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Nyheder2018juli30

 

Individual training of parents is best for small children with ADHD

A major research project highlights that individual behavioral treatment and support for parents who have preschool children with ADHD is significantly better than what is currently routinely offered in Danish Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services.

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Sharing parenting leads to healthier young, beetle study finds

Animals who share the task of parenting do a better job than parents who do so on their own, according to a study of insects.

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Former refugee among winners of Fields medal – the 'Nobel prize for maths'

Caucher Birkar grew up on a farm near the Kurdish city of Marivan in Iran and spoke little English when he began his PhD A Kurdish man who came to Britain as a refugee after fleeing conflict two decades ago is one of four men who have been awarded the Fields medal, considered the equivalent of a Nobel prize for mathematics. The winners of the prize, presented at the International Congress of the

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Insight into loss processes in perovskite solar cells enables efficiency improvements

In perovskite solar cells, charge carriers are mainly lost through recombination occurring at interface defect sites. In contrast, recombination at defect sites within the perovskite layer does not limit the performance of the solar cells at present. Teams from the University of Potsdam and the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB) were able to reach this interesting conclusion through extremely accurate

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Women seeing baby animals have a reduced appetite for meat

Images of baby animals reduces people's appetite for meat say researchers, who found that the effect is much stronger for women than for men.The findings may reflect women's greater emotional attunement towards babies and, by extension, their tendency to empathise more with baby animals. Also, meat is associated with masculinity and images of tough men who consume meat for muscle building protein,

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Insight into catalysis through novel study of X-ray absorption spectroscopy

An international team has made a breakthrough at BESSY II. For the first time, they succeeded in investigating electronic states of a transition metal in detail and drawing reliable conclusions on their catalytic effect from the data. These results are helpful for the development of future applications of catalytic transition-metal systems. The work has now been published in Chemical Science, the

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Measure of belly fat in older adults is linked with cognitive impairment

Data from over 5,000 adults over the age of 60 indicates that as waist:hip ratio increases, so does cognitive impairment. The findings have significant implications as the global prevalence of dementia is predicted to increase from 24.3 million in 2001 to 81.1 million by 2040.

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Distrust of power influences choice of medical procedures

Many individuals, also in Germany, prefer to resort to the techniques used in complementary and alternative medicine, even though they may have been expressly warned against these. According to recent research, this may be associated with a potent underlying predisposition to believe in conspiracy theories, a trait known as a conspiracy mentality.

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India needs 'giant leap' to meet 2030 targets in reducing child mortality rates

IIASA researchers have found that almost half of the districts in India are not on track to reduce the mortality rates of newborns and meet the target set out under Sustainable Development Goal 3 (SDG3) for 2030, while a third will not meet the target for under-five mortality rates.

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A protein could be key to preserving heart function in Duchenne muscular dystrophy

The brain-derived neurotrophic factor protein, known to be vital for brain function, might hold the key for preserving heart function in children and young adults with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.Heart failure often kills Duchenne patients early in life and there is no effective treatment.Developing therapies designed to activate or supplement brain-derived neurotrophic factor could give new hope

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What I learned from getting covered in whale snot

Animals Scientists can learn a lot from the substances in whale blow. To collect that spray, one research developed a special tool: a drone dubbed SnotBot. Scientists can learn a lot from the substances in whale blow. To collect that spray, one research developed a special tool: a drone dubbed SnotBot.

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Fields Medals Awarded to 4 Mathematicians

The prize, bestowed every four years to mathematicians 40 years or younger, is often described as the subject’s Nobel Prize.

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Fravalgte aircondition: Patienter på supersygehus har 30 grader på stuen

På Aarhus Universitetshospital stod valget mellem en helikopterlandingsplads og aircondition på sengeafsnittene. Det kan mærkes denne sommer.

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Maximising support for migrant youth across the EU

A large-scale study offers important insights into the main features of youth mobility within Europe. Policy and action recommendations include migrant support initiatives at national and regional levels for cultural and labour market integration as well as enhanced public awareness.

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Increased safety for children around lawn mowers

Robotic lawn mowers are great for cutting the grass, but they do pose a risk of injury to children playing nearby. Highly advanced sensors developed by Fraunhofer researchers ensure that the lawn mower shuts down when children are in close proximity. The system, which is based on LiDAR technology, uses a single pulse of light to capture the entire surroundings, covering a range of up to 200 meters

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Father's genes can impact motherly love

A father's genes are no longer thought to just provide a blueprint for the growth and development of their offspring. Research finds that paternal genes can affect the type of care the offspring receives both before and after they are born.

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This Whale-Dolphin Hybrid Is Not a 'Wholphin.' Here's Why.

This hybrid was spotted swimming alongside a melon-headed whale, possibly his mother

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Networked lighting to eliminate auto blind spots

It is a horror scenario for every driver: Suddenly, a previously invisible pedestrian comes out of the dark between two street lights or the shade of two parked cars. Researchers at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) are working on a method to optimally adapt car headlights to local conditions with the help of external sensors that may be located at the roadside or in other vehicles.

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What are the biggest threats to the Endangered Species Act?

Since Richard Nixon signed the Endangered Species Act 45 years ago, the law has been credited with rescuing many species from the threat of extinction. Among them: icons such as the bald eagle, gray wolf, grizzly bear, and humpback whale.

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How changing the world's food systems can help to protect the planet

Going into debt with nature is a dangerous thing. When our stocks of water, land and clean air are spent – we don't have a second planet to borrow from. But that's exactly the way that Earth is heading. 1 August 2018 marks an annual event, "Earth Overshoot Day": the day on which the natural resources the planet can regenerate within one year are exhausted. This is the earliest date on which Earth

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The Surreal Spectacle of the Manafort Trial

ALEXANDRIA , Va.—Outside the federal courthouse here, where the trial of Paul Manafort began on Tuesday morning, a handful of protesters had gathered. Lock Him Up one sign implored. Trump won’t do time for you read another. A demonstrator played a snare drum. A bank of cameras in the square across from the red-brick-and-stone courthouse was trained on the front entrance, vainly awaiting Manafort’

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Active substance raises hopes of curing hepatitis E

An international team of researchers has now found a possible active substance against the virus in the naturally occurring substance silvestrol. The substance inhibited the replication of pathogens both in cell culture and in the mouse model. The researchers led by Dr. Daniel Todt and Professor Dr. Eike Steinmann from the Department of Medical and Molecular Virology at Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RU

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Multi-feature based brain network improves auto-diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease

Researchers have developed a new method for constructing personal brain networks using multiple structural features to improve the accuracy of diagnosing Alzheimer's disease (AD) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). The personal networks accurately classified 96 percent of patients with AD or MCI from healthy control participants, a level similar to the current accuracy of clinical evaluations. Th

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Animals and fungi enhance the performance of forests

In addition to the diversity of tree species, the variety of animal and fungus species also has a decisive influence on the performance of forests. Forest performance comprises many facets besides timber production, such as carbon storage and climate regulation. The study is based on ten years of research in species-rich subtropical forests. A team of researchers led by iDiv and the Martin-Luther-

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Medical researchers from MSU suggested a new approach of targeted cancer therapy

A team from the Faculty of Medicine, MSU has analysed a link between the p53 protein, tumor dissemination and 'cell suicide' and discussed possible approaches to predict metastases development and their treatment. They also discussed new chemical compounds that might influence the process of metastasis. The study was supported by a grant from Russian Science Foundation (RSF). The results were publ

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Liverpool researchers find treatment for ultra-rare disease

A new study published in Molecular Genetics and Metabolism, conducted by a Liverpool based research collaboration involving the University of Liverpool, has identified the drug that treats the extremely rare genetic disease alkaptonuria (AKU).

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Can we predict the long-term outcome of boys with ADHD?

A study published in the August 2018 issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry(JAACAP) reports on a group of boys diagnosed with ADHD in childhood (when they were, on average, 8 years old) and followed into adulthood (when they were in their early 40s). The goal was to examine whether boys' characteristics in childhood and adolescence predicted their subsequen

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Sharing parenting leads to healthier young, beetle study finds

Animals who share the burden of raising young tend to have healthier offspring than animals who do so alone.

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Gas sensing gut pill beats breath test diagnosis

Findings show the revolutionary gas-sensing capsule, which provides real time detection and measurement of gut gases, could surpass breath testing as the benchmark for diagnosing gut disorders.

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How Greenland scorched its underside

The world's largest island ran over Iceland's volcanic hotspot and has the rocky scar to prove it.

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After the Kepler supernova explosion, no survivors were left behind

A new study argues that the explosion that Johannes Kepler observed in 1604 was caused by a merger of two stellar residues.

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Distribution of rat lungworm, now and into future

A recent study revealed that Angiostrongylus cantonensis, the rat lungworm, is widespread in the Hawaiian Islands and its distribution may expand, especially towards higher elevations, as the climate warms.

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Just two weeks' inactivity can trigger diabetic symptoms in vulnerable patients

Just two weeks without much activity can have a dramatic impact on health from which it is difficult to recover, according to researchers who studied overweight older adults at risk of developing Type 2 diabetes.

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Dangerous foodborne pathogen linked to centipedes

A dangerous foodborne parasite typically found in snails and other mollusks was detected in two patients in a Chinese hospital and traced to their consumption of raw centipedes, according to a new case report. Patient infections with rat lungworm parasite linked to eating raw centipedes; parasite can cause meningitis and is gaining foothold in snails in Louisiana and South Florida.

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Better way found to determine the integrity of metals

Researchers have found a better way to identify atomic structures, an essential step in improving materials selection in the aviation, construction and automotive industries.

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A year after data breach: Atlanta-based Equifax unbowed

A year after the worst data breach in U.S. history to date, Atlanta-based Equifax has been chastened, but its business model is unchanged and the company churns on, virtually undamaged by legislative, regulatory or prosecutorial penalties.

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Clean through solar power

In combination with the right materials, sunbeams can work wonders: they clean building facades and decompose pollutants from the air or in the water. The magic word is photocatalysis. In practice, though, the effectiveness of this "miracle cure" fluctuates greatly, depending on the material used and the environmental factors. With a new measuring device, researchers now want to determine the phot

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All-you-can-eat landfill buffet spells trouble for birds

Among all the types of waste we generate, plastic tends to pose the greatest problems.

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A Pregnant Dolphin. A Fatal Gunshot. A Disturbing Trend.

The case is the latest example of violence against dolphins in the northern Gulf of Mexico, which experts say is becoming increasingly common.

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The Sadness of Deleting Your Old Tweets

After I hit the delete button on my public timeline last week, I immediately felt regret. What had I done?

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A Polar Bear Frolics on Sea Ice, and 13 Other Gorgeous Drone Photos

Florian Ledoux was named this year's Drone Photographer of the Year for his winning wildlife photo captured in Nunavut, Canada.

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Why Big Stuff Cools Off Slower Than Small Stuff

Take a batch of cookies out of the oven, and the big ones cool down slower than the small ones. Why's that?

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Researchers develop novel clip-on device for smartphones to analyse sperm

Male infertility tests are currently performed exclusively in labs, requiring several visits and several days to get a result. The EU-funded QS Mobile project has developed a male fertility test that can be carried out at home quickly, accurately and more cheaply than in the lab.

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A robotic hand can juggle a cube—with lots of training

How long does it take a robotic hand to learn to juggle a cube?

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Geoengineering the Great Barrier Reef needs strong rules

The Great Barrier Reef has experienced extensive coral bleaching over the past two years. Faced with this reality, scientists are proposing a range of options to save the reef.

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Questioning conventional understanding of antifreeze proteins

Scientists have discovered that an ice-binding protein (fcIBP) from the sea ice microalga does not fit in the conventional classification of ice-binding proteins, suggesting unknown mechanisms behind its antifreeze property. This finding could lead to a broader application of the antifreeze protein in food and medical industries.

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Optical secrets of disulfide nanotubes are disclosed by Lomonosov MSU Scientists

The findings allow consideration of tungsten disulfide nanotubes as a platform for developing new concepts in nanotube-based photonic devices.

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Sunscreen for dancing molecules

This study is the first to use heavy water (D2O) — a form of water that contains deuterium (D) instead of hydrogen — in the field of transmission electron microscopy (TEM). This approach significantly delays sample damage, which is one of the major impediments for broader application of liquid-phase TEM to fragile biological samples.

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Baby talk words build infants' language skills, study shows

The more baby talk words that infants are exposed to the quicker they grasp language, a study suggests.Assessments of nine-month-old children suggest that those who hear words such as bunny or choo-choo more frequently are faster at picking up new words between nine and 21 months.

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Individual training of parents is best for small children with ADHD

A major research project from Aarhus University and the Centre for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Risskov, Denmark in collaboration with the University of Copenhagen, University of Nottingham, UK, and Kings College London highlights that individual behavioral treatment and support for parents who have preschool children with ADHD is significantly better than what is currently routinely offered i

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Why I use Harry Potter to teach a college course on child development

In an effort to find a more engaging way to present child development to new psychology students, I decided to use a book about a little orphan boy who later discovers he is a wizard.

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What's wrong with big solar in cities? Nothing, if it's done right

Many of us are familiar with developments of big solar farms in rural and regional areas. These are often welcomed as a positive sign of our transition towards a low-carbon economy. But do large-scale solar installations have a place in our cities?

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From cobalt to tungsten: how electric cars and smartphones are sparking a new kind of gold rush

What's in your stuff? Most of us give no thought to the materials that make modern life possible. Yet technologies such as smart phones, electric vehicles, large screen TVs and green energy generation depend on a range of chemical elements that most people have never heard of. Until the late 20th century, many were regarded as mere curiosities – but now they are essential. In fact, a mobile phone

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Multiple pregnancies seem to age women’s cells

Multiple pregnancies might make women’s cells age more quickly, a new study suggests. The findings could help explain why women with many children tend to show signs of accelerated aging. For the study, which appears in Scientific Reports , researchers looked at two separate markers of cellular aging—telomere length and epigenetic age—in hundreds of young women with different reproductive histori

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Research confirms fecal bacteria contaminated surface water after Hurricane Harvey

Hurricane Harvey was an unprecedented rain event that delivered five consistent days of flooding and storms to Texas last August. Now, research from UTSA Assistant Professor Vikram Kapoor in civil and environmental engineering has substantiated that the storm caused high levels of fecal contamination to be introduced into waterways draining into the Gulf of Mexico and impairing surface water quali

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Researchers turn powerful, viscous disinfectants into breathable mist for the first time

A team of engineers and physicians in San Diego have developed a device that diffuses potent disinfectants for airborne delivery. Notably, the device works on a range of disinfectants that have never been atomized before, such as Triethylene glycol, or TEG.

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EV charging in cold temperatures could pose challenges for drivers

New research from Idaho National Laboratory suggests that electric vehicle drivers could face longer charging times when temperatures drop. The reason: cold temperatures impact the electrochemical reactions within the cell, and onboard battery management systems limit the charging rate to avoid damage to the battery.

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Estrogen therapy may still hold the key to fight specific ER resistant breast cancers

Estrogen treatment promotes apoptotic death in cancer cells through balanced upregulation of liganded and non-liganded pathways of estrogen receptor activation.

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Researchers turn powerful, viscous disinfectants into breathable mist for the first time

A team of San Diego researchers have developed a device that diffuses potent disinfectants for airborne delivery. The device works on a range of disinfectants that have never been atomized before, such as Triethylene glycol, or TEG. In the August issue of Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology, the team used the device to atomize disinfectants onto environmental surfaces contaminated with bacteria

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UTSA research confirms fecal bacteria contaminated surface water after Hurricane Harvey

Research by a civil and environmental engineering professor at The University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA) has substantiated that Hurricane Harvey caused high levels of fecal contamination to be introduced into waterways draining into the Gulf of Mexico and impairing surface water quality. UTSA faculty member Vikram Kapoor hopes his research will help lead to the development of a predictive fram

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Red-blood-cell 'hitchhikers' offer new way to transport drugs to specific targets

A new drug-delivery technology which uses red blood cells to shuttle nano-scale drug carriers, called RBC-hitchhiking, has been found in animal models to dramatically increase the concentration of drugs ferried precisely to selected organs,

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Trump Taps Meteorologist as White House Science Advisor

Nomination of Kelvin Droegemeier could end long drought at the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Conservatives Are Scared, Even Under Trump

On a side wall of the lobby of the Family Research Council in Washington, D.C., there’s a little exhibit that inadvertently testifies to the organization’s current level of influence in Washington. It displays a 1995 photo of Elsa Prince posing with Rich and Helen DeVos at the ground-breaking of the group’s new building on G Street, right across from the National Portrait Gallery. The two wealthy

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Researchers predict distribution of rat lungworm, now and into future

A recent study by University of Hawai'i at Mānoa researchers revealed that Angiostrongylus cantonensis, the rat lungworm, is widespread in the Hawaiian Islands and its distribution may expand, especially towards higher elevations, as the climate warms.

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Human rights group: Employee targeted with Israeli spyware

An Amnesty International employee has been targeted with Israeli-made surveillance software, the human rights group said Wednesday, adding to a growing number of examples of Israeli technology being used to spy on human rights workers and opposition figures in the Middle East and beyond.

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Teaching AI to learn from non-experts

Today my IBM team and my colleagues at the UCSF Gartner lab reported in Nature Methods an innovative approach to generating datasets from non-experts and using them for training in machine learning. Our approach is designed to enable AI systems to learn just as well from non-experts as they do from expert-generated training data. We developed a platform, called Quanti.us, that allows non-experts t

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Image: Speck from an asteroid

Seen on a microscopic support, this sharp-edged grain of rock is an extraterrestrial object – a tiny sample from the Itokawa asteroid, retrieved by Japan's Hayabusa mission and now being tested by ESA researchers.

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Oil discoveries in Turkana six years ago haven't delivered benefits for women

Turkana is a vast dry, remote county, in northwest Kenya, home to around 1.5 million nomadic livestock herders. The discovery of commercially viable oil deposits six years ago brought with it great expectations of economic transformation of the historically under served area.

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‘Slingshot’ lets these fish vacuum up food really fast

The snipefish, an ocean-dwelling relative of the seahorse, has a very long, skinny snout ending in a tiny mouth. It feeds with an elastic-boosted head flick at almost unprecedented speed, new research finds. “At as little as two milliseconds, it’s among the fastest feeding events ever recorded for fish,” says University of California, Davis, graduate student Sarah Longo, now a postdoctoral resear

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New ideas are getting harder to find—and more expensive

It's an age of astonishing technological progress—but are we starting to have a harder time coming up with new ideas?

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Volkswagen profit jumps, but 'great challenges' ahead

Volkswagen on Wednesday reported a leap in second quarter profit thanks to strong sales, but the German car giant warned that strict new emissions tests and global trade tensions posed "great challenges" in the months ahead.

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Fight or flight? Sexual cycle determines the behaviour of female guinea pigs

Due to a stabile social hierarchy, guinea pigs rely on their intuition to decide whether to compete or to escape. So far, there has been limited research on how the sexual cycle may shape female social behaviour in animals. Researchers from the University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna, and the University of Vienna showed now that flight was the preferred strategy during experimental confrontation

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Electrically tunable third-order nonlinear optical response in graphene

The research focus on 2-D materials has intensified with its potential to modulate light for superior performance and realize applications that can enhance existing technologies. Graphene, the best known 2-D material, derived from 3-D graphite, constitutes a monolayer of carbon atoms arranged in a 2-D hexagonal lattice, exhibiting strong ultra-wideband light-matter interactions, able to operate at

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Middle managers lack resources to achieve gender equity, new study shows

The managers who make the most decisions about hiring staff need more support to achieve greater gender equity in the workplace, a new study including UNSW Canberra researchers shows.

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Ba-Boom! There Goes Your Hearing

New discoveries offer hope for noise-induced hearing loss — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Arctic cyclone limits the time-scale of precise sea-ice prediction in Northern Sea Route?

Climate change has accelerated sea-ice retreat in the Arctic Ocean, leading to new opportunities for summer commercial maritime navigation along the Northern Sea Route. International researchers led by Japan's National Institute of Polar Research demonstrated a new system for forecasting sea-ice thickness in early summer in the East Siberian Sea. The system was accurate up to three days ahead, rep

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One in 3 youth who break the law identify as LGBTQ

Adolescents who identified as non-heterosexual are significantly over-represented among first-time offenders, according to a new study that examined sexual orientation, gender expression and mental health among adolescents who are involved in the justice system, but are not incarcerated.

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Only 10 percent of non-dialysis kidney patients ever see a dietitian

In patients with chronic kidney disease, medical nutrition therapy can slow the progression and significantly reduce healthcare costs. But 90 percent of non-dialysis kidney disease patients never meet with a dietitian, according to a report in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.

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Mapping endangered red knots' remote breeding habitat

Red knots make an amazing journey from their breeding grounds in the Canadian Arctic to their winter habitat in South America and back each year. Their numbers have fallen precipitously in recent decades, and with such a broad range, determining what's behind the shorebird's decline is a huge challenge. A new study has determined that while there is plenty of breeding habitat to support today's po

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Financial checkup should be part of health screenings for childhood cancer survivors

Adult survivors of childhood cancer should be screened for financial problems that might cause them to delay or skip medical care or to suffer psychological distress. The recommendation from St. Jude Children's Research Hospital researchers followed an analysis that found 65 percent of survivors reported financial challenges related to their childhood cancer diagnoses.More than half of survivors (

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Researchers predict distribution of rat lungworm, now and into future

A recent study by University of Hawai'i at Mānoa researchers revealed that Angiostrongylus cantonensis, the rat lungworm, is widespread in the Hawaiian Islands and its distribution may expand, especially towards higher elevations, as the climate warms.

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Study: Prayer makes families connected, unified and bonded with less relational tension

In a recently-published study in the Journal of Family Psychology, BYU researchers explored how family prayer influences family relationships, finding a connection between prayer and a number of benefits for families.

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EV charging in cold temperatures could pose challenges for drivers

New research from Idaho National Laboratory suggests that electric vehicle drivers could face longer charging times when temperatures drop. The reason: cold temperatures impact the electrochemical reactions within the cell, and onboard battery management systems limit the charging rate to avoid damage to the battery.

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Listening Isn't Reading, But Audiobooks Still Resonate

The experiences are different, but playing a novel while doing other things can optimize your time.

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Burley Solstice Review: Rugged and Comfortable

Juggling errands, childcare, and fitness? The Burley Solstice is for you.

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"Binti," "Murderbot," and the Rise of the Sci-Fi Novella

The classic form has recently re-emerged as the genre’s most vibrant—and, in the crazed modern era, readable—option.

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Crying 'Pedophile' Is the Oldest Propaganda Trick in the Book

The far-right trolls accusing Tom Hanks of pedophilia aren’t original. They’re just the latest propagandists borrowing a tactic that long, long predates the internet.

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Playing Monopoly: What Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg Can Learn From Bill Gates

Harvard dropouts. Precocious whiz kids. Beleaguered titans. The parallels between the two tech moguls are startling. Will history repeat—or just rhyme?

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The Only Thing Fire Scientists Are Sure of: This Will Get Worse

It's a new world for global warming-powered wildfires. Unless things change, they're just going to get bigger.

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Instagram and Facebook Add New Screen-Time Management Tools

Because you spend too much time scrollin' already.

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Naked Labs' $1,395 3-D Body Scanner Shows You the Naked Truth

Because a head-to-toe scan that measures your body fat is exactly what you wanted.

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Sacramento Eases Into the Self-Driving Scene

A $100,000 partnership with the company Phantom Auto shows the city wants to be tech-forward, but is cautious.

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Can Waymo Self-Driving Cars Help Fix Phoenix's Public Transit?

The Silicon Valley self-driving company just announced a partnership with Phoenix’s Valley Metro, which prompts the age-old question: Can a private tech company provide solutions for the masses?

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Modeling research identifies potentially profitable bioproducts

Imagine a new and improved biorefinery, one that produces advanced biofuels as environmentally sustainable as they are economically viable. In the biorefinery of the future, every step of the pipeline is optimized, almost every part of the energy crop is used, and the entire system, from field to fuel, serves to drive down carbon emissions.

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Sri Lanka reverses hybrid car incentive

Sri Lanka Wednesday sharply increased customs duties on imports of the top-selling Japanese hybrid car, in an apparent shift in its policy of encouraging greener vehicles.

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EU coal regions—opportunities and challenges ahead

Over the past few decades the production and consumption of coal in the EU has been in steady decline, due to the closure of coal mines and the phasing out of coal use for power generation.

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Image: Prepping to launch for the sun

NASA's Parker Solar Probe has cleared the final procedures in the clean room before its move to the launch pad, where it will be integrated onto its launch vehicle, a United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy. This is an historic mission that will revolutionize our understanding of the sun, where changing conditions can propagate out into the solar system, affecting Earth and other worlds. Parker Sola

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Dengue fever outbreak stopped by special mosquitoes

An Australian city has been successfully protected from the mosquito-borne disease, researchers say.

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Sharks Are Living A Lot Longer Than We Thought | Shark News

Scientists used to measure a shark's age by counting "growth rings" in its vertebrae, but one scientist discovered those numbers are very wrong. Sharks are living a lot longer than we ever thought. Stream Shark Week Episodes: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/shark-week/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery https://www.f

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Researchers rebuild the tree of life of freshwater macroinvertebrates in the European continent

A study from the Faculty of Biology and the Biodiversity Research Institute of the University of Barcelona (IRBio-UB) analysed how water macroinvertebrate species, such as beetles, mosquitos and dragonflies, evolved and diversified since their beginnings. With the analysis of the ecological features of about 6,600 European species, researchers rebuilt the functional space they occupy. At the same

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Devastating events can drive human trafficking, paper shows

UC Santa Cruz doctoral student Sabina Tomkins has long been moved by the horrible stories of victims of human trafficking.

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Electricity crisis leaves Iraqis gasping for cool air

As the stultifying summer heat sends Iraqis in search of cool spots, restaurateur Ali Hussein provides sanctuary—even though it means hooking up to an expensive generator.

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A Poet of Computation Who Uncovers Distant Truths

Scroll down to the bottom of Constantinos Daskalakis’ web page — past links to his theoretical computer science papers and his doctoral students at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology — and you will come upon a spare, 21-line poem by Constantine Cavafy, “The Satrapy.” Written in 1910, it addresses an unnamed individual who is “made for fine and great works” but who, having met with small-mi

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Planetary defense has new tool in weather satellite lightning detector

NASA's efforts to better understand asteroid impacts has found unexpected support from a new satellite sensor designed to detect lightning. New research published in the journal Meteoritics and Planetary Science finds that the new Geostationary Lightning Mapper, or GLM, on two weather satellites is able to pick up signals of meteors in Earth's atmosphere.

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Video: Next-generation spacesuit design

Movement really moves Richard Fineman, a fourth-year Ph.D. student in the Harvard-MIT Program in Health Sciences and Technology. Using wearable sensors and a range of complex modeling tools, Fineman is able to measure and understand a body in motion in unprecedented ways. He is using what he's learning to advance human health and medicine, as well as astronaut garb.

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Mapping endangered red knots' remote breeding habitat

The rufa subspecies of Red Knot travels from its breeding grounds in the Canadian Arctic to its winter habitat in South America and back each year, an incredible 15,000 kilometers each way. Its numbers have fallen precipitously in recent decades, and with such a broad range, determining what's behind the shorebird's decline is a huge challenge. A new study from The Condor: Ornithological Applicati

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Chinese scientists discover genomic key to plateau adaptation

The hot-spring snake belongs to the genus Thermophis. Chinese scientists studying genomic data of hot-spring snakes have, for the first time, discovered the genetic mechanism for ectothermic animals' adaptation to high-elevation extreme environments.

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A Number Theorist Who Bridges Math and Time

At the playground on the leafy campus of the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, New Jersey, one afternoon in May, the mathematician Akshay Venkatesh alternated between pushing his 4-year-old daughter on the swing and musing on the genius myth in mathematics. The genius stereotype does the discipline no favors, he told Quanta . “I think it doesn’t capture all the different kinds of ways pe

19h

 

A Master of Numbers and Shapes Who Is Rewriting Arithmetic

In the run-up to the presentation of the Fields Medals — mathematics’ highest honor — the identity of the winners is always a closely guarded secret. But this time around, one name has been on everyone’s lips: Peter Scholze , of the University of Bonn in Germany. Today, those expectations proved justified. The 30-year-old Scholze was awarded the medal at the International Congress of Mathematicia

19h

 

Asteroid Sample-Return Spacecraft Are Approaching Their Targets

Japanese and U.S. missions could yield new discoveries about the origins of life on Earth — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

19h

 

NASA's MISR views raging fires in California

More than a dozen wildfires are burning in the state of California, with several of them threatening life and property. The Ferguson Fire ignited July 13 in the Sierra National Forest west of Yosemite National Park. Much of the forest in this area suffered extreme stress due to the extended drought of 2012 through 2017, and bark beetle damage, leaving many dead trees through which the fire has bur

19h

 

Fields medal: UK refugee wins 'biggest maths prize'

One of the most prestigious prizes in mathematics are awarded at a ceremony in Brazil.

19h

 

A little competition could rein in algal blooms

Researchers have discovered a correlation between the degree of competition within microalgae communities’ and the overgrowth of algal blooms that can be manipulated through hydrology. The findings will help alleviate an increasing harmful algal bloom issue in the United States, they say. An overabundance of simple plants living in bodies of water cause harmful algal blooms—known for releasing de

19h

 

Study confirms that island birds have bigger brains

A team of researchers from Sweden, Canada and Spain has found evidence suggesting that birds that live on islands tend to have bigger brains than their mainland cousins. In their paper published in the journal Nature Communications, the group describes their analysis of data on over 1800 bird species and what they found.

19h

 

Made in Fukushima: Japan farmers struggle to win trust

The pumpkin is diced, the chicken carved and the eggs beaten into an omelette, but the people preparing the food are not chefs—they are scientists testing produce from Japan's Fukushima region.

19h

 

Connecticut's forests today a far cry from towering giants of old

Imagine stepping back in time, before the first Europeans arrived, into the forests of New England more than 500 years ago.

19h

 

An Innovator Who Brings Order to an Infinitude of Equations

This spring, not long after Caucher Birkar learned that he would be receiving the Fields Medal, the highest honor in mathematics, he shared a memory from his undergraduate years. Even by that time he had come a long way. Born and raised in a rural subsistence farming village in the Kurdish region of western Iran, Birkar had made his way to the University of Tehran, one of the pre-eminent universi

19h

 

Trump appoints Oklahoma professor to lead science policy office

President Donald Trump's appointment of a University of Oklahoma professor as director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy is being cheered by a leading scientific society.

19h

 

Slovakia faces challenge of shifting gear into e-cars

A small country but ranked as a major automaker, Slovakia now risks paying a heavy price should it miss out on the accelerating change to electric cars, analysts say.

19h

 

Facebook, Instagram to introduce time-management toolsFacebook Instagram

Do you worry that you, or your children, spend too much time on social media? Facebook and Instagram on Wednesday said they want to help you take control.

19h

 

Analysts expect Tesla 2Q revenue gain but big net loss

Tesla's second-quarter revenue should grow by more than $1 billion as it delivered more Model 3 electric cars. But analysts predict it won't be enough to stop the company's net loss from rising dramatically when the Palo Alto, California, company reports earnings after the bell Wednesday.

19h

 

Applying physics of gels to help understand formation of terrorist groups

A team of researchers from the University of Miami and George Washington University has developed a model to simulate terrorist group development using the physics surrounding the behavior of gels. In their paper published in the journal Physical Review Letters, the group describes manipulating physics theories to make them work in a simulation they created. They also report on how well the simula

19h

 

Baidu profit up 45% on growth in news app and AI push

Chinese online search giant Baidu on Wednesday said net profit for the second quarter jumped 45 percent, fuelled by growth in its personalised news app and artificial intelligence (AI) projects.

19h

 

7 Myths About Suicide

The recent tragedies of Kate Spade’s and Anthony Bourdain’s suicides raised awareness of suicide as a mental health issue, but also generated a lot of misinformation — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

20h

 

Women with polycystic ovary syndrome more likely to have a child with autism

Women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) are more likely than other women to have an autistic child, according to an analysis of NHS data carried out by a team at Cambridge University's Autism Research Centre. The research is published today in the journal Translational Psychiatry.

20h

 

Sunscreen chemicals in water may harm fish embryos

For most people, a trip to the beach involves slathering on a thick layer of sunscreen to protect against sunburn and skin cancer. However, savvy beachgoers know to reapply sunscreen every few hours because it eventually washes off. Now researchers, reporting in ACS' journal Environmental Science & Technology, have detected high levels of sunscreen chemicals in the waters of Shenzhen, China, and t

20h

 

Burton Richter obituary

American physicist who won the Nobel prize for his groundbreaking particle discovery On the morning of 11 November 1974, members of the programme selection committee at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center in California were assembling for one of their regular meetings. Sam Ting, from Brookhaven National Laboratory, New York, met Burton Richter, a leading experimenter at SLAC and said: “Burt, I

20h

 

How to Make Friends, According to Science

Christopher DeLorenzo “W hat are friends for?” This isn’t a rhetorical question. Friendship is one of life’s most important features, and one too often taken for granted. The human desire for companionship may feel boundless, but research suggests that our social capital is finite—we can handle only so many relationships at one time. Social scientists have used a number of ingenious approaches to

20h

 

Problem in exciton-polariton physics resolved using novel method

Researchers at ANU recently proved a novel method for generating orbital angular momentum states (vortices), with a topological charge that is ensured by an exceptional point.

20h

 

Prehistoric mass graves may be linked to tsunamis, new research reveals

UNSW scientists have shown – for the first time – that a series of high-profile burial sites in the Pacific, Mediterranean and northern Scotland were likely related to catastrophic tsunamis. The work was published in the Journal of Archaeological Method and Theory.

20h

 

Why 2-D? Measuring thickness-dependent electronic properties

Constraining the movement of charge carriers (electrons or holes) to two dimensions unlocks unusual quantum properties, resulting in useful electronic properties.

20h

 

Software framework designed to accelerate drug discovery wins IEEE International Scalable Computing Challenge

Solutions to many real-world scientific and engineering problems—from improving weather models and designing new energy materials to understanding how the universe formed—require applications that can scale to a very large size and high performance. Each year, through its International Scalable Computing Challenge (SCALE), the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) recognizes a p

20h

 

Did scientists discover a new shape? Well, first we have to define ‘shape.’ Also, ‘new.’

Science A cool scientific finding and a strange semantic investigation. “Scientists just discovered a new shape” makes for a great headline—and a lot of questions. Chief among them: What the heck is a new shape?

20h

 

Sunscreen chemicals in water may harm fish embryos

For most people, a trip to the beach involves slathering on a thick layer of sunscreen to protect against sunburn and skin cancer. However, savvy beachgoers know to reapply sunscreen every few hours because it eventually washes off. Now researchers, reporting in ACS' journal Environmental Science & Technology, have detected high levels of sunscreen chemicals in the waters of Shenzhen, China, and t

20h

 

A Traveler Who Finds Stability in the Natural World

In the company of Alessio Figalli , you get a sense that everything is taken care of. The young Italian mathematician is tall, fit and stylish, his R’s rolling off the tongue with an intoxicating Roman richness. He likes to be around other people, and other people like to be around him. Which is why the secret he has had to keep has been so hard for him. Over the past few months, he’s visited fri

20h

 

Image of the Day: Bigger Picture

Island birds possess bigger brains than those from the mainland.

20h

 

To Fight Fake News, SETI Researchers Update Alien-Detection Scale

Dubbed Rio 2.0, the scale seeks to measure how important any potential signal from aliens might be — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

20h

 

Electromagnetic Fields at Work Show No Brain Tumor Risk

A new study finds no significant correlation between workplace exposure to radio frequency (RF) or intermediate frequency (IF) electromagnetic waves and the most common brain tumors. This is more reassuring evidence that non-ionizing EMFs are probably safe.

20h

 

As Memes Evolve, Apps Are Struggling to Keep Up

Last year, Alex, a 19-year-old in California who runs a network of Instagram pages dedicated to publishing memes, became so frustrated with the current apps for making memes that she hired a developer to build her own. She spent $3,000 on the project, which she says has saved her hours of time and frustration. “I don’t want to say it’s a competitive edge, because at the end of the day that’s not

20h

 

In Photos: The Deadly Carr Fire Blazes Across Northern California

The Carr Fire has burned well over 100,000 acres and destroyed thousands of structures.

20h

 

20h

 

Nyt phthalat stemples som hormonforstyrrende af EU

Endnu en plastblødgører følger trop med de fire kendte phthalater DEHP, DBP, DIBP og BBP og stemples nu som både hormonforstyrrende og skadeligt for forplantningsevnen på EU's kandidatliste.

20h

 

Open Letter to the Fields Medal Committee

Why you should give the award to me — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

20h

 

Lotteries May Be the Fairest Way to Fix Elite-College Admissions

A federal court has in recent weeks unsealed a trove of documents revealing how Harvard decides whom to admit out of the 40,000 or so students who apply each year for its roughly 1,600 freshman seats. The documents, provided as part of a 2014 lawsuit filed by the organization Students for Fair Admissions (SFFA), which represents Asian Americans who at some point were rejected from Harvard, contai

21h

 

How to Write a Book Without Losing Your Mind

A few months ago, I promised some nice people in New York that I would, sometime very soon, write a book. Since then, I have: Called my mom rejoicing. Called my mom crying. Considered changing my Twitter bio, then thought better of it. Considered emailing all my ex-boyfriends and mentors to let them know I’m an impostor, then thought better of it. Extensively researched three different long-form

21h

 

Hearing Amazon's footsteps, Walgreens unveils new digital platform to connect patients to doctors

Walgreens has unveiled a new digital platform to connect customers to medical services, just weeks after its stock dove on news that Amazon is expanding into the pharmacy business.

21h

 

The Miseducation of Cameron Post Is a Graceful Coming-of-Age Tale

The Miseducation of Cameron Post sets itself an intriguing story challenge in its very concept. The lead character, Cameron Post (Chloë Grace Moretz), is a teenager who gets bundled away to a Christian conversion camp in 1993, after she’s caught kissing another girl. Desiree Akhavan’s film, which won this year’s Grand Jury Prize at the Sundance Film Festival, follows Cameron as she bonds with her

21h

 

When the Mind's Eye Is Blind

Some people find it impossible to imagine a friend’s face or their own apartment—a phenomenon named aphantasia. Scientists are beginning to tease out the brain features underlying the… — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

21h

 

You'll soon be able to use your iPhone to pay for CVS prescriptions with Apple Pay

You'll soon be able to use your iPhone or Apple Watch to pay for prescriptions at CVS or a Slurpee at 7-Eleven. The two previous retail holdouts will start rolling out support nationwide for the the Apple Pay mobile payments system in the fall. Apple CEO Tim Cook made the announcement during an earnings call Tuesday with investors.

21h

 

Before Its Death Dive, Cassini Caught Saturn Hissing at Its Rings

For the first time scientists have observed the gas giant sending magnetic waves back to its ring system and its moon Enceladus — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

21h

 

Fruit flies farm their own probiotics

The role of the microbiome is increasingly recognized as part of wellbeing. The most diverse and significant bacteria community is located in the intestines. It is believed that the manipulation of the microbiota can contribute to treating some diseases. However, to enable it, it is necessary to understand the range of bacteria and how they colonize the intestine. Research in this field has used m

22h

 

British Jews Find Their Voice

Sometimes, I don’t think I recognize British Jews anymore. For decades my community has been quiet and watchful, slow to place itself in the public eye. But last week, watching British Jews call out antisemitism in Jeremy Corbyn’s Labour Party I had to pinch myself. Were these really the Jews of Britain: publicly furious, outraged, venting their fear and disgust as they faced down what might well

22h

 

Stop Bending the Knee to Donald Trump

In Westeros, the fictional realm where Game of Thrones is set, common men and women are expected to bend the knee to kings, queens, lords, and ladies, pledging their fealty “from this day till my last day.” Americans are citizens, not servile subjects. After voting for a public servant, there is no obligation of abiding loyalty. Indeed, the right to critique all shortcomings is enshrined in the C

22h

 

Aphids manipulate their food

How do aphids reproduce on plants so successfully? This is among the questions that Professor Dr. Caroline Müller and her research team are addressing at Bielefeld University's Faculty of Biology. They have discovered that aphids are able to influence the quality of their food, and that this may enable them to construct a niche on their own host plants. Müller's research team is located in the Tra

22h

 

Behandl kvinder skidt – og de strømmer ind på naturvidenskabelige studier

Mange kvinder tøver stadig ved at søge ind på teknologitunge studier, viser de nye optagelsestal. Forskning forklarer kønskløften med kontroversielt paradoks.

22h

 

Tagged shortfin mako shark caught and killed by fishermen

For one week every year people seem glued to their televisions watching program after program about sharks. After that week, the spotlight on sharks seems to fade – but not for the researchers who are studying these apex predators all 52 weeks of the year.

22h

 

July's Stunning Space Pictures

July's Stunning Space Pictures Enjoy the drama of supermassive black holes, colliding planets and glittering “starscapes.” 1_crop_PM_DESY_Blazar_quer_A4_300DPI.jpg An artist's impression of an active galactic nucleus — the source of neutrino mysterious particles that scientists have located for the first time. Image credits: DESY, Science Communication Lab Space Tuesday, July 31, 2018 – 17:00 Ab

22h

 

High photoresponsivity in modified upon maskless processing graphene detectors

Graphene is one of the most promising materials for advanced electronics due to its extraordinary chemical and physical properties. The interaction between the graphene lattice and light opens the way for the development of novel devices with superior functionality. Nevertheless, technology used for traditional silicon electronics is unlikely suitable for graphene. Photolithography is the main pro

22h

 

Single-cell RNA profiling

An LMU team has improved both the sensitivity and efficiency of a popular method for single-cell RNA sequencing, which yields a molecular fingerprint for individual cells based on their patterns of gene activity.

22h

 

Trigger warnings don't work like you think.

submitted by /u/moodog72 [link] [comments]

22h

 

River complexity maintains regional population stability

An international group of researchers has demonstrated that branching complexity of rivers affects regional population stability and persistence in nature, contrary to current theories which suggest the importance of an ecosystem's size.

22h

 

BiSb expands the potential of topological insulators for ultra-low-power electronic devices

A research team led by Pham Nam Hai at the Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) has developed the world's best-performing pure spin current source made of bismuth-antimony (BiSb) alloys, which they report as the best candidate for the first industrial application of topological insulators. The achievement represents a big step forward in t

22h

 

Could symbiotic microbes help ecosystems survive global warming?

Studies of the relationships between microbes and the organisms they live on are revealing how plants and animals could adapt to climate change.

22h

 

Andrew Wheeler, New E.P.A. Chief, Details His Energy Lobbying Past

Mr. Wheeler, the agency’s acting administrator, has put forth the fullest explanation yet of his energy lobbying activities.

22h

 

Facebook opdager forsøg på at påvirke amerikansk midtvejsvalg

Ny kampagne på Facebook minder om tidligere russiske forsøg.

22h

 

Undervisningsministeriet: Det er skolens skyld, at elev ikke fik slettet identitet fra måling

Skole havde flere uger til at gøre opmærksom på problemet med elevs sporbare besvarelse, mener ministeriet, der 'låste' database med svar samme nat, som deadlinen udløb.

22h

 

Drexel's polymer pill proves it can deliver

Selecting the right packaging to get precious cargo from point A to point B can be a daunting task. Scientists have wrestled with a similar set of questions when packaging medicine for delivery in the bloodstream: How much packing will keep it safe? Is it the right packing material? Is it too big? Is it too heavy? Researchers from Drexel University have developed a new type of container that seems

23h

 

On-chip optical filter processes wide range of light wavelengths

MIT researchers have designed an optical filter on a chip that can process optical signals from across an extremely wide spectrum of light at once, something never before available to integrated optics systems that process data using light. The technology may offer greater precision and flexibility for designing optical communication and sensor systems, studying photons and other particles through

23h

 

Novel drug cocktails strengthen targeted cancer therapies while lessening side effects

Mount Sinai researchers have discovered that certain drug cocktails help targeted therapies attack cancer more efficiently while lessening common side effects, according to a study published today in Cancer Research.

23h

 

WATCH: The Science Behind Why Some Bullets Are More Destructive Than Others

How much damage a bullet does when fired at the human body hinges on physics. Our latest "Let's Talk" video shows and explains why certain types of ammunition cause greater havoc than others. (Image credit: Alessandro Novelli for NPR)

23h

 

Varmt havvand lukker svensk atomreaktor

Det svenske atomkraftværk Ringhals bruger havvand til køling. Men nu er vandtemperaturen ved værket over 25 grader. Og så er havvandskøling ikke længere nok.

23h

 

Tests show 'crystalsome' nanoparticle lasts longer in bloodstream

Selecting the right packaging to get precious cargo from point A to point B can be a daunting task at the post office. For some time, scientists have wrestled with a similar set of questions when packaging medicine for delivery in the bloodstream: How much packing will keep it safe? Is it the right packing material? Is it too big? Is it too heavy? Researchers from Drexel University have developed

23h

 

On-chip optical filter processes wide range of light wavelengths

MIT researchers have designed an optical filter on a chip that can process optical signals from across an extremely wide spectrum of light at once, something never before available to integrated optics systems that process data using light. The technology may offer greater precision and flexibility for designing optical communication and sensor systems, studying photons and other particles through

23h

 

Ny trend: Sagsøg et olieselskab for klimaproblemer

Baltimore er den seneste amerikanske by, der har sagsøgt olieselskaber, for at stå bag konsekvenser for klimaforandringerne.

23h

 

Huawei tops Apple in tightening smartphone market: IDC

China-based Huawei took the second-place spot from Apple in a tightening global smartphone during the second quarter of this year, according to figures released Tuesday by International Data Corporation.

1d

 

The competitive edge: Dietary competition played a key role in the evolution of early primates

Since Darwin first laid out the basic principles of evolution by means of natural selection, the role of competition for food as a driving force in shaping and shifting a species' biology to outcompete its adversaries has played center stage. So important is the notion of competition between species, that it is viewed as a key selective force that resulted in the split of the lineage leading to mo

1d

 

Scientists discover why elusive aye-aye developed such unusual features

It is one of the most unusual primates on the planet—famed for its large eyes, big ears and thin, bony finger used for probing.

1d

 

Soil phosphorus availability and lime: More than just pH?

Plants can't do without phosphorus. But there is often a 'withdrawal limit' on how much phosphorus they can get from the soil. That's because phosphorus in soils is often in forms that plants can't take up. That affects how healthy and productive the plants can be.

1d

 

Differences in social status and politics encourage paranoid thinking

Differences in social status and political belief increase paranoid interpretations of other people's actions, finds a new UCL experimental study.

1d

 

NASA’s plans to end the ISS could put its Mars missions in danger

A report on NASA's plans to stop funding the International Space Station by 2024 reveals that crucial studies on human spaceflight won't be done in time

1d

 

Boy’s brain works just fine after a large piece was removed

A boy had a third of his right brain hemisphere removed to treat his epilepsy. His brain has now rearranged itself, preventing any cognitive impairment

1d

 

When you ride the subway you share bacteria with everyone in your city

Unique bacterial communities exist on most Hong Kong subway train lines in the morning, but these merge during the day, also spreading antibiotic resistance

1d

 

Was this the scorcher that finally ended climate denial? | Michael McCarthy

The blazing summer of 2018 has led to a shift in tone from some rightwing sceptics who can no longer deny the obvious It’s not always easy to recognise a historical tipping point when you see one, but I believe I spotted one when I walked into my local newsagent last Wednesday and saw the front page of the Sun. Over a map of the world which was coloured bright scarlet, the splash headline screame

1d

 

Trial to test if GM fed salmon are more nutritious

Researchers are feeding genetically modified crops to farmed salmon to see if it boosts their nutritional value.

1d

 

Salmon fed genetically modified plants in nutrition trial

Researchers are feeding farmed salmon a genetically modified plant to see if it boosts omega-3 levels.

1d

 

I dag har vi brugt Jordens ressourcer for 2018

Earth Overshoot Day er den dag, verdens befolkning har brugt de ressourcer, der kan gendannes på et år. I år falder dagen tidligere end nogensinde før.

1d

 

Tech takes on cigarette smoking

Researchers at Case Western Reserve University are using wearable sensor technology to develop an automatic alert system to help people quit smoking.

1d

 

Soil phosphorus availability and lime: More than just pH?

Plants can't do without phosphorus. But there is often a 'withdrawal limit' on how much phosphorus they can get from the soil. A new study looks at how liming, soil management history and enzymes relate to plants' access to phosphorus.

1d

 

Single-payer plan in New York could cover all without increasing spending

The New York State Assembly has passed a bill that would create a single-payer plan providing coverage to all state residents. A new study finds that the proposal would expand coverage, but would require significant new tax revenue. Overall health care costs would decrease slightly over time if administrative costs are reduced and state officials slow the growth of payments to health care provider

1d

 

Lung cancer mortality rates among women projected to increase by over 40 percent by 2030

The global age-standardized lung cancer mortality rate among women is projected to increase by 43 percent from 2015 to 2030, according to an analysis of data from 52 countries. The global age-standardized breast cancer mortality rate is projected to decrease by 9 percent in the same time frame.

1d

 

Bacterial Genetics Could Help Researchers Block Interplanetary Contamination

Identifying microbes from Earth that can survive on spacecraft may help scientists eliminate them from future space missions and from searches for extraterrestrial life.

1d

 

The Superpowers of Genetically Modified Pigs

Scientists have engineered swine that pollute less, fend off disease, and produce more meat – but you won't find them outside experimental farms . . . yet.

1d

 

Scientists Can’t Agree on What’s Making Pistachio Trees Sick

A new study ignites debate on the cause of pistachio bushy top syndrome, a disease that has crippled farms in California, Arizona, and New Mexico.

1d

 

Oxytocin Makes Time Fly

Can people’s social skills affect their experience of time?

1d

 

August 2018 Crossword

Try your hand at a sciency brain teaser.

1d

 

Do Electric Fish Dream in Zaps?

Studying electrical communication in the wild requires braving the Amazon jungle with sensitive equipment.

1d

 

These Molecules Zipper Embryos Closed

Actin rings seal off the ball of cells, aiding in implantation in the uterus. But faults in the process could explain why some pregnancies fail.

1d

 

Drones Are Changing the Face of Ecology

Unmanned aerial vehicles allow researchers to collect huge volumes of biological data cheaply, easily, and at higher resolution than ever before.

1d

 

From Railroad Tracks to Racetracks, 1870s

How a robber baron and an eccentric inventor solved a millennia-old question about horses.

1d

 

Infographic: Inner Glow

How GFP-grabbing nanobodies enable instant tracking of protein dynamics in live cells.

1d

 

How Ants Make Collective Decisions

Transport of food sways between two modes.

1d

 

Ten-Minute Sabbatical

Take a break from the bench to puzzle and peruse.

1d

 

Life Scientists Cut Down on Plastic Waste

Across the US, laboratories are finding creative ways to minimize the amount of plastic they throw away.

1d

 

August 2018 Crossword Puzzle Answers

See how well you did.

1d

 

Officially Intelligent

Humanity is on the precipice of major change. Some fear a world ruled by bots. I fear a world ruled by people.

1d

 

Infographic: Embryonic Zippering

How actin seals embryos early in development

1d

 

Opinion: Learning from Immunotherapy's Recent Failures

The promise of immunotherapy is real. We now need to figure out how to maximize the number of patients the approach benefits.

1d

 

Ready, Set, Glow

Tagging proteins with GFP-grabbing nanobodies enables instant tracking of the proteins' dynamics in live cells.

1d

 

The Cell’s Integrated Circuit: A Profile of Lucy Shapiro

Shapiro helped to found the field of systems biology.

1d

 

Heather Massey Respects Water

The University of Portsmouth sports scientist and open-water swimmer investigates the human body’s response to extreme conditions.

1d

 

Dengue fever outbreak halted by release of special mosquitoes

Insects unable to transmit viruses halted disease in Australian city – now scientists hope same technique could help tackle Zika and malaria The first large-scale deployment of mosquitoes infected with Wolbachia bacteria, which makes them unable to transmit viruses, has stopped all outbreaks of dengue fever in a city in northern Australia for the last four years. The success of the project in Tow

1d

 

How to Track Metabolites in Tissues Using NMR

Whether it's aligning software or prepping samples, researchers share their tips for studying the metabolome with this underused approach.

1d

 

Lessons from Biosphere 2

Both the scientific community and the general public still have a lot to learn from the largest mesocosm research project ever conducted.

1d

 

Infographic: Choosing the Right Umbrella

Researchers must consider the entire ecosystem when planning conservation strategies.

1d

 

Replication Failures Highlight Biases in Ecology and Evolution Science

As robust efforts fail to reproduce findings of influential zebra finch studies from the 1980s, scientists discuss ways to reduce bias in such research.

1d

 

Umbrella Species: Conservation's Poster Children

Researchers are evaluating whether selecting one species to provide protection for many is the right approach.

1d

 

As Brain Organoids Mature, Ethical Questions Arise

Inserting human "mini-brains" into rodents has the potential to broaden scientists’ understanding of neurological disease, but raises quandaries about consciousness.

1d

 

Infographic: Treating with CRISPR

Researchers explore the use of the gene-editing technology to manipulate cells both in a dish and in patients.

1d

 

CRISPR Inches Toward the Clinic

The gene-editing technology is already in trials for some rare conditions, with more human testing on the horizon.

1d

 

Infographic: How to Make a Brain Organoid

Mini-brains can be grown in culture or printed.

1d

 

Macular Degeneration: Symptoms, Diagnosis and Treatments

Symtpoms, causes and treatments for macular degeneration.

1d

 

Facts About Radon

Properties, sources and uses of the element radon.

1d

 

Antallet af landmøller skal halveres

Energiforlig lægger loft over den allerbilligste grønne strøm – landmøllerne. Det gør den grønne omstilling dyrere, konstaterer energiforsker.

1d

 

Trods brunt græs og visne blomster: Biolog glæder sig over den ekstreme danske varme

Tørken er god for biodiversiteten, da det giver muligheder for andre planter og insekter, lyder det fra biolog Rasmus Ejrnæs.

1d

 

Ekstremt sommervejr: Er der et mønster – eller er det tilfældigt?

Sommerens ekstreme varme sætter rekord efter rekord. Men hvorfor?

1d

 

Plastic bags: Australia anger over Coles 'caving in to tantrums'

Social media users turn on supermarket giant Coles for "caving in" to "tantrums" over reusable bags.

1d

 

Eat high-fiber foods to reduce effects of stress on gut and behavior

Eating high-fiber foods may reduce the effects of stress on our gut and behavior, according to new research published in The Journal of Physiology.

1d

 

1d

 

People with depression have low blood levels of this stuff

People with depression have low blood levels of a substance called acetyl-L-carnitine, according to a new study. “[Depression is] the No. 1 reason for absenteeism at work, and one of the leading causes of suicide…” Naturally produced in the body, acetyl-L-carnitine is also widely available in drugstores, supermarkets, and health food catalogs as a nutritional supplement. People with severe or tre

1d

 

To make a smartphone, lose your ethics

How is a smartphone made? Nearly every stage in the smartphone life cycle involves something ethically questionable. Read More

1d

 

Memristor setup could make computer chips more efficient

A new way of arranging advanced computer components called memristors on a chip could pave the way for their use in general computing. This could cut energy consumption by a factor of 100. Using memristors would improve performance in low power environments such as smartphones or make for more efficient supercomputers, says Wei Lu, professor of electrical and computer engineering at the Universit

1d

 

The competitive edge: Dietary competition played a key role in the evolution of early primates

New research published online today in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B -Biological Sciences confirms the critical role that dietary adaptations played in the survival and diversification of North American euprimates.

1d

 

Differences in social status and politics encourage paranoid thinking

Differences in social status and political belief increase paranoid interpretations of other people's actions, finds a new UCL experimental study.

1d

 

Scientists discover why elusive aye-aye developed such unusual features

A new study has, for the first time, measured the extent to which the endangered aye-aye has evolved similar features to squirrels, despite being more closely related to monkeys, chimps, and humans.

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British Journal of Cancer press notice

These are upcoming paper publications of interest for journalists.

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Research suggests coffee consumption associated with reduced risk of death

A new roundtable report from the Institute for Scientific Information on Coffee (ISIC) titled 'Coffee, caffeine, mortality and life expectancy' highlights the potential role of coffee consumption on all-cause mortality, examining both published and yet-to-be published research to date.

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After losing chunk of brain, boy recovers visual system

A new study provides the first evidence of how the human brain recovers the ability to function after losing parts of the visual system. Published in Cell Reports , researchers report on three years of behavioral and brain imaging tests on a nearly 7-year-old boy—”UD”—who had a third of the right hemisphere of his brain removed in an attempt to control seizures. Even though the procedure left UD

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Planetary ‘fingerprints’ will boost exoplanet hunt

Researchers have created a reference catalog using calibrated spectra and geometric albedos (the light reflected by a surface) of 19 of the most diverse bodies in our solar system. The catalog contains all eight planets, from rocky to gaseous; nine moons, from frozen to lava-spewing; and two dwarf planets, one in the asteroid belt (Ceres) and one in the Kuiper belt (Pluto). By comparing observed

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Oh Say Can You See Subtle Details?

Different people have differing aptitudes for observing small changes and particular features. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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New strategy fights foot-and-mouth disease in real time

Researchers have developed a new real-time strategy that could help combat future outbreaks of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) quickly, efficiently, and early on—when authorities have minimal information. “It is crucial for policymakers to employ surveillance to resolve uncertainty in how the disease is spreading…” Researchers from the University of Warwick discovered that the most effective policie

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This kind of RNA could contribute to fatty liver

Scientists have uncovered a potential new role for long noncoding RNA in obesity and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease—an accumulation of too much fat in the liver that affects an estimated 64 million Americans and increases their risk for cirrhosis and liver failure. Working in mouse models, the researchers identified a specific type of long noncoding RNA (also called lncRNA) that increases fat a

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Tiny snails suck the life out of stressed corals

A previously overlooked predator—a thumbnail-sized snail—could be increasing the pressure on coral reefs already weakened by the effects of overfishing, rising ocean temperatures, pollution, and other threats, researchers say. “The Porites coral is kind of the last man standing, the last hope for some of these reefs coming back…” The snail damages coral by sucking fluid from coral like a tick, an

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Weak link could lead to universal flu vaccine

Researchers may have found a weakness in a protein that delivers the flu virus that could be a useful target to stop the virus from infecting cells. In a new paper, which appears in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences , the researchers delve further into a glycoprotein complex they began to define in a 2014 paper. That protein, hemagglutinin, sits on the surface of flu viruses and

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The Atlantic Daily: Life’s Chaotic

What We’re Following Manafort in Court: The financial-crimes trial of Paul Manafort, the former chairman of Donald Trump’s campaign, is underway. Although it’s the first trial to come out of Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s probe of election interference, prosecutors won’t be focused on Russian collusion. And in a broader sense, this trial isn’t just about Manafort. Instead, writes Franklin Foer,

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Here's How the Government Plans to Take Down Paul Manafort

Paul Manafort allegedly laundered millions of dollars through a complex network of offshore shell companies and hid more than $60 million in foreign bank accounts to conceal his income from the IRS. But the government’s pitch to jurors on Tuesday, during the first day of his trial, boiled down to a simple, even relatable offense: Manafort is a “shrewd” liar who wouldn’t pay his taxes. The prosecu

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Ancient space crystals may prove the sun threw heated tantrums as a tot

Space You can learn a lot from 4.5-billion-year-old rocks. A peculiar set of ancient blue crystals from space suggest the sun emitted a much higher flux of cosmic rays in its early history than we once thought.

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The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Manafort of the Moment

Written by Elaine Godfrey ( @elainejgodfrey ), Maddie Carlisle ( @maddiecarlisle2 ), and Olivia Paschal (@ oliviacpaschal ) Today in 5 Lines Facebook announced that it had uncovered a “coordinated” disinformation campaign on its site ahead of the 2018 midterm elections, and has removed 32 fake pages and profiles. A judge heard opening arguments on the first day of the trial for former Trump campa

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After Calf's Death, Orca Mother Carries It For Days In 'Tragic Tour Of Grief'

What began as a moment of joy ended in tragedy when the infant died last week. Since then its mother has refused to let go, holding her child tightly in what experts call a moving expression of grief. (Image credit: Michael Weiss/Center for Whale Research via AP)

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Deal reached to clean land around 3 US plutonium reactors

A portion of the vast Washington state site where the U.S. government created much of the plutonium for the nation's nuclear arsenal will be scrubbed free of radiation and other pollution under a final plan reached by the U.S. Department of Energy and federal and state regulators.

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Apple quarterly profit leaps, nears $1 trillion value

Apple said Tuesday that its profit had jumped more than 30 percent to $11.5 billion in the recently ended quarter, besting market expectations despite selling fewer iPhones than analysts projected.

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Patricia Cohen, Who Tracked Mental Health of Children, Dies at 81

Ms. Cohen oversaw one of the longest-running studies of its kind, tracing the mental well-being of youngsters as they grew into adolescence.

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Migraine Drug Wins EU Approval

Aimovig will soon be available for individuals who have four or more migraines a month.

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Here's how 3D printing is changing photography

Technology The Standard Camera, Cameradactyl, and the PinBox are three cameras using 3D printing. 3D printing makes it easier to prototype quickly, leading to a boom of products for film photographers.

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What is causing more extreme precipitation in the Northeast?

From Maine to West Virginia, the Northeast has seen a larger increase in extreme precipitation than anywhere else in the U.S. Prior research found that these heavy rain and snow events, defined as a day with about two inches of precipitation or more, have been 53 percent higher in the Northeast since 1996. A Dartmouth study finds that hurricanes and tropical storms are the primary cause of this in

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This Is So Much Bigger Than Paul Manafort

On the eve of the Paul Manafort trial, Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin casually announced that the Trump administration was considering a fresh $100 billion tax cut for the wealthy. The two events—the trial and the tax cut—should be considered plot points in the very same narrative. Manafort had grown very rich by looting public monies, and Mnuchin was proposing an arguably legal version of the

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Largest King Penguin Colony Population Has Declined Drastically

Compared to 500,000 breeding pairs in the 1980s, only 60,000 penguin pairs now remain.

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Wildfires More Common in Western U.S.

A century's worth of fire suppression in forests, drought and heat from climate change, and the "suburbanization" of the woods mean that fires like the Carr Fire in Redding, Calif., are the new norm.

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Diabetes risk higher among LGBQ teens than heterosexual teens, study finds

In the largest study of its kind to report differences in physical activity and obesity by sex and sexual orientation, obesity was more likely among lesbian, bisexual and questioning female youth than heterosexual female peers. Additionally, lesbian, gay, bisexual and questioning youth are more likely to develop Type 2 diabetes, be obese and engage in less physical activity and more sedentary acti

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What is causing more extreme precipitation in the northeast?

From Maine to West Virginia, the Northeast has seen a larger increase in extreme precipitation than anywhere else in the US. Prior research found that these heavy rain and snow events, defined as a day with about two inches of precipitation or more, have been 53 percent higher in the Northeast since 1996. A Dartmouth study finds that hurricanes and tropical storms are the primary cause of this inc

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Let’s open our sealed-off lives to semi-permeable architecture

Traditional buildings were designed to provide protection against a savage world. But the world has changed. We need to develop a more sustainable relationship with the environment, and semi-permeable architecture allows us to do that. Read More

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Grieving Mother Orca Carries Dead Calf For More Than A Week, Over Hundreds Of Miles

The calf was the first to be born in the endangered pod of Pacific Northwest killer whales in three years. (Image credit: Taylor Shedd/Soundwatch, taken under NMFS MMPA permit #21114)

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Trial Launched to Treat Parkinson's with Reprogrammed Stem Cells

Surgeons will inject approximately 5 million dopamine-producing progenitor cells into patients' brains.

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Facebook’s Big Disinformation Bust Is Cold Comfort

Facebook announced today that it has removed pages, events, and accounts involved in “coordinated inauthentic behavior” on its social-media platforms, including Facebook and Instagram. The posts and accounts in question appeared to have been created to sow discord in advance of a second “Unite the Right” rally in Washington D.C., meant to memorialize last year’s deadly white supremacist protest i

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Do spiders have a favorite color?

Scientists recently discovered the aptly named peacock jumping spiders have the color vision needed to appreciate the male's gaudy display. Now biologists are studying whether that ability translates to the more humdrum-looking wolf spiders that are muted browns and tans instead of electric blue, fiery orange and stoplight red.

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Implants made by computer-aided design provide good results in patients with rare chest muscle deformity

For patients with Poland syndrome — a rare congenital condition affecting the chest muscle — computer-aided design (CAD) techniques can be used to create custom-made silicone implants for reconstructive surgery of the chest, reports a paper in the August issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery®, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS).

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Why are some athletes able to compete into their 40s?

Health Training, motivation, and luck are key to a long athletic career. The time it takes the body to lose its peak performance might be lengthening. Could 40 be the new 20? Based on current elite athletes' ages and skills, for some, the…

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Why Would Iran Want to Talk to Trump Anyway?

One would think that Tehran might welcome President Donald Trump’s recent announcement that he is willing to meet with his Iranian counterparts “any time they want” with “no preconditions.” After all, Trump’s offer could be interpreted both as a vindication of Tehran’s refusal to blink first, and as a timely relief for an embattled Iranian economy. Only days earlier, Trump had issued an all-caps

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What If Earth Turned into a Giant Pile of Blueberries?

If Earth suddenly turned into an Earth-size pile of blueberries, things would start exploding. This is science.

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Facebook Uncovers New Fake Accounts Ahead of Midterm ElectionsFacebook US Russian

The company removed 32 pages and accounts from Facebook and Instagram for “coordinated inauthentic behavior.”

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The National Risk Management Center Will Combat Critical Infrastructure Hacks

The National Risk Management Center will give critical infrastructure companies much needed-support when under cyberattack.

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US says driving would be riskier if fuel standards tougher

The Trump administration says people would drive more and be exposed to increased risk if their cars get better gas mileage, an argument intended to justify freezing Obama-era toughening of fuel standards.

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Pulses of laser light could find murder victims in unmarked graves

Unmarked graves can be difficult and time-consuming to find, but scanning with pulses of laser light could help us pinpoint where the bodies are buried

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Scientists Test Tiny Labels for Sorting Out Space Debris

Scientists Test Tiny Labels for Sorting Out Space Debris Numerous bits of orbiting debris threaten spacecraft, so two teams propose tracking them with unique license plate-like transponders. Space_debris.jpg An artist’s depiction of objects currently in low-Earth orbit, shown at an exaggerated scale to make them visible at the scale shown. Image credits: European Space Agency Space Tuesday, July

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UTA technology could change way computers dissipate heat

UTA researchers have received a patent on a novel cold electron transistor that drastically reduces the amount of energy required to operate as compared to traditional transistors.

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Scientists: Surprisingly small 'dead zone' off Louisiana

This year's Gulf of Mexico "dead zone" is surprisingly small, but the oxygen-depleted water rose higher toward the surface than usual, scientists said Tuesday.

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Patients opt for 3D simulation for breast augmentation — but it doesn't improve outcomes

Three-dimensional image simulation is popular among women planning breast augmentation surgery. But while this evolving technology may enhance communication, it doesn't improve patient satisfaction with the results of the procedure, reports a paper in the August issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery®, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS).

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How chronic infections can outsmart the immune system

Second leading cause of death by parasitic infection, visceral leishmaniasis takes advantage of a mechanism to sustain the infection. Professor Simona Stäger and her team at INRS have shown that damage from chronic inflammation induces the death of white blood cells essential to eliminating the parasite. The findings published in Cell Reports have the potential to lead to treatment and bring to li

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Megan Sykes (Columbia U.) 3: Xenotransplantation

https://www.ibiology.org/immunology/xenotransplantation Megan Sykes provides an introduction to the field of organ transplantation, discusses the immunological responses associated with this procedure, and explains the new onsets of xenotransplantation. Talk Overview: Dr. Megan Sykes provides an introduction to the field of organ transplantation and discusses the immunological responses associate

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Megan Sykes (Columbia U.) 2: Taming and Tracking the Human Alloresponse

https://www.ibiology.org/immunology/xenotransplantation Megan Sykes provides an introduction to the field of organ transplantation, discusses the immunological responses associated with this procedure, and explains the new onsets of xenotransplantation. Talk Overview: Dr. Megan Sykes provides an introduction to the field of organ transplantation and discusses the immunological responses associate

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Megan Sykes (Columbia U.) 1: Introduction to Transplantation

https://www.ibiology.org/immunology/xenotransplantation Megan Sykes provides an introduction to the field of organ transplantation, discusses the immunological responses associated with this procedure, and explains the new onsets of xenotransplantation. Talk Overview: Dr. Megan Sykes provides an introduction to the field of organ transplantation and discusses the immunological responses associate

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Faced with losses, MoviePass discount tix service hikes fee

MoviePass, the discount service for movie tickets, is raising prices by 50 percent and barring viewings of most major releases during the first two weeks.

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Flies meet gruesome end under influence of puppeteer fungus

Carolyn Elya discovered the puppet-master on the balcony of her Berkeley apartment. It was a fungus that infects fruit flies, invading their nervous system and eating them from the inside out.

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Artificial intelligence system designs drugs from scratch

An artificial-intelligence approach created at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Eshelman School of Pharmacy can teach itself to design new drug molecules from scratch and has the potential to dramatically accelerate the design of new drug candidates.

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Flies meet gruesome end under influence of puppeteer fungus

Various fungi are known to infect insects and alter their behavior, presumably to assist in spreading fungal spores as widely as possible. But little is known about how the fungi affect behavior. UC Berkeley scientists have now found a fungus that infects the common lab fly, Drosophila melanogaster, providing a model in which to explore behavior-manipulating fungi. They found that the fungus invad

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Artificial intelligence system created at UNC-Chapel Hill designs drugs from scratch

An artificial-intelligence approach created at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Eshelman School of Pharmacy can teach itself to design new drug molecules from scratch and has the potential to dramatically accelerate the design of new drug candidates.

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Do spiders have a favorite color?

Scientists recently discovered the aptly named peacock jumping spiders have the color vision needed to appreciate the male's gaudy display. Now biologists at the University of Cincinnati are studying whether that ability translates to the more humdrum-looking wolf spiders that are muted browns and tans instead of electric blue, fiery orange and stoplight red.

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Can seagrass help fight ocean acidification?

Seagrass meadows could play a limited, localized role in alleviating ocean acidification in coastal ecosystems, according to new work.

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Small amounts of pharmaceuticals found in north central Pa. rural well water

Drinking water from wells in rural north central Pennsylvania had low levels of pharmaceuticals, according to a new study.

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Cannabinoid improves survival rates of mice with pancreatic cancer

Mice with pancreatic cancer that were treated with a naturally occurring constituent of medicinal cannabis alongside chemotherapy, survived almost three times longer than those treated with chemotherapy alone, a new study reports.

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NASA analyzes US east coast persistent rains

A stalled weather pattern led to persistent showers and thunderstorms moving up the eastern seaboard during the week of July 22, resulting in significant rainfall amounts and numerous flood warnings. NASA utilized satellite data to analyze and tally the rainfall from the storms.

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The most dangerous jobs in the U.S. by race, gender, and state

The latest data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor statistics reveal a rise in workplace fatalities, including how people are dying, and where they’re dying. Read More

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'Pale Blue Dot': Hear raw audio of Carl Sagan's most beautiful words

Hear Carl Sagan as you've never heard him before. Read More

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845-page analytical report on the longevity industry in the UK released

The Biogerontology Research Foundation announces the publication of a new analytical report titled Longevity Industry in UK Landscape Overview 2018.

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NASA analyzes US east coast persistent rains

A stalled weather pattern led to persistent showers and thunderstorms moving up the eastern seaboard during the week of July 22, resulting in significant rainfall amounts and numerous flood warnings. NASA utilized satellite data to analyze and tally the rainfall from the storms.

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Ancient climate change may have dragged the wild horses away

Animals Maybe that's why none exist today. It’s hard to imagine an ice age would be the ideal climate for horses, but almost 12,000 years ago, it was.

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New Homeland Security center to guard against cyberattacks

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security is creating a center aimed at protecting banks, electric companies and other critical infrastructure against cyberattacks—a threat that now exceeds the danger of a physical attack against the U.S. by a hostile foreign group, Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen said Tuesday.

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Ryanair boss cancels bonus after flights grounded

Ryanair boss Michael O'Leary waived his hefty yearly bonus, the low-fares airline's annual report showed, following the flight cancellations crisis that gripped the Irish carrier.

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Scandalous Beyond a Reasonable Doubt

Through a series of confusing and often contradictory statements over the past three days, President Donald Trump and his lawyer Rudy Giuliani have kept to one consistent theme: Collusion with a foreign power is not a crime . As the president crisply put it Tuesday morning: Collusion is not a crime, but that doesn’t matter because there was No Collusion (except by Crooked Hillary and the Democrat

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Over 100 wildlife rangers died on duty in past year: WWF

More than 100 wildlife rangers died on the job in Asia and central Africa over the last year, nearly half killed by poachers, the WWF reported Tuesday.

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Colorado Springs' baby giraffe euthanized

A Colorado Springs zoo says it decided to euthanize its eight-week-old giraffe after veterinarians determined that her dislocated hip, infected leg and other health complications would severely impact her quality of life.

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Facebook finds 'sophisticated' efforts to disrupt elections (Update)

Facebook elevated concerns about election interference Tuesday, announcing that it had uncovered "sophisticated" efforts, possibly linked to Russia, to manipulate U.S. politics and by extension the upcoming midterm elections.

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Facebook fjerner 32 konti: Frygter indblanding i det amerikanske midtvejsvalg

Det er endnu uvist, hvem der står bag de koordinerede kampagner.

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Astrophysicists Just Saw an Amazing Structure in the Sun's Outer Atmosphere

Inside the sun's atmosphere, what may seem like cosmic clutter hides some beautiful order.

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This Duck Supermom Leads 76 Ducklings in Amazing, Adorable Photo

One duck, 76 ducklings: What the duck is happening in this photo?

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Animal taxonomy: Outwardly identical, yet distinct

All placozoans are superficially identical. But comparative genomic data reveals the presence of different genera. This is the first time that a new animal genus has been defined solely by genomics.

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MoviePass Raises Prices, Limits First-Run Availability as Pressures Mount

In an effort to stay afloat, MoviePass will raise prices and limit availability.

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Heatwave deaths will rise steadily by 2080 as globe warms up

If people cannot adapt to future climate temperatures, deaths caused by severe heatwaves will increase dramatically in tropical and subtropical regions, followed closely by Australia, Europe and the United States, a global new Monash-led study shows.

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Animal taxonomy: Outwardly identical, yet distinct

All placozoans are superficially identical. But comparative genomic data reported by an LMU team reveals the presence of different genera. This is the first time that a new animal genus has been defined solely by genomics.

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In the tiniest animals, genomic analysis reveals new species and new genus

Apparently identical marine animals called placozoans, once thought to all belong to a single species, are revealed by their genomes to in fact belong to different genera, according to a new study publishing on July 31 in the open access journal PLOS Biology by Michael Eitel and Gert Wörheide of Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität (LMU) in Munich, Germany, and colleagues.

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Father's genes can impact motherly love

A father's genes are no longer thought to just provide a blueprint for the growth and development of their offspring. Research publishing July 31 in the open access journal PLOS Biology by scientists led by Professors Rosalind John and Anthony Isles from Cardiff University's School of Biosciences finds that paternal genes can affect the type of care the offspring receives both before and after the

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Methadone linked to lower death rates among convicted offenders with opioid dependence

Among convicted offenders, receiving methadone is associated with lower rates of death from external and non-external causes, according to new research published this week in PLOS Medicine by Angela Russolillo of Simon Fraser University, Canada, and colleagues.

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Small amounts of pharmaceuticals found in north central Pa. rural well water

Drinking water from wells in rural north central Pennsylvania had low levels of pharmaceuticals, according to a study led by Penn State researchers.

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Can seagrass help fight ocean acidification?

Seagrass meadows could play a limited, localized role in alleviating ocean acidification in coastal ecosystems, according to new work led by Carnegie's David Koweek and including Carnegie's Ken Caldeira and published in Ecological Applications.

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Modern-Day Soldiers Discover Ancient Warrior Clutching Spear

A U.S. veteran discovered the grave of an ancient warrior — a sixth-century Saxon soldier buried with a sword, spear and knife — just in the nick of time.

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NASA finds Tropical Storm Jongdari now comma shaped

Tropical Depression Jongdari re-strengthened into a tropical storm when it was southeast of Kyushu, Japan and NASA's Aqua satellite saw it take on a comma shape.

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Taxi strike stretches into eighth day in Spain

Taxi drivers in Spain dug their heels in and vowed to continue Wednesday a strike against ride hailing competitors such as Uber and Cabify that has paralysed major cities.

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Raging fires in California creating havoc for the state

From last until today the Carr fire has consumed 12,000 more acres for a total of 110,154 acres and is 27% contained. The number of residences destroyed overnight rose by 161, commercial buildings by 1, and outbuildings by 108. These numbers do not even reflect structures damaged by the fire, only those destroyed. This fire has proven to be extremely difficult to contain due to both weather condit

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Distracted pedestrians walk slower and are less steady on their feet: study

Distracted drivers are responsible for more collisions in Canada than impaired drivers, but with smartphones becoming ubiquitous, distracted walking is also on the rise. Now, University of British Columbia engineers have analyzed just how mobile device use affects pedestrians, and their findings could help develop safer roads and autonomous cars in the future.

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NASA finds wind shear battering Tropical Depression 16W

Tropical Depression 16W was still being battered by vertical wind shear, and appeared elongated for the second day in a row on satellite imagery from NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite.

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Father's genes can impact motherly love

A father's genes are no longer thought to just provide a blueprint for the growth and development of their offspring. Research publishing 31 July in the open access journal PLOS Biology by scientists led by Professors Rosalind John and Anthony Isles from Cardiff University's School of Biosciences finds that paternal genes can affect the type of care the offspring receives both before and after the

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In the tiniest animals, genomic analysis reveals new species and new genus

Apparently identical marine animals called placozoans, once thought to all belong to a single species, are revealed by their genomes to in fact belong to different genera, according to a new study publishing on July 31 in the open access journal PLOS Biology by Michael Eitel and Gert Wörheide of Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität (LMU) in Munich, Germany, and colleagues. The genomic approach that they

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Small amounts of pharmaceuticals found in north central Pa. rural well water

Drinking water from wells in rural north central Pennsylvania had low levels of pharmaceuticals, according to a study led by Penn State researchers.

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Raging fires in California creating havoc for the state

Fires across California are creating havoc statewide with homes being destroyed, people displaced, and huge amounts of noxious smoke being propelled into the atmosphere.

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Blood samples used to investigate adaptive repair mechanisms of transplanted kidneys

Researchers at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center have shown that gene expression analysis of blood samples taken from the recipients of transplanted kidneys can be used to better understand the mechanisms that promote repair and regeneration of the transplanted organs.

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Dramatic Photos of the California Wildfires

Dry conditions, high temperatures, and strong winds have once more spawned several large and destructive wildfires across the state of California. Thousands of firefighters are now battling multiple blazes that have burned hundreds of thousands of acres in the past few weeks, and recently claimed at least eight lives. Gathered below: a collection of images of those affected by these recent fires,

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Mapping of magnetic particles in the human brain

Researchers have for the first time mapped the distribution of magnetic particles in the human brain. The study reveals that the particles are primarily located in the cerebellum and the brainstem, which are the more ancient parts of the brain.

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Spatz 10-Step System: A national model for breastfeeding

Mothers of critically ill infants may not receive necessary breastfeeding support, because their babies may be taken directly to a newborn intensive care unit or to surgery. A lactation expert now presents a model for healthcare providers to serve the needs of these vulnerable babies.

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The tipping point: Service sector employees are more susceptible to mental health issues

Service workers who rely on tips are at greater risk for depression, sleep problems and stress compared with employees who work in non-tipped positions. Strongest impact is to women who comprise 56 percent of all service workers.

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Fruit flies farm their own probiotics

A new study offers a new tool to study bacteria-host interaction. Scientists have revealed how the bacterial community colonizes the fruit flies kept in the lab or in the wild, and which may be the impact of this colonization in nature. Understanding these mechanisms of colonization may allow microbiota manipulation in insects responsible for agriculture pests or diseases vectors.

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Single-cell RNA profiling

A team has improved both the sensitivity and efficiency of a popular method for single-cell RNA sequencing, which yields a molecular fingerprint for individual cells based on their patterns of gene activity.

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In a first, physicists accelerate atoms in the Large Hadron Collider

Ionized lead atoms took a spin around the world’s biggest particle accelerator.

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NASA finds wind shear battering Tropical Depression 16W

Tropical Depression 16W was still being battered by vertical wind shear, and appeared elongated for the second day in a row on satellite imagery from NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite.

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Can seagrass help fight ocean acidification?

Seagrass meadows could play a limited, localized role in alleviating ocean acidification in coastal ecosystems, according to new work led by Carnegie's David Koweek and including Carnegie's Ken Caldeira.

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The Sonos Beam is a great soundbar, but not yet an awesome listener

Technology This $400 device provides crisp and clean sound. The Beam is the latest in the Sonos series of speakers meant to pull double duty.

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Blue Meteorite Crystals Reveal the Sun's Wild Youth

Ancient relics confirm our solar system’s tempestuous origins — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Creating a (synthetic) song from a zebra finch's muscle

Birds create songs by moving muscles in their vocal organs to vibrate air passing through their tissues, and new research shows that these muscles act in concert to create sound. Scientists describe how zebra finches produce songs: Using electromyographic signals, they tracked the activity of one muscle involved in creating sound, the syringealis ventralis. They then used the data from this muscle

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Turning off protein could boost immunotherapy effectiveness on cancer tumors

Researchers have discovered that inhibiting a previously known protein could reduce tumor burdens and enhance the effectiveness of immunotherapy treatments.

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Past experiences shape what we see more than what we are looking at now

A new study argues that humans recognize what they are looking at by combining current sensory stimuli with comparisons to images stored in memory.

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Energy-intensive Bitcoin transactions pose a growing environmental threat

A study warns that failure to lower the energy use by Bitcoin and similar Blockchain designs may prevent nations from reaching their climate change mitigation obligations under the Paris Agreement.

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New cell lines produce monoclonal antibody for improved biologic drugs

NISTmAb, the world's first standardized monoclonal antibody has become a valuable tool for biomanufacturers developing new biologic therapies for cancers, autoimmune disorders and infectious diseases. Although the molecule has been precisely characterized, the current proprietary method for its production has not. In a new article, researchers describe how they have taken the first step to solve t

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Platinum is key in ancient volcanic related climate change

Scientists look to platinum for clues to stay ahead of future high magnitude volcanic related climate change.

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Smart phone use: Distracted pedestrians walk slower and are less steady on their feet

Engineers have analyzed just how mobile device use affects pedestrians, and their findings could help develop safer roads and autonomous cars in the future.

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Aphids manipulate their food

Aphids – who hasn't been bothered by these little insects at one time or another? Why do they reproduce on plants so successfully? Researchers have found out that aphids are able to influence the quality of their food, and that this may enable them to construct a niche on their own host plants.

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Stem Cells: Opportunities, Hurdles, and Promises

The Scientist is bringing together a panel of experts to discuss the grand opportunity stem cells represent.

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Shark Stolen from an Aquarium in a Baby Stroller Is Rescued and Recovering

"Miss Helen" is doing swimmingly after a harrowing brush with kidnappers.

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Soft wetting: Models based on energy dissipation or on force balance are equivalent [Physical Sciences]

In Newtonian mechanics, an overdamped system at steady state is governed by a local balance of mechanical stress but also obeys a global balance between injected and dissipated energy. In the classical literature of purely viscous drop spreading, apparent differences in “dissipation” and “force” approaches have led to unnecessary debates,…

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Reply to Karpitschka et al.: The Neumann force balance does not hold in dynamical elastowetting [Physical Sciences]

In their letter, Karpitschka et al. (1) discuss our claim that the predictions of our theoretical description for the spreading of a droplet on a soft solid layer based on a global-dissipation approach (2) differ from the outcomes of Karpitschka et al.’s model based on a local-force-balance analysis (3). In…

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Robert W. Kates (1929-2018): Grappled with problems of the human environment [Retrospectives]

Robert W. Kates died April 21, 2018, at age 89, a geographer who studied the relationship between society and environment and whose commitment to collaborative science kept his colleagues busy with big questions, big projects, and the challenge of fixing problems imbricated in the human use and transformation of the…

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Information utility in the human brain [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

A funding agency just made a decision about your grant application. The official letter should arrive tomorrow, announcing the outcome, but you can log in to the agency’s website and find out today. Would you? Humans and other animals are intrinsically motivated to acquire information, even when this information is…

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Kv2 potassium channels meet VAP [Cell Biology]

A defining characteristic of eukaryotic cells is the presence of distinct intracellular membrane-bound compartments. Much research has focused on the functional interconnection of these organelles via membrane traffic. A flurry of recent studies, however, has brought to center stage the important role of interorganelle communication independent of vesicular transport and…

1d

 

When maternal periconceptional diet affects neurological development, it’s time to think [Neuroscience]

There is increasing awareness that the nutritional status of women at the onset of pregnancy can have a profound effect on the general health and well-being of children. However, recent analyses indicate that the majority of women from different socioeconomic backgrounds are ill prepared for the nutritional rigors of pregnancy,…

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Wafer-recyclable, environment-friendly transfer printing for large-scale thin-film nanoelectronics [Engineering]

Transfer printing of thin-film nanoelectronics from their fabrication wafer commonly requires chemical etching on the sacrifice of wafer but is also limited by defects with a low yield. Here, we introduce a wafer-recyclable, environment-friendly transfer printing process that enables the wafer-scale separation of high-performance thin-film nanoelectronics from their fabrication wafer…

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Theoretical search for heterogeneously architected 2D structures [Engineering]

Architected 2D structures are of growing interest due to their unique mechanical and physical properties for applications in stretchable electronics, controllable phononic/photonic modulators, and switchable optical/electrical devices; however, the underpinning theory of understanding their elastic properties and enabling principles in search of emerging structures with well-defined arrangements a

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Valuation of knowledge and ignorance in mesolimbic reward circuitry [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

The pursuit of knowledge is a basic feature of human nature. However, in domains ranging from health to finance people sometimes choose to remain ignorant. Here, we show that valence is central to the process by which the human brain evaluates the opportunity to gain information, explaining why knowledge may…

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Pupil mimicry promotes trust through the theory-of-mind network [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

The human eye can provide powerful insights into the emotions and intentions of others; however, how pupillary changes influence observers’ behavior remains largely unknown. The present fMRI–pupillometry study revealed that when the pupils of interacting partners synchronously dilate, trust is promoted, which suggests that pupil mimicry affiliates people. Here we…

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Genetic analysis of social-class mobility in five longitudinal studies [Social Sciences]

A summary genetic measure, called a “polygenic score,” derived from a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of education can modestly predict a person’s educational and economic success. This prediction could signal a biological mechanism: Education-linked genetics could encode characteristics that help people get ahead in life. Alternatively, prediction could reflect social…

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Delineating the role of cooperativity in the design of potent PROTACs for BTK [Biochemistry]

Proteolysis targeting chimeras (PROTACs) are heterobifunctional small molecules that simultaneously bind to a target protein and an E3 ligase, thereby leading to ubiquitination and subsequent degradation of the target. They present an exciting opportunity to modulate proteins in a manner independent of enzymatic or signaling activity. As such, they have…

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Evolutionary repurposing of a sulfatase: A new Michaelis complex leads to efficient transition state charge offset [Biochemistry]

The recruitment and evolutionary optimization of promiscuous enzymes is key to the rapid adaptation of organisms to changing environments. Our understanding of the precise mechanisms underlying enzyme repurposing is, however, limited: What are the active-site features that enable the molecular recognition of multiple substrates with contrasting catalytic requirements? To gain…

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Deep mutational analysis reveals functional trade-offs in the sequences of EGFR autophosphorylation sites [Biochemistry]

Upon activation, the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) phosphorylates tyrosine residues in its cytoplasmic tail, which triggers the binding of Src homology 2 (SH2) and phosphotyrosine-binding (PTB) domains and initiates downstream signaling. The sequences flanking the tyrosine residues (referred to as “phosphosites”) must be compatible with phosphorylation by the EGFR…

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Monovalent ions modulate the flux through multiple folding pathways of an RNA pseudoknot [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

The functions of RNA pseudoknots (PKs), which are minimal tertiary structural motifs and an integral part of several ribozymes and ribonucleoprotein complexes, are determined by their structure, stability, and dynamics. Therefore, it is important to elucidate the general principles governing their thermodynamics/folding mechanisms. Here, we combine laser temperature-jump experiments and…

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Cholesterol promotes Cytolysin A activity by stabilizing the intermediates during pore formation [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Pore-forming toxins (PFTs) form nanoscale pores across target membranes causing cell death. Cytolysin A (ClyA) from Escherichia coli is a prototypical α-helical toxin that contributes to cytolytic phenotype of several pathogenic strains. It is produced as a monomer and, upon membrane exposure, undergoes conformational changes and finally oligomerizes to form…

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Kv2 potassium channels form endoplasmic reticulum/plasma membrane junctions via interaction with VAPA and VAPB [Cell Biology]

Kv2.1 exhibits two distinct forms of localization patterns on the neuronal plasma membrane: One population is freely diffusive and regulates electrical activity via voltage-dependent K+ conductance while a second one localizes to micrometer-sized clusters that contain densely packed, but nonconducting, channels. We have previously established that these clusters represent endoplasmic…

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Direction of flagellum beat propagation is controlled by proximal/distal outer dynein arm asymmetry [Cell Biology]

The 9 + 2 axoneme structure of the motile flagellum/cilium is an iconic, apparently symmetrical cellular structure. Recently, asymmetries along the length of motile flagella have been identified in a number of organisms, typically in the inner and outer dynein arms. Flagellum-beat waveforms are adapted for different functions. They may…

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Enhanced expression of MycN/CIP2A drives neural crest toward a neural stem cell-like fate: Implications for priming of neuroblastoma [Developmental Biology]

Neuroblastoma is a neural crest-derived childhood tumor of the peripheral nervous system in which MycN amplification is a hallmark of poor prognosis. Here we show that MycN is expressed together with phosphorylation-stabilizing factor CIP2A in regions of the neural plate destined to form the CNS, but MycN is excluded from…

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Role of carbon allocation efficiency in the temperature dependence of autotroph growth rates [Ecology]

Relating the temperature dependence of photosynthetic biomass production to underlying metabolic rates in autotrophs is crucial for predicting the effects of climatic temperature fluctuations on the carbon balance of ecosystems. We present a mathematical model that links thermal performance curves (TPCs) of photosynthesis, respiration, and carbon allocation efficiency to the…

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Stress-testing the relationship between T cell receptor/peptide-MHC affinity and cross-reactivity using peptide velcro [Immunology and Inflammation]

T cell receptors (TCRs) bind to peptide-major histocompatibility complex (pMHC) with low affinity (Kd ∼ μM), which is generally assumed to facilitate cross-reactive TCR “scanning” of ligands. To understand the relationship between TCR/pMHC affinity and cross-reactivity, we sought to engineer an additional weak interaction, termed “velcro,” between the TCR and…

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Stem cell-derived clade F AAVs mediate high-efficiency homologous recombination-based genome editing [Medical Sciences]

The precise correction of genetic mutations at the nucleotide level is an attractive permanent therapeutic strategy for human disease. However, despite significant progress, challenges to efficient and accurate genome editing persist. Here, we report a genome editing platform based upon a class of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC)-derived clade F adeno-associated…

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Insights into bacterial lipoprotein trafficking from a structure of LolA bound to the LolC periplasmic domain [Microbiology]

In Gram-negative bacteria, outer-membrane lipoproteins are essential for maintaining cellular integrity, transporting nutrients, establishing infections, and promoting the formation of biofilms. The LolCDE ABC transporter, LolA chaperone, and LolB outer-membrane receptor form an essential system for transporting newly matured lipoproteins from the outer leaflet of the cytoplasmic membrane to the..

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Mouse maternal protein restriction during preimplantation alone permanently alters brain neuron proportion and adult short-term memory [Neuroscience]

Maternal protein malnutrition throughout pregnancy and lactation compromises brain development in late gestation and after birth, affecting structural, biochemical, and pathway dynamics with lasting consequences for motor and cognitive function. However, the importance of nutrition during the preimplantation period for brain development is unknown. We have previously shown that maternal…

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Aspirin binds to PPAR{alpha} to stimulate hippocampal plasticity and protect memory [Neuroscience]

Despite its long history, until now, no receptor has been identified for aspirin, one of the most widely used medicines worldwide. Here we report that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα), a nuclear hormone receptor involved in fatty acid metabolism, serves as a receptor of aspirin. Detailed proteomic analyses including cheminformatics,…

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Time-resolved neural reinstatement and pattern separation during memory decisions in human hippocampus [Neuroscience]

Mnemonic decision-making has long been hypothesized to rely on hippocampal dynamics that bias memory processing toward the formation of new memories or the retrieval of old ones. Successful memory encoding may be best optimized by pattern separation, whereby two highly similar experiences can be represented by underlying neural populations in…

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Phosphodiesterase 2 inhibition preferentially promotes NO/guanylyl cyclase/cGMP signaling to reverse the development of heart failure [Pharmacology]

Heart failure (HF) is a shared manifestation of several cardiovascular pathologies, including hypertension and myocardial infarction, and a limited repertoire of treatment modalities entails that the associated morbidity and mortality remain high. Impaired nitric oxide (NO)/guanylyl cyclase (GC)/cyclic guanosine-3′,5′-monophosphate (cGMP) signaling, underpinned, in part, by up-regulation of cyclic

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Protease-activated receptor-2 in endosomes signals persistent pain of irritable bowel syndrome [Pharmacology]

Once activated at the surface of cells, G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) redistribute to endosomes, where they can continue to signal. Whether GPCRs in endosomes generate signals that contribute to human disease is unknown. We evaluated endosomal signaling of protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR2), which has been proposed to mediate pain in patients…

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Environmental limits of Rift Valley fever revealed using ecoepidemiological mechanistic models [Population Biology]

Vector-borne diseases (VBDs) of humans and domestic animals are a significant component of the global burden of disease and a key driver of poverty. The transmission cycles of VBDs are often strongly mediated by the ecological requirements of the vectors, resulting in complex transmission dynamics, including intermittent epidemics and an…

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Observing carbon cycle-climate feedbacks from space [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

The impact of human emissions of carbon dioxide and methane on climate is an accepted central concern for current society. It is increasingly evident that atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide and methane are not simply a function of emissions but that there are myriad feedbacks forced by changes in climate…

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Archaeobotanical evidence reveals the origins of bread 14,400 years ago in northeastern Jordan [Anthropology]

The origins of bread have long been associated with the emergence of agriculture and cereal domestication during the Neolithic in southwest Asia. In this study we analyze a total of 24 charred food remains from Shubayqa 1, a Natufian hunter-gatherer site located in northeastern Jordan and dated to 14.6–11.6 ka…

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The impact of environmental change on the use of early pottery by East Asian hunter-gatherers [Anthropology]

The invention of pottery was a fundamental technological advancement with far-reaching economic and cultural consequences. Pottery containers first emerged in East Asia during the Late Pleistocene in a wide range of environmental settings, but became particularly prominent and much more widely dispersed after climatic warming at the start of the…

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NIH funding longevity by gender [Applied Biological Sciences]

Women have achieved parity with men among biomedical science degree holders but remain underrepresented in academic positions. The National Institutes of Health (NIH)—the world’s largest public funder of biomedical research—receives less than one-third of its new grant applications from women. Correspondingly, women compose less than one-third of NIH research grantees,…

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Electrometry by optical charge conversion of deep defects in 4H-SiC [Applied Physical Sciences]

Optically active point defects in various host materials, such as diamond and silicon carbide (SiC), have shown significant promise as local sensors of magnetic fields, electric fields, strain, and temperature. Modern sensing techniques take advantage of the relaxation and coherence times of the spin state within these defects. Here we…

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Mechanics of spontaneously formed nanoblisters trapped by transferred 2D crystals [Applied Physical Sciences]

Layered systems of 2D crystals and heterostructures are widely explored for new physics and devices. In many cases, monolayer or few-layer 2D crystals are transferred to a target substrate including other 2D crystals, and nanometer-scale blisters form spontaneously between the 2D crystal and its substrate. Such nanoblisters are often recognized…

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Combined computational and experimental investigation of the La2CuO4-xSx (0 <=x <=4) quaternary system [Applied Physical Sciences]

The lack of a mechanistic framework for chemical reactions forming inorganic extended solids presents a challenge to accelerated materials discovery. We demonstrate here a combined computational and experimental methodology to tackle this problem, in which in situ X-ray diffraction measurements monitor solid-state reactions and deduce reaction pathways, while theoretical computations…

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Oxidative stress is tightly regulated by cytochrome c phosphorylation and respirasome factors in mitochondria [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Respiratory cytochrome c has been found to be phosphorylated at tyrosine 97 in the postischemic brain upon neuroprotective insulin treatment, but how such posttranslational modification affects mitochondrial metabolism is unclear. Here, we report the structural features and functional behavior of a phosphomimetic cytochrome c mutant, which was generated by site-specific…

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Molecular switch-like regulation enables global subunit coordination in a viral ring ATPase [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Subunits in multimeric ring-shaped motors must coordinate their activities to ensure correct and efficient performance of their mechanical tasks. Here, we study WT and arginine finger mutants of the pentameric bacteriophage φ29 DNA packaging motor. Our results reveal the molecular interactions necessary for the coordination of ADP–ATP exchange and ATP…

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Specific cardiolipin-SecY interactions are required for proton-motive force stimulation of protein secretion [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

The transport of proteins across or into membranes is a vital biological process, achieved in every cell by the conserved Sec machinery. In bacteria, SecYEG combines with the SecA motor protein for secretion of preproteins across the plasma membrane, powered by ATP hydrolysis and the transmembrane proton-motive force (PMF). The…

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Essential nucleotide- and protein-dependent functions of Actb/{beta}-actin [Cell Biology]

The highly similar cytoplasmic β- and γ-actins differ by only four functionally similar amino acids, yet previous in vitro and in vivo data suggest that they support unique functions due to striking phenotypic differences between Actb and Actg1 null mouse and cell models. To determine whether the four amino acid…

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Acceleration of hydrogen absorption by palladium through surface alloying with gold [Chemistry]

Enhancement of hydrogen (H) absorption kinetics improves the performance of hydrogen-purifying membranes and hydrogen-storage materials, which is necessary for utilizing hydrogen as a carbon-free energy carrier. Pd–Au alloys are known to show higher hydrogen solubility than pure Pd. However, the effect of Au on the hydrogen penetration from the surface…

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Spatially constrained tandem bromodomain inhibition bolsters sustained repression of BRD4 transcriptional activity for TNBC cell growth [Chemistry]

The importance of BET protein BRD4 in gene transcription is well recognized through the study of chemical modulation of its characteristic tandem bromodomain (BrD) binding to lysine-acetylated histones and transcription factors. However, while monovalent inhibition of BRD4 by BET BrD inhibitors such as JQ1 blocks growth of hematopoietic cancers, it…

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Efficient compression in color naming and its evolution [Computer Sciences]

We derive a principled information-theoretic account of cross-language semantic variation. Specifically, we argue that languages efficiently compress ideas into words by optimizing the information bottleneck (IB) trade-off between the complexity and accuracy of the lexicon. We test this proposal in the domain of color naming and show that (i) color-naming…

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US particulate matter air quality improves except in wildfire-prone areas [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

Using data from rural monitoring sites across the contiguous United States, we evaluated fine particulate matter (PM2.5) trends for 1988–2016. We calculate trends in the policy-relevant 98th quantile of PM2.5 using Quantile Regression. We use Kriging and Gaussian Geostatistical Simulations to interpolate trends between observed data points. Overall, we found…

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Linear response of east Greenland’s tidewater glaciers to ocean/atmosphere warming [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

Predicting the retreat of tidewater outlet glaciers forms a major obstacle to forecasting the rate of mass loss from the Greenland Ice Sheet. This reflects the challenges of modeling the highly dynamic, topographically complex, and data-poor environment of the glacier–fjord systems that link the ice sheet to the ocean. To…

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Species diversity concurrently dilutes and amplifies transmission in a zoonotic host-pathogen system through competing mechanisms [Ecology]

In this era of unprecedented biodiversity loss and increased zoonotic disease emergence, it is imperative to understand the effects of biodiversity on zoonotic pathogen dynamics in wildlife. Whether increasing biodiversity should lead to a decrease or increase in infection prevalence, termed the dilution and amplification effects, respectively, has been hotly…

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Evaporation-induced foam stabilization in lubricating oils [Engineering]

Foaming in liquids is ubiquitous in nature. Whereas the mechanism of foaming in aqueous systems has been thoroughly studied, nonaqueous systems have not enjoyed the same level of examination. Here we study the mechanism of foaming in a widely used class of nonaqueous liquids: lubricant base oils. Using a newly…

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Biogeographic regions and events of isolation and diversification of the endemic biota of the tropical Andes [Evolution]

Understanding the spatial and temporal evolution of biota in the tropical Andes is a major challenge, given the region’s topographic complexity and high beta diversity. We used a network approach to find biogeographic regions (bioregions) based on high-resolution species distribution models for 151 endemic bird taxa. Then, we used dated…

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Estrogen-regulated feedback loop limits the efficacy of estrogen receptor-targeted breast cancer therapy [Medical Sciences]

Endocrine therapy resistance invariably develops in advanced estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancer, but the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. We have identified C-terminal SRC kinase (CSK) as a critical node in a previously unappreciated negative feedback loop that limits the efficacy of current ER-targeted therapies. Estrogen directly drives CSK expression…

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Pharmacological reactivation of inactive X-linked Mecp2 in cerebral cortical neurons of living mice [Medical Sciences]

Rett syndrome (RTT) is a genetic disorder resulting from a loss-of-function mutation in one copy of the X-linked gene methyl-CpG–binding protein 2 (MECP2). Typical RTT patients are females and, due to random X chromosome inactivation (XCI), ∼50% of cells express mutant MECP2 and the other ∼50% express wild-type MECP2. Cells…

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Exopolysaccharide protects Vibrio cholerae from exogenous attacks by the type 6 secretion system [Microbiology]

The type 6 secretion system (T6SS) is a nanomachine used by many Gram-negative bacteria, including Vibrio cholerae, to deliver toxic effector proteins into adjacent eukaryotic and bacterial cells. Because the activity of the T6SS is dependent on direct contact between cells, its activity is limited to bacteria growing on solid…

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Suppression of Staphylococcus aureus virulence by a small-molecule compound [Microbiology]

Emerging antibiotic resistance among bacterial pathogens has necessitated the development of alternative approaches to combat drug-resistance-associated infection. The abolition of Staphylococcus aureus virulence by targeting multiple-virulence gene products represents a promising strategy for exploration. A multiplex promoter reporter platform using gfp-luxABCDE dual-reporter plasmids with select

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Data-driven body-machine interface for the accurate control of drones [Neuroscience]

The accurate teleoperation of robotic devices requires simple, yet intuitive and reliable control interfaces. However, current human–machine interfaces (HMIs) often fail to fulfill these characteristics, leading to systems requiring an intensive practice to reach a sufficient operation expertise. Here, we present a systematic methodology to identify the spontaneous gesture-based interaction…

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Hippocampus-dependent emergence of spatial sequence coding in retrosplenial cortex [Neuroscience]

Retrosplenial cortex (RSC) is involved in visuospatial integration and spatial learning, and RSC neurons exhibit discrete, place cell-like sequential activity that resembles the population code of space in hippocampus. To investigate the origins and population dynamics of this activity, we combined longitudinal cellular calcium imaging of dysgranular RSC neurons in…

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Schwann cell O-GlcNAcylation promotes peripheral nerve remyelination via attenuation of the AP-1 transcription factor JUN [Neuroscience]

Schwann cells (SCs), the glia of the peripheral nervous system, play an essential role in nerve regeneration. Upon nerve injury, SCs are reprogrammed into unique “repair SCs,” and these cells remove degenerating axons/myelin debris, promote axonal regrowth, and ultimately remyelinate regenerating axons. The AP-1 transcription factor JUN is promptly induced…

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Astrocytes restore connectivity and synchronization in dysfunctional cerebellar networks [Neuroscience]

Evidence suggests that astrocytes play key roles in structural and functional organization of neuronal circuits. To understand how astrocytes influence the physiopathology of cerebellar circuits, we cultured cells from cerebella of mice that lack the ATM gene. Mutations in ATM are causative of the human cerebellar degenerative disease ataxia-telangiectasia. Cerebellar…

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MIZ1 regulates ECA1 to generate a slow, long-distance phloem-transmitted Ca2+ signal essential for root water tracking in Arabidopsis [Plant Biology]

Ever since Darwin postulated that the tip of the root is sensitive to moisture differences and that it “transmits an influence to the upper adjoining part, which bends towards the source of moisture” [Darwin C, Darwin F (1880) The Power of Movement in Plants, pp 572–574], the signal underlying this…

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Biogenesis of a 22-nt microRNA in Phaseoleae species by precursor-programmed uridylation [Plant Biology]

Phased, secondary siRNAs (phasiRNAs) represent a class of small RNAs in plants generated via distinct biogenesis pathways, predominantly dependent on the activity of 22-nt miRNAs. Most 22-nt miRNAs are processed by DCL1 from miRNA precursors containing an asymmetric bulge, yielding a 22/21-nt miRNA/miRNA* duplex. Here we show that miR1510, a…

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Amygdala lesions eliminate viewing preferences for faces in rhesus monkeys [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

In free-viewing experiments, primates orient preferentially toward faces and face-like stimuli. To investigate the neural basis of this behavior, we measured the spontaneous viewing preferences of monkeys with selective bilateral amygdala lesions. The results revealed that when faces and nonface objects were presented simultaneously, monkeys with amygdala lesions had no…

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Cognitive impairments by alcohol and sleep deprivation indicate trait characteristics and a potential role for adenosine A1 receptors [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

Trait-like differences in cognitive performance after sleep loss put some individuals more at risk than others, the basis of such disparities remaining largely unknown. Similarly, interindividual differences in impairment in response to alcohol intake have been observed. We tested whether performance impairments due to either acute or chronic sleep loss…

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Correction for Touboul et al., On the complex dynamics of savanna landscapes [Corrections]

APPLIED MATHEMATICS, ECOLOGY Correction for “On the complex dynamics of savanna landscapes,” by Jonathan David Touboul, Ann Carla Staver, and Simon Asher Levin, which was first published January 29, 2018; 10.1073/pnas.1712356115 (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 115:E1336–E1345). The authors wish to note the following: “In the original version of this…

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In This Issue [This Week in PNAS]

Bioregions and phylogenies reveal evolution in tropical Andes Hummingbird (Oxypogon stubelii) endemic to a biogeographic region in the tropical Andes. For more than a century, researchers have sought to unravel faunal evolution in the tropical Andes, a topographically complex region noted for its extraordinary species richness and endemism. Despite general…

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News Feature: The race to extinguish insect pests by enlisting their own kind [Environmental Sciences]

The unheralded success of a massive operation to control the insidious screwworm offers lessons learned and cautionary tales for mosquitoes and other insect scourges. On a Friday in the fall of 2016, John Welch got an email he’d been dreading—a picture of a mystery insect sent from the Florida Keys….

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