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Nyheder2018juli27

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Our 14,400-Year-Old Relationship with Bread

New evidence from Jordan is challenging what we thought we knew about hunter–gatherer diets — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

 

2018's blood moon seen around the world – in pictures

The world’s press photographers have fun taking pictures of the lunar eclipse Space stations, dark rituals and chorizo: the blood moon on social media Continue reading…

22h

 

Kvinder er slet ikke bygget til at få menstruation hver måned

Oprindelige folkeslag har langt færre menstruationer, fordi de er gravide eller ammer det meste af deres liv – og det nedsætter risikoen for kræft, viser forskning.

5h

 

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E-cigarettes and tobacco product use linked to increased risk of oral cancer

At the 96th General Session of the International Association for Dental Research (IADR), held in conjunction with the IADR Pan European Regional (PER) Congress, Benjamin Chaffee, University of California, San Francisco, USA gave a poster presentation 'Nicotine and Carcinogen Exposure by Tobacco Product Type and Dual-Use.'

26min

Cooking oil coating prevents bacteria from growing on food processing equipment, study suggests

Many foods produced on an industrial scale include raw ingredients mixed together in enormous stainless steel machines that can be difficult to clean. A research team proposes a simple new solution: trapping a thin layer of cooking oil at the metal surface to fill in microscopic scrapes, cracks and fissures and create a barrier to bacterial attachment. This solution resulted in a 1,000x reduction

1h

Typhoon slams into Japan, approaches disaster-hit regions

A powerful typhoon slammed into central Japan early Sunday, prompting local authorities to issue evacuation orders, with western areas recently devastated by floods and landslides in the storm's crosshairs.

1h

UK lawmakers recommend tougher rules on Facebook

The U.K. government should increase oversight of social media like Facebook and election campaigns to protect democracy in the digital age, a parliamentary committee has recommended in a scathing report on fake news, data misuse and interference by Russia.

1h

Experts say urban sprawl, climate change hike wildfire risk

A fire that started in a rural community in Northern California underscored a new reality in the state when days later it suddenly roared through neighborhoods on the edge of the city of Redding: Urban areas are increasingly vulnerable to wildfires.

1h

David Bohm, Quantum Mechanics and Enlightenment

The visionary physicist, whose ideas remain influential, sought spiritual as well as scientific illumination — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

Saliva diagnostics and salivaomics: Will saliva translate to a real diagnostic tool?

At the 96th General Session of the International Association for Dental Research (IADR), held in conjunction with the IADR Pan European Regional (PER) Congress, David Wong, University of California, Los Angeles, USA presented his research 'Saliva Diagnostics and Salivaomics' as part of the symposium 'Will Saliva Translate to a Real Diagnostic Tool?' on Saturday, July 28, 2018.

3h

Longest Lunar Eclipse of the Century Dazzles Skywatchers

The 21st century's longest total lunar eclipse entranced skywatchers around the globe today (July 27).

4h

MicroRNA panel can identify malignancy in indeterminate thyroid nodules

A panel of 19 microRNAs identified using next-generation sequencing could categorize indeterminate thyroid nodule samples into malignant and benign.

5h

Public views of gene editing for babies depend on how it would be used

A new survey finds a majority of Americans support the idea of using gene editing with the goal of delivering direct health benefits for babies. Yet, a majority also considers the use of gene editing to boost a baby's intelligence as something that takes technology 'too far.'

5h

Technique to easily fabricate ceramic films used as OPV inter-layers developed

Researchers developed a technique for coating Zinc related oxide (ZnOx, ZnOHx) simply by depositing the films in a solution process using the Metal Organic Decomposition method at ambient temperature and pressure without heating. They also demonstrated that their thin films produced by this technique were useful as buffer layers for OPV cells and that the films achieved a power conversion efficien

5h

New algorithm could help find new physics

Scientists have developed an algorithm that could provide meaningful answers to condensed matter physicists in their searches for novel and emergent properties in materials.

5h

Aging overweight scuba divers at risk of underwater heart attack

Older, overweight scuba divers are being urged to shed pounds to avoid an underwater heart attack.

5h

Scientists discover rare dolphin hybrid near Hawaii

Scientists have discovered a rare hybrid between a melon-headed whale and a rough-toothed dolphin in waters near Kauai, Hawaii. Read More

5h

Dinosaurs in the Wild: An Inside View

Mix up-to-date science with cutting-edge robotics, CG, time travel and Cretaceous dinosaurs, and combine them to create an amazing visitor attraction. The result? Welcome… to Dinosaurs in the… — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

Thousands flee new California blaze, governor asks aid

Thousands of people in Southern California had fled a deliberately set blaze southeast of Los Angeles by Saturday morning, after the state's governor requested federal aid to help battle a deadly fire elsewhere.

5h

Lebanon sinks old tanks to create underwater dive 'park'

Lebanese environmentalists on Saturday sank 10 old tanks and armoured vehicles to the bottom of the Mediterranean Sea in a novel attempt to attract divers and create new habitats for marine life.

6h

Home of Islanders, Nets abandoning plastic drinking straws

An arena where the NBA's Brooklyn Nets and the NHL's New York Islanders play is the latest place making plastic straws a thing of the past.

6h

Madrid taxis join Barcelona strike against Uber

Taxi drivers in Madrid went on strike Saturday in solidarity with Barcelona cabbies protesting against "unfair competition" from Uber and Cabify.

6h

How stimulant treatments for ADHD work

Stimulant medications are an effective treatment for Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). In the classroom, parents and teachers say that medications like methylphenidate (MPH) can reduce symptoms and improve behavior. Although stimulants have been in use for decades to treat ADHD in school-aged children, just how they work hasn't been clear. But the results of a new study are filling

6h

Genetic basis of heart rhythms explored in large population study

New information about the biology behind the heart's electrical activity has been revealed in a major genome study with the largest sample size ever of a project of this type. These molecular mechanisms offer insights into cardiac electrical diseases and could suggest avenues of drug research for preventing and treating heart rhythm or conduction problems. Genes in 44 loci identified as associated

6h

Can pollution alter wildlife behavior?

Scientists have developed new scientific tests to better understand the effects of pollution on wildlife behavior.

6h

Hollow trees host massive moth slumber parties

Moths are generally loners. So, when a lepidopterist spotted a dozen glossy black Idia moths inside a hollow tree, he made a mental note. When their numbers jumped to more than 400, he was astounded.

6h

Engineers use Tiki torches in study of soot, diesel filters

Chemical engineers are using the summer staple in testing methods to improve efficiency of diesel engines.

6h

Optical neural network demo

Researchers have made a silicon chip that distributes optical signals precisely across a miniature brain-like grid, showcasing a potential new design for neural networks.

6h

Checking phones in lectures can cost students half a grade in exams

Students perform less well in end-of-term exams if they are allowed access to an electronic device, such as a phone or tablet, for non-academic purposes in lectures, a new study.

6h

Ability to identify genuine laughter transcends culture

People across cultures are largely able to tell the difference between a fake laugh and a real one, according to a new study. Across all societies, listeners were able to tell better than chance whether a laugh was 'real' or 'fake' with some variation. For example, Samoan listeners only got the right answer 56 percent of the time whereas Japanese listeners were correct 69 percent of the time.

6h

Leopard geckos can make new brain cells

Researchers have discovered the type of stem cell allowing geckos to create new brain cells. This finding provides evidence that lizards may also be able to regenerate parts of the brain after injury.

6h

Cost of flood losses in Maritimes could increase by up to 300 percent

The financial costs of flooding in Canada's maritime region could spike by 300 percent by the end of the century if steps are not taken to address the impacts of climate change.

6h

Extinct vegetarian cave bear diet mystery unravelled

Until now, very little is known about the dietary evolution of the cave bear and how it became a vegetarian, as the fossils of the direct ancestor, the Deninger's bear (Ursus deningeri), are extremely scarce.

6h

Ocean acidification is having major impact on marine life

Carbon dioxide emissions are killing off coral reefs and kelp forests as heat waves and ocean acidification damage marine ecosystems, scientists have warned.

6h

Fat production and burning are synchronized in livers of mice with obesity

Mice fed a fattening diet develop new liver circadian rhythms that impact the way fat is accumulated and simultaneously burned. The team found that as liver fat production increases, surprisingly, so does the body's ability to burn fat. These opposing physiological processes reach their peak activity each day around 5 p.m., illustrating an unexpected connection between overeating, circadian rhythm

6h

To keep more carbon on the ground, halting farmland expansion is key

The conversion of forests to farmland is recognized as a major contributor to rising levels of greenhouse gases. And yet it hasn't been clear how to best minimize the loss of sequestered carbon into the atmosphere. Researchers now say that, based on their extensive studies of agricultural operations on three continents, the best course in all cases is to limit the conversion of natural habitat to

6h

Changes to sperm's small RNA in the epididymis may help ensure mouse embryos implant

This week, Louise Brown, the first person born after conception by in vitro fertilization (IVF), celebrates her 40th birthday. Thanks to assisted reproductive technologies like IVF and intracytoplasmic sperm injection and to new techniques developed in laboratory animals, researchers are able to uncover new details about the processes of fertilization and reproduction in mammals. This research is

6h

Fertilizer destroys plant microbiome's ability to protect against disease

Despite enthusiasm for spraying probiotics on crops to ensure healthy microbiomes, little is known about what a healthy above-ground biome, or phyllosphere, looks like. Recent experiments show that both natural microbiomes and synthetic biomes constructed from normal populations are protective against pathogens, though sometimes low doses work better than high doses. Surprisingly, fertilizing the

6h

Evolution of efflux pumps could yield important insights in fighting antibiotic resistance

Different types of efflux pump proteins might have evolved independently, instead of divergently as previously thought. This could yield insights in mediating antibiotic resistance.

6h

Space Photos of the Week: A Stormy Summer on Mars

Planet-encircling dust storms are shrouding skies and imperiling a NASA rover.

6h

Electricity sparks neuronal diversity during brain development

To understand how neuronal circuits emerge during development, researchers investigated what enables neuronal stem cells to generate successive subtypes of neurons as the embryo grows. By measuring the electrical activity, they found that membrane voltage values increase as the embryo develops and new neurons are being created. To test the role of this electrical charge, neuroscientists experiment

7h

Can scientists leverage mysterious mossy cells for brain disease treatments?

Scientists showed that 'mossy cells' in the hippocampus regulate local stem cells to control their production of new neurons, which is important for normal learning and memory, stress response, and mood regulation. Such neurogenesis in the adult brain is disrupted in many common conditions including Alzheimer's disease, depression, anxiety, schizophrenia, traumatic brain injury, and some forms of

7h

Next generation ALS drug silences inherited form of the disease in animal models

Researchers delayed signs of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) in rodents by injecting them with a second-generation drug designed to silence the gene, superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1). The results suggest the newer version of the drug may be effective at treating an inherited form of the disease caused by mutations in SOD1.

7h

And then there was (more) light: Researchers boost performance quality of perovskites

Scientists report that a prototype semiconductor thin-film has performed even better than today's best solar cell materials at emitting light.

7h

Tool to reduce slavery in seafood supply chains

A new screening tool is giving seafood companies the ability to pinpoint the highest risks of forced labour in their supply chain.

7h

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Europe may thrive on renewable energy despite unpredictable weather

Researchers have shown how long-term weather patterns affect wind and solar renewable energy technologies across Europe. The work suggests that despite the unpredictable nature of wind and solar energy, the European power system can comfortably generate at least 35 percent of its electricity using these renewables alone without major impacts on prices or system stability.

7h

Why men say they've had more lifetime sexual partners than women

The disparity between the number of sexual partners reported by men and women can largely be explained by a tendency among men to report extreme numbers of partners, and to estimate rather than count their lifetime total, a new study finds.

7h

New arthritis severity gene identified

The finding could lead to targeted therapies for chronic conditions.

7h

Four weeks of riding an e-bike promotes fitness and health

The role of the e-bike in promoting health and fitness is comparable to that of a conventional bicycle. In particular, overweight and untrained individuals can benefit from riding an e-bike.

7h

New hope for rare disorder

Hereditary angioedema is a chronic disorder that can sometimes be life-threatening. Now, a new drug therapy has been successfully tested in an international study.

7h

First ever study of serious case reviews of sudden unexpected infant deaths conducted

For the first time in England a study has been conducted of official investigations of unexpected infant deaths. The researchers aimed to develop a detailed understanding of the circumstances of sudden unexpected death in infancy (SUDI) cases subject to serious case review.

7h

New virtual reality experience delivers extremely high quality imagery

Scientists have unveiled a new virtual reality (VR) immersive experience based on a novel system that captures and renders high-quality, realistic images from the real world using light fields.

7h

Tweets prove to be reliable indicator of air quality conditions during wildfires

Whether it is caused by wildfire or prescribed fire, smoke can have serious health ramifications. Scientists evaluated 39,000 tweets originating in California during the state's 2015 wildfire season to learn whether what people tweet can be used to predict air quality in areas affected by fire.

7h

Engineers track neural activity, muscle movement in ageless aquatic creatures

Scientists developed microfluidics platforms to study the nervous system of the hydra, a squid-like creature with remarkable regenerative abilities.

7h

New method to detect nucleation

Scientists studying nucleation often use microscopic droplets as miniature experiments that can run quickly, in parallel, and in a small space. However, these experiments require high-resolution images, limiting the number of droplet images that can be simultaneously processed. Researchers recently overcame this challenge by focusing their measurements on the contrast between droplets and their su

7h

Theorists find mechanism behind nearly pure nanotubes from the unusual catalyst

Scientists decode the unusual growth characteristic of carbon nanotubes that start out as one chirality but switch to another, resulting in nearly homogenous batches of single-walled nanotubes.

7h

Molecules from breast milk and seaweed suggest strategies for controlling norovirus

New research suggests that it may be easier than anticipated to find a compound that could be used as a food supplement to stop the spread of norovirus in children's hospitals.

7h

Aging can make it more difficult to swallow

As adults age, they all experience a natural loss of muscle mass and function. A new study finds that as the loss of muscle and function in the throat occurs it becomes more difficult for efficient constriction to occur while swallowing — which leads to an increased chance of food and liquids being left over in the throat.

7h

Nano-carrier releases drugs into damaged cells

Scientists have designed a drug encapsulation system that selectively targets senescent cells. The study paves the way for therapeutic approaches to eliminate senescent cells in many diseases, such as pulmonary fibrosis and cancer.

7h

Inside the U.S. Military’s Secret Nuclear Defense Plans

From hidden fallout shelters to remote missile sites to microwave communication towers, the United States spent the Cold War preparing for doomsday.

7h

The Jurassic's Big 5

If you could travel back to the time of the Morrison Formation, these are the dinosaurs you'd see — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

'Nudging' doctors to prescribe cholesterol-lowering statins triples prescription rates

Pairing an online patient dashboard with 'nudges' to doctors tripled statin prescribing rates in a clinical trial. The study used two nudges, active choice framing to prompt physicians to make a decision on prescriptions, and peer comparison feedback which provided physicians with information on their performance relative to other physicians.

8h

Neurodegenerative disease found in monkeys

Scientists have discovered a naturally occurring disease in monkeys that mimics a deadly childhood neurodegenerative disorder in people — a finding that holds promise for developing new gene therapies to treat Batten disease. Scientists confirmed through genetic analysis that a small population of Japanese macaque monkeys carry a mutation in the CLN7 gene that causes one form of the disease. It's

8h

Diabetes drugs act as powerful curb for immune cells in controlling inflammation

A common class of drugs used to treat diabetes has been found to exert a powerful check on macrophages by controlling the metabolic fuel they use to generate energy. Keeping macrophages from going overboard on the job may inhibit the onset of obesity and diabetes following tissue inflammation.

8h

Researchers are first to sequence rare bacteria that causes rampant tooth decay

Little is know about the bacteria Streptococcus sobrinus, which accelerates tooth decay in some people. This will soon change because a team of researchers has now successfully sequenced the complete genomes of three strains of S. sobrinus.

8h

Artificial intelligence can predict your personality … simply by tracking your eyes

It's often been said that the eyes are the window to the soul, revealing what we think and how we feel. Now, new research reveals that your eyes may also be an indicator of your personality type, simply by the way they move.

8h

Agricultural and urban habitat drive long-term bird population changes

Land use changes are a major driver of species declines, but in addition to the habitat to which they're best adapted, many bird species use 'alternative' habitats such as urban and agricultural land. A new study documents a century of land use change in Illinois and shows that species' long-term fate can depend on the availability and suitability of these alternative habitats.

8h

How to make sure no one is spying on your computer

DIY Keep your digital life private. When spyware sneaks onto your system, it can secretly log everything you do on your computer. Here's how to spot and remove this type of software.

8h

New geometric shape used by nature to pack cells efficiently

A multinational team of scientists have uncovered a previously undescribed shape — they call the 'scutoid' — adopted by epithelial cells during embryonic development that enables the cells to minimize energy use and maximize packing stability.

8h

Cannabis does not improve breathlessness during exercise in patients with advanced COPD

Inhaled vaporized cannabis does not appear to improve or worsen exercise performance and activity-related breathlessness in patients with advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), according to a randomized controlled trial.

8h

Deglacial changes in western Atlantic Ocean circulation

A new study carried out by an international team of researchers, using the chemistry of ocean sediments has highlighted a widespread picture of Atlantic circulation changes associated with rapid climate change in the past.

8h

Making love can make men sad too

A world-first study concludes men can and do suffer from postcoital dysphoria (PCD) which results in feelings of sadness, tearfulness or irritability following sex. While the condition had been recognized in women, no studies had previously identified the phenomenon among males.

8h

X-ray technology reveals never-before-seen matter around black hole

Scientists have clarified how gravity affects the shape of matter near the black hole in binary system Cygnus X-1. Their findings may help scientists further understand the physics of strong gravity and the evolution of black holes and galaxies.

8h

Medical errors in the emergency room: Understanding why

Medical errors are estimated to cause 250,000 deaths per year in the US. Previously, research on admitted patients suggested that errors are due to the way doctors process the data they have about patients — in other words, doctors have the right information, but might not act on it in the best way.

8h

Regenerative medicine: Cell conversion factors predicted

Thanks to a newly developed computational method, researchers can accurately predict how one subpopulation of cells can be converted into another.

8h

Dense breast notification and insurance legislation analysis

Increased awareness of breast tissue density masking cancer and thus decreasing the diagnostic sensitivity of mammography has brought about relevant state-level policies. This new study examines which characteristics of breast density state-level policies were associated with increased use of downstream breast ultrasound for enhancing earlier detection of breast cancer.

8h

Airbus' smilende hvidhval i luften for første gang

Airbus-flyet Beluga XL, der skal fragte store flydele rundt mellem fabrikkerne i Europa, har været på sin første flyvetur.

8h

Researchers discover chemical reaction that uses a surprising molecule

Researchers report they have discovered a chemical reaction that might someday be used to process petroleum into useful compounds.

8h

A calmer horse is just a sniff away

Research shows the calming benefits of lavender aromatherapy for horses.

8h

“Hvis vi ikke får et barn, skal jeg have 10 gravhunde”

Marina og Jakob Staun er "uforklarligt barnløse". De er i gang med reagensglasbehandling, men især Marina frygter, at det aldrig kommer til at lykkes.

8h

Russian Hackers, a Bluetooth Flaw, and More Security News This Week

A Google security key, Russian hackers, and more of the week's top security news.

8h

'The Polity' Is Libertarian Space Opera Done Right

Sci-fi writer Neal Asher's series is a thrill-ride of grotesque aliens, badass hardware, rogue AIs, and deadly secret agents.

8h

The Mysterious Return of Ozone-Depleting CFCs

CFCs, the harmful ozone-depleting chemicals banned back in the 1980s, are experiencing a mysterious comeback — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9h

Parker Posey — I See a Dachshund in You — Think Again – a Big Think Podcast #158

On hallucinating a teensy Virgin Mary in a water fountain, our weird relationship to fame, her stint as an elf-hunting camp counselor, and more in what feels like a 4 am college conversation with the inimitable Parker Posey. Read More

9h

Are These Corals Feeding, Or Is This an Underwater Dance Party?

Just need to add some music and we've got a party.

9h

Shark Fin Soap | Shark Week's The Daily Bite

We go behind the scenes at Lush during our Conservation Spotlight and curate the ultimate Shark Week playlist. Stream The Daily Bite on Discovery GO: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/the-daily-bite/ Stream Shark Week Episodes: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/shark-week/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery https://ww

9h

23andMe Is Sharing Genetic Data with Drug Giant

The genetics testing company and GlaxoSmithKline are using 5 million people’s data to develop medical treatments — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9h

The Best of the Physics arXiv (week ending July 28, 2018)

This week’s most thought-provoking papers from the Physics arXiv.

9h

Why Do Some of Us Shiver When We Pee?

Is there a purpose to pee shivers, or are they simply a biological glitch?

9h

The Family Weekly: Are Parents Responsible for Their Children’s Choices?

This Week in Family A historic number of women are running for office in this fall’s midterm elections, and the moms among them are promoting their motherhood as a strength, reports Annika Neklason, an assistant editor at The Atlantic. Women in politics have long struggled against the perception that being a mom stands in the way of a successful career, but it says something about this particular

10h

Cambodia Eviscerates Its Free Press—And the Whole Region Suffers

PHNOM PENH , Cambodia — It is the final stretch of campaign season in Cambodia. The dark-blue posters for Prime Minister Hun Sen and his Cambodian People’s Party are ubiquitous, seen from the sides of buildings in Phnom Penh to the billboards along the main roads in the Cambodian countryside. Yet somehow it still doesn’t feel like a parliamentary election is happening on Sunday in this country of

10h

American Farmers Are Still Worried About Trump's Trade War

When the Trump administration announced on Tuesday that it’s setting aside $12 billion in aid for farmers affected by the international trade war, the underlying political motivation seemed obvious: It was a move aimed at shoring up support in the white farming towns that had overwhelmingly voted for Trump. The president was scheduled to speak in Iowa two days after the announcement, and reports

10h

Can science save Australia’s quoll from a deadly diet?

Targeted genetics will help a threatened species spurn a poisonous toad meal Australia’s northern quoll, one of the world’s rarest carnivores, has developed a feeding habit that puts its very existence in peril. The squirrel-sized marsupial turns out to have a fondness for the poisonous flesh of invasive cane toads, introduced into Australia in the 1930s. And this appetite has wiped out vast numbe

10h

Questions Rise About Shortcomings Of DNA Tests For Dogs

DNA testing of dogs has become a booming business. But critics say the pet genetics industry is running too wild, and they're calling for it to be reined in. (Image credit: /Pearl Mak for NPR)

10h

The Peculiar Math That Could Underlie the Laws of Nature

New findings are fueling an old suspicion that fundamental particles and forces spring from strange eight-part numbers called “octonions.”

10h

Weekend Tech Deals: Google Pixelbook, Vizio, Apple Watch

Whether you're looking for a discounted 4K TV or an affordable Apple Watch, we have deals for you.

10h

'Blood moon' dazzles skygazers in century's longest eclipse

The longest "blood moon" eclipse this century dazzled skygazers across the globe Friday, coinciding with Mars' closest approach in 15 years in a thrilling celestial spectacle.

11h

World gazes at total lunar eclipse, longest of this century

Curiosity and awe have greeted a complete lunar eclipse, the longest one of this century and visible in much of the world.

11h

It's Rubens vs. Facebook in fight over artistic nudity

For four centuries, the opulent, exuberant nudes of Peter Paul Rubens have been known to shock and delight in sometimes equal measure. And now, even in 2018, his Baroque paintings are still jolting the internet.

11h

Pakistan’s Recent Election Could Signal Change

On July 25, Pakistanis went to the polls to elect a new government in what would be only the second transition of power from one civilian government to another in the country's seven-decade history. That might be cause for celebration, except that the vote was hardly a peaceful or squeaky-clean affair. Despite the 371,000 soldiers stationed at polling places around the country—five times the numb

11h

Spørg Scientariet: Hvor længe kan jeg leve på min slankekursmad?

En læser er på kur og vil gerne vide, om hun kan holde fast i sine livsstilsændringer permanent. Det svarer ernæringsforsker på.

11h

Disaster-hit Japan braces for powerful typhoon

A powerful typhoon buffeted Japan's eastern coast on Saturday evening, prompting local authorities to issue early evacuation orders, with western areas recently devastated by floods and landslides in the storm's crosshairs.

11h

Facebook cleanup: Hurt the stock, help the world?

It's been a rough year for Facebook and its investors. Questions of data privacy, fake news proliferation and user growth have dogged the company.

11h

Minke whale hunting ends in Iceland

The controversial hunt for minke whales in Iceland has come to end after declining profits led to the local industry closing, the International Fund for Animal Welfare said on Friday.

11h

To repair reputation, Twitter, Facebook incur investor wrath

Two of the biggest social media platforms lost nearly one-fifth of their market value after reporting disappointing user growth.

11h

Science Says: Record heat, fires worsened by climate change

Heat waves are setting all-time temperature records across the globe, again. Europe suffered its deadliest wildfire in more than a century, and one of nearly 90 large fires in the U.S. West burned dozens of homes and forced the evacuation of at least 37,000 people near Redding, California. Flood-inducing downpours have pounded the U.S. East this week.

11h

Canada Is Raging Against Gun Violence—But Not Like America

Like so much else in Canada, the debate over guns typically happens more quietly than it does in the United States. But on rare occasions, a tragic moment will come along and propel the issue to the top of the public agenda. When that happens, the country abandons the decibel range of polite discourse and begins to argue—loudly—about gun control. That’s what happened this week after a lone gunman

12h

Skal togene køre på el, damp eller diesel?

Det spørgsmål rejste ingeniør Svend Aa. Andersen ved et foredrag i Ingeniørforeningen i 1927, hvor han konkluderede, at de tre drivmidler havde hver deres fordele. Han forudså bl.a. elektrificeringen af banerne omkring hovedstaden.

13h

Myths, monsters and the maze: how writers fell in love with the labyrinth

From the ancient Minotaur myth to Stanley Kubrick’s The Shining … why are mazes so powerful and comforting in confusing times? I cannot navigate. My internal disorientation is mirrored by the world’s; perhaps it is even caused by it. We are surrounded by confusion. I am afraid of what will happen. Round every corner, down every false trail, there are monstrous dangers that threaten to consume us.

13h

Facts About Rainforests

Rainforests are vitally important, producing most of the oxygen we breathe and providing habitat for half of the planet's plants and animals.

15h

Karakterkrav betyder færre nye studerende

I dag har 6.873 ansøgere fået besked om, at de har fået en studieplads på en…

16h

Space stations, dark rituals and chorizo: the blood moon, as seen on social media

The lunar eclipse captivated stargazers across the world, generating countless photos and a decent dose of humour • The blood moon around the world – in pictures Amateur skywatchers and photographers from around the world – as well as the stargazing professionals – have sacrificed sleep to share spectacular images of the blood moon on social media. NASA put up a handy explainer (even though North

19h

Pruitt’s Successor Wants Rollbacks, Too. And He Wants Them to Stick.

Andrew Wheeler, the acting head of the E.P.A., is taking a more disciplined approach to dismantling environmental regulations.

20h

Happy Weekend, Here’s DJ Khaled on a Lyft E-Scooter

The first look at the ride-hail company’s newest line of business, courtesy of the ‘gram.

21h

What the ‘Blood Moon’ Lunar Eclipse Looked Like

The entire moon was in shadow for 103 minutes, about 15 minutes longer than the average eclipse, and was visible from Europe, Africa, Asia, Australia and parts of South America.

21h

Australians wake to 'beautiful sight' of blood-moon eclipse

Those who looked skyward before sunrise were not left disappointed, as the sun, Earth and moon aligned Australians who looked skyward before sunrise were not left disappointed, as the moon glowed blood red for the longest lunar eclipse of the 21st century. The total lunar eclipse, or “blood moon” began at 5.32am AEST on Saturday, lasting for one hour and 43 minutes, as the sun, Earth and moon ali

22h

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Summer Fights

Written by Elaine Godfrey ( @elainejgodfrey ) Today in 5 Lines President Trump denied knowing about the June 2016 meeting between his campaign officials and a Russian lawyer, contradicting reporting from CNN and NBC News. Russian President Vladimir Putin said he is “ready” to visit Washington, D.C., and has already invited Trump to travel to Moscow. The White House said Trump is “open” to visitin

22h

Medicare Slashes Star Ratings for Staffing at 1 in 11 Nursing Homes

1,387 facilities got only one out of five stars for staffing because they failed to maintain the required nursing coverage or to provide data proving they did.

23h

‘Blood Moon’ Provides Dramatic Sights, and a Dose of Folklore

A lunar eclipse on Friday drew viewers from around the world as the moon passed through the Earth’s shadow, glowing deep red. Since ancient times, the ‘blood moon’ has been viewed as an omen.

23h

UK to Legalize Medicinal Cannabis

Patients will be able to access the drug with a prescription, and there are no plans to allow for recreational use.

23h

Clouds put damper on hopes of blood moon sightings in UK

Lunar observers foiled as thunderclouds obscure rare phenomenon for most of UK Stargazers across the globe were treated to the longest celestial event of the 21st century on Friday as a lunar eclipse turned the moon bright red. But UK-based astronomers were left disappointed because, after weeks of uninterrupted sunshine, thunderstorms and banks of cloud obscured the skies, dashing many people’s

23h

The Case for a Trump-Russia Conspiracy Just Got a Little Stronger

CNN’s bombshell scoop Thursday night shined a bright light yet again on the June 9, 2016 meeting at Trump Tower in Manhattan and raised the specter that President Donald Trump and his surrogates may have been lying about one of the most significant Russia-related episodes of the 2016 election. According to CNN, the former Trump lawyer Michael Cohen is willing to testify that Trump approved the me

23h

Does Hillsdale College’s Approach to Fundraising Jeopardize Its Mission?

Earlier this week, I wrote about the clash between Hillsdale College’s stated values and the close ties that it has cultivated with the Trump administration—and I asked Hillsdale faculty, students, and alumni to send me their dissents or to share their own concerns about their institution in light of the recent commencement speech Mike Pence gave there. Dozens of Hillsdale students and alumni sen

23h

The Atlantic Daily: Build Me Bridges

What We’re Following Cohen’s Claim: Michael Cohen is reportedly prepared to tell prosecutors that he and several others were present when Donald Trump learned of his campaign officials’ plans to meet with a Russian lawyer who’d promised damaging information about Hillary Clinton. Trump’s legal team denies Cohen’s account—but the president’s claims about the meeting have been proven false before.

23h

Nasa captures historic eclipse and blood moon from all over the world – video

People all over the world were looking to the skies on Friday night for the longest lunar eclipse of the century, which was also a blood moon. Seen best along the southern hemisphere, many stargazers were disappointed by cloudy skies. A blood moon is coming! Here's what you need to know Continue reading…

23h

Shocking Global Map Shows the Extent of a Global Heat Wave

Heat waves swarm across the world, and a new visualization shows just how bad things are.

23h

Life doesn’t feel easier than 20 years ago. And maybe that’s a good thing | Paul Daley

Ageing motivates me to strive with ever greater enthusiasm and urgency to be better at the things that are important to me It came as a surprise to me that the midlife crisis is something of a myth and the less time I’ve got left the happier I’ll apparently become. It’ll also be news to many 50-something people I know, some of whom, besides still supporting school and university-aged children at

23h

A veterinarian explains what dog and cat years really mean

Animals Understanding your pet's real age can be vital to keeping them healthy. It may seem like sort of a silly thing to ponder, born out of owners’ love for their pets and the human-animal bond between them. But determining a pet’s “real” age is…

23h

New Scientist Live: will we ever understand the true nature of time?

Physicist and best-selling author Carlo Rovelli is coming to London this September to explain the deep mysteries of time

23h

Climate change made Europe’s heatwave twice as likely to happen

The current heatwave in northern Europe was made twice as likely by climate change, according to a preliminary analysis.

23h

AI creates Shakespearean sonnets – and they’re actually quite good

Human poets have been wrestling with sonnets for centuries. Now artificial intelligence is trying to innovate in the form

23h

Rare half-female, half-male cricket leads a complicated life

An extremely rare cricket with female sex organs but male wings – known as a gynandromorph – could tell us more about how sex differences arise

23h

Amazon face recognition mistakes US politicians for crime suspects

A face recognition service sold by Amazon falsely identified 28 members of Congress – and disproportionately black legislators – as people arrested for a crime

23h

Drug to treat endometriosis pain first to be approved in over a decade

A new drug relieves pelvic pain in women with endometriosis, but is expensive and can cause side-effects like hot flushes, headaches and nausea

23h

A new shape called the scutoid has been discovered in our cells

We’ve discovered a new shape called the scutoid, which lets cells pack so closely together – and could lead to better methods for making artificial organs

23h

How A Group of Imprisoned Hackers Introduced JPay to the WorldIdaho JPay Tablets

Over the last 15 years, JPay has quietly been moving into prisons across the country—connecting family members through email, at a cost.

23h

A new Ebola species has been found in bats in Sierra Leone

A sixth species of Ebola has been found, but we don’t know if it can cause disease in humans.

1d

A look back at hyped gadgets that never came to market

Gadgets Friendly robots, Lady Gaga’s camera glasses, and other products we’ll never get to buy. Hardware is hard. Here are some concrete examples.

1d

What Is a Genetically Modified Crop? A European Ruling Sows Confusion

In Europe, plants created with gene-editing technologies will be stringently regulated as G.M.O.’s. But older crops whose DNA has been altered will be left alone.

1d

Grieving Orca Carries Dead Calf for More Than 3 Days: ‘She’s Just Not Letting Go’

The calf, part of a declining population of orca whales in the Pacific Northwest, was the first born in the area since 2015.

1d

Hvor er blodmånen? Dis og skyer kom i vejen for måneformørkelse

Dis og skyer kom i vejen for måneformørkelse

1d

Scientist Who Blew the Whistle on Flint Water Sues Activists

Flint residents and activists wrote a letter in May calling out Marc Edwards for hurting their community. His says it’s defamation.

1d

Twitter shares plunge in black week for social media

Twitter shares took a pounding on Friday after it reported a decline in its user base, extending a stock market bloodbath for what had been a sizzling social media sector.

1d

'Blood moon' eclipse delights young Kenyans

"Mars, Pluto, Saturn, Jupiter, Venus—Mercury, that's the one I really wanted to see," said Chu Owen as he used an app on his mobile phone to locate planets above.

1d

DNA to X-ray: Military has variety of tools to ID remains

The U.S. military remains released by North Korea on Friday will be sent to a military lab in Hawaii, where they'll enter a system that routinely identifies service members from decades-old conflicts.

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France, Spain, Portugal up energy links

France, Spain and Portugal agreed Friday to build an undersea power line in the Bay of Biscay as they up electricity links aimed at helping the Iberian peninsula out of its energy isolation.

1d

Are caries linked to political regime?

At the 96th General Session of the International Association for Dental Research (IADR), held in conjunction with the IADR Pan European Regional (PER) Congress, John Estrada-Montoya, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogotá, gave a poster presentation titled 'Does a Country's Political Regime Influence Its DMTF Index.'

1d

Parker Solar Probe and the curious case of the hot corona

Something mysterious is going on at the Sun. In defiance of all logic, its atmosphere gets much, much hotter the farther it stretches from the Sun's blazing surface.

1d

NASA's GPM sees another dangerous typhoon threatening Japan

The Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite provided a rainfall and cloud analysis on powerful Typhoon Jongdari as it moves toward Japan. Jongdari follows another powerful typhoon that made landfall in Japan earlier this year.

1d

New algorithm could help find new physics—inverse method takes wave functions and solves for Hamiltonians

Scientists at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have developed an algorithm that could provide meaningful answers to condensed matter physicists in their searches for novel and emergent properties in materials. The algorithm, invented by physics professor Bryan Clark and his graduate student Eli Chertkov, inverts the typical mathematical process condensed matter physicists use to sear

1d

Cooking oil coating prevents bacteria from growing on food processing equipment

Many foods produced on an industrial scale include raw ingredients mixed together in enormous stainless steel machines that can be difficult to clean. With repeated use, equipment surfaces get minute scratches and grooves, providing bacteria and biofilms the perfect place to hide. While surface scratches may appear small to the naked eye, they are like a canyon to bacteria, which are only a few mi

1d

Genetic basis of heart rhythms explored in large population study

New information about the biology behind the heart's electrical activity has been revealed in a major genome study with the largest sample size ever of a project of this type. These molecular mechanisms offer insights into cardiac electrical diseases and could suggest avenues of drug research for preventing and treating heart rhythm or conduction problems. Genes in 44 loci identified as associated

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Why Is the US One of the 'Most Dangerous' Places in the Developed World to Give Birth?

Each year, about 50,000 U.S. women are severely injured and 700 die during childbirth.

1d

Wildfires In Western U.S. Could Affect Air Quality For Prolonged Period Of Time

The smoke from nearly 100 large Western wildfires has public health officials worried. Air quality managers are warning this is the new norm for the region, given climate change.

1d

New algorithm could help find new physics

Scientists at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have developed an algorithm that could provide meaningful answers to condensed matter physicists in their searches for novel and emergent properties in materials.

1d

Arrests, Investigations Over Vaccine Scandal in China

Changsheng is found to have forged records for a rabies vaccine and is accused of distributing thousands of substandard DPT immunizations to be used in children.

1d

Lab Animal Use in the UK Dips Below 2010 Levels

A report finds a decline in the number of experiments involving animals in 2017, noting a particular decrease in procedures on dogs and primates.

1d

Don’t Buy into the Backlash — the Science on Meditation Is Clear

A new study contests the benefits of meditation in the workplace. We show everything that's wrong with the research. Read More

1d

Why do secular groups often act like religious ones?

Why do secular groups often act like churches? The answer is simpler than you think. Read More

1d

PopSci Kids team up with the Teen Titans to learn all about lasers

Science The cast of 'Teen Titans Go! To the Movies' find out what their powers could do in real life. In this sneak peek of their new series, the PopSci Kids interview their pals the Teen Titans and learn about lasers!

1d

UB research suggests how stimulant treatments for ADHD work

Stimulant medications are an effective treatment for Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). In the classroom, parents and teachers say that medications like methylphenidate (MPH) can reduce symptoms and improve behavior.Although stimulants have been in use for decades to treat ADHD in school-aged children, just how they work hasn't been clear. But the results of a new study in The Journa

1d

Cooking oil coating prevents bacteria from growing on food processing equipment

Many foods produced on an industrial scale include raw ingredients mixed together in enormous stainless steel machines that can be difficult to clean. The University of Toronto research team proposes a simple new solution: trapping a thin layer of cooking oil at the metal surface to fill in microscopic scrapes, cracks and fissures and create a barrier to bacterial attachment. This solution resulte

1d

How a slime mold near death packs bacteria to feed the next generation

Social amoebas that farm bacteria for food use proteins to preserve the crop for their offspring.

1d

Forget the Blood Moon, the Red Planet is waiting for you tonight

Space Mars is at its closest and clearest right now. You know you want to look at it. Though news has been trending about the blood moon for weeks now in the U.S., it will only be visible to people in the Eastern hemisphere . And though a “blood moon” is…

1d

Gadget Lab Podcast: The New MacBook Pro

This week, WIRED product reviews editor Brendan Nystedt joins the show to run down the particulars of the 2018 MacBook Pro.

1d

Complete lunar eclipse begins, the longest of this century

Skywatchers around much of the world have begun watching a complete lunar eclipse that is the longest of this century.

1d

Researchers are first to sequence rare bacteria that causes rampant tooth decay

The most prevalent chronic disease in both children and adults, tooth decay occurs when the good and bad bacteria in our mouth become imbalanced. The bad bacteria, Streptococcus mutans, forms a biofilm (aka tartar), then takes the sugars we eat and ferments them into acid, which decalcifies our teeth and causes cavities.

1d

1d

NASA's GPM sees another dangerous typhoon threatening Japan

The Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite provided a rainfall and cloud analysis on powerful Typhoon Jongdari as it moves toward Japan. Jongdari follows another powerful typhoon that made landfall in Japan earlier this year.

1d

Magnetic surgical cement heals spinal fractures, provides targeted drug delivery

Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago report in the journal PLOS ONE, that by adding magnetic particles to surgical cement used to heal spinal fractures, they could guide magnetic nanoparticles directly to lesions near the fractures.

1d

Researchers are first to sequence rare bacteria that causes rampant tooth decay

Little is know about the bacteria Streptococcus sobrinus, which accelerates tooth decay in some people. This will soon change because a team of Illinois Bioengineering researchers led by Assistant Professor Paul Jensen has successfully sequenced the complete genomes of three strains of S. sobrinus.

1d

NASA's Parker Solar Probe and the curious case of the hot corona

Something mysterious is going on at the Sun: Its atmosphere gets much, much hotter the farther it stretches from the Sun's blazing surface. Parker Solar Probe offers the chance for scientists to solve this mystery at last.

1d

Q&A: Hives in the City

Is urban honey tainted by pollution?

1d

Emails From Trump Education Official Reveal Ties to For-Profit Colleges

This week, advocates for student-loan borrowers have seen some of their worst fears come true. More than a year after Education Secretary Betsy DeVos announced that the U.S. Department of Education would begin to unwind two Obama-era regulations aimed at holding for-profit colleges accountable, the department has started to make good on that promise. One of the regulations is being scaled back si

1d

Roman rooftops all abuzz for air pollution study

Italian beekeepers are spreading their wings into the study of pollution in Rome, working with the country's carabinieri military police to learn more about the state of the air in the Eternal City.

1d

The first underwater film was lost for decades—until now

Science Popular Science's senior video producer discovered the lost film "The Terrors of the Deep." In his memoir, Williamson remembered it like this: “I grasped the monster's fin, felt my hand close upon it. With a twist, I was under the livid white belly at the spot…

1d

The stiletto heel is the embodiment of post-war material science

Technology Skyscrapers and sky-high shoes share one common ingredient. The stiletto was a pivotal point in the history of fashion—and material science.

1d

NASA sees the development of Tropical Storm Gilma

The Eastern Pacific Ocean's Tropical Depression 8E formed on July 26 and strengthened into a tropical storm by 5 a.m. EDT on July 27. At that time the storm was renamed Gilma. NASA's Terra satellite provided forecasters with an early look at the eighth depression as it was developing.

1d

Photos of the Week: Stilt Dance, Pony Swim, Giant Revolver

Protesting the Tour de France, sunflowers in Umbria, fishing in New York, mud games in Germany, murals on a barrier wall in Bethlehem, an Atlantic puffin in Wales, vertical landscapes in China, a women-only motorcycle festival in Germany, wildfires in California and Greece, and much more.

1d

Scientists Figured Out How To Track Sharks Like A Remora

No one knows how to stick to a shark like its ocean buddy, the remora. Scientists are drawing inspiration from the friendly fish to improve shark-tagging technology. Stream Shark Week Episodes: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/shark-week/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery https://www.facebook.com/SharkWeek Follow on

1d

Hollow trees host massive moth slumber parties

Unlike social insects such as bees and ants, moths are generally loners. So, when Florida Museum of Natural History lepidopterist Andrei Sourakov spotted a dozen glossy black Idia moths inside a hollow tree, he made a mental note.

1d

USTC proposes a facile, general, and effective strategy to prepare carbon nanomaterials

Shuhong Yu's team and their collaborator proposes a simple, effective, and versatile method to prepare a series of functional CMs from small organic molecules (SOMs) by a transition metal assisted carbonization process.

1d

NASA catches tropical depression 9E at peak before dissipation

The Eastern Pacific Ocean's Tropical Depression 9E formed on July 26 and by July 27 the depression had dissipated over 1,200 miles from Hilo, Hawaii. NASA's Terra satellite captured a look at the storm at its peak.

1d

Big Pharma Would Like Your DNA

Updated on July 28, 2018 23andMe has always planned to sell access to its customers’ DNA—a fact it has not exactly kept secret. When the company’s DNA-testing service launched in 2007, Wired touted its quest to amass a “treasure trove of data … to drive research forward” as a “key part of the 23andMe business plan.” Co-founders Anne Wojcicki and Linda Avey outright told the San Francisco Chroni

1d

NASA's TESS spacecraft starts science operations

NASA's Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite has started its search for planets around nearby stars, officially beginning science operations on July 25, 2018. TESS is expected to transmit its first series of science data back to Earth in August, and thereafter periodically every 13.5 days, once per orbit, as the spacecraft makes it closest approach to Earth. The TESS Science Team will begin search

1d

North Korea just delivered the remains of 55 U.S. soldiers to South Korea

Exactly 65 years after the end of the Korean war, these soldiers are headed home. Read More

1d

What does Mars’ lake mean for the search for life on the Red Planet?

A lake spotted hiding under Martian ice could support life, but finding out if anything lives there could be challenging.

1d

NASA's TESS spacecraft starts science operations

NASA's Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite has started its search for planets around nearby stars, officially beginning science operations on July 25, 2018.

1d

Worms Frozen for 42,000 Years in Siberian Permafrost Wriggle to Life

Imagine getting a wake-up call after being "asleep" for 42,000 years.

1d

Blood moon 2018: the lunar eclipse – as it happened

Tracking the eclipse from Australia, India, the Middle East, east Africa and Europe The blood moon around the world – in pictures Share your moon photographs Space stations, dark rituals and chorizo: the blood moon on social media 11.25pm BST That’s all folks The sun (or blood moon) has set on our time together. Related: Clouds put damper on hopes of blood moon sightings in UK Related: Australian

1d

Orange Is the New Black Is Still Worth Watching

Orange Is the New Black has never been a show you might characterize as consistent. Since its debut in 2013, it’s toggled between different modes and moods, to the point where not even the Netflix series seems entirely clear whether it’s a comedy or drama . It constantly reinvents its characters, redeeming even the most unlikely villains, and turning its one-time protagonist, Piper (Taylor Schill

1d

NASA catches tropical depression 9E at peak before dissipation

The Eastern Pacific Ocean's Tropical Depression 9E formed on July 26 and by July 27 the depression had dissipated over 1,200 miles from Hilo, Hawaii. NASA's Terra satellite captured a look at the storm at its peak.

1d

NASA sees the development of Tropical Storm Gilma

The Eastern Pacific Ocean's Tropical Depression 8E formed on July 26 and strengthened into a tropical storm by 5 a.m. EDT on July 27. At that time the storm was renamed Gilma. NASA's Terra satellite provided forecasters with an early look at the eighth depression as it was developing.

1d

Diabetes drugs act as powerful curb for immune cells in controlling inflammation

A common class of drugs used to treat diabetes has been found to exert a powerful check on macrophages by controlling the metabolic fuel they use to generate energy. Keeping macrophages from going overboard on the job may inhibit the onset of obesity and diabetes following tissue inflammation.

1d

What's the Best Way to Learn New Sounds in a Foreign Language?

What's the Best Way to Learn New Sounds in a Foreign Language? Studies show the answer is complicated. 36106329150_3dac13d496_k.jpg Image credits: Marco Verch via Flickr Rights information: CC BY-SA 2.0 Human Friday, July 27, 2018 – 12:00 Yuen Yiu, Staff Writer (Inside Science) — When Mickey Rooney, playing a Japanese man, exclaims "Miss Gorightry!" in the 1961 film "Breakfast at Tiffany's," his

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4 things to know about fungi ‘climate warriors’

Certain fungi play an important role in how well forests can absorb carbon dioxide. Two researchers, Colin Averill and Jennifer M. Bhatnagar of Boston University, explain below how these fungi fit into forest microbiome and fight climate change, as well as how we can safeguard them for the future. Their paper is published in Global Change Biology . Fungi represent an entire kingdom of life on Ear

1d

Comey Is ‘Really Concerned’ About Trump’s Attacks on the FBI

“I’m really concerned… about the constant criticism and accusation from the president of the United States that the FBI and Department of Justice [are] corrupt,” James Comey said this June in an interview with The Atlantic at the 2018 Aspen Ideas Festival. The former FBI director goes on to explain how President Trump’s “attacks on the rule of law” have the effect of eroding trust in these instit

1d

Novel genome-wide association study risk loci for nonsyndromic orofacial clefts

At the 96th General Session of the International Association for Dental Research (IADR), held in conjunction with the IADR Pan European Regional (PER) Congress, Azeez Butali, University of Iowa, Iowa City, USA, gave an oral presentation titled 'Novel Genome-wide Association Study Risk Loci for Nonsyndromic Orofacial Clefts.'

1d

Spacewatch: Nasa telescope launch – keep watching this space

Fresh delay to the James Webb Space Telescope, because of test results that need investigating, will bring the cost to $9.6bn The ambitious James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) has a new launch date: March 2021. It had been planned for lift off in October this year, but has suffered numerous delays since the project began in 1996. Back then, its budget was forecast at $500m and the launch date was s

1d

The Meaning of North Korea’s Remains Transfer

On this very date in 1953, leaders of North Korean, Chinese, and U.S.-led United Nations forces signed an armistice to halt the Korean War, vowing to convene another conference within three months to achieve “the peaceful settlement of the Korean question.” Sixty-five years later, we’re still waiting on that settlement. But on Friday, the long shadow of the war got a little bit smaller. North Kor

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Five rad and random foot things I found this week

Gadgets The end-of-week dispatch from PopSci's commerce editor. Vol. 51. My job is to find cool stuff. Throughout the week I spend hours scouring the web for things that are ingenious or clever or ridiculously cheap.

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