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Kurdish refugee wins the Fields medal – the biggest prize in maths

Caucher Birkar, who fled Iran for the UK, is one of four winners of the Fields medal, often called the Nobel prize of mathematics

50min

 

Rekord-sommeren får prisen på strøm til at eksplodere

Elprisen er steget med 66 procent sammenlignet med sidste år. Og strømmen kommer fra tysk kulkraft.

5h

 

Both long term abstinence and heavy drinking may increase dementia risk

People who abstain from alcohol or consume more than 14 units a week during middle age (midlife) are at increased risk of developing dementia, finds a study in The BMJ today.

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Newly-discovered type of lung cell has central role in cystic fibrosis

A new type of lung cell is rare in our bodies, but is the main place where the gene involved in the common hereditary condition cystic fibrosis is active

50min

 

Donald Trump may finally appoint a science adviser after 18 month wait

Kelvin Droegemeier, a weather researcher, has been nominated to be the director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy

50min

 

AI camera to help spot the best grapes for making pesticide-free wine

A combination of AI and photography is helping wine makers keep their grapes free of disease, by spotting the grapes that are most resistant to rot

50min

 

One drink a day might be enough to stop dementia by flushing the brain

Light drinking helps prevent dementia, and now we may know why: it revs up the brain’s waste disposal system

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VR headset helps people who are legally blind see again

A VR headset has helped people who are legally blind see again. While it didn’t cure their blindness, they were able to resume activities they previously found impossible

50min

 

Row over 3D-printed firearms distracts from US gun violence crisis

Legal wrangling over whether plans for 3D-printed guns can be made available online ignores the US’s real public health crisis

50min

 

Lemurs self-medicate by rubbing toxic millipedes over their bottoms

Red-fronted lemurs sometimes pick up a millipede, give it a chew to make it secrete toxins, then rub it on the skin around their anus – but why?

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Earth Overshoot Day – what to make of this moment of reckoning?

Earth Overshoot Day is a hugely popular way to highlight our global environmental impact. Here are two views on it…

50min

 

An Amazonian snake has two types of venom that kill different prey

The Amazon puffing snake has evolved to deliver two kinds of venom with one bite – one kills lizards and birds but doesn’t harm mammals, and the other does the opposite

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Google developing censor-friendly search engine for China: sourceGoogle Search China

Google is crafting a search engine that would meet China's draconian censorship rules, a company employee told AFP on Thursday, in a move decried by human rights activists.

1h

 

Gold lunar module replica stolen from museum still missing

It's been just over a year since a thief broke into the Armstrong Air and Space Museum in Ohio and stole an 18-karat gold replica of the Apollo 11 lunar module and other artifacts that have yet to be recovered or suspects arrested.

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US 'crypto-anarchist' sees 3D-printed guns as fundamental right

The US "crypto-anarchist" who caused panic this week by publishing online blueprints for 3D-printed firearms said Wednesday that whatever the outcome of a legal battle, he has already succeeded in his political goal of spreading the designs far and wide.

1h

 

Facts About Niobium

Properties, sources and uses of the element niobium, and facts about its unusual history.

2h

 

Study suggests obesity may also impact flu transmission, not just severity of illness

Obesity increases a person's risk for severe complications from influenza, including hospitalization and even death. It may also play a role in how flu spreads, according to a new study published in The Journal of Infectious Diseases. The findings suggest that obese adults infected with flu shed the virus for a longer time than adults who are not obese, potentially increasing the opportunity for t

3h

 

Is compassion fatigue inevitable in an age of 24-hour news?

We have never been more aware of the appalling events that occur around the world every day. But in the face of so much horror, is there a danger that we become numb to the headlines – and does it matter if we do? By Elisa Gabbert In April this year, a woman calling herself Apathetic Idealist wrote to an advice columnist at the New York Times, asking for help in overcoming a sense of political pa

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FDA blacklists cesium chloride, ineffective and dangerous naturopathic cancer treatment

The FDA recently issued an alert warning of significant safety risks associated with cesium chloride, a mineral salt promoted by naturopathic “doctors” and “integrative” medicine practitioners as an alternative treatment for cancer, despite the lack of evidence of safety and efficacy in treating cancer or any other disease.

3h

 

New study shows smoking can affect breastfeeding habits

Researchers at UBC Okanagan have determined that new mothers exposed to cigarette smoke in their homes, stop breastfeeding sooner than women not exposed to second-hand smoke.

4h

 

Key piece identified for slowing a colorectal cancer subtype

Inhibiting the Jagged 1 protein in mice prevents the proliferation and growth of colon and rectal tumours. What is more, this approach to the disease permits the removal of existing tumours. The discovery leads the way to the development of a therapy for treating this type of pathology in humans, the second leading cause of cancer-related death in Western countries

4h

 

Clothing, furniture also to blame for ocean and freshwater pollution

Lakes choked with algae and marine 'dead zones' result from too many nutrients in the water. The traditional culprit is agriculture, which relies on fertilizer to boost production. But the production of consumer goods, like clothing, is also a major — and growing — contributor.

4h

 

Naked mole-rats defy conventions of aging and reproduction

Naked mole-rats live in colonies of two breeders and around 300 non-breeding workers. Although the breeding pair carries the metabolic cost of reproduction and, in the queen's case, lactation, they live longer than non-breeders and remain fertile throughout their lives. Researchers investigated the genetic mechanisms beneath this apparent paradox.

5h

 

Lemur extinction: Vast majority of species under threat

The vast majority of lemur species, unique primates found only in Madagascar, are on the brink of extinction, say scientists.

7h

 

Fields medal: UK refugee's major maths award stolen

The Cambridge professor loses his 14-carat gold medal in Brazil minutes after receiving it.

7h

 

Microbes Share Your Morning Metro Commute

An analysis of the Hong Kong metro found that microbes, including some with antibiotic resistance genes, freshly disperse throughout the system each day. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

 

Newly discovered crossbill species numbers few

The recently discovered Cassia crossbill is range-restricted, occurring in just two small mountain ranges on the northeast edge of the Great Basin Desert. Based on a new study, Cassia crossbills occupy about 70 square kilometers of lodgepole pine forest and number only about 5,800 birds.

7h

 

Nine out of 10 people caring for a family member with dementia don't get enough sleep

More than 90 percent of people caring for a family member with dementia experience poor sleep, according to new research.

7h

 

Smarter cancer treatment: AI tool automates radiation therapy planning

Beating cancer is a race against time. Developing radiation therapy plans — individualized maps that help doctors determine where to blast tumors — can take days. Now, engineering researchers have developed automation software that aims to cut the time down to mere hours.

7h

 

Google Might Be Ready to Play By China’s Censorship Rules

Eight years after leaving China, Google hopes to offer search results again, through an Android app.

8h

 

Innovation and speculation drive stock market bubble activity, according to new study

A group of data scientists conducted an in-depth analysis of major innovations and stock market bubbles from 1825 through 2000 and came away with novel takeaways of their own as they found some very distinctive patterns in the occurrence of bubbles over 175 years.

8h

 

Challenges around childbearing owe to dissatisfaction among surgical residents

Research suggests female medical students are deterred by the perception that surgeons have difficulty balancing professional and personal pursuits. Nevertheless, in recent years, female surgeons have become more likely to begin families during residency rather than waiting until their completion of training as they might have in the past.

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Naked mole-rats defy conventions of aging and reproduction

Naked mole-rats live in colonies of two breeders and around 300 non-breeding workers. Although the breeding pair carries the metabolic cost of reproduction and, in the queen's case, lactation, they live longer than non-breeders and remain fertile throughout their lives. Researchers at the Leibniz Institute on Aging in Germany investigated the genetic mechanisms beneath this apparent paradox. Their

8h

 

Tesla Loses More Money Than Ever, But Says Profits Are Coming

Today's investor call was low on Muskian braggadocio, delivered a little hater schadenfreude, and offered some reasonable promises.

8h

 

BioBits: Teaching synthetic biology to K-12 students

As biologists have probed deeper into the genetic underpinnings of life, K-12 schools have struggled to provide a curriculum that reflects those advances. Now, a collaboration between the Wyss Institute at Harvard University, MIT, and Northwestern University has developed BioBits, new educational biology kits that teach students the basic principles of molecular and synthetic biology through fun,

8h

 

A soft, on-the-fly solution to a hard, underwater problem

Studying the animals that live in the deep ocean is notoriously difficult, especially because the underwater equipment that exists for sampling them is designed for marine oil and gas exploration and frequently damages the delicate creatures they're trying to capture. Now, researchers have created a soft, flexible sampling device that interacts with delicate marine life gently, and can be 3D print

8h

 

Scientists identify new mechanisms underlying pediatric kidney cancer

Connecting two previously unrelated insights about the formation of pediatric kidney cancer, researchers have uncovered the means by which the cancer continues to grow, providing potential targets for more effective treatments in the future.

8h

 

Understanding soil through its microbiome

Soil is full of life, essential for nutrient cycling and carbon storage. To better understand how it functions, researchers conducted the first global study of bacteria and fungi in soil. Their results show that bacteria and fungi are in constant competition for nutrients and produce an arsenal of antibiotics to gain an advantage over one another.

8h

 

Pinpointing a molecule for sea lamprey control

Scientists have identified a single molecule that could be a key in controlling invasive sea lampreys. The researchers have homed in on a fatty molecule that directs the destructive eels' migration.

8h

 

Monsoon rains found to be beneficial to underground aquifers

Using a combination of field instrumentation, unmanned aerial vehicles and a hydrologic model, a team of researchers has been studying the fate of monsoon rainfall and its impact on groundwater recharge in the Chihuahuan Desert of New Mexico.

8h

 

Fast, cheap and colorful 3-D printing

People are exploring the use of 3-D printing for wide-ranging applications, including manufacturing, medical devices, fashion and even food. But one of the most efficient forms of 3D printing suffers from a major drawback: It can only print objects that are gray or black in color. Now, researchers have tweaked the method so it can print in all of the colors of the rainbow.

8h

 

What gives firefighters the nerve to run into a fire?

A new study suggests that two sets of dynamics initiate and perpetuate the kinds of leaps of faith firefighters and others in high-risk occupations routinely take: supporting and sustaining. The findings convey what goes into a person’s ability to make critical trust-related judgments. The study also has relevance and managerial implications in an era of declining trust in both people and institu

8h

 

Trump Finally Picks a Science Adviser. And Scientists? They Seem Relieved.

Kelvin Droegemeier, a well-regarded meteorologist, has a long research record. But his views on climate change are not well known.

9h

 

One trait can tell you who’s really trustworthy

When it comes to predicting who is most likely to act in a trustworthy manner, one of the most important factors is the anticipation of guilt, according to a new study. In the study, researchers identify a trait predictor of trustworthy intentions and behavior. They also provide practical advice for deciding in whom we should place our trust. Among the study’s key findings: a person’s tendency to

9h

 

1 molecule may be key to controlling toothy invasive fish

Scientists have identified a single molecule that could help in controlling invasive sea lampreys. Researchers have homed in on a fatty molecule that directs the destructive eels’ migration, according to a new study, which appear in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences . “We’ve found a pheromone, a fatty acid derivative, that’s released by larval sea lamprey and guides migratory ad

9h

 

The Atlantic Daily: On Our Watch and by Our Hands

What We’re Following All Eyes on Manafort: The second day of Paul Manafort’s trial finds the former Trump campaign chairman in a curious position: repairing his own public image, as he’s made a career of doing for others. Here’s Franklin Foer’s dispatch from the courtroom. Though Manafort is being tried for financial crimes, his case is shadowed by the possibility of Russian collusion—a term that

9h

 

Computer simulations predict the spread of HIV

In a new study, researchers show that computer simulations can accurately predict the transmission of HIV across populations, which could aid in preventing the disease.

9h

 

Breast tissue tumor suppressor PTEN: A potential Achilles heel for breast cancer cells

Researchers report that they have identified a novel pathway for connective tissue PTEN in breast cancer cell response to radiotherapy.

9h

 

Degrading plastics revealed as source of greenhouse gases

Researchers have found that several greenhouse gases are emitted as common plastics degrade in the environment. Their study reports the unexpected discovery of the universal production of greenhouse gases methane and ethylene by the most common plastics when exposed to sunlight.

9h

 

Latent TB treatment: Shorter is better

Treatment of latent tuberculosis is set to transform after a pair of studies revealed that a shorter treatment was safer and more effective in children and adults compared to the current standard.

9h

 

Harmless or hormone disorder? A new test enables quick diagnosis for drinking by the liter

Drinking excessive amounts of fluids can be a medically unremarkable habit, but it could also signify a rare hormone disorder. A new procedure now enables a fast and reliable diagnosis.

9h

 

Nowhere to hide: Molecular probe illuminates elusive cancer stem cells in live mice

After a primary tumor is treated, cancer stem cells may still lurk in the body, ready to metastasize and cause a recurrence of the cancer in a form that's more aggressive and resistant to treatment. Researchers have developed a molecular probe that seeks out these elusive cells and lights them up so they can be identified, tracked and studied not only in cell cultures, but in their native environm

9h

 

Some religious scientists are more likely to face discrimination

Muslim and Protestant scientists are more likely than other US scientists to experience religious discrimination, according to a new study. The study also shows that for some scientists, religious identity may fuel perceptions of discrimination. The study examined a survey of 879 biologists and 903 physicists at schools classified as US research institutions by the National Research Council. The

9h

 

Material could offer ‘smarter’ wound healing

A new study takes a step toward the development of smarter skin grafts that facilitate healing while minimizing infection for chronic skin wounds. “Our group has expertise in developing new polymers and functional surface assemblies for biomedical applications,” says Svetlana Sukhishvili, professor and director of the soft matter facility at Texas A&M University. “At Texas A&M we investigated how

9h

 

These sandals replace petroleum with sugarcane. How smug can I be about wearing them?

Technology Fossil fuels aren’t sustainable, but alternatives aren't perfect, either. What to know about Allbirds' new sandals, from field to flip-flop.

9h

 

Electronic skin allows amputees to 'feel' pain and touch

When Gyorgy Levay lost parts of all four extremities, including most of his left arm, to meningitis in 2010, he resolved to make the best of a bad situation.

9h

 

Rewiring rodent brains makes epilepsy seizures less severe

Researchers have discovered a new treatment for reducing seizure activity in the brains of rodents, a discovery they hope might one day help people living with epilepsy. An estimated 2.2 million Americans suffer from epilepsy and 20 to 30 percent of these individuals live with seizures that do not respond to current medications. “On command, we instruct neurons to assemble more inhibitory synapse

9h

 

Here’s a better way to predict when milk will go bad

A new predictive model that examines spore-forming bacteria and when they’ll emerge may make the “sell-by” and “best-by” dates on milk cartons more meaningful and accurate, according to research. “Putting dates on milk cartons is a big issue, because consumers often discard the milk if it is past the sell-by date,” says Martin Wiedmann, a professor in food safety at Cornell University and a senio

9h

 

New dinosaur found in the wrong place, at the wrong time

Researchers have discovered a new dinosaur which roamed the Ningxia Autonomous Region, northwest China, approximately 174 million years ago. This is in a place they were never thought to roam and 15 million years earlier than this type of dinosaur was thought to exist.

9h

 

Number of opioid prescriptions remains unchanged, Mayo Clinic research finds

Despite increased attention to opioid abuse, prescriptions have remained relatively unchanged for many US patients, research led by Mayo Clinic finds.

9h

 

US opioid use not declined, despite focus on abuse and awareness of risk

Use of prescription opioids in the United States has not substantially declined over the last decade, despite increased attention to opioid abuse and awareness of their risks, finds a study published by The BMJ today.

9h

 

The Heaviness of Robyn’s ‘Missing U’

A song can be about something, but can it be about a lack of something? Robyn, the 39-year-old Swedish pop adventurer, would say of course . Her signature anthem captured something turning to nothing—an old flame becoming someone else’s new flame—as viewed from a corner of a dance floor. Her first solo song in eight years, the satisfyingly wrenching “Missing U,” has a more conceptual take on loss

9h

 

A Hell of a Performance by Paul Manafort

Paul Manafort lumbered into the courtroom, his movements as stiff as you would expect of a man who now sleeps on a concrete bed. Over the years, Manafort constantly explored novel methods for preserving his youth, for tending to the details of his appearance. In his mid-60s, he took to receiving regular manicures. And to any casual acquaintance, it was clear that he carefully managed the tint of

9h

 

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Suits Himself

Written by Elaine Godfrey ( @elainejgodfrey ) and Maddie Carlisle ( @maddiecarlisle2 ) Today in 5 Lines President Trump called on Attorney General Jeff Sessions to end Robert Mueller’s investigation immediately. White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders defended the tweet, saying, “The president is not obstructing, he is fighting back.” During the second day of Paul Manafort’s trial, a m

10h

 

Fruitful discoveries: The power to purify water is in your produce

A study of more than a dozen foods shows how fruit and vegetable peels can be used as a natural, low-cost way to remove pollutants such as dyes and heavy metals from water. The methods used can be used from classrooms to kitchens.

10h

 

New technique uses templates to guide self-folding 3D structures

Researchers have developed a new technique to control self-folding three-dimensional (3D) structures. Specifically, the researchers use templates to constrain deformation in certain selected areas on a two-dimensional structure, which in turn dictates the resulting 3D structure of the material.

10h

 

After 60 years, scientists uncover how thalidomide produced birth defects

More than 60 years after the drug thalidomide caused birth defects in thousands of children whose mothers took the drug while pregnant, scientists have solved a mystery that has lingered ever since the dangers of the drug first became apparent: how did the drug produce such severe fetal harm?

10h

 

New lung cell type discovered

Two research teams report the discovery of a new, rare type of cell in the human airway. These cells appear to be the primary source of activity of the CFTR gene, mutations to which cause cystic fibrosis.

10h

 

Icy Greenland's heated geologic past

By mapping the heat escaping from below the Greenland Ice Sheet, a scientist has sharpened our understanding of the dynamics that dominate and shape terrestrial planets.

10h

 

Death Valley Smashes Heat Record, 2nd Year in a Row

The hottest place in the U.S., Death Valley, was not left out of this year's record-breaking heat wave.

10h

 

Plastic junk spews greenhouse gases, just like cows and cars

Environment New study directly links plastics and climate change. A new study reveals that plastics—especially the most common single-use plastics—are directly contributing to climate change.

10h

 

Fin7: The Inner Workings of a Billion-Dollar Hacking Group

The Justice Department announced the arrest of three members of notorious cybercrime group Fin7—and detailed some of their methods in the process.

10h

 

Tesla burns $739.5 million in cash on way to record 2Q loss

Electric car maker Tesla Inc. burned through $739.5 million in cash last quarter, paving the way to a company record $717.5 million net loss as it cranked out more electric cars.

10h

 

Man charged with hacking network of hospital convicted

A Massachusetts man has been convicted by a federal jury for attacking the computer network of a world-renowned hospital.

10h

 

Australian Akshay Venkatesh wins Fields medal – the 'Nobel for maths'

US-based professor is only the second Australian to win the prestigious prize The Australian mathematician Akshay Venkatesh has won the Fields medal, the mathematics equivalent of the Nobel prize. He becomes only the second Australian to win the prestigious prize, after Terence Tao in 2006. It is only awarded every four years to up to four mathematicians who are under 40. Continue reading…

10h

 

Politicization and prioritization in the judiciary

In "The Politics of Selecting the Bench from the Bar: The Legal Profession and Partisan Incentives to Introduce Ideology into Judicial Selection," published in the Journal of Law and Economics, Adam Bonica and Maya Sen analyze how and why American courts become politicized. The authors present a theory of strategic selection in which politicians appoint judges with specific ideological backgrounds

10h

 

Exoplanets where life could develop as it did on Earth

Scientists have identified a group of planets outside our solar system where the same chemical conditions that may have led to life on Earth exist.

10h

 

Nature holds key to nurturing green water treatment facilities

Scientists have pioneered an innovative new method to incorporate ecological processes to allow 'green' water treatment facilities.

10h

 

Climate change-driven droughts are getting hotter, study finds

In a new study, researchers report that temperatures during droughts have been rising faster than in average climates in recent decades, and they point to concurrent changes in atmospheric water vapor as a driver of the surge.

10h

 

Yeast grow — but can't always breed — with their 16 chromosomes fused into two

Baker's yeast survive and grow after a drastic reorganization, not of their genes, but of the chromosome superstructures that house, protect and control access to their DNA code.

10h

 

Harmful dyes in lakes, rivers can become colorless with new, sponge-like material

Scientists have created an environmentally friendly way to remove color from dyes in water in a matter of seconds.

10h

 

Chirality switching in biomineral structures

Researchers have discovered a mechanism by which helical biomineral structures can be synthesized to spiral clockwise or counterclockwise using only either the left-handed or right-handed version of a single acidic amino acid.

10h

 

Insight into catalysis through novel study of X-ray absorption spectroscopy

An international team has made a breakthrough at BESSY II. For the first time, they succeeded in investigating electronic states of a transition metal in detail and drawing reliable conclusions on their catalytic effect from the data. These results are helpful for the development of future applications of catalytic transition-metal systems.

10h

 

In darters, male competition drives evolution of flashy fins, bodies

Scientists once thought that female mate choice alone accounted for the eye-catching color patterns seen in some male fish. But for orangethroat darters, male-to-male competition is the real force behind the flash, a new study finds.

10h

 

On-chip optical filter processes wide range of light wavelengths

Researchers have designed an optical filter on a chip that can process optical signals from across an extremely wide spectrum of light at once, something never before available to integrated optics systems that process data using light. The technology may offer greater precision and flexibility for designing optical communication and sensor systems, studying photons and other particles through ult

10h

 

Polymer pill proves it can deliver

Selecting the right packaging to get precious cargo from point A to point B can be a daunting task. Scientists have wrestled with a similar set of questions when packaging medicine for delivery in the bloodstream: How much packing will keep it safe? Is it the right packing material? Is it too big? Is it too heavy? Researchers have developed a new type of container that seems to be the perfect fit

10h

 

Soil phosphorus availability and lime: More than just pH?

Plants can't do without phosphorus. But there is often a 'withdrawal limit' on how much phosphorus they can get from the soil. A new study looks at how liming, soil management history and enzymes relate to plants' access to phosphorus.

10h

 

Alzheimer's drug may stop disease if used before symptoms develop, study suggests

Biologists have gained new understanding of how Alzheimer's disease begins, and how it might be halted using a current medication.

10h

 

Birds categorize colors just like humans do

For a reddish-beaked bird called the zebra finch, sexiness is color-coded. Males have beaks that range from light orange to dark red. But to females, a male's colored bill may simply be hot, or not, findings suggest. Due to a phenomenon called categorical perception, zebra finches partition the range of hues from red to orange into two discrete categories, much like humans do, researchers report.

10h

 

Deportation and family separation impact entire communities, researchers say

The deportation and forced separation of immigrants has negative effects that extend beyond individuals and families to entire communities in the United States, according to a division of the American Psychological Association.

10h

 

Molecular mechanisms of rare skin disease uncovered

Scientists describe a group of proteins that protect cells from a subtype of human papilloma virus. They also outline genetic mutations that make this virus unusually harmful in people with epidermodysplasia verruciformis, a rare skin condition.

10h

 

Gas sensing gut pill beats breath test diagnosis

Findings show the revolutionary gas-sensing capsule, which provides real time detection and measurement of gut gases, could surpass breath testing as the benchmark for diagnosing gut disorders.

10h

 

Case study: Child's lobectomy reveals brain's ability to reorganize its visual system

Researchers report on three years of behavioral and brain imaging tests on a nearly seven year-old boy — 'UD' — who had a third of the right hemisphere of his brain removed in an attempt to control seizures. Even though the procedure left UD unable to see the left side, the team found that his brain's left hemisphere eventually compensated for visual tasks such as recognizing faces and objects.

10h

 

Sex problems among middle-aged Canadians common

Researchers found nearly 40 per cent of women and almost 30 per cent of men between the ages of 40 and 59 face challenges in their sex lives. Based on a first-ever national survey of 2,400 people, the study found low desire, vaginal dryness and difficulty achieving orgasm to be common challenges facing women. Low desire and erectile and ejaculation problems are the common challenges facing men.

10h

 

Microscale superlubricity could pave way for future improved electromechanical devices

A new study finds that robust superlubricity can be achieved using graphite and hexagonal boron nitride, which exhibit ultra-low friction and wear. This is an important milestone for future technological applications in the space, automotive, electronics and medical industries.

10h

 

Distrust of power influences choice of medical procedures

Many individuals prefer to resort to the techniques used in complementary and alternative medicine, even though they may have been expressly warned against these. According to recent research, this may be associated with a potent underlying predisposition to believe in conspiracy theories, a trait known as a conspiracy mentality.

10h

 

Insight into loss processes in perovskite solar cells enables efficiency improvements

In perovskite solar cells, charge carriers are mainly lost through recombination occurring at interface defect sites. In contrast, recombination at defect sites within the perovskite layer does not limit the performance of the solar cells at present. Teams from the University of Potsdam and the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB) were able to reach this interesting conclusion through extremely accurate

10h

 

Women with polycystic ovary syndrome more likely to have a child with autism

Women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) are more likely than other women to have an autistic child, according to an analysis of data.

10h

 

Novel drug cocktails strengthen targeted cancer therapies while lessening side effects

Researchers have discovered that certain drug cocktails help targeted therapies attack cancer more efficiently while lessening common side effects.

10h

 

Latent TB treatment: Shorter is better

Treatment of latent tuberculosis is set to transform after a pair of studies from the Research-Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (RI-MUHC) revealed that a shorter treatment was safer and more effective in children and adults compared to the current standard. These findings are published today in the New England Journal of Medicine.

11h

 

Harmless or hormone disorder? A new test enables quick diagnosis for drinking by the liter

Drinking excessive amounts of fluids can be a medically unremarkable habit, but it could also signify a rare hormone disorder. A new procedure now enables a fast and reliable diagnosis. Researchers from the University of Basel and University Hospital Basel reported these findings in the New England Journal of Medicine.

11h

 

Fishing fleets travelling further to catch fewer fish

Industrial fishing fleets have doubled the distance they travel to fishing grounds since 1950, which means that they are now able to reach 90 percent of the global ocean, but are catching only a third of what they did 65 years ago per kilometer traveled.

11h

 

Advanced microscopy technique reveals new aspects of water at the nanoscale level

A new microscopy technique allows researchers to visualize liquids at the nanoscale level — about 10 times more resolution than with traditional transmission electron microscopy — for the first time.

11h

 

New competition for MOFs: Scientists make stronger COFs

Hollow molecular structures known as COFs suffer from an inherent problem: It's difficult to keep a network of COFs connected in harsh chemical environments. Now, a team has used a chemical process discovered decades ago to make the linkages between COFs much more sturdy, and to give the COFs new characteristics that could expand their applications.

11h

 

Troubled waters: Wealthy nations are responsible for almost all of trackable industrial fishing across the global oceans

As the global population booms, equitable access to healthy food sources is more important than ever. But a new study shows that wealthy countries' industrial fishing fleets dominate the global oceans. This skew in power and control has important implications for how our planet shares food and wealth.

11h

 

Common evolutionary origins between vertebrates and invertebrates revealed

Researchers have elucidated the evolutionary origins of placodes and neural crests, which are defining features of vertebrates, through lineage tracing and genetic analysis in Ciona intestinalis, a marine invertebrate animal. Striking similarities between the patterning of the lateral plate in Ciona and the compartmentalization of the neural plate ectoderm in vertebrates were observed, suggesting

11h

 

Makeup of an individual's gut bacteria may play role in weight loss

A preliminary study suggests that, for some people, specific activities of gut bacteria may be responsible for their inability to lose weight, despite adherence to strict diet and exercise regimens.

11h

 

Breaking up 'fatbergs': Engineers develop technique to break down fats, oil and grease

Cooking oil and similar waste can clog pipes, harm fish and even grow into solid deposits like the 'fatbergs' that recently blocked London's sewage system. But researchers may have found a way to treat these fats, oils and grease — collectively called FOG — and turn them into energy.

11h

 

Blind people depend on timing cues for some spatial awareness

It's a popular idea in books and movies that blind people develop super sensitive hearing to help navigate the world around them. But a new study shows that, in at least one situation, blind people have more trouble discerning the location of sounds than do people who can see.

11h

 

New tuberculosis treatment could help tackle global epidemic

One quarter of the world’s population has latent tuberculosis – with 10.4m new cases and 1.7m deaths reported in 2016 alone A new, shorter and safer drug regime for latent tuberculosis could help curb the global epidemic by increasing the numbers successfully treated and reducing the pool of infection, researchers believe. Two groundbreaking studies, one in adults and the other in children, have

11h

 

2017 Was One Of The Hottest Years On Record

Greenhouse gas concentrations reached a record high. Global sea level was the highest on record, too. NOAA's State of the Climate report points to the urgency of addressing climate change. (Image credit: Yasin Akgul/AFP/Getty Images)

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Newfound airway cells may breathe life into tackling cystic fibrosis

A newly discovered cell in the lining of the airways is the primary site of activity for the gene that, when defective, causes cystic fibrosis.

11h

 

Researchers put a new spin on cooling electronic hotspots

The longevity of electronic devices is tested in many ways as they endure the rigors of daily usage. Even when they are treated with the utmost care, they still have a major challenge to overcome – the removal of heat.

11h

 

Reddit Got Hacked Thanks to a Woefully Insecure Two-Factor SetupReddit 2FA User Data

The tech community has known about the risk of using SMS in two-factor authentication for years. Reddit appears to have missed the memo.

11h

 

Politicization and prioritization in the judiciary

In "The Politics of Selecting the Bench from the Bar: The Legal Profession and Partisan Incentives to Introduce Ideology into Judicial Selection," published in the Journal of Law and Economics, Adam Bonica and Maya Sen analyze how and why American courts become politicized. The authors present a theory of strategic selection in which politicians appoint judges with specific ideological backgrounds

11h

 

Breast tissue tumor suppressor PTEN: A potential Achilles heel for breast cancer cells

A highly collaborative team of researchers at the Medical University of South Carolina and Ohio State University report in Nature Communications that they have identified a novel pathway for connective tissue PTEN in breast cancer cell response to radiotherapy.

11h

 

Nowhere to hide: Molecular probe illuminates elusive cancer stem cells in live mice

After a primary tumor is treated, cancer stem cells may still lurk in the body, ready to metastasize and cause a recurrence of the cancer in a form that's more aggressive and resistant to treatment. University of Illinois researchers have developed a molecular probe that seeks out these elusive cells and lights them up so they can be identified, tracked and studied not only in cell cultures, but i

11h

 

Deadly Ebola Strikes Anew, a Week After Previous Outbreak Was Extinguished

At least 20 people have died as the Ebola virus struck the Democratic Republic of Congo again.

11h

 

California Carr Fire Leaves Many Unsure About Their Future

People who escaped the Carr fire near Redding, Calif., are living with uncertainty. Some know they lost their homes, others know their homes are standing but don't know when they can go back.

11h

 

With one island’s losses, the king penguin species shrinks by a third

Once home to the largest known colony of king penguins, Île aux Cochons has lost most of its birds for unknown reason.

11h

 

Death Valley sets tentative world record for hottest month (Update)

The natural furnace of California's Death Valley was on full broil in July, tentatively setting a world record for hottest month ever.

11h

 

Innovation and speculation drive stock market bubble activity, according to new study

A group of data scientists conducted an in-depth analysis of major innovations and stock market bubbles from 1825 through 2000 and came away with novel takeaways of their own as they found some very distinctive patterns in the occurrence of bubbles over 175 years.

11h

 

Study expands what we know about natural, low-cost ways to remove pollutants from water

Newly published research by a Dickinson College chemistry professor is advancing what we know about the power of fruit and vegetable peels to remove pollutants, such as dyes and heavy metals, from water. Cindy Samet, professor of chemistry, and her students performed water purification experiments using peels and seeds from more than a dozen varieties of foods—from pumpkin and okra to lemon and ba

11h

 

Computer simulations predict the spread of HIV

In a recently published study in the journal Nature Microbiology, researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory show that computer simulations can accurately predict the transmission of HIV across populations, which could aid in preventing the disease.

11h

 

NASA's GPM sees Tropical Storm Hector forming

Tropical storm Hector was forming in the eastern Pacific Ocean southwest of Mexico when the GPM core observatory satellite passed over on July 31.

11h

 

The World's Deepest, Rarest Diamonds Revealed a Big Secret About Our Planet's Interior

Only about 0.02 percent of the world's diamonds are naturally blue. That rare minority holds some huge secrets about the Earth.

12h

 

Innovation and speculation drive stock market bubble activity, according to new study

A group of data scientists conducted an in-depth analysis of major innovations and stock market bubbles from 1825 through 2000 and came away with novel takeaways of their own as they found some very distinctive patterns in the occurrence of bubbles over 175 years.The study, "Two Centuries of Innovations and Stock Market Bubbles," will be published in the INFORMS journal Marketing Science.

12h

 

Drugs for heart failure are still under-prescribed, years after initial study

This study found that many people with heart failure do not receive the medications recommended for them under guidelines set by the American College of Cardiology, American Heart Association and Heart Failure Society of America.

12h

 

Computer simulations predict the spread of HIV

In a recently published study in the journal Nature Microbiology, researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory show that computer simulations can accurately predict the transmission of HIV across populations, which could aid in preventing the disease.

12h

 

Synthetic suede gives high-end cars that luxury feel

Leather car seats were once synonymous with luxury, but these days, synthetic suede is becoming the material of choice for high-end automobiles. With increased affluence worldwide, and the growing popularity of car-sharing and luxury-driving services, business is booming for manufacturers of synthetic suede. Among these companies, Japanese firms sit snugly in the driver's seat, reports an article

12h

 

95% of lemur population facing extinction: conservationists

Ninety-five percent of the world's lemur population is "on the brink of extinction," making them the most endangered primates on Earth, a leading conservation group said Wednesday.

12h

 

Canada gives big polluters a break on carbon levies

Canada is scaling back its planned carbon pricing scheme to curb greenhouse gas emissions after industry executives warned it would hurt their international competitiveness, the office of the environment minister said Wednesday.

12h

 

Earth Overshoot Day came early this year. That’s a bad thing.

Environment We consumed a year’s worth of natural resources in just seven months. Earth Overshoot Day marks the point on the calendar at which humans have consumed a year’s worth of natural resources. This year, it came early.

12h

 

Wildfire threatens Spain natural park

Firefighters were battling Wednesday to put out a wildfire near one of Spain's famous Estrecho natural park in the south west of the country.

12h

 

12h

 

WhatsApp out to make money from business messagesFacebook WhatsApp Money

Facebook on Wednesday set out to make money from WhatsApp with a scheme to connect businesses with customers via the smartphone messaging service.

12h

 

Steve McQueen's family sues Ferrari over trademark

Steve McQueen's descendants are suing Ferrari for marketing autos around the image of the iconic actor without compensating the family.

12h

 

Fruitful discoveries: The power to purify water is in your produce

A study of more than a dozen foods shows how fruit and vegetable peels can be used as a natural, low-cost way to remove pollutants such as dyes and heavy metals from water. The methods can be used from classrooms to kitchens.

12h

 

Challenges around childbearing owe to dissatisfaction among surgical residents

Refined mentorship programs, further education and understanding are cited as necessary to improve work-life balance

12h

 

NASA's GPM sees Tropical Storm Hector forming

Tropical storm Hector was forming in the eastern Pacific Ocean southwest of Mexico when the GPM core observatory satellite passed over on July 31.

12h

 

NASA satellite finds Jongdari a Tropical Depression

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite found Tropical Depression Jongdari was still being battered by wind shear.

12h

 

Student charged in elaborate digital money theft scheme

A Massachusetts college student who was named his high school's valedictorian for his savvy tech skills hacked into unsuspecting investors' personal cellphones, email and social media accounts to steal at least $2 million in digital currency like Bitcoin, according to documents provided by California prosecutors Wednesday.

12h

 

Three Ukrainians arrested for hacking over 100 US companies

Three Ukrainians have been arrested for hacking more than 100 US companies and stealing millions of credit and debit card numbers, the Department of Justice announced Wednesday.

12h

 

NASA satellite finds Jongdari a Tropical Depression

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite found Tropical Depression Jongdari was still being battered by wind shear.

12h

 

Chirality switching in biomineral structures

Researchers at McGill University have discovered a mechanism by which helical biomineral structures can be synthesized to spiral clockwise or counterclockwise using only either the left-handed or right-handed version of a single acidic amino acid.

12h

 

Facebook and Instagram launch 'wellness dashboard' to help users combat app addictionFacebook Instagram

Facebook and Instagram are introducing new tools that let mobile users track and manage how they spend time on their apps, like a timer that reminds you when you’ve hit a self-imposed app use time limit, and an option to limit notifications. Read More

12h

 

Study: Sci-fi and fantasy readers are killing it in the relationship department

It's all about having mature ideas about how romantic relationships work. Read More

12h

 

How America supplies the world with weapons

The United States is by far the world's largest dealer of arms, which often fall into the wrong hands. Read More

12h

 

New Ebola Outbreak Declared in the Democratic Republic of the Congo

Experimental therapies, shipped to the DRC for its last outbreak, are still in the country — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

12h

 

How Rare Blue Diamonds Form Deep below the Ocean Floor

Minerals and elements are recycled in Earth’s mantle to form the precious gems — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

12h

 

NASA satellite finds 16W now subtropical

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite found 16W was still being battered by wind shear after transitioning into an extra-tropical cyclone.

12h

 

Newly discovered crossbill species numbers few

As might be expected for a recently discovered bird species in the continental United States—only the second in nearly 80 years—the Cassia Crossbill (Loxia sinesciuris) is range-restricted. It occurs in just two small mountain ranges on the northeast edge of the Great Basin Desert where it is engaged in a coevolutionary arms race with lodgepole pine. Based on a current paper in The Condor: Ornitho

12h

 

Chirality switching in biomineral structures

Researchers at McGill University have discovered a mechanism by which helical biomineral structures can be synthesized to spiral clockwise or counterclockwise using only either the left-handed or right-handed version of a single acidic amino acid.

12h

 

NASA satellite finds 16W now subtropical

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite found 16W was still being battered by wind shear after transitioning into an extra-tropical cyclone.

12h

 

Collusion Is Worse Than a Crime

It’s a crime for a U.S. presidential campaign knowingly to receive—or even solicit—anything of value from any foreign entity. It’s a crime for anyone, campaign or not, to knowingly receive stolen data. In fact, receiving stolen data triggers a complex nexus of crimes, both state and federal. Donald Trump Jr., Jared Kushner, Paul Manafort, and other top Trump aides met with a lawyer who identified

12h

 

Yeast still grow—but can't always breed—when their sixteen chromosomes are fused into two

Baker's yeast survive and grow after a drastic reorganization, not of their genes, but of the chromosome superstructures that house, protect and control access to their DNA code, a study just published in Nature finds.

12h

 

Wealthy nations responsible for almost all of trackable industrial fishing across the global oceans

As the global population booms, equitable access to healthy food sources is more important than ever. But, a study conducted by researchers at UC Santa Barbara shows that wealthy countries' industrial fishing fleets dominate the global oceans. This skew in power and control has important implications for how our planet shares food and wealth.

12h

 

New technique uses templates to guide self-folding 3-D structures

Researchers from North Carolina State University have developed a new technique to control self-folding three-dimensional (3-D) structures. Specifically, the researchers use templates to constrain deformation in certain selected areas on a two-dimensional structure, which in turn dictates the resulting 3-D structure of the material.

12h

 

Advanced microscopy technique reveals new aspects of water at the nanoscale level

A new microscopy technique developed at the University of Illinois at Chicago allows researchers to visualize liquids at the nanoscale level—about 10 times more resolution than with traditional transmission electron microscopy—for the first time.

12h

 

New competition for MOFs: Scientists make stronger COFs

Hollow molecular structures known as COFs (covalent organic frameworks), which could serve as selective filters or containers for other substances and have many other potential uses, also tend to suffer from an inherent problem: It's difficult to keep a network of COFs connected in harsh chemical environments.

12h

 

Harmful dyes in lakes, rivers can become colorless with new, sponge-like material

A team led by the University of Washington has created an environmentally friendly way to remove color from dyes in water in a matter of seconds.

13h

 

Getting Micro: The Deal With Stem Cells

Stem cells represent an exciting scientific frontier, but they're also capable of producing some scary results. (Image credit: SAM PANTHAKY/AFP/Getty Images)

13h

 

Harmful dyes in lakes, rivers can become colorless with new, sponge-like material

Dyes are widely used in industries such as textiles, cosmetics, food processing, papermaking and plastics. Globally, we produce about 700,000 metric tons—the weight of two Empire State Buildings—of dye each year to color our clothing, eye shadow, toys and vending machine candy.

13h

 

What If Earth Turned into a Giant Pile of Blueberries?

A curious thought experiment explores the physics at play on and within exotic worlds — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

13h

 

'Blurred face' news anonymity gets an artificial intelligence spin

Researchers have devised a way to replace the use of 'blurring' faces in news reports when anonymity is needed. The team's method uses artificial intelligence (AI) techniques that aim to improve visuals while amplifying emotions tied to the story.

13h

 

DIY robots help marine biologists discover new deep-sea dwellers

A multidisciplinary group of engineers, marine biologists, and roboticists have developed a sampling device that is soft, flexible, and customizable, which allows scientists to gently collect different types of organisms from the sea without harming them.

13h

 

Number-Theory Prodigy Among Winners of Most Coveted Prize in Mathematics

The Fields Medals have been awarded to four researchers who work on number theory, geometry and network analysis — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

13h

 

Your Gut Bacteria May Make It Harder to Lose Weight

People's gut bacteria may play a role in determining how easy, or difficult, it is for them to lose weight, a new study suggests.

13h

 

Newly discovered crossbill species numbers few

As might be expected for a recently discovered bird species in the continental United States — only the second in nearly 80 years — the Cassia crossbill is range-restricted, occurring in just two small mountain ranges on the northeast edge of the Great Basin Desert. Based on a new study, Cassia crossbills occupy about 70 km2 of lodgepole pine forest and number only ~5,800 birds.

13h

 

The weirdest things we learned this week: art made from human skin, solving a 17th-century thought experiment, and detachable sex organs

Science Our editors scrounged up some truly bizarre facts. What’s the weirdest thing you learned this week? Well, whatever it is, we promise you’ll have an even weirder answer if you listen to PopSci’s newest podcast.

13h

 

Trees travelling west: How climate is changing our forests

Many studies on the impacts of global temperature rise have suggested that the range of trees will migrate poleward and upward. However, new research suggests that more tree species have shifted westward than poleward.

13h

 

Troubled waters

Research concludes that wealthy nations are responsible for almost all of trackable industrial fishing across the global oceans.

14h

 

Yeast grow — but can't always breed — with their 16 chromosomes fused into two

Baker's yeast survive and grow after a drastic reorganization, not of their genes, but of the chromosome superstructures that house, protect and control access to their DNA code.

14h

 

Scientists identify new mechanisms underlying pediatric kidney cancer

Connecting two previously unrelated insights about the formation of pediatric kidney cancer, researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center have uncovered the means by which the cancer continues to grow, providing potential targets for more effective treatments in the future.

14h

 

New technique uses templates to guide self-folding 3D structures

Researchers have developed a new technique to control self-folding three-dimensional (3D) structures. Specifically, the researchers use templates to constrain deformation in certain selected areas on a two-dimensional structure, which in turn dictates the resulting 3D structure of the material.

14h

 

Fishing fleets travelling further to catch fewer fish

Industrial fishing fleets have doubled the distance they travel to fishing grounds since 1950, which means that they are now able to reach 90 percent of the global ocean, but are catching only a third of what they did 65 years ago per kilometer traveled.

14h

 

Microscopic imaging pierces the 'black box' of cancer bone metastasis

Scientists at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have engineered a system allowing microscopic monitoring and imaging of cancer that has spread to the bone in mice so they can better understand and develop treatment for bone metastasis in humans.

14h

 

Degrading plastics revealed as source of greenhouse gases

Researchers from the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (SOEST) discovered that several greenhouse gases are emitted as common plastics degrade in the environment.

14h

 

Hospital-associated bacterial species becoming tolerant to alcohol disinfectants

A multidrug-resistant bacterial species that can cause infections in hospitals is becoming increasingly tolerant to the alcohols used in handwash disinfectants, a new study finds.

14h

 

Nature holds key to nurturing green water treatment facilities

The quest to develop greener and more affordable methods to treat wastewater has taken a new, innovative twist.

14h

 

Women with polycystic ovary syndrome dissatisfied with medical care

A US-based survey of women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), a common condition characterized by reproductive and metabolic problems, points to distrust and lack of social support from healthcare providers as major contributing factors in their negative medical care experiences, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of the Endocrine Society.

14h

 

Scientists identify exoplanets where life could develop as it did on Earth

Scientists have identified a group of planets outside our solar system where the same chemical conditions that may have led to life on Earth exist.

14h

 

Climate change-driven droughts are getting hotter, UCI study finds

In a study published today in Science Advances, researchers at the University of California, Irvine report that temperatures during droughts have been rising faster than in average climates in recent decades, and they point to concurrent changes in atmospheric water vapor as a driver of the surge.

14h

 

BioBits: Teaching synthetic biology to K-12 students

As biologists have probed deeper into the genetic underpinnings of life, K-12 schools have struggled to provide a curriculum that reflects those advances. Now, a collaboration between the Wyss Institute at Harvard University, MIT, and Northwestern University has developed BioBits, new educational biology kits that teach students the basic principles of molecular and synthetic biology through fun,

14h

 

Inexpensive biology kits offer hands-on experience with DNA

To help students gain a better grasp of biological concepts, MIT and Northwestern University researchers have designed educational kits that can be used to perform experiments with DNA, to produce glowing proteins, scents, or other easily observed phenomena.

14h

 

UTMB researchers successfully transplant bioengineered lung

A research team at the University of Texas Medical Branch have bioengineered lungs and transplanted them into adult pigs with no medical complication.

14h

 

Epigenetic immune cell diagnostic tool helps detect diseases in newborns not currently identified

A novel diagnostic approach using epigenetic immune monitoring to screen newborns for inherited diseases could expand the number of life-threatening immune deficiencies identified in newborns, as well as advance treatment for HIV patients in low-resource countries.

14h

 

A soft, on-the-fly solution to a hard, underwater problem

Studying the animals that live in the deep ocean is notoriously difficult, especially because the underwater equipment that exists for sampling them is designed for marine oil and gas exploration and frequently damages the delicate creatures they're trying to capture. Now, researchers have created a soft, flexible sampling device that interacts with delicate marine life gently, and can be 3D print

14h

 

Salads and Wraps Sold at Trader Joe's, Kroger, Walgreens May Be Contaminated with Cyclospora Parasite

Just when you thought it was "safe" to eat salad again, there's news that more salad products may be contaminated, this time with a parasite called Cyclospora.

14h

 

Scientists Are 'Spying On Whales' To Learn How They Eat, Talk And … Walked?

Paleobiologist Nick Pyenson is dedicated to uncovering the "hidden lives" of whales. He says that 40 million to 50 million years ago, they had four legs and lived at least part of their lives on land. (Image credit: J. Scott Applewhite/AP)

14h

 

Frequent sauna bathing has many health benefits

A new report found that sauna bathing is associated with a reduction in the risk of vascular diseases, such as high blood pressure and cardiovascular disease, neurocognitive diseases, nonvascular conditions, such as pulmonary diseases, mental health disorders, and mortality. Furthermore, sauna bathing alleviated conditions such as skin diseases, arthritis, headache, and flu. The evidence also sugg

14h

 

How firefighters and others take leaps of faith

A study of firefighters in the United States breaks new ground in understanding how groups of workers — especially those in high-risk occupations — are able to take leaps of faith. The study conveys what goes into a person's ability to make critical trust-related judgments. It also has relevance and managerial implications in an era of declining trust in both people and institutions, the study's

14h

 

Bacteria becoming resistant to hospital disinfectants, warn scientists

The alcohol-based handrubs that hospitals use to prevent infection are becoming less effective, research has shown Hospitals will need to use new strategies to tackle bacteria experts have warned, after finding a type of hospital superbug is becoming increasingly tolerant of alcohol – the key component of current disinfectant hand rubs. Handwashes based on alcohols such as isopropanol have become

14h

 

New Lung Cell Identified

The cell type was discovered via single-cell RNA sequencing of thousands of cells in mouse and human airways and may play a role in cystic fibrosis.

14h

 

Jordan Peterson's 5 most controversial ideas, explained

Jordan Peterson is one of the most controversial public figures in recent years. Here's a recap of some of his ideas. Read More

14h

 

Bioengineers Are Closer Than Ever To Lab-Grown Lungs

The first research team to bioengineer human lungs in a lab have now performed multiple successful transplants in pigs.

14h

 

Scientists identify exoplanets where life could develop as it did on Earth

Scientists have identified a group of planets outside our solar system where the same chemical conditions that may have led to life on Earth exist.

14h

 

Industrial fisheries' expansion impacts 90 per cent of the global ocean, causes massive catch decline

Industrial fishing fleets have doubled the distance they travel to fishing grounds since 1950 but catch only a third of what they did 65 years ago per kilometre travelled, a new study has found.

14h

 

Degrading plastics revealed as source of greenhouse gases

Researchers from the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (SOEST) discovered that several greenhouse gases are emitted as common plastics degrade in the environment.

14h

 

BioBits: Teaching synthetic biology to K-12 students

As biologists have probed deeper into the molecular and genetic underpinnings of life, K-12 schools have struggled to provide a curriculum that reflects those advances. Hands-on learning is known to be more engaging and effective for teaching science to students, but even the most basic molecular and synthetic biology experiments require equipment far beyond an average classroom's budget, and ofte

14h

 

Climate change-driven droughts are getting hotter, study finds

Dry months are getting hotter in large parts of the United States, another sign that human-caused climate change is forcing people to encounter new extremes.

14h

 

Wild horses in Theodore Roosevelt National Park have mixed ancestry

Feral horses living in Theodore Roosevelt National Park in the Badlands of North Dakota likely had multiple origins, but have since become inbred, according to Igor Ovchinnikov of the University of North Dakota, and colleagues, in a study published August 1 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE.

14h

 

Nature holds key to nurturing green water treatment facilities

The quest to develop greener and more affordable methods to treat wastewater has taken a new, innovative twist.

14h

 

Too Much of a Good Thing at NASA

In June, NASA officials announced some distressing news : America’s next great space telescope won’t launch next spring, as they had hoped. Engineers needed more time to finish it. Their new deadline, they said, is 2021. To explain the delay, officials brought in Tom Young, a highly respected engineer who has been involved with NASA since the 1970s. Young ran through a litany of problems, each mo

14h

 

China Is Still Sorting Through Its Colorful Bike-Share Graveyards

Back in March, I posted “ The Bike-Share Oversupply in China: Huge Piles of Abandoned and Broken Bicycles ,” showing just some of the millions of bicycles that had been rapidly built and dumped into Chinese cities by bike-share companies looking to get in on the next big thing, only to crash hard. In the months since, more of those bike-share startups have gone bankrupt or consolidated, and the b

14h

 

Chinese Tech Isn’t the Enemy

On a recent tour of an enormous, impressive set of artificial-intelligence labs in Beijing, I saw a scene straight out of Silicon Valley : Bright 20-something Chinese researchers with hipster glasses and pink streaked hair sat at row after row of open tables, headphones in, working hard. Projects ranged from innocuous applications like the AI-enabled bicycle share Mobike or the online education p

14h

 

Study: Alzheimer's drug may stop disease if used before symptoms develop

Biologists have gained new understanding of how Alzheimer's disease begins, and how it might be halted using a current medication.

14h

 

NewcCompetition for MOFs: Scientists make stronger COFs

Hollow molecular structures known as COFs suffer from an inherent problem: It's difficult to keep a network of COFs connected in harsh chemical environments. Now, a team at the Berkeley Lab has used a chemical process discovered decades ago to make the linkages between COFs much more sturdy, and to give the COFs new characteristics that could expand their applications.

14h

 

Advanced microscopy technique reveals new aspects of water at the nanoscale level

A new microscopy technique developed at the University of Illinois at Chicago allows researchers to visualize liquids at the nanoscale level — about 10 times more resolution than with traditional transmission electron microscopy — for the first time.

14h

 

Planet Nine: 'Insensitive' Term Riles Scientists

Calling the hypothetical undiscovered world in the outer solar system "Planet Nine" doesn't show the proper amount of respect to the discoverer of the original ninth planet, Pluto, a group of researchers argues.

14h

 

Scientists are putting the X factor back in X-rays

Technology Medical imaging will be revolutionized by extreme light, artificial intelligence, and more. The X-ray has been an essential medical tool since its discovery in 1895. Now, it’s undergoing an incredible change.

14h

 

As temperatures rise, Earth's soil is 'breathing' more heavily

The vast reservoir of carbon stored beneath our feet is entering Earth's atmosphere at an increasing rate, according to a new study. Blame microbes: When they chew on decaying leaves and dead plants, they convert a storehouse of carbon into carbon dioxide that enters the atmosphere.

14h

 

Diesel Dave’s 18-Month-Old Is Already “Driving” | Diesel Brothers

Buckle up with new dad Diesel Dave and his daughter Saylor Fe as they enjoy a morning ride with Hoot in their UTV. Stream Full Episodes of Diesel Brothers: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/diesel-brothers/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DieselBrothersTV https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow on Twitter: https://twitter.c

14h

 

Researchers Fuse Chromosomes to Create New Yeast Strains

Saccharomyces cerevisiae showed only minor alterations in growth and gene expression when its 16 chromosomes were combined.

14h

 

In Middle School, ‘You’re Trying to Build a Parachute as You’re Falling’

Social media has now been around long enough that teens who grew up with it are now adults who can make art about that experience. If stereotypes about young people and the internet were true, one might expect such art to be narcissistic or shallow or Instagrammy. But Eighth Grade, a new movie written and directed by Bo Burnham, a former YouTube star, is generous and deep, and makes room for all

14h

 

Grieving orca highlights plight of endangered whales

Whale researchers are keeping close watch on an endangered orca that has spent the past week keeping her dead calf afloat in Pacific Northwest waters, a display that has struck an emotional chord around the world and highlighted the plight of the declining population that has not seen a successful birth since 2015.

14h

 

What makes diamonds blue? Boron from oceanic crustal remnants in Earth's lower mantle

Blue diamonds — like the world-famous Hope Diamond at the National Museum of Natural History — formed up to four times deeper in the Earth's mantle than most other diamonds, according to new work.

14h

 

Women seeing baby animals have a reduced appetite for meat

Images of baby animals reduces people's appetite for meat say researchers, who found that the effect is much stronger for women than for men. The findings may reflect women's greater emotional attunement towards babies and, by extension, their tendency to empathize more with baby animals. Also, meat is associated with masculinity and images of tough men who consume meat for muscle building protein

14h

 

3D-Printed implants shown to help grow 'real bone'

Chemically coated, ceramic implants successfully guided the regrowth of missing bone in lab animals while 'steadily dissolving,' researchers report.

14h

 

Germany moves to tackle sales tax fraud in e-commerce

The German government on Wednesday approved a draft law to crack down on VAT fraud in online sales by tightening the rules for e-commerce giants like Amazon and eBay.

14h

 

Arctic heat melts away Sweden's highest peak

Sweden's highest peak, a glacier on the southern tip of the Kebnekaise mountain, is melting due to record hot Arctic temperatures and is no longer the nation's tallest point, scientists said Wednesday.

14h

 

Large supercrystals promise superior sensors

Using an artful combination of nanotechnology and basic chemistry, Sandia National Laboratories researchers have encouraged gold nanoparticles to self-assemble into unusually large supercrystals that could significantly improve the detection sensitivity for chemicals in explosives or drugs.

14h

 

Large supercrystals promise superior sensors

Supercrystals grown from tiny particles of gold have finer sensing capabilities than those commonly used to detect the chemicals in drugs or explosives.

15h

 

Researchers uncover molecular mechanisms of rare skin disease

Scientists describe a group of proteins that protect cells from a subtype of human papilloma virus. They also outline genetic mutations that make this virus unusually harmful in people with epidermodysplasia verruciformis, a rare skin condition.

15h

 

Understanding soil through its microbiome

Soil is full of life, essential for nutrient cycling and carbon storage. To better understand how it functions, an international research team led by EMBL and the University of Tartu (Estonia) conducted the first global study of bacteria and fungi in soil. Their results show that bacteria and fungi are in constant competition for nutrients and produce an arsenal of antibiotics to gain an advantage

15h

 

Discovery gives cystic fibrosis researchers new direction

A multi-disciplinary team of researchers at the Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research (NIBR) and Harvard Medical School (HMS) started out trying to catalogue all the different cells in the airway and the paths they take to become those cells. In the process, they discovered a completely new type of cell, which they name a pulmonary ionocyte.

15h

 

What makes diamonds blue? Boron from oceanic crustal remnants in Earth's lower mantle

Blue diamonds — like the world-famous Hope Diamond at the National Museum of Natural History — formed up to four times deeper in the Earth's mantle than most other diamonds, according to new work published on the cover of Nature.

15h

 

Researchers discover new type of lung cell, critical insights for cystic fibrosis

Researchers identified a rare cell type in airway tissue, previously uncharacterized in the scientific literature, that appears to play a key role in the biology of cystic fibrosis. Using new technologies to study gene expression in thousands of individual cells, the team comprehensively analyzed the mouse airway and validated results in human tissue. The molecular survey also characterized other

15h

 

Common evolutionary origins between vertebrates and invertebrates revealed

Tsukuba-centered researchers elucidated the evolutionary origins of placodes and neural crests, which are defining features of vertebrates, through lineage tracing and genetic analysis in Ciona intestinalis, a marine invertebrate animal. Striking similarities between the patterning of the lateral plate in Ciona and the compartmentalization of the neural plate ectoderm in vertebrates were observed,

15h

 

As temperatures rise, Earth's soil is 'breathing' more heavily

The vast reservoir of carbon stored beneath our feet is entering Earth's atmosphere at an increasing rate, according to a new study in the journal Nature. Blame microbes: When they chew on decaying leaves and dead plants, they convert a storehouse of carbon into carbon dioxide that enters the atmosphere.

15h

 

Birds categorize colors just like humans do

For a reddish-beaked bird called the zebra finch, sexiness is color-coded. Males have beaks that range from light orange to dark red. But to females, a male's colored bill may simply be hot, or not, findings suggest. Due to a phenomenon called categorical perception, zebra finches partition the range of hues from red to orange into two discrete categories, much like humans do, researchers report i

15h

 

Frequent sauna bathing has many health benefits, new literature review finds

A new report published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings found that sauna bathing is associated with a reduction in the risk of vascular diseases, such as high blood pressure and cardiovascular disease, neurocognitive diseases, nonvascular conditions, such as pulmonary diseases, mental health disorders, and mortality. Furthermore, sauna bathing alleviated conditions such as skin diseases, arthritis, head

15h

 

FCC Offers Small ISPs a Boost, but a Bigger Setback Looms

Big telecom companies want to end a 22-year-old requirement that they allow upstart rivals to tap into their facilities and equipment.

15h

 

The Tricksters of Afghanistan’s New Online-Dating Scene

Rami Niemi W hen Makiz Nasirahmad, a 24-year-old Afghan American who recently lived in Afghanistan, received a Facebook friend request from a woman with an unfamiliar name, she didn’t think twice about accepting it. The woman’s profile picture had clearly been copied off the internet, but Nasirahmad figured that the woman could be a relative of hers, trying to hide her identity; many families in

15h

 

15h

 

Innovative technique converts white fat to brown fat

Increasing healthy brown fat might help weight management and reduce symptoms of diabetes. Engineers have developed a simple, innovative method to directly convert white fat to brown fat outside the body and then reimplant it in a patient. The technique uses fat-grafting procedures commonly performed by plastic surgeons, in which fat is harvested from under the skin and then retransplanted into th

15h

 

Measure of belly fat in older adults is linked with cognitive impairment

Data from over 5,000 adults over the age of 60 indicates that as waist:hip ratio increases, so does cognitive impairment. The findings have significant implications as the global prevalence of dementia is predicted to increase from 24.3 million in 2001 to 81.1 million by 2040.

15h

 

Deportation and family separation impact entire communities, researchers say

The deportation and forced separation of immigrants has negative effects that extend beyond individuals and families to entire communities in the United States, according to a division of the American Psychological Association, which has issued a policy statement calling for changes to U.S. policy.

15h

 

First global survey of soil genomics reveals a war between fungi and bacteria

Soil is full of life, essential for nutrient cycling and carbon storage. To better understand how it functions, an international research team led by EMBL and the University of Tartu (Estonia) conducted the first global study of bacteria and fungi in soil. Their results show that bacteria and fungi are in constant competition for nutrients and produce an arsenal of antibiotics to gain an advantage

15h

 

Study: How firefighters and others take leaps of faith

A study of firefighters in the United States breaks new ground in understanding how groups of workers—especially those in high-risk occupations—are able to take leaps of faith. The study conveys what goes into a person's ability to make critical trust-related judgments. It also has relevance and managerial implications in an era of declining trust in both people and institutions, the study's autho

15h

 

Sweeping Chinese Landscapes Transformed By Rapid Development

Photographers Sebastien Tixier and Raphael Bourelly took a 300-mile road trip from Gansu province to Inner Mongolia.

15h

 

Breaking up 'fatbergs'—engineers develop technique to break down fats, oil and grease

Cooking oil and similar waste can clog pipes, harm fish and even grow into solid deposits like the "fatbergs" that recently blocked London's sewage system. But UBC researchers may have found a way to treat these fats, oils and grease—collectively called FOG—and turn them into energy.

15h

 

As temperatures rise, Earth's soil is 'breathing' more heavily

The vast reservoir of carbon stored beneath our feet is entering Earth's atmosphere at an increasing rate, most likely as a result of warming temperatures, suggest observations collected from a variety of the Earth's many ecosystems.

15h

 

Birds categorize colors just like humans do

For a small, reddish-beaked bird called the zebra finch, sexiness is color-coded. Males have beaks that range from light orange to dark red. But from a female's point of view, a male's colored bill may simply be hot, or not, new findings suggest.

15h

 

Common evolutionary origins between vertebrates and invertebrates revealed

Placodes and neural crests are defining features of vertebrates (animals with a spinal cord surrounded by cartilage or bone). Placodes are embryonic structures that develop into sensory organs such as ear, nose, and lens cells, while neural crests develop into various cell lineages such as bone, craniofacial cartilage, and epidermal sensory neurons.

15h

 

What makes diamonds blue? Boron from oceanic crustal remnants in Earth's lower mantle

Blue diamonds—like the world-famous Hope Diamond at the National Museum of Natural History—formed up to four times deeper in the Earth's mantle than most other diamonds, according to new work published on the cover of Nature.

15h

 

Racial diversity increases student leadership skills, especially for white students

Universities prepare students to enter the professional workforce, but they also develop the next generation of leaders to head up organizations and drive social change. But, as the United States and its college campuses become more racially diverse, are students being trained to lead within diverse contexts? And how does diversity impact leadership development for both white and non-white student

15h

 

'Blurred face' news anonymity gets an artificial intelligence spin

Researchers in Simon Fraser University's School of Interactive Arts and Technology (SIAT) have devised a way to replace the use of 'blurring' faces in news reports when anonymity is needed. The team's method uses artificial intelligence (AI) techniques that aim to improve visuals while amplifying emotions tied to the story.

15h

 

Nine out of 10 people caring for a family member with dementia don't get enough sleep

More than 90 percent of people caring for a family member with dementia experience poor sleep, according to new research by the University at Buffalo School of Nursing.

15h

 

Trees travelling west: How climate is changing our forests

Many studies on the impacts of global temperature rise have suggested that the range of trees will migrate poleward and upward. However, research that will be presented at the 2018 ESA Annual Meeting in August suggests that more tree species have shifted westward than poleward.

15h

 

Deportation and family separation impact entire communities, researchers say

The deportation and forced separation of immigrants has negative effects that extend beyond individuals and families to entire communities in the United States, according to a division of the American Psychological Association.

15h

 

Rice University study: How firefighters and others take leaps of faith

A study of firefighters in the United States breaks new ground in understanding how groups of workers — especially those in high-risk occupations — are able to take leaps of faith. The study conveys what goes into a person's ability to make critical trust-related judgments. It also has relevance and managerial implications in an era of declining trust in both people and institutions, the study's

15h

 

Innovative technique converts white fat to brown fat

Increasing healthy brown fat might help weight management and reduce symptoms of diabetes. Columbia Engineers have developed a simple, innovative method to directly convert white fat to brown fat outside the body and then reimplant it in a patient. The technique uses fat-grafting procedures commonly performed by plastic surgeons, in which fat is harvested from under the skin and then retransplante

15h

 

Winning the Infectious Disease Marathon

We're immunizing more kids than ever, but the population growth means the percentage of children being protected is stagnating — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

15h

 

Rare blue diamonds are born deep in Earth’s mantle

Rare blue diamonds are among the deepest ever found, and hint at possible pathways for recycling of ocean crust in the mantle.

15h

 

Sole dictator-led countries make tempting target for certain investors

Dictatorships are typically thought to be risky places for investments, but Penn State researchers indicate that the potential to monopolize markets can make up for the risks associated with investing in those regimes.

15h

 

Muslim and Protestant scientists most likely to experience, perceive religious discrimination

Muslim and Protestant scientists are more likely than other U.S. scientists to experience religious discrimination, according to new research from Rice University and West Virginia University (WVU). The study also shows that for some scientists, religious identity may fuel perceptions of discrimination.

15h

 

Monsoon rains found to be beneficial to underground aquifers

The summer monsoon in the deserts of the southwestern U.S. is known for bringing torrents of water, often filling dry stream beds and flooding urban streets. A common misconception when observing the fast moving water generated by monsoon storms is that most of the water is swept away into large rivers, with very little of it percolating into underground aquifers.

15h

 

Effort to Reproduce Cancer Studies Scales Down to 18 Papers

The Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology initially aimed to replicate the results of 50 high-impact research articles.

15h

 

Fast, cheap and colorful 3-D printing

People are exploring the use of 3-D printing for wide-ranging applications, including manufacturing, medical devices, fashion and even food. But one of the most efficient forms of 3-D printing suffers from a major drawback: It can only print objects that are gray or black in color. Now, researchers have tweaked the method so it can print in all of the colors of the rainbow. They report their resul

15h

 

NASA scientists reveal details of icy Greenland's heated geologic past

By mapping the heat escaping from below the Greenland Ice Sheet, a NASA scientist has sharpened our understanding of the dynamics that dominate and shape terrestrial planets.

15h

 

Microscale superlubricity could pave way for future improved electromechanical devices

Lubricity measures the reduction in mechanical friction and wear by a lubricant. These are the main causes of component failure and energy loss in mechanical and electromechanical systems. For example, one-third of the fuel-based energy in vehicles is expended in overcoming friction. So superlubricity—the state of ultra-low friction and wear—holds great promise for the reduction of frictional wear

15h

 

Racial diversity increases student leadership skills, especially for white students

Universities prepare students to enter the professional workforce, but they also develop the next generation of leaders to head up organizations and drive social change. But, as the United States and its college campuses become more racially diverse, are students being trained to lead within diverse contexts? And how does diversity impact leadership development for both white and non-white student

15h

 

Breaking up 'fatbergs': UBC engineers develop technique to break down fats, oil and grease

Cooking oil and similar waste can clog pipes, harm fish and even grow into solid deposits like the 'fatbergs' that recently blocked London's sewage system. But UBC researchers may have found a way to treat these fats, oils and grease — collectively called FOG — and turn them into energy.

15h

 

BIDMC study determines risk factors for opioid misuse

When opioids are prescribed following surgery, approximately four percent of the general patient population will continue using opioids for an extended time period. Race and household income were not significant risk factors for prolonged opioid use. Physicians' prescribing practices may influence patient risk. Patients in the worker's compensation setting experienced the highest rates of prolonge

15h

 

30 Years Ago, Humans Bungled the Best Chance to Stop Climate Change

Could our current climate crisis have been averted?

15h

 

Scientists find holes in light by tying it in knots

Theoretical physicists have found a new way of evaluating how light flows through space — by tying knots in it.

15h

 

First-of-its-kind material for the quantum age

A physicist has discovered a new material that has the potential to become a building block in the new era of quantum materials, those that are composed of microscopically condensed matter and expected to change our development of technology.

15h

 

Heatwave deaths will rise steadily by 2080 as globe warms up

If people cannot adapt to future climate temperatures, deaths caused by severe heatwaves will increase dramatically in tropical and subtropical regions, followed closely by Australia, Europe and the United States, a global new study shows.

15h

 

Scientists discover why elusive aye-aye developed such unusual features

A new study has, for the first time, measured the extent to which the endangered aye-aye has evolved similar features to squirrels, despite being more closely related to monkeys, chimps, and humans.

15h

 

16h

 

Muslim, Protestant scientists most likely to experience, perceive religious discrimination

Muslim and Protestant scientists are more likely than other US scientists to experience religious discrimination, according to new research from Rice University and West Virginia University (WVU).

16h

 

Story tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, August 2018

These are ORNL story tips: residents' shared desire for water security benefits neighborhoods; 3D printed molds for concrete facades promise lower cost, production time; ORNL engineered the edges of structures in 2D crystals; chasing runaway electrons in fusion plasmas; new tools to understand US waterways and identify potential hydropower sites; and better materials for 3D printed permanent magne

16h

 

Travel times affect neurocritical care unit nurse staffing levels

For specialist nurses on neurocritical care units, accompanying patients for imaging scans and other procedures has a major impact on nurse staffing ratios, reports a study in the Journal of Neuroscience Nursing, official journal of the American Association of Neuroscience Nurses. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

16h

 

Monsoon rains found to be beneficial to underground aquifers

Using a combination of field instrumentation, unmanned aerial vehicles and a hydrologic model, a team of researchers from Arizona State University and the Jornada Long Term Ecological Research Program of the National Science Foundation has been studying the fate of monsoon rainfall and its impact on groundwater recharge in the Chihuahuan Desert of New Mexico.

16h

 

After 60 years, scientists uncover how thalidomide produced birth defects

More than 60 years after the drug thalidomide caused birth defects in thousands of children whose mothers took the drug while pregnant, scientists at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute have solved a mystery that has lingered ever since the dangers of the drug first became apparent: how did the drug produce such severe fetal harm?

16h

 

Exenatide treatment alleviated symptoms of depression in patients

Non-motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD), such as depression, apathy, cognitive impairment, sleep disorders, and sensory symptoms, can have a greater impact on health-related quality of life than motor deficits. In a post hoc analysis of the exenatide-PD trial results, investigators found that patients on exenatide treatment experienced improvements in severity of depression, independent of

16h

 

Makeup of an individual's gut bacteria may play role in weight loss, Mayo study suggests

A preliminary study published in the August issue of Mayo Clinic Proceedings suggests that, for some people, specific activities of gut bacteria may be responsible for their inability to lose weight, despite adherence to strict diet and exercise regimens.

16h

 

Huawei overtakes Apple as world’s second-largest smartphone seller

Huawei sold about 54 million smartphones last quarter, achieving a record-high global market share of 15.8 percent. Read More

16h

 

Multi-feature based brain network improves auto-diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease

Researchers have developed a new method for constructing personal brain networks using multiple structural features to improve the accuracy of diagnosing Alzheimer's disease (AD) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). The personal networks accurately classified 96 percent of patients with AD or MCI from healthy control participants, a level similar to the current accuracy of clinical evaluations. Th

16h

 

Fast, cheap and colorful 3D printing

People are exploring the use of 3D printing for wide-ranging applications, including manufacturing, medical devices, fashion and even food. But one of the most efficient forms of 3D printing suffers from a major drawback: It can only print objects that are gray or black in color. Now, researchers have tweaked the method so it can print in all of the colors of the rainbow. They report their results

16h

 

NASA scientist reveals details of icy Greenland's heated geologic past

By mapping the heat escaping from below the Greenland Ice Sheet, a NASA scientist has sharpened our understanding of the dynamics that dominate and shape terrestrial planets.

16h

 

Microscale superlubricity could pave way for future improved electromechanical devices

A new joint Tel Aviv University/Tsinghua University study finds that robust superlubricity can be achieved using graphite and hexagonal boron nitride, which exhibit ultra-low friction and wear. This is an important milestone for future technological applications in the space, automotive, electronics and medical industries.

16h

 

Trilobites: That’s Not Algae Swirling on the Beach. Those Are Green Worms.

Researchers demonstrated that plant-worms rotate in circular congregations along Atlantic beaches. But nobody is certain why.

16h

 

Data-mining medieval text reveals medically bioactive ingredients

Medieval apothecaries used recipes with significant antibacterial properties, researchers say.

16h

 

Implants made by computer-aided design provide good results in patients with rare chest muscle deformity

For patients with Poland syndrome — a rare congenital condition affecting the chest muscle — computer-aided design (CAD) techniques can be used to create custom-made silicone implants for reconstructive surgery of the chest.

16h

 

Patients opt for 3D simulation for breast augmentation — but it doesn't improve outcomes

Three-dimensional image simulation is popular among women planning breast augmentation surgery. But while this evolving technology may enhance communication, it doesn't improve patient satisfaction with the results of the procedure.

16h

 

How chronic infections can outsmart the immune system

Second leading cause of death by parasitic infection, visceral leishmaniasis takes advantage of a mechanism to sustain the infection. Researchers have shown that damage from chronic inflammation induces the death of white blood cells essential to eliminating the parasite. The findings have the potential to lead to treatment and bring to light a phenomenon that may be shared by other chronic infect

16h

 

Flies meet gruesome end under influence of puppeteer fungus

Various fungi are known to infect insects and alter their behavior, presumably to assist in spreading fungal spores as widely as possible. But little is known about how the fungi affect behavior. UC Berkeley scientists have now found a fungus that infects the common lab fly, Drosophila melanogaster, providing a model in which to explore behavior-manipulating fungi. They found that the fungus invad

16h

 

Sex problems among middle-aged Canadians common, University of Guelph study reveals

Researchers found nearly 40 per cent of women and almost 30 per cent of men between the ages of 40 and 59 face challenges in their sex lives.Based on a first-ever national survey of 2,400 people, the study found low desire, vaginal dryness and difficulty achieving orgasm to be common challenges facing women. Low desire and erectile and ejaculation problems are the common challenges facing men.

16h

 

Sole dictator-led countries make tempting target for certain investors

Dictatorships, especially ones that are led by a sole dictator, may seem like risky places for investments. But, sole dictatorships — or personalist dictators — receive significantly more foreign investments in certain industries than other political regimes. Penn State researchers say that the ability to monopolize markets may make companies believe their investments are worth the risks. They a

16h

 

Ketamine has potential therapeutic role in adolescents with treatment-resistant depression

A new study has shown a significant average decrease in the Children's Depression Rating Scale (42.5 percent) among adolescents with treatment-resistant depression (TRD) who were treated with intravenous ketamine.

16h

 

Deadly heatwaves threaten China's northern breadbasket

The North China Plain, home to nearly 400 million people, could become a life-threatening inferno during future heat waves if climate change continues apace, researchers have warned.

16h

 

We’re All Michael Cohen

For years, Michael Cohen delighted in doing an awful job. He cleaned up Donald Trump’s messes. Cohen first came to President Trump’s attention more than a decade ago when a group of apartment owners in Trump World Tower, a glass skyscraper across from the United Nations, accused Trump of “ financial impropriety .” Cohen, who was the treasurer of the board, took Trump’s side against his fellow own

16h

 

Marking breast implants with tomato DNA to prevent counterfeiting

For years, a French company sold breast implants made of cheap industrial silicone components. Headline news when it broke in 2010, this scandal is still keeping the courts busy today. Now, a research team at the Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Polymer Research IAP has come up with a method to prevent this sort of fraud. It gives manufacturers the opportunity to counterfeit-proof implants – by ta

16h

 

Greenhouse gases surge to new highs worldwide in 2017: US report

Planet-warming greenhouse gases surged to new highs as abnormally hot temperatures swept the globe and ice melted at record levels in the Arctic last year due to climate change, a major US report said Wednesday.

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16h

 

Animals and fungi enhance the performance of forests

In addition to the diversity of tree species, the variety of animal and fungus species also has a decisive influence on the performance of forests. Forest performance comprises many facets besides timber production, such as carbon storage and climate regulation. The study is based on ten years of research in species-rich subtropical forests.

16h

 

Can we predict the long-term outcome of boys with ADHD?

A new study reports on a group of boys diagnosed with ADHD in childhood (when they were, on average, 8 years old) and followed into adulthood (when they were in their early 40s). The goal was to examine whether boys' characteristics in childhood and adolescence predicted their subsequent school performance, their work, and social adjustment.

16h

 

New treatment for ultra-rare disease, alkaptonuria

A new study has identified the drug that treats the extremely rare genetic disease alkaptonuria (AKU).

16h

 

Electric vehicle charging in cold temperatures could pose challenges for drivers

New research suggests that electric vehicle drivers could face longer charging times when temperatures drop. The reason: cold temperatures impact the electrochemical reactions within the cell, and onboard battery management systems limit the charging rate to avoid damage to the battery.

16h

 

Sunscreen chemicals in water may harm fish embryos

For most people, a trip to the beach involves slathering on a thick layer of sunscreen to protect against sunburn and skin cancer. However, savvy beachgoers know to reapply sunscreen every few hours because it eventually washes off. Now researchers have detected high levels of sunscreen chemicals in the waters of Shenzhen, China, and they also show that the products can affect zebrafish embryo dev

16h

 

Tech takes on cigarette smoking

Researchers are using wearable sensor technology to develop an automatic alert system to help people quit smoking.

16h

 

What is causing more extreme precipitation in northeastern U.S.?

From Maine to West Virginia, the Northeast has seen a larger increase in extreme precipitation than anywhere else in the US. Prior research found that these heavy rain and snow events, defined as a day with about two inches of precipitation or more, have been 53 percent higher in the Northeast since 1996. A new study finds that hurricanes and tropical storms are the primary cause of this increase,

16h

 

The ozone hole is both an environmental success story and an enduring global threat

Environment And we should take what it's taught us into future fights. Headlines in recent months have read like something out of an eco-thriller. Who's producing the banned chemicals we know will destroy the ozone layer?

16h

 

Car Rules Fight Pits Safety against Pollution

The Trump administration argues higher fuel efficiency will keep older, unsafe cars on the road — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

17h

 

Leaked chats show alleged Russian spy seeking hacking tools

Six years ago, a Russian-speaking cybersecurity researcher received an unsolicited email from Kate S. Milton.

17h

 

Pinpointing a molecule for sea lamprey control

A team of scientists has identified a single molecule that could be a key in controlling invasive sea lampreys.

17h

 

What's the Coldest Place in the Universe?

It's not Miami Beach, if that's what you were thinking. Nor is it the North Pole.

17h

 

3D-printed implants shown to help grow 'real bone'

Chemically coated, ceramic implants successfully guided the regrowth of missing bone in lab animals while 'steadily dissolving,' researchers report.

17h

 

Placenta barrier-on-a-chip could lead to better understanding of premature births

More than one in 10 babies worldwide are born prematurely, according to the World Health Organization. Now scientists report in ACS Biomaterials Science & Engineering that they have developed an organ-on-a-chip that could help explain why. The device, which replicates the functions of a key membrane in the placenta, could lead to a better understanding of how bacterial infections can promote prete

17h

 

Scientists draw new connections between climate change and warming oceans

Earth scientists exploring how ocean chemistry has evolved found similarities between an event 55 million years ago and current predicted trajectories of planet temperatures, with regards to inputs of CO2 into the atmosphere and oxygen levels in the oceans. As the oceans warm, oxygen decreases while hydrogen sulfide increases, making the oceans toxic and putting marine species at risk.

17h

 

Pinpointing a molecule for sea lamprey control

A team of scientists has identified a single molecule that could be a key in controlling invasive sea lampreys. Researchers from Michigan State University, the University of Minnesota and Western Michigan University have homed in on a fatty molecule that directs the destructive eels' migration. The results, published in the current issue of PNAS, could lead to better ways to control sea lampreys.

17h

 

Smarter cancer treatment: AI tool automates radiation therapy planning

Beating cancer is a race against time. Developing radiation therapy plans — individualized maps that help doctors determine where to blast tumours — can take days. Now, engineering researcher Aaron Babier of the University of Toronto has developed automation software that aims to cut the time down to mere hours.

17h

 

Behavioral nudges lead to striking drop in prescriptions of potent antipsychotic

Letters targeting high prescribers of Seroquel (quetiapine), an antipsychotic with potentially harmful side effects in the elderly, significantly reduced the number of prescriptions for patients in Medicare. The results showed that peer comparison letters led to statistically meaningful, persistent decreases in quetiapine prescribing, with no detected negative effects on patients.

17h

 

Intensive outpatient therapy shows rapid reduction of veterans' PTSD symptoms

New research shows that military veterans who participated in a three week, intensive outpatient treatment program for PTSD saw rapid and clinically meaningful improvements, adding the growing body evidence that several hours of therapy over several consecutive days could be an important step in addressing the unmet mental health needs of tens of thousands of military veterans.

17h

 

Study finds blind people depend on timing cues for some spatial awareness

It's a popular idea in books and movies that blind people develop super sensitive hearing to help navigate the world around them. But a study, published Aug. 1 in the journal iScience, shows that, in at least one situation, blind people have more trouble discerning the location of sounds than do people who can see.

17h

 

Two Ways to Read the Newest Intelligence on North Korea

First came reports last month that North Korea was upgrading nuclear and missile facilities and increasing production of fuel for nuclear bombs at secret sites. Then came a report this week in The Washington Post that the North is building new long-range missiles and exploring ways to hide the extent of its nuclear-weapons program from the United States. What does all this add up to? Is Kim Jong

17h

 

Placenta barrier-on-a-chip could lead to better understanding of premature births

More than one in 10 babies worldwide are born prematurely, according to the World Health Organization. Now scientists report in ACS Biomaterials Science & Engineering that they have developed an organ-on-a-chip that could help explain why. The device, which replicates the functions of a key membrane in the placenta, could lead to a better understanding of how bacterial infections can promote prete

17h

 

Synthetic suede gives high-end cars that luxury feel

Leather car seats were once synonymous with luxury, but these days, synthetic suede is becoming the material of choice for high-end automobiles. With increased affluence worldwide, and the growing popularity of car-sharing and luxury-driving services, business is booming for manufacturers of synthetic suede. Among these companies, Japanese firms sit snugly in the driver's seat, reports an article

17h

 

Hazardous contaminated sites in the North and the Baltic Sea

Millions of tons of old ordnance and poison gas grenades lie at the bottom of the North and the Baltic Sea – dangerous legacies of two world wars. The old weapons are corroding and releasing the toxic substances they contain. Disposal is hazardous, time-consuming and expensive. This has led Fraunhofer researchers in cooperation with salvage companies to develop a semi-automated robotic disposal sy

17h

 

Scientists draw new connections between climate change and warming oceans

It happened once before, and it could happen again.

17h

 

Sunscreen for dancing molecules

This study is the first to use heavy water (D2O) – a form of water that contains deuterium (D) instead of hydrogen – in the field of transmission electron microscopy (TEM). This approach significantly delays sample damage, which is one of the major impediments for broader application of liquid-phase TEM to fragile biological samples.

17h

 

Baby talk words build infants' language skills

The more baby talk words that infants are exposed to the quicker they grasp language, a study suggests. Assessments of nine-month-old children suggest that those who hear words such as bunny or choo-choo more frequently are faster at picking up new words between nine and 21 months.

17h

 

Sharing parenting leads to healthier young, beetle study finds

Animals who share the burden of raising young tend to have healthier offspring than animals who do so alone

17h

 

In darters, male competition drives evolution of flashy fins, bodies

Scientists once thought that female mate choice alone accounted for the eye-catching color patterns seen in some male fish. But for orangethroat darters, male-to-male competition is the real force behind the flash, a new study finds.

17h

 

Scientists find holes in light by tying it in knots

A research collaboration including theoretical physicists from the University of Bristol and Birmingham has found a new way of evaluating how light flows through space—by tying knots in it.

17h

 

Team discovers a first-of-its-kind material for the quantum age

A UCF physicist has discovered a new material that has the potential to become a building block in the new era of quantum materials, those that are composed of microscopically condensed matter and expected to change our development of technology.

17h

 

Controlling drones via voice channels

The future is airborne. Drones may soon become the key to relieving the burden of traffic on our streets, optimizing deliveries, and improving the safety and efficiency of firefighting. But there are still a few hurdles to cross before the technology reaches the maturity required for large-scale commercial roll-out. In particular, a suitable communication system to control and determine their loca

17h

 

NASA Created a Rare, Exotic State of Matter in Space

A special device aboard the International Space Station has produced Bose-Einstein condensates in space for the first time ever.

17h

 

Kurdish refugee wins 'Nobel of mathematics' Fields medal (Update)

Kurdish refugee turned Cambridge University professor Caucher Birkar and an Italian who once preferred football to math on Wednesday were among four winners of the prestigious Fields medal, dubbed the Nobel prize for mathematics.

17h

 

Breakthrough in treatment of deadly 'Alabama rot' dog disease

Researchers at the Royal Veterinary College's (RVC) Queen Mother Hospital for Animals (QMHA) have made a ground-breaking discovery in the treatment of Alabama rot, a deadly disease which affects dogs.

17h

 

Study: In darters, male competition drives evolution of flashy fins, bodies

Scientists once thought that female mate choice alone accounted for the eye-catching color patterns seen in some male fish. But for orangethroat darters, male-to-male competition is the real force behind the flash, a new study finds.

17h

 

UCF professor discovers a first-of-its-kind material for the quantum age

A UCF physicist has discovered a new material that has the potential to become a building block in the new era of quantum materials, those that are composed of microscopically condensed matter and expected to change our development of technology.

17h

 

Scientists find holes in light by tying it in knots

A research collaboration including theoretical physicists from the University of Bristol and Birmingham has found a new way of evaluating how light flows through space — by tying knots in it.

17h

 

Jeff Bezos’s $150 Billion Fortune Is a Policy Failure

Last month, Bloomberg reported that Jeff Bezos, the founder of Amazon and owner of the Washington Post , has accumulated a fortune worth $150 billion. That is the biggest nominal amount in modern history, and extraordinary any way you slice it. Bezos is the world’s lone hectobillionaire . He is worth what the average American family is, nearly two million times over. He has about 50 percent more

17h

 

Trump Finally Picks a Science Adviser—And People Are Delighted

For decades, the meteorologist Kelvin Droegemeier has been immersed in the study of thunderstorms, tornadoes, and other extreme weather. Now he looks set to enter the unpredictable and stormy world of the Trump administration as its top scientific consigliere. As The Washington Post reported , the president has tapped Droegemeier to direct the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP), an of

17h

 

The Dangerous Insufficiency of ‘No Means No’

There is an approach to the giving of constructive criticism that is sometimes referred to, in the corporate world and beyond, as a compliment sandwich . The method, if you’re not familiar with it, goes, basically, like this: If you have a criticism to make of someone, you couch the complaint in a pair of compliments, thereby cushioning the complaint’s negative emotional impact on the recipient.

17h

 

The Problem With The New York Times’ Big Story on Climate Change

The New York Times Magazine has tried to make the release of its new article , which details a decade of climate history, as momentous as possible. It has devoted the entire new issue of the magazine to just this one story, which is written by Nathaniel Rich. It has even produced a video trailer for it. Having read the story, I am left to wonder: What was the point? The article tells the tale of

17h

 

3-D Printed Gun Blueprints Have Been Taken Offline—For Now

Defense Distributed has complied with a nationwide injunction issued against its 3-D printed gun files, but the matter is far from settled.

17h

 

Sunscreen for dancing molecules

Since life is mostly based on water, our molecules are moving, vibrating and somersaulting in a liquid environment. But electron microscopy—a technique to study a static version of this nanoworld—has been almost impossible to use to see moving molecules, because the incident electron beam damages the samples. Scientists at the Center for Soft and Living Matter, within the Institute for Basic Scien

17h

 

The growing gap between physical and social technologies

The word "technology," from the Greek techne, usually evokes physical technologies like artificial intelligence, swarm robots, and the like. But there's an older meaning. By Jacob Bigelow's 1829 definition, technology can describe a process that benefits society. In that sense, social institutions, like governments and healthcare systems, can be seen, and studied, as technologies.

17h

 

Natural silica-based pesticide protects crops in storage and can eliminate toxic phosphine

Corn, wheat and rice constitute 90 percent of cereal production globally, and around 40 percent of all calories in food consumed. Yet up to half of those harvested cereal grains, so vital for our daily diets, can be lost due to ineffective storage techniques related to pest infestation.

17h

 

Fire-resistant nanocontainers

Polymers play an essential role in our daily lives, but they also come with an increased risk of fire. Efficient flame retardants are key to ensuring the safety of humans and safeguarding goods from the dangers of accidental fires.

17h

 

Research reveals the benefits of investment in energy efficiency

Several new research projects at The University of Manchester's Urban Institute have shown how improvements in the efficiency of household energy use can result in benefits for human health and well-being, economic productivity, environmental quality and urban development.

17h

 

Improvement of humanlike conversations in humanoid robots

In a symbiotic human-robot interaction project, a multimodal conversation control system and a multi-robot conversation control system were developed to promote a robot with a higher degree of human-like presence as well as a 'sense of conversing'. This project attempted to expand the field of activity of such conversational robots and has resulted in the development of a child-like android 'ibuki

17h

 

Active substance raises hopes of curing hepatitis E

Researchers have now found a possible active substance against the virus in the naturally occurring substance silvestrol. The substance inhibited the replication of pathogens both in cell culture and in the mouse model.

17h

 

Questioning conventional understanding of antifreeze proteins

Scientists have discovered that an ice-binding protein (fcIBP) from the sea ice microalga does not fit in the conventional classification of ice-binding proteins, suggesting unknown mechanisms behind its antifreeze property. This finding could lead to a broader application of the antifreeze protein in food and medical industries.

17h

 

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