ago and set up shop in Bramber, Nova Scotia, he never thought he'd be at the centre of an international shark-tracking effort.

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SK Hynix posts record quarterly profits

The world's second-largest memory chipmaker SK Hynix posted record profits in the second quarter, the South Korean company said Thursday, citing strong global demand.

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Chimpanzee 'nests' shed light on the origins of humanity

Home is where the heart is, they say. But a chimpanzee's home may be where we can find the origins of the entire human species.

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Scientists use 'funnel-vision' to pioneer cheap and efficient solar energy

Scientists have developed a pioneering new technique that could unlock new methods of making solar energy more efficient.

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How Software Ate the Point of Sale

I’m standing at the counter of a Vietnamese restaurant in Berkeley, ordering a pork bun. There was a time when I knew exactly what would happen next. I’d hand over my card, the cashier would swipe it, a little receipt would curl out of a machine, I’d sign it, and I’d crumple the bottom copy into a pocket. Easy. Now all kinds of things can happen. I might stick my card directly into a point-of-sal

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Swift parrot protection agreements are being broken

A new research paper from The Australian National University (ANU) has found agreements to protect the critically endangered Swift parrot in Tasmania have been broken leaving the species at high risk of extinction.

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First ever study of serious case reviews of sudden unexpected infant deaths conducted

For the first time in England a study has been conducted of official investigations of unexpected infant deaths.The research was conducted by academics at the University of Warwick who aimed to develop a detailed understanding of the circumstances of sudden unexpected death in infancy (SUDI) cases subject to serious case review.

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Google unveils new virtual reality experience at ACM SIGGRAPH 2018

Google Inc. has unveiled a new virtual reality (VR) immersive experience based on a novel system that captures and renders high-quality, realistic images from the real world using light fields. Created by a team of leading researchers at Google, Welcome to Light Fields is the tech giant's splash into the nascent arena of light fields VR experiences, an exciting corner of VR video technology gainin

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Specialized approach to open heart surgery saves lives

Patients who undergo coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) — the most common heart surgery performed — may live longer and experience fewer complications when under the care of a highly focused surgical team that uses simplified and standardized approaches, according to research published today in The Annals of Thoracic Surgery.

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Researchers discover system that could reduce neurodegeneration in Huntington's disease

The neuroscientist Dr David Vilchez and his team at CECAD, the University of Cologne's Cluster of Excellence for Aging Research, have made an important step towards understanding the mechanisms that cause the neurodegenerative disorder Huntington's disease. Particularly, they identified a system blocking the accumulation of toxin protein aggregates, which are responsible for neurodegeneration. The

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New technique offers faster, safer way to optimize industrial chemical reactions

Researchers have developed a flow-based high-throughput screening technology that offers a faster, safer and less expensive means of identifying optimum conditions for performing high-pressure/high-temperature catalytic chemical reactions. The technique focuses on hydroformylation reactions, which are used to create a variety of commercial products.

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Finally, a breathtaking photo of beluga whale snot

The above photo captures a beluga calf exhaling thousands of tiny droplets of respiratory vapour, which are valuable to science. The droplets—snot, essentially—help researchers like U of M's Justine Hudson measure stress in whale and dolphin populations all over the world in a non-invasive way, enabling us to accurately measure stress and determine the cause.

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Grubhub to buy LevelUp mobile ordering and payment company for $390 million

Grubhub is set to pay $390 million for mobile ordering and payment company LevelUp in an effort to reach more diners, the company announced Wednesday.

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Tesla, others help Puerto Ricans go solar amid power turmoil

Ten months after Hurricane Maria, Adjuntas still loses power any time a heavy rain or wind pounds the rickety power lines feeding this town high in the central mountains of Puerto Rico.

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How climate change will alter our food

The world population is expected to grow to almost 10 billion by 2050. With 3.4 billion more mouths to feed, and the growing desire of the middle class for meat and dairy in developing countries, global demand for food could increase by between 59 and 98 percent. This means that agriculture around the world needs to step up production and increase yields. But scientists say that the impacts of cli

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Physicists practice 'spin control' to improve information processing

Currently, information-processing tools like computers and cell phones rely on electron charge to operate. A team of UC San Diego physicists, however, seeks alternative systems of faster, more energy-efficient signal processing. They do this by using "excitons," electrically neutral quasiparticles that exist in insulators, semiconductors and in some liquids. And their latest study of excitonic spi

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Are we prepared for climate change? Health experts say no

Health experts told Congress that we're woefully unprepared for the coming realities of climate change. Will we listen? Read More

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Feeling guilt-prone likely means you're trustworthy, new study finds

The anticipation of guilt implies personal responsibility, which researchers found to be a marker of trustworthiness. Read More

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Removing malaria-carrying mosquitoes unlikely to affect ecosystems, says report

By combining studies on one species of malaria-carrying mosquito, researchers found that no other animals rely solely on them for food.

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Nu skal Højesteret afgøre det: Må politiet tvinge dig til at åbne din telefon?

En dansker sagde sidste år nej til at åbne sin iPhone for politiet, men betjente tvang ham med magt til at låse op med sit fingeraftryk. Nu skal Højesteret tage stilling til, om det er i orden.

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Svenske skovbrande udsætter raketopsendelse ved Bornholm

De svenske luftfartsmyndigheder kan ikke undvære ressourcerne til at føre tilsyn med luftrummet over Østersøen. Derfor må Copenhagen Suborbitals opgive at opsende raketten Nexø II lørdag.

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Exploring Galapagos snakes on volcanoes

Finding snakes in the Galapagos islands is a gargantuan undertaking, one that has lead Massey University's Dr. Luis Ortiz-Catedral to the summit of an active volcano.

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Australian media giants Fairfax and Nine to merge

Publisher Fairfax Media and Nine Entertainment on Thursday announced plans to merge, creating an integrated Australian media giant across television, online video streaming, print, and digital.

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'Urban island' heat tests Phoenix, other large cities

When temperatures soar as they have this week in downtown Phoenix, homeless people ride the air-conditioned light rail to avoid a heat so brutal it killed 155 people in the city and surrounding areas last year. An occasional siren wails as paramedics rush to help people sick from the heat.

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Heatwave grips northern Europe as Greece burns

Scorching hot weather set the conditions for Greece's wildfires—Europe's deadliest this century with scores killed—while record temperatures in the north of the continent have also sparked blazes causing widespread damage in recent days.

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Amazon looks to floating warehouses in the sky for drone deliveries

Amazon is looking to push its supply chain into the heavens as it goes full steam ahead on drone deliveries.

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New hope for rare disorder

Hereditary angioedema is a chronic disorder that can sometimes be life-threatening. Now, a new drug therapy has been successfully tested in an international study headed by the University Hospital Frankfurt.

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Tropical treetops are warming, putting sensitive species at risk

New research from FSU scientists show that tropical forest canopies are warming significantly faster than air temperatures. That could mean major consequences for overall forest health.

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Making thread in Bronze Age Britain

Splicing technique identified on 3,800-year-old Cambridgeshire textiles made from plant fibers.

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Researchers report unraveling the immune recognition of nucleic acid nanoparticles

An extensive experiment testing the immune effects of lab-designed nucleic acid nanoparticles found varying and specific responses from various immune cells, depending on each particle's shape and formulation, a finding that may encourage further study of the particles' therapeutic use. The researchers propose that they may have discovered an auxiliary system for managing immune response — a mole

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Mathematical analysis explains transpiration-driven sap flow in coniferous trees

The exact science of tree sap transport has puzzled plant physiologists for many years. Sap's migration throughout tree trunks and branches is linked heavily to transpiration, the movement and subsequent evaporation of moisture from plants. In an article publishing this week in the SIAM Journal of Applied Mathematics, Bebart M. Janbek and John M. Stockie present a multidimensional porous medium mo

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Public views of gene editing for babies depend on how it would be used

A new Pew Research Center survey finds a majority of Americans support the idea of using gene editing with the goal of delivering direct health benefits for babies. Yet, a majority also considers the use of gene editing to boost a baby's intelligence as something that takes technology 'too far.'

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India to probe whether Cambridge Analytica used Indian data

India will investigate whether personal data from Indian voters and Facebook users were compromised by political consultant Cambridge Analytica, a government minister said Thursday.

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Up Close And Personal with Sharks | Fin Frenzy

New technological advances have helped us get up close and personal with sharks, improving our understanding of their behavior and the world they live in. Stream Fin Frenzy on Discovery GO: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/fin-frenzy/ Stream Shark Week Episodes: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/shark-week/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://w

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Japan, home of the high-tech loo, hopes basic toilet can save lives

Japan may be famous for high-tech toilets, but one local firm is hoping a much more basic model can help solve deadly sanitation problems in developing countries.

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Henna losing its allure as Tunisia's 'red gold'

In and around the Tunisian coastal city of Gabes, henna has long been a key driver of the economy—so much so that the plant is known as "red gold".

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Sky profits jump amid Comcast-Fox takeover battle

Sky's annual net profits have jumped 17 percent, the pan-European television broadcaster said Thursday as US media giants Comcast and 21st Century Fox battle for control of the group.

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Nokia profit hit as clients wary of spending on new networks

Nokia says its second-quarter earnings slumped as clients were not willing yet to increase spending on the faster but more expensive new generation of mobile networks and are seeking price cuts.

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The Disaster Zone of Netflix’s Dark Tourist

The host of Dark Tourist , David Farrier, is likened in the final episode of the new Netflix travel series to a kind of budget Louis Theroux, which he considers a compliment. Like the legendary British documentarian, Farrier is lanky, awkward, frequently befuddled, and undeniably charming (he hails from New Zealand, and most recently co-directed the 2016 documentary Tickled ). His signature outfi

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‘Amazing Dragon’ Discovery in China Reshapes History of Dinosaurs’ Evolution

Fossilized remains of Lingwulong shenqi show that big herbivores with long necks reached East Asia and evolved earlier than scientists had thought.

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Most Americans Support Gene Editing for Babies to Treat Diseases, Poll Finds

A new poll looks at Americans' views on using gene-editing technology to alter unborn babies' DNA.

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'Mission: Impossible–Fallout": How Plausible Are All Those Gadgets, Anyway?

Facing a franchise known for futuristic gadgets, our mission was to consult experts to find out what’s achievable and what’s still, you know, impossible.

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The Abandoned Soviet Spas Inhabited by Georgian Refugees

In its heyday, the spa town of Tskaltubo drew more than 100,000 visitors each year. Today, Georgians displaced by the Abkhazian conflict call it home.

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Europe's energy giants reap benefits of oil price surge

Anglo-Dutch energy giant Royal Dutch Shell, French peer Total and Spain's Repsol on Thursday logged surging second-quarter net profits on the back of soaring oil prices.

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Deforestation of Guiana Shield will have impact across South America, scientists warn

Deforestation of the 'overlooked' Guiana rainforests, at the northern boundary of the Amazon rainforest, will have 'drastic impact' on the rainfall patterns that support ecosystems and livelihoods right across South America, scientists have warned in a new report.

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Mathematical analysis explains transpiration-driven sap flow in coniferous trees

The exact science of tree sap transport has puzzled plant physiologists for many years. Sap's migration throughout tree trunks and branches is linked heavily to transpiration, the movement and subsequent evaporation of moisture from plants. As carbon dioxide diffuses inward from the air to plant leaves, a vapor pressure deficit between the leaf interior and surrounding atmosphere causes evaporatio

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Traumatic brain injury: Discovery of two molecules could lead to new drug treatments

After 10 years of research, a Rutgers-led team of scientists has identified two molecules that protect nerve cells after a traumatic brain injury and could lead to new drug treatments. The molecules promote full recovery after traumatic brain injury (TBI) in mice, according to the study published online in Neurobiology of Disease.

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New possibilities for using ozonized erythrocyte mass explored by UNN scientists

Lobachevsky University (UNN) researchers focused their attention on ozone therapy as a medical technology that can be successfully applied in the field of physiotherapy of pathological conditions accompanied by tissue hypoxia.

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Removing malaria-carrying mosquitoes unlikely to affect ecosystems, says report

By combining studies on one species of malaria-carrying mosquito, researchers found that no other animals rely solely on them for food.

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Parents: Use caution when pushing your picky eater

Using coercion to get your kid to eat healthy foods doesn’t really have effect, good or bad, on their weight. But it can cause meal-time tension and damage the parent-child relationship, a new study suggests. Researchers set out to answer several questions: Should parents pressure kids to eat, and what are the consequences for kids’ weight and picky eating? Will the child learn to eat everything,

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4 Myths about Extroversion We're Guilty of Believing

submitted by /u/thedabarry [link] [comments]

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Time is running out in the tropics: Researchers warn of global biodiversity collapse

A global biodiversity collapse is imminent unless we take urgent, concerted action to reverse species loss in the tropics, according to a major scientific study.

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An insect-inspired drone deforms upon impact

An origami-like drone is flexible enough to absorb shocks without breaking before returning to its initial shape. This new type of drone, which was inspired by insect wings, draws on the advantages of both stiff and flexible structures.

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How to erase your embarrassing old Facebook and Twitter posts

DIY In one fell swoop. You might be careful about what you say on social media now, but we were all dumb teenagers once. Here’s how to delete all of your old, embarrassing Facebook and Twitter…

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Closed Captioning and Transcripts Now Available for Videos and Podcasts!

At the Dana Foundation, we strive to make credible and current information about the brain available to as many people as possible. As part of that effort, we have recently taken steps to make our materials accessible to people who are deaf or hard of hearing. The majority of our YouTube videos are now closed captioned, including our Neuroscience and Society Series , public talks organized by AAA

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Endangered pygmy elephant shot dead on Borneo

A pygmy elephant was shot dead on Borneo island after it destroyed villagers' crops, a Malaysian wildlife official said Thursday, the latest of the endangered creatures to be killed.

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Austrians to power steel industry entirely on clean hydrogen

Scientists are investigating alternative methods to produce the energy that is required for us to carry on living our lives, but in a way that doesn't burden the environment. Now, one group of scientists is getting ready to deliver on such efforts with the world's biggest pilot plant for the production of green hydrogen.

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Spotify reaches 83 million paying subscribers

Top streaming platform Spotify said Thursday that it has reached 83 million paying subscribers, marking steady growth even as the company still struggled to make a profit.

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The American Government’s Declining Investment in Children

American politics, especially in the Donald Trump era, increasingly resembles a slow-motion civil war between the nation’s past and its future. One of the best places to track the state of battle is the federal budget. Federal spending is steadily tilting toward the preponderantly white senior population and away from the increasingly diverse youth population. Put another way, precisely as the ra

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Barcelona taxis strike for 2nd day, tourists face delays

Tourists arriving in Barcelona are facing long lines and jam-packed buses and subways as the city's taxis went on strike for a second day.

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Comcast tops profit forecasts; cable TV subscriptions fall

Comcast is reporting a stronger-than-expected second-quarter profit even as it struggles to keep cable TV subscribers.

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Hurricane Harvey samples saddled with antibiotic-resistant genes

High levels of fecal bacteria as well as genes associated with antibiotic resistance were found in Houston floodwaters and sediment after Hurricane Harvey. The study showed that residents and remediation workers must be extra cautious when they encounter standing water in closed homes.

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Feel lightheaded when standing up? You may have a greater risk of dementia

People who feel faint, dizzy or lightheaded when standing up may be experiencing a sudden drop in blood pressure called orthostatic hypotension. Now a new study says middle-aged people who experience such a drop may have a greater risk of developing dementia or stroke decades later.

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NE Australian marine heatwave shakes up coral reef animal populations

Research describes upheaval among fish and invertebrate communities after a marine heatwave hit Australia's Great Barrier Reef and Coral Sea in early 2016. The study analyzed data collected across these areas by the Reef Life Survey (RLS) citizen science program. It identified important changes in reef-animal communities that may affect the resilience of coral reefs, potentially reducing the capac

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Soil bugs munch on plastics

Thin mulch films made of polyethylene are used in agriculture in numerous countries, where they cause extensive soil contamination. Researchers have now identified an alternative: films made of the polymer PBAT biodegrade in soils.

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New clues to origins of mysterious atmospheric waves in Antarctica

Scientists find a link between gravity waves in the upper and lower Antarctic atmosphere, helping create a clearer picture of global air circulation.

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Brain activity cautions against buying stocks

Despite long-term profit expectations, many people shy away from investing their money in supposedly riskier forms of investment. Why? Scientists have now developed a model that makes real-life stock buying behavior comprehensible for the first time. The researchers combined socioeconomic, psychological and neuroscientific data in an innovative way.

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Unisexual salamander evolution: A long, strange trip

The reproductive history of the unisexual, ladies-only salamander species is full of evolutionary surprises. In a new study, biologists have traced the animals' genetic history back 3.4 million years and found some head-scratching details — primarily that they seem to have gone for millions of years without any DNA contributions from male salamanders and still have managed to persist.

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A new milestone in laboratory grown human brain tissue

A cutting-edge laboratory technique that turns human stem cells into brain-like tissue now recapitulates human brain development more accurately than ever, according to a new study. The research demonstrates how to grow brain 'organoids' — self-organizing mini spheres that now contain all the major cell types found in the human cerebral cortex — in laboratory dishes.

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Team shatters theoretical limit on bio-hydrogen production

An engineered bacterium produced 46 percent more hydrogen per cell than a naturally occurring form of the same species. The research team's highest reported yield — 5.7 units of hydrogen for every unit of glucose fed to the bacterium — easily surpassed the longstanding theoretical limit of 4 units.

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Brain discovery could block aging's terrible toll on the mind

Aging vessels connecting the brain and the immune system play critical roles in both Alzheimer's disease and the decline in cognitive ability that comes with time, new research reveals. By improving the function of the lymphatic vessels, scientists have dramatically enhanced aged mice's ability to learn and improved their memories. The work may provide doctors an entirely new path to treat or prev

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IGC scientists discover a tap that controls the flow of pro-inflammatory molecules

One of the major therapeutic targets for inflammatory diseases is TNF. However, excess levels of TNF cause side effects and can lead to diseases. In a study published in eLIFE journal, a research team from Gulbenkian Institute of Science (IGC, Portugal) discovered a new protein, called iTAP, that controls the levels of TNF in circulation by regulating its release from immune cells. These findings

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A spin trio for strong coupling

To make qubits for quantum computers less susceptible to noise, the spin of an electron or some other particle is preferentially used. Researchers at ETH Zurich have now developed a method that makes it possible to couple such a spin qubit strongly to microwave photons.

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Researchers design a nano-carrier to release drugs into damaged cells

A team headed by Manuel Serrano at IRB Barcelona has designed a drug encapsulation system that selectively targets senescent cells.The study paves the way for therapeutic approaches to eliminate senescent cells in many diseases, such as pulmonary fibrosis and cancer.

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Riding an e-bike promotes fitness and health — already after four weeks

The role of the e-bike in promoting health and fitness is comparable to that of a conventional bicycle. This was reported by researchers of the University of Basel in the Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine. In particular, overweight and untrained individuals can benefit from riding an e-bike.

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Redefining 'small-scale' fishing may help support English fisheries

Researchers at the University of York are calling for a re-evaluation of the definition of 'small-scale' fishing vessels, following a study that shows the impact of these vessels are underestimated.

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Adult fish 'predict' availability of food for their young

A recently published study led by University of Hawai'i (UH) at Mānoa oceanographer Anna Neuheimer, revealed that fish parents 'predict' a beneficial environment for their offspring with populations 'adjusting' spawning time so that the young can meet their prey.

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Computer simulation of receptors reveals a new ligand-binding site

Using a computer simulation of an important receptor, EPFL scientists have discovered a novel binding site for natural ligands and drugs. The new site might be present on other receptors and can be exploited in novel treatments for multiple diseases.

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Bolivian water frog in lovelorn race against clock

Romeo the water frog, a social media star whose desperate need to mate has not been met, is now staring down extinction as stoically as an amphibian can.

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Babies Died in a Drug-Trial Tragedy. Why Were Their Mothers Given Viagra?

Earlier this week, a study came to a surprising and heartbreaking halt. A Dutch drug triallooking into the effects of sildenafil — the generic version of Viagra — on a rare but serious fetal-development condition was cut short after 11 infants died.

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Space experts worry US won't make it to Mars by 2030s

The United States has vowed to send the first humans to Mars by the 2030s, but space experts and lawmakers on Wednesday expressed concern that poor planning and lack of funds will delay those plans.

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Airbus profits halved but hopes to meet delivery target

European air giant Airbus said Thursday its half-year profits plunged, as the company is hit by delays in the delivery of its A320neo engines, but confirmed its objective to provide 800 aircraft this year despite "risks".

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Facebook hammered as user growth cools

Facebook shares took a hit Wednesday after the world's biggest social network reported weaker-than-expected user growth in the first full quarter since being rocked by a series of scandals on data privacy.

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How to grow crops on Mars if we are to live on the red planet

Preparations are already underway for missions that will land humans on Mars in a decade or so. But what would people eat if these missions eventually lead to the permanent colonisation of the red planet?

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Harvey floodwater in houses teems with E. coli

The first results of extensive water sampling in Houston after Hurricane Harvey caused epic flooding show widespread contamination by E. coli, report researchers. The microbial survey showed high levels of E. coli , a fecal indicator organism, trapped in homes that still contained stagnant water weeks after the storm, as well as high levels of key genes that indicate antibiotic resistance. “If yo

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The Primum non nocere principle in psychotherapy: A science based approach

Is the principle of primum non nocere , to do no harm, applied by psychotherapists?

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Technique to fabricate ceramic films for OPV inter-layers

As environmental and energy issues have become increasingly aggravated in recent years, photovoltaic (PV) cells are drawing attention as a new energy source. However, since the cost of silicon PV cells is still high, it's important to reduce the cost of PV cells. On the other hand, organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells using organic compounds have several advantages: they are lightweight, flexible, and

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GRAFIK Sådan forhindrer medicin HIV-virussen i at sprede sig

Ny undersøgelse viser, at moderne medicin helt fjerner risikoen for smitte, hvis den HIV-syge er i behandling. Se her hvordan medicinen virker.

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We asked catfish why they trick people online—it's not about money

If you have engaged with internet culture at all in recent years, you have probably come across the term "catfish", first coined in the 2010 documentary of the same name.

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Lynchings of the past affect health today

Counties with higher rates of lynching between 1877 and 1950 showed higher mortality rates between 2010 and 2014. A new study by researchers from the University of South Carolina in the US, led by Janice Probst and Saundra Glover, looks into the relationship between past occurrence of lynching — unpunished, racially motivated murder — and recent death rates.

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Solution to medical mystery may help some children avoid bone marrow transplantation

Researchers have helped solve a decades-old mystery about which mutations are responsible for an inherited bone marrow disorder. The answer may allow some children to avoid the risk and expense of bone marrow transplantation, a common treatment for leukemia and bone marrow disorders. Investigators at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital and UCSF, led the study, which appears today in the scientif

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UBC researcher develops tool to reduce slavery in seafood supply chains

A new screening tool developed at the University of British Columbia is giving seafood companies the ability to pinpoint the highest risks of forced labour in their supply chain.

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UCalgary researchers discover why sepsis from a staph infection causes organ failure

Scientists have known for some time that one of the reasons a staph infection is so deadly is that the bacteria send out a toxin, known as Alpha Toxin (AT), which quickly worsens sepsis. University of Calgary scientists at the Cumming School of Medicine's Snyder Institute for Chronic Diseases have discovered the most important target of the toxin and how to neutralize the danger.

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Next generation ALS drug silences inherited form of the disease in animal models

NIH-funded researchers delayed signs of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) in rodents by injecting them with a second-generation drug designed to silence the gene, superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1). The results suggest the newer version of the drug may be effective at treating an inherited form of the disease caused by mutations in SOD1.

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30 Years of Sharks | Shark Week's The Daily Bite

On today's episode of The Daily Bite, find out what Yamaneika Saunders thinks of "Sharkwrecked". Also, ever wonder who is best in class in the world of sharks? We breakdown who's the most athletic to the most dog like. Stream The Daily Bite on Discovery GO: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/the-daily-bite/ Stream Shark Week Episodes: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/shark-week/ Subscribe to Di

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Archeological plant remains point to southwest Amazonia as crop domestication center

The remains of domesticated crop plants at an archaeological site in southwest Amazonia supports the idea that this was an important region in the early history of crop cultivation, according to a new study.

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Leggy lizards don't survive the storm

Biologists have published a first-of-its-kind look at the physical characteristics of lizards that seem to make the difference between life and death in a hurricane.

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Tickborne diseases are likely to increase, say NIAID officials

The incidence of tickborne infections in the United States has risen significantly within the past decade. It is imperative, therefore, that public health officials and scientists build a robust understanding of pathogenesis, design improved diagnostics, and develop preventive vaccines, according to experts.

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Yellowstone super-volcano has a different history than previously thought

The long-dormant Yellowstone super-volcano in the American West has a different history than previously thought, according to a new study.

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Soundwave-surfing droplets leave no traces

Engineers have developed a way to manipulate, split and mix droplets of biological fluids by having them surf on acoustic waves in oil. The technology could form the basis of a small-scale, programmable, rewritable biomedical chip that is completely reusable for disparate purposes from on-site diagnostics to laboratory-based research.

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Mars Express detects liquid water hidden under planet’s south pole

Radar data collected by ESA's Mars Express point to a pond of liquid water buried under layers of ice and dust in the south polar region of Mars.

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Scientists unlock the properties of new 2D material

A new two-dimensional material has become a reality, thanks to scientists. The research succeeded in the first experimental realization and structural investigation of single-layer vanadium disulphide (VS2).

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Treatments for cancer and sickle cell disease deplete germ cells in young boys

Scientists have discovered that some treatments for cancer and sickle cell disease can destroy the germ cells that go on to develop into sperm in the testes of young boys. In some pre-pubescent boys, the treatment for sickle cell disease results in complete destruction of all their germ cells, which are called spermatogonia.

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Rice with fewer stomata requires less water and is better suited for climate change

A new study finds that engineered rice lines with low stomatal density used just 60 percent of the normal amount of water and were able to survive drought and high temperatures for longer than unaltered plants.

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Living systematic review describes the epidemiology of sexual transmission of Zika virus

Zika virus (ZIKV) may be sexually transmissible for a shorter period than previously estimated, according to a new systematic review.

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High glucose spikes are common in 'healthy' people

It is well known that glucose levels above or below certain thresholds can cause damage to organs; however, a new study reveals that 'normal' blood glucose levels are often not normal at all — they stray much farther from the healthy ranges than we assumed.

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A huge liquid water lake beneath the southern pole of Mars

We now know that there is permanent liquid water on Mars, according to a paper published today in the journal Science.

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Technology extends shelf life of dairy exports

A suite of drying technology platforms developed by researchers at Monash University could help extend the shelf life of Australia's powdered dairy exports – including infant formula – while meeting stringent safety and quality benchmarks.

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Highly magnified gravitationally lensed red quasar detected by astronomers

Astronomers have discovered a highly magnified, gravitationally lensed quasi-stellar object (QSO). The newly found quasar, designated W2M J104222.11+164115.3, is dust-reddened, and exhibits a significant flux anomaly. The finding is reported in a paper published July 14 on the arXiv pre-print server.

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Cannabis-based medicines get green light as UK eases rules

Relaxation of laws means doctors will be able to prescribe medicinal cannabis Doctors in the UK will be able to prescribe cannabis-derived medicine after the government announced a relaxation of laws governing access to the substance. Thousands of people with drug-resistant conditions will potentially be able to use cannabis-derived medicinal products for treatment after the home secretary, Sajid

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Bystanders in cyberbullying

Your child is in elementary school and is begging you to buy them a cell phone, an iPod and iPad. Anything, as long as they can communicate with their friends, either by texting or through social media. As a parent, you're worried about cyberbullying. Indeed, up to 30% of children and adolescents admit to cyberbullying others, while 25% of students report being victimized on electronic platforms.

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Presto Nomad Review: A Portable Slow-Cooker With Serious Smarts

Presto rethinks the staid slow-cooker with a fun and portable design.

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Why Do You Feel Lighter at the Top of a Ferris Wheel?

It's because of something called apparent weight, and you can calculate it for yourself.

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Among golden-crowned sparrows, a false crown only fools strangers

Scientists studying winter flocks of golden-crowned sparrows have discovered surprisingly complex social behavior in these small migratory birds. A new study reveals that the sparrows have different ways to assess dominance status depending on whether the interaction is with a familiar bird or a stranger.

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Landbruget om GMO-dom: Ingen vej uden om Crispr-redigeret mad

Manglende kontrolsystemer vil gøre det umuligt at regulere gensaksen Crispr/cas9 inden for planteforædling, uanset hvad EU kræver, mener Landbrug & Fødevarer.

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A new quasiparticle lurks in semiconductors

Strange entities called collexons hint at undiscovered physics among interacting subatomic particles in a semiconductor.

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Watch This Giant Sea Cucumber Expel a Spiraling Poop Log

Footage from the ocean bottom captured activity from another type of bottom — the rear end of a sea cucumber.

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High-precision on-site analysis of precious metals in metallurgical waste spills

Researchers from Kanazawa University report in Sensors and Actuators B: Chemical the application of a portable and efficient method for the on-site analysis of wastewaters for the quantitative analysis of their gold, platinum and palladium content.

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Technique to easily fabricate ceramic films used as OPV inter-layers developed

Researchers developed a technique for coating Zinc related oxide (ZnOx, ZnOHx) simply by depositing the films in a solution process using the Metal Organic Decomposition method at ambient temperature and pressure without heating. They also demonstrated that their thin films produced by this technique were useful as buffer layers for OPV cells and that the films achieved a power conversion efficien

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And then there was (more) light: Researchers boost performance quality of perovskites

In a paper published online this spring in the journal Nature Photonics, scientists at the University of Washington report that a prototype semiconductor thin-film has performed even better than today's best solar cell materials at emitting light.

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Nature, not just industry, puts toxic chromium into water

Natural sources of the toxic form of chromium appear in wells that provide drinking water to a large population in California, research shows. When Erin Brockovich sued a major utility company in the 1990s for contaminating drinking water with hexavalent chromium, a toxic and carcinogenic metal, national attention turned to California. Now researchers have determined that natural sources of the e

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Star spotted speeding near black hole at centre of Milky Way

Chile’s Very Large Telescope tracks S2 star as it reaches mind-boggling speeds by supermassive black hole Astronomers have observed a star speeding close to the massive black hole at the centre of the Milky Way for the first time. The observations, made using the Very Large Telescope in Chile, tracked a star called S2 as it passed through the extreme gravitational field at the heart of our galaxy

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GRAVITY confirms predictions of general relativity near the galactic centre's massive black hole

Observations made with the Very Large Telescope (VLT) of the European Southern Observatory (ESO) have, for the first time, detected the effects of general relativity predicted by Einstein, in the movement of a star passing into the intense gravitational field of Sagittarius A*, a massive black hole at the centre of the Milky Way. These results were obtained by the GRAVITY consortium, led by the Ma

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Local winds play key role in some megafires

Although drought and overgrown forests are often blamed for major fires in the western United States, new research using unique NASA before-and-after data from a megafire site indicates that highly localized winds sometimes play a much larger role—creating large, destructive fires even when regional winds are weak.

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Adult fish 'predict' availability of food for their young

In seasonal environments, timing is everything: Ecosystem dynamics are controlled by how well predators can match their prey in space and time. A recently published study, led by University of Hawai'i at Mānoa oceanographer Anna Neuheimer, revealed that fish parents "predict" a beneficial environment for their offspring with populations "adjusting" spawning time so that the young can meet their pr

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How crab shells and trees could keep food fresher

A flexible material made from multiple layers of chitin from crab shells and cellulose from trees could one day replace plastic packaging film. “The main benchmark that we compare it to is PET, or polyethylene terephthalate, one of the most common petroleum-based materials in the transparent packaging you see in vending machines and soft drink bottles,” says J. Carson Meredith, a professor in Geo

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A spin trio for strong coupling

To make qubits for quantum computers less susceptible to noise, the spin of an electron or some other particle is preferentially used. Researchers at ETH Zurich have now developed a method that makes it possible to couple such a spin qubit strongly to microwave photons.

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Evidence that feral cats are preying on the critically endangered Leadbeater's possum

New evidence has raised concerns about the possibility of feral cats preying upon the critically endangered Leadbeater's possum, with a cat detected on cameras at two nest boxes used by the possums.

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Why women stay behind the scenes at work

While research has shown that visibility in the workplace is critical for professional advancement, the reality is that for som