Search Posts

Nyheder2018juli31


 

NASA finds Tropical Storm Jongdari now comma shaped

Tropical Depression Jongdari re-strengthened into a tropical storm when it was southeast of Kyushu, Japan and NASA's Aqua satellite saw it take on a comma shape.

1d

 

Distracted pedestrians walk slower and are less steady on their feet: UBC study

University of British Columbia engineers have analyzed just how mobile device use affects pedestrians, and their findings could help develop safer roads and autonomous cars in the future.

1d

 

Fruit flies farm their own probiotics

A study published in the PLoS Biology offers a new tool to study bacteria-host interaction. A research team from the Gulbenkian Institute of Science (IGC) revealed how the bacterial community colonizes the fruit flies kept in the lab or in the wild, and which may be the impact of this colonization in nature. Understanding these mechanisms of colonization may allow microbiota manipulation in insect

1d

 

Why the Most Important Idea in Behavioral Decision-Making Is a Fallacy

The popular idea that avoiding losses is a bigger motivator than achieving gains is not supported by the evidence — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

 

Trilobites: Largest King Penguin Colony in the World Drops by 90%

Researchers hadn’t visited the remote island in 30 years when there were 500,000 breeding pairs. Satellite images now indicate perhaps as few as 60,000 pairs.

1d

 

En tredjedel af verdens kongepingviner er forsvundet

På blot 30 år er en enorm pingvinkoloni svundet med 88 procent, viser nye helikopter- og satellitbilleder. Klimaforandringer kan stå bag.

1d

 

Vaginal 'Rejuvenation' Procedures Are Unproven, Pose Serious Risks, FDA Warns

Women are being warned that so-called "vaginal rejuvenation" procedures may pose serious risks.

1d

 

Heads up! Mars makes its closest, brightest approach in 15 years.

No, it won't be as big as the moon, as some have claimed. Still, it will be a nice show for the next month or so. Read More

1d

 

The tipping point: Service sector employees are more susceptible to mental health issues

Service workers who rely on tips are at greater risk for depression, sleep problems and stress compared with employees who work in non-tipped positions. Strongest impact is to women who comprise 56 percent of all service workers.

1d

 

CHOP nurse-researcher presents the Spatz 10-Step system as national model for breastfeeding

Mothers of critically ill infants may not receive necessary breastfeeding support, because their babies may be taken directly to a newborn intensive care unit or to surgery. Lactation expert Dr. Diane Spatz presents a model for healthcare providers to serve the needs of these vulnerable babies.

1d

 

Scientists uncover new facts concerning working memory in children

Researchers from the Higher School of Economics conducted a meta-analysis by compiling data across 17 neuroimaging studies on working memory in children.The data obtained shows concordance in frontoparietal regions recognized for their role in working memory as well as regions not typically highlighted as part of the working memory network, such as the insula. The results were published in the art

1d

 

Predicting heart attack, stroke risk just got easier

A team of researchers led by cardiologists at UT Southwestern Medical Center has developed a new online tool to more accurately predict who among those ages 40-65 is at the highest risk of suffering a heart attack or stroke in the next 10 years.

1d

 

The Existential Comfort of Making It

When the historians of the future look back upon this particular era in history, NBC’s Making It is one way they’ll ascertain how very wrong things went in 2018. To be clear, the crafting competition hosted by Amy Poehler and Nick Offerman is a total joy, a cashmere-swaddled hug of a show that exudes geniality and zany warmth. If it had a scent, that scent would be fall leaves, cinnamon, and clea

1d

 

How the Parker probe was built to survive close encounters with the sun

Scientists had to get creative in testing the technology for the Parker Solar Probe, using huge mirrors, dust tunnels and even reams of paper.

1d

 

8 books to read on your beach vacation

Science Recommendations from the Popular Science staff. 8 book recommendations from the staff at Popular Science to read on your beach vacation.

1d

 

Mars makes closest approach to Earth in 15 years

Earth's neighboring planet, Mars, is closer than it has been in the past 15 years, offering unusually bright views of the Red Planet's auburn hues.

1d

 

Urban geophone array offers new look at northern Los Angeles basin

Using an array of coffee-can sized geophones deployed for about a month in backyards, golf courses and public parks, researchers collected enough data to allow them to map the depth and shape of the San Gabriel and San Bernardino sedimentary basins of Los Angeles, Calif.

1d

 

Ancient pottery factory unveiled in Israel

Israeli archaeologists on Tuesday unveiled what they said was a major pottery plant which produced wine storage jars continuously from Roman to Byzantine times.

1d

 

Scientists discover potential therapy for human copper metabolism disorders

Individuals with defects in copper metabolism may soon have more targeted treatment options thanks to a new discovery. A new report that an investigational anticancer-drug, elesclomol, can restore the production of cytochrome oxidase protein complex, a critical copper-dependent enzyme required for mitochondrial energy production.

1d

 

Part of This Boy's Brain Was Removed. The Rest of His Brain Made Sure He Wouldn't Notice.

He can't see the left side of his world, but his brain makes sure that's the only thing he can't see.

1d

 

Volkswagen says may have to recall 124,000 electric cars

Volkswagen on Tuesday said it may be forced to recall 124,000 electric and hybrid cars due to the presence of cadmium, a carcinogenic metal, in the vehicles.

1d

 

Urban geophone array offers new look at northern Los Angeles basin

Using an array of coffee-can sized geophones deployed for about a month in backyards, golf courses and public parks, researchers collected enough data to allow them to map the depth and shape of the San Gabriel and San Bernardino sedimentary basins of Los Angeles, California.

1d

 

Mapping of magnetic particles in the human brain

LMU researchers have for the first time mapped the distribution of magnetic particles in the human brain. The study reveals that the particles are primarily located in the cerebellum and the brainstem, which are the more ancient parts of the brain.

1d

 

Single-cell RNA profiling

An LMU team has improved both the sensitivity and efficiency of a popular method for single-cell RNA sequencing, which yields a molecular fingerprint for individual cells based on their patterns of gene activity.

1d

 

Beyoncé’s Vogue Takeover Is a Show of Power

Control, meet control: The legendarily exacting editor Anna Wintour has handed the legendarily exacting singer Beyoncé some rule over the legendarily influential Vogue . In an unprecedented arrangement, reported by HuffPost , the cover and some inside photos of the forthcoming September issue have been orchestrated and selected by the subject rather than the editors. Beyoncé will not break her ye

1d

 

Assad Has Made His Allies Think He's Indispensable

BEIRUT—On Friday, forces loyal to a triumphant Bashar al-Assad, the president of Syria, raised Syrian and Palestinian flags at a roundabout in Quneitra, a destroyed town inside a demilitarized zone separating Syria and Israel. In July, Russian-backed military operations sought to drive mainstream rebels, as well as fighters linked to the Islamic State, out of the southern province of Daraa and ne

1d

 

Astronomers assemble 'light-fingerprints' to unveil mysteries of the cosmos

Earthbound detectives rely on fingerprints to solve their cases; now astronomers can do the same, using 'light-fingerprints' instead of skin grooves to uncover the mysteries of exoplanets.

1d

 

Next-generation photodetector camera to deploy during demo mission

Testing tools and technologies for refueling and repairing satellites in orbit won't be the only demonstration taking place aboard the International Space Station during NASA's next Robotic Refueling Mission 3, or RRM3.

1d

 

Gene therapy: Better adenine base editing system

Scientists have developed and improved the ABE system in mouse and rat strains, which has great implications for human genetic disorders and gene therapy.

1d

 

Clearer vision of the biochemical reaction that allows us to see

What happens when a photon collides with a molecule? A reaction takes place that often changes the shape of the molecule, and therefore its functionality. This is what makes it possible for us to see, for example. Scientists propose a refined approximation of the equation that describes the effect of this photo-excitation on the components of such molecules.

1d

 

Why are some animals venomous?

Some animals, such as venomous snakes and insects, can use venom for predation or defense, which is an ability that has been developed through millions of years. And the evolution continues – partly due to an increasing pressure from humans.

1d

 

Major Quantum Computing Advance Made Obsolete by Teenager

A teenager from Texas has taken quantum computing down a notch. In a paper posted online earlier this month, 18-year-old Ewin Tang proved that ordinary computers can solve an important computing problem with performance potentially comparable to that of a quantum computer . In its most practical form, the “recommendation problem” relates to how services like Amazon and Netflix determine which pro

1d

 

Healthy relationships education offers a real chance to reduce domestic violence

As part of the new-style sex education curriculum, school pupils will soon start learning about healthy intimate relationships – which could help to significantly reduce future domestic abuse in the UK. In recent research we did on this issue we spoke to various professionals who work with victims of domestic abuse. One of them told us that they believe healthy relationships education needs to be

1d

 

Clothing rental could be the key to a stylishly sustainable fashion industry

A staggering 235m items of unwanted clothing were forecast to be dumped in UK landfill in 2017, while the average American is estimated to bin 81lb (37kg) of used clothing annually. Overconsumption and the inevitable disposal of unwanted clothing has become a worrying global problem – and in many cases, this clothing is unnecessarily thrown away. Instead, it could be repaired or recycled.

1d

 

Environmental Groups Ask Supreme Court to Revisit Clean Power Plan Stay

Attorneys argue that delays have let the EPA circumvent its duty to regulate greenhouse gases — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

 

Soccer heading may be riskier for female players

Researchers have found that women who play soccer may be more at risk than their male counterparts. According to a new study, female soccer players exhibit more extensive changes to brain tissue after repetitive 'heading' of the soccer ball.

1d

 

Real-time foot-and-mouth strategy to better fight disease

Future outbreaks of foot-and-mouth (FMD) disease can be combatted quickly and efficiently from early on — when authorities have minimal information — thanks to a new real-time strategy.

1d

 

Use of VA services impacted by external economic, policy changes

A new study has found that use of VA services is affected by economic and policy changes outside the VA, such as Medicaid eligibility, private employer insurance coverage, unemployment and (non-VA) physician availability.

1d

 

Acidic pH: The weakness of cancer cells

A new computational model has allowed researchers to identify new therapeutic targets that can attack cancer cells by lowering their intracellular pH.

1d

 

Recreational fisheries pose threat to skittish sea turtles

When recreational scallopers flocked to Florida's Crystal River region, native sea turtles turned tail. Researchers say that sudden behavioral disruption could mean trouble the turtles overall health.

1d

 

China could face deadly heat waves due to climate change

The North China Plain, a region that holds one of the biggest concentrations of people on Earth, could be pushing against the boundaries of habitability by the latter part of this century due to global warming, an MIT study shows.

1d

 

Dental plaque is no match for catalytic nanoparticles

Twice-daily rinses with a solution containing FDA-approved nanoparticles broke up plaque and prevented tooth decay in two models that mimic severe cavities in young children. The research was led by a team of Penn scientists. Following clinical trials, the particles may find their way into mouthwash or toothpaste.

1d

 

Case study: Child's lobectomy reveals brain's ability to reorganize its visual system

Published in Cell Reports, the researchers report on three years of behavioral and brain imaging tests on a nearly seven year-old boy — 'UD' — who had a third of the right hemisphere of his brain removed in an attempt to control seizures. Even though the procedure left UD unable to see the left side, the team found that his brain's left hemisphere eventually compensated for visual tasks such as

1d

 

Long-term study of a boy's lobectomy offers rare glimpse of plasticity in action

The boy suffered his first epileptic seizure at four. Doctors tried medication and other treatments to control the seizures — the result of a low-grade brain tumor — but nothing worked. As a last resort, shortly before the boy's seventh birthday, surgeons removed a third of the right hemisphere of his brain. In a case study appearing July 31 in the journal Cell Reports, neuroscientists report th

1d

 

Microbes in the Hong Kong subway system mix together by evening rush hour

Every day, the hundred-mile-long Hong Kong subway system serves nearly five million people commuting from as far away as mainland China. On July 31 in the journal Cell Reports, researchers show how microbes from these diverse travelers mix throughout the day. While each subway line hosts a characteristic set of bacteria during morning rush hour, by evening, these unique bacteria join into one unif

1d

 

Creating a (synthetic) song from a zebra finch's muscle

Birds create songs by moving muscles in their vocal organs to vibrate air passing through their tissues, and new research shows that these muscles act in concert to create sound. Scientists describe how zebra finches produce songs in this week's Chaos. Using electromyographic signals, they tracked the activity of one muscle involved in creating sound, the syringealis ventralis. They then used the

1d

 

Traces on George Orwell letter suggest he caught TB from Spanish hospital

Scientist claims it is likely that the illness that killed the novelist was contracted after he was wounded in the Spanish civil war Scientific tests carried out on a letter sent by George Orwell shortly after his return from the Spanish civil war have suggested he may have caught the tuberculosis that killed him in a Spanish hospital. The letter, written after the author came home from fighting

1d

 

A new look at racial disparities in police use of deadly force

One of the most important social issues of the last five years is fatal police shootings of black Americans.

1d

 

What Is the 'Success Sequence' and Why Do So Many Conservatives Like It?

What to do when financial stability is beyond one’s grasp? Over the past decade, a coterie of pundits and think-tank scholars have arrived at a surefire answer , a simple one that comes with a snappy title and puts the onus on the individual: pursue the “success sequence.” The slogan refers to a time-honored series of life events: graduating from high school (at least), getting a full-time job, a

1d

 

A new smartphone app for collecting travel info

Transportation agencies need travel behavior data to plan changes to their networks, systems, and policies. They'll soon be able to purchase a new smartphone application called Daynamica, developed and patented by a U of M research team, to collect that important information more easily and for less cost than traditional methods.

1d

 

160-year-old mystery about the origin of skeletons solved

Scientists have used powerful X-rays to peer inside the skeletons of some of our oldest vertebrate relatives, solving a 160-year-old mystery about the origin of our skeletons.

1d

 

These windows could keep the sun out while powering your house

Nexus Media News New solar technology could transform the way we view — and power — our world. Researchers have developed a new material that can be applied to windows to simultaneously block out the light and harness the power of the sun.

1d

 

If your home's energy footprint bugs you, do something about it

A comprehensive energy efficiency infographic that lays out the ways you can make a home energy efficient, from smart window treatments and roofing to walls and doors. Read More

1d

 

Chinese researchers further develop adenine base editing system

Two research teams from East China Normal University and Sun Yat-Sen University in China have developed and improved the ABE system in mouse and rat strains, which has great implications for human genetic disorders and gene therapy. The research has been published by Springer Nature in two articles in the open access journal Protein & Cell.

1d

 

Dental plaque is no match for catalytic nanoparticles

Combine a diet high in sugar with poor oral hygiene habits and dental cavities, or caries, will likely result. The sugar triggers the formation of an acidic biofilm, known as plaque, on the teeth, eroding the surface. Early childhood caries is a severe form of tooth decay that affects one in every four children in the United States and hundreds of millions more globally. It's a particularly severe

1d

 

Environmental transformation spells brighter future for Redonda's fantastic beasts

If conservationists had waved a magic wand, the results could hardly have been more spectacular. Within 12 months of starving goats and thousands of ravenous rats being removed from Redonda, this remote Caribbean island has witnessed a miraculous transformation.

1d

 

China could face deadly heat waves due to climate change

A region that holds one of the biggest concentrations of people on Earth could be pushing against the boundaries of habitability by the latter part of this century, a new study shows.

1d

 

Microbes in the Hong Kong subway system mix together by evening rush hour

Every day, the hundred-mile-long Hong Kong subway system serves nearly five million people commuting from as far away as mainland China. On July 31 in the journal Cell Reports, researchers show how microbes from these diverse travelers mix throughout the day. While each subway line hosts a characteristic set of bacteria during morning rush hour, by evening, these unique bacteria join into one unif

1d

 

Creating a (synthetic) song from a zebra finch's muscle

Birds create songs by moving muscles in their vocal organs to vibrate air passing through their tissues. While previous research reported that each of the different muscles controls one acoustic feature, new research shows that these muscles act in concert to create sound.

1d

 

Edge of Belgravia Shiroi Hana Knife Set: Price, Specs, Release Date

Edge of Belgravia’s new $299 Japanese-steel knife set will inspire your most wishful culinary dreams.

1d

 

A Behind-the-Scenes Peek at the Smithsonian’s New Dinosaur Hall

As I walk into the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History’s partially reassembled dinosaur hall, the first thing I notice is a Diplodocus peeking out at me. Its long neck cranes out from behind a cutout of a Jurassic tree, and its 150-million-year-old skull is angled in an almost cheeky way. “Oh hi,” it seems to say. “It’s you. Welcome.” The famous 107-year-old hall closed down in 2014 fo

1d

 

Popcaan Keeps Dancehall Moving Forward—With Its Roots Intact

Popcaan is always in motion, but his voice beckons home. When he answers my call last Friday, a week after the release of Forever , his second studio album, the prolific dancehall singer is quick to tell me he’s in the car. As if to confirm the veracity of his claim, an unknown vehicle in the background honks its horn seconds later. The sound interrupts our conversation with an abrupt blare. When

1d

 

Sword vs Pen: Which is mightier?

The Sword and the Pen – two powerful weapons that take great mastery to wield correctly. Make your choice carefully, we’ll soon find out which is the mightiest weapon of them all! Sword Swords evolved from daggers of the Neolithic era where they were made of flint or bone. During the Bronze Age daggers became more refined and ornate, but the material was not strong enough to make a blade longer t

1d

 

Heading May Be Riskier For Female Soccer Players Than Males

Females are more likely than males to suffer measurable impact on their brains as a result of heading the ball during soccer. (Image credit: Krista Long/Getty Images)

1d

 

Study reveals how sand dunes alter seismic waves

Sand dunes may be lovely to behold, but they have long been seismic troublemakers to geophysicists trying to detect what lies underground nearby. A new study takes a stab at figuring out just how dunes are fouling seismic surveys in hopes of finding ways to work around them.

1d

 

The Last-Ditch Legal Fight to Stop 3-D Printed GunsUS Donald Trump Printed

After five years, US lawmakers and law enforcement are starting to fight back against 3-D printed firearms and "ghost guns."

1d

 

Heatshield for extreme entry environment technology nears maturity

Over the past four years, NASA's Heatshield for Extreme Entry Environment Technology (HEEET) Project has been maturing a novel, three-dimensional, woven Thermal Protection System (TPS) technology for science missions recommended in the Planetary Science Decadal Survey. These missions—Venus probes and landers, Saturn and Uranus probes, and sample return missions to comets and asteroids—will require

1d

 

How Empathetic Is Your Dog?

An experiment involving 34 dogs of various breeds tested whether they would push through a magnetically sealed door to “save” their owners.

1d

 

New research challenges common assumptions about people who use food shelves

The first-ever statewide survey of Minnesota food-shelf users uncovered important information about a population whose voices are rarely represented in research.

1d

 

Chinese researchers further develop adenine base editing system

Two research teams from East China Normal University and Sun Yat-Sen University in China have developed and improved the ABE system in mouse and rat strains, which has great implications for human genetic disorders and gene therapy. The research has been published by Springer Nature in two articles in the open access journal Protein & Cell.

1d

 

New cell lines produce NIST monoclonal antibody for improved biologic drugs

NISTmAb, the world's first standardized monoclonal antibody has become a valuable tool for biomanufacturers developing new biologic therapies for cancers, autoimmune disorders and infectious diseases. Although the molecule has been precisely characterized, the current proprietary method for its production has not.In a new paper, NIST researchers describe how they have taken the first step to solve

1d

 

Engaging with interactive media may be a sequence of actions, assessments

The way people engage with interactive media is usually portrayed as a single act—users either click on the content, or they do not. However, a team of researchers suggest that online engagement is not a single act, after all, but rather a sequence of assessments and interactions.

1d

 

Innovative technologies for a sustainable dairy industry

The dairy industry comprises around 13 percent of Europe's total food and drink sector and is one of largest consumers of energy and water. An EU-funded initiative has therefore explored the economic and environmental benefits of implementing innovative technologies and water management systems.

1d

 

How Homo sapiens could thrive in all kinds of places

Homo sapiens were able to thrive because they could generalize across different kinds of environments, but then also rapidly specialize upon encountering specifically challenging environments, say researchers. They call this new ecological role the “general specialist.” The Homo sapiens that migrated out of Africa about 80,000 years ago settled with relative ease into habitats as wide-ranging as

1d

 

The Sunspot Cycle Is More Intricate Than Previously Thought

The sun's dark spots cycle every 11 years—as well as every 88, 200, and 2,400 years — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

 

New cell lines produce NIST monoclonal antibody for improved biologic drugs

When the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) issued the world's first standardized monoclonal antibody (mAb) in July 2016, the exhaustively analyzed protein known as NISTmAb (NIST Reference Material 8671) was intended as a valuable tool for biopharmaceutical companies. Its purpose: to help ensure the quality of measurement techniques used in the development and manufacture of bio

1d

 

Embraer dives with 2nd-quarter loss

Brazil-based Embraer, the world's third biggest aircraft manufacturer, posted losses on Tuesday of 467 million reais ($126 million) for the second quarter of 2018.

1d

 

India's Tata Motors posts surprise loss

Losses at Jaguar Land Rover helped drag Indian carmaker Tata Motors into the red for the three months to June amid declining demand for its luxury cars and higher raw material costs, the company said Tuesday.

1d

 

Next-generation photodetector camera to deploy during robotic servicing demonstration mission

Testing tools and technologies for refueling and repairing satellites in orbit won't be the only demonstration taking place aboard the International Space Station during NASA's next Robotic Refueling Mission 3, or RRM3.

1d

 

Recreational fisheries pose threat to skittish sea turtles

Every summer, thousands of amateur scallopers flock to the warm coastal waters of Florida's Crystal River region, anchor their boats and reap the delicious bounty of the state's largest recreational bay scallop fishery.

1d

 

Gulf Of Alaska Cod Are Disappearing. Blame 'The Blob'

The cod population in the Gulf of Alaska is at its lowest level on record. Scientists say the culprit is a warm-water mass known as "the blob." (Image credit: Annie Feidt for NPR)

1d

 

VR kan nu føles med hænderne

En "formviser" giver mulighed for at mærke virtuelle objekter.

1d

 

Astronomers assemble 'light-fingerprints' to unveil mysteries of the cosmos

Earthbound detectives rely on fingerprints to solve their cases; now astronomers can do the same, using "light-fingerprints" instead of skin grooves to uncover the mysteries of exoplanets.

1d

 

Hate speech from women is judged harsher than that from men

Women who make hateful remarks on social media are likely to be judged more severely than men who make the same comments. This is also true for reactions to hate speech (counter speech) which when made by women are less accepted than counter speech from men. This is according to a study published in Springer's journal Sex Roles by Claudia Wilhelm and Sven Joeckel of the University of Erfurt in Ger

1d

 

Real-time foot-and-mouth strategy to better fight disease

Future outbreaks of foot-and-mouth (FMD) disease can be combatted quickly and efficiently from early on—when authorities have minimal information—thanks to a new real-time strategy, developed by researchers at the University of Warwick.

1d

 

1d

 

Predatory sea corals team up to feed on stinging jellyfish

Cave-dwelling corals in the Mediterranean can work alongside one another to catch and eat stinging jellyfish, a study reveals.

1d

 

Astronomers assemble 'light-fingerprints' to unveil mysteries of the cosmos

Earthbound detectives rely on fingerprints to solve their cases; now astronomers can do the same, using 'light-fingerprints' instead of skin grooves to uncover the mysteries of exoplanets.

1d

 

Next-generation photodetector camera to deploy during demo mission

Testing tools and technologies for refueling and repairing satellites in orbit won't be the only demonstration taking place aboard the International Space Station during NASA's next Robotic Refueling Mission 3, or RRM3.

1d

 

Turning off protein could boost immunotherapy effectiveness on cancer tumors

Researchers at the Bloomberg-Kimmel Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy in the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center discovered inhibiting a previously known protein could reduce tumor burdens and enhance the effectiveness

1d

 

Soccer heading worse for women's brains than for men's

Women's brains are much more vulnerable than men's to injury from repeated soccer heading, according to a new study by researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine, part of Montefiore. The study found that regions of damaged brain tissue were five times more extensive in female soccer players than in males, suggesting that sex-specific guidelines may be warranted for preventing soccer-relate

1d

 

Soccer heading may be riskier for female players

Researchers have found that women who play soccer may be more at risk than their male counterparts. According to a new study, female soccer players exhibit more extensive changes to brain tissue after repetitive 'heading' of the soccer ball.

1d

 

The U.S. Coast Guard Is Gonna Need A Bigger Boat | Shark News

The crew of the U.S. Coast Guard Boothbay Harbor in Maine spotted a massive basking shark while returning from a search-and-rescue mission. Stream Shark Week Episodes: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/shark-week/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery https://www.facebook.com/SharkWeek Follow on Twitter: https://twitter.c

1d

 

New electrocatalyst developed for oxygen reduction reaction

Recent research published in a paper in NANO by a team of researchers from Beihang University have fabricated a new type of VNQD-NG as nonprecious metal-based electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). The unique structural features of plentiful VN quantum dots with the sizes of 3-6 nm, high surface area and multi-level pores afford considerable structural edges and defects as active sit

1d

 

Energy-intensive Bitcoin transactions pose a growing environmental threat

A study published in Energy Research & Social Science warns that failure to lower the energy use by Bitcoin and similar Blockchain designs may prevent nations from reaching their climate change mitigation obligations under the Paris Agreement.

1d

 

What Personal Genome Testing Can and Can't Do

The limitations of personal genome service testing — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

 

New electrocatalyst developed for ORR

Scientists have fabricated a new type of VNQD-NG as nonprecious metal-based electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). This has significant practical and commercial applications.

1d

 

Exposure to high-frequency electromagnetic fields at work not associated with brain tumors

No clear associations were found between occupational exposure to high frequency electromagnetic fields (EMF) and risk of glioma or meningioma, in one of the largest epidemiological studies performed to date and led by ISGlobal, an institution supported by 'la Caixa' Foundation. However, the findings highlight the need for further research on radiofrequency magnetic fields and tumor promotion, as

1d

 

Optical fibers that can 'feel' the materials around them

Researchers have developed an optical fiber capable of detecting what sort of material or liquid they have come into contact with.

1d

 

Physicists develop improved algorithms for simulating how complex molecules respond to excitation by photons

What makes it possible for our eyes to see? It stems from a reaction that occurs when photons come into contact with a protein in our eyes, called rhodopsin, which adsorbs the photons making up light.

1d

 

Yes, humans are depleting Earth's resources, but 'footprint' estimates don't tell the full story

Experts widely agree that human activities are harming the global environment. Since the Industrial Revolution, the world economy has grown dramatically. Overall this is a success story, since rising incomes have lifted millions of people out of poverty. But it has been fueled by population growth and increasing consumption of natural resources.

1d

 

Airstream's Nest Is a Compact Escape Pod That Doesn't Skimp on Luxury

Forget #vanlife—#nestlife is about to have its moment.

1d

 

Top Stories in July 2018: How 3-D Gun Printing Became a First Amendment Case

Senior writer Andy Greenberg reported on the landmark legal shift that allowed 3-D gun blueprints to be freely available online. Plus: The nine things Robert Mueller will pursue next, and inside Facebook's early days.

1d

 

New film brings more color to flat-screen TVs

Researchers have developed a color-enhancement film that could bring richer and more natural colors to next-generation flat-panel electronic displays. Current commercial display technologies such as organic light-emitting diodes (OLED) and quantum dot light-emitting diodes (QLED) can only produce slightly more than 50 percent of the colors visible to the human eye, limiting color reproduction tha

1d

 

Recreational fisheries pose threat to skittish sea turtles

When recreational scallopers flocked to Florida's Crystal River region, native sea turtles turned tail. Researchers say that sudden behavioral disruption could mean trouble the turtles overall health.

1d

 

Real-time foot-and-mouth strategy to better fight disease

Future outbreaks of foot-and-mouth (FMD) disease can be combatted quickly and efficiently from early on — when authorities have minimal information — thanks to a new real-time strategy, developed by researchers at the University of Warwick.

1d

 

Acidic pH: The weakness of cancer cells

A new computational model has allowed researchers to identify new therapeutic targets that can attack cancer cells by lowering their intracellular pH.

1d

 

Titanium dioxide as a nanoscale sensor of mechanical stress

Scientists from EPFL, Germany and France have revealed a new property of the cheap and abundant material anatase titanium dioxide, which promises applications as a medium for room-temperature nanosensors of mechanical stress with an optical read-out.

1d

 

Lessons to learn, despite another report on missing flight MH370 and still no explanation

The latest report into the disappearance of Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 says that investigations have failed to find any explanation as to why the aircraft went missing with 239 passengers and crew on board.

1d

 

Taping doctors and nurses reveals communication failures

New research sheds light on communication failures between nurses and doctors, one of the primary reasons for patient care mistakes in the hospital. In a small pilot study, researchers learned about potential causes of these communication breakdowns by recording interactions among nurses and doctors, and then having them watch and critique the footage together. “The only way you can become aware

1d

 

Soccer headers may hurt women’s brains more than men’s

Women sustain more damage from heading soccer balls than men, a brain scan study suggests.

1d

 

How Cryptojacking Can Corrupt the Internet of Things

IoT devices often have weak security, making them prime targets for criminals looking to score digital cash — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

 

Cryo-electron microscopy characterizes integrins

A collaboration between three labs at UC San Francisco has resulted in an unprecedented look at a member of a vital and ubiquitous class of proteins called integrins (pronounced "INT-uh-grins"). Integrins are associated with fibrosis, scarring and stiffening of tissues that is associated with nearly half of all deaths in developed countries, and yet researchers had no high-resolution structural mo

1d

 

Hubble images Milky Way's big sister

This image taken by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope's Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) shows a beautiful spiral galaxy called NGC 6744. At first glance, it resembles our Milky Way albeit larger, measuring more than 200,000 light-years across compared to a 100,000-light-year diameter for our home galaxy.

1d

 

Diamond – an indispensable material in fusion technology

Fusion power plants promise nearly unlimited climate-friendly energy and scientists worldwide cooperate to reach this goal. A little known aspect of this highly specialized field of research concerns diamond which is in fact an indispensable material for fusion technology. Researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) develop diamond disks for window units to heat the plasma in fusion rea

1d

 

Research into cell-to-cell signalling mechanism may lead to new cancer treatments

Pioneering new research into the way in which cells communicate with each other could hold the key to unlocking new, improved treatment for life-threatening diseases, including cancer.

1d

 

Predatory sea corals team up to feed on stinging jellyfish

Cave-dwelling corals in the Mediterranean can work alongside one another to catch and eat stinging jellyfish, a study reveals.

1d

 

Heat therapy boosts mitochondrial function in muscles

A new study finds that long-term heat therapy may increase mitochondrial function in the muscles. The discovery could lead to new treatments for people with chronic illness or disease.

1d

 

River complexity maintains regional population stability

An international group of researchers has demonstrated that branching complexity of rivers affects regional population stability and persistence in nature, contrary to current theories which suggest the importance of an ecosystem's size.

1d

 

A colossal breakthrough for topological spintronics

Scientists have developed the world's best-performing pure spin current source made of bismuth-antimony (BiSb) alloys, which they report as the best candidate for the first industrial application of topological insulators. The achievement represents a big step forward in the development of spin-orbit torque magnetoresistive random-access memory (SOT-MRAM) devices with the potential to replace exis

1d

 

Energy-intensive Bitcoin transactions pose a growing environmental threat

A study published in Energy Research & Social Science warns that failure to lower the energy use by Bitcoin and similar Blockchain designs may prevent nations from reaching their climate change mitigation obligations under the Paris Agreement.

1d

 

Use of VA services impacted by external economic, policy changes

A new study has found that use of VA services is affected by economic and policy changes outside the VA, such as Medicaid eligibility, private employer insurance coverage, unemployment and (non-VA) physician availability.

1d

 

Past experiences shape what we see more than what we are looking at now

A new study argues that humans recognize what they are looking at by combining current sensory stimuli with comparisons to images stored in memory.

1d

 

Engaging with interactive media may be a sequence of actions, assessments

The way people engage with interactive media is usually portrayed as a single act — users either click on the content, or they do not. However, a team of researchers suggest that online engagement is not a single act, after all, but rather a sequence of assessments and interactions.

1d

 

Study: UVA heart failure program improves survival, reduces costs

A University of Virginia Health System program that provides follow-up care for heart failure patients after they leave the hospital significantly improves survival and other outcomes while saving money, a new study finds.

1d

 

Hate speech from women is judged harsher than that from men

Women who make hateful remarks on social media are likely to be judged more severely than men who make the same comments. This is also true for reactions to hate speech (counter speech) which when made by women are less accepted than counter speech from men. This is according to a study published in Springer's journal Sex Roles by Claudia Wilhelm and Sven Joeckel of the University of Erfurt in Ger

1d

 

Designing a 'solar tarp,' a foldable, packable way to generate power from the sun

The energy-generating potential of solar panels – and a key limitation on their use – is a result of what they're made of. Panels made of silicon are declining in price such that in some locations they can provide electricity that costs about the same as power from fossil fuels like coal and natural gas. But silicon solar panels are also bulky, rigid and brittle, so they can't be used just anywher

1d

 

A miniaturized semiconductor biochip to identify drug-resistant pathogens

Evolving strains of multi-drug resistant pathogens are a growing global concern, outpacing drug discovery efforts and undermining the efficacy of existing antibiotics. The development of comprehensive diagnostics for clinical applications will become crucial to control escalating health risks. Existing laboratory tests to diagnose infectious disease are generally carried out via culture-based meth

1d

 

Aphids manipulate their food

Aphids – who hasn't been bothered by these little insects at one time or another? Why do they reproduce on plants so successfully? These are among the questions that Professor Dr. Caroline Müller and her research team are addressing at Bielefeld University's Faculty of Biology. They have found out that aphids are able to influence the quality of their food, and that this may enable them to constru

1d

 

Scientists discover potential therapy for human copper metabolism disorders

Individuals with defects in copper metabolism may soon have more targeted treatment options thanks to a discovery by a research team led by Dr. Vishal Gohil of Texas A&M AgriLife Research in College Station.A paper in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences reports that an investigational anticancer-drug, elesclomol, can restore the production of cytochrome oxidase protein complex, a c

1d

 

Clearer vision of the biochemical reaction that allows us to see

What happens when a photon collides with a molecule? A reaction takes place that often changes the shape of the molecule, and therefore its functionality. This is what makes it possible for us to see, for example. In a study published in EPJ B, Federica Agostini, University Paris-Sud, Orsay, France, and colleagues propose a refined approximation of the equation that describes the effect of this ph

1d

 

Survey of Sexual Medicine Society members reveals only half ask for patients' sexual orientation

Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers say their small survey of nearly 100 health care practitioners who are members of the Sexual Medicine Society of North America revealed that only half routinely ask their patients directly about their sexual orientation. In addition, the survey found, of those who do not ask, more than 40 percent say that sexual orientation is irrelevant to patients' care, a posi

1d

 

A colossal breakthrough for topological spintronics

Scientists have developed the world's best-performing pure spin current source made of bismuth-antimony (BiSb) alloys, which they report as the best candidate for the first industrial application of topological insulators. The achievement represents a big step forward in the development of spin-orbit torque magnetoresistive random-access memory (SOT-MRAM) devices with the potential to replace exis

1d

 

New electrocatalyst developed for ORR

Recent research published in a paper in NANO by a team of researchers from Beihang University have fabricated a new type of VNQD-NG as nonprecious metal-based electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). This has significant practical and commercial applications.

1d

 

Captain's Spotlight: Sean Dwyer, Part 1 | Deadliest Catch

After the passing of his father from an 8-year battle with ALS, Captain Sean Dwyer was motivated to carry on the family legacy. Daily, he accepts new risks, and responsibilities, to learn what it'll take to fill his father's shoes. From: Discovery

1d

 

A virtual platform for data access, analysis and publication helps shape Blue Growth

Blue Growth is the term applied to the long term strategy for sustainable growth in the marine and maritime sectors. The EU-funded BlueBRIDGE project has helped build the necessary knowledge infrastructure for workflows and informed decision making across domains.

1d

 

For Many College Students, Hunger 'Makes It Hard To Focus'

With rising school costs, as many as half of U.S. college students are feeling so stretched financially that they either aren't getting enough to eat or they're worried about it, studies find. (Image credit: franckreporter/Getty Images)

1d

 

What Does It Take to Put a Waterfall on a Skyscraper?

The Liebian Building in Guiyang, China has a 350-foot-tall artificial waterfall built into its face.

1d

 

Goodreads and the Crushing Weight of Literary FOMO

Have a friend on social media who's always reading 10 times as much as you? I feel your pain.

1d

 

How Technology Shapes the Way We Read

WIRED set out to examine how technology is shifting our relationships with books. Here's what we found out.

1d

 

How My Smartphone Revived the Purity of Reading

Apps like Pocket and Flipboard have turned commutes into the perfect time to binge-read.

1d

 

From Surface Go to the Instant Pot Max, All the Things We Loved This Month

Plus: Our review of Apple's new MacBook Pro, Roku's new TV speakers, and the next generation of Gorilla Glass.

1d

 

Coordinated ocean energy efforts herald a new industrial sector

Despite its remaining mystery, the ocean is a complex working environment, widely used for fishing, shipping and recreation; but so far largely untapped for energy generation. OCEANERA-NET seeks to give the industry the boost it needs.

1d

 

Using physics to make better GDP estimates

A team of Italian physicists has used economic complexity theory to produce five-year gross domestic product (GDP) estimates for several countries around the world. In their paper published in the journal Nature Physics, Andrea Tacchella, D. Mazzilli and Luciano Pietronero describe how they applied the theory to economic forecasting and how well it has worked thus far.

1d

 

Now we finally know what Ancient Greek music sounded like

In 1932, the musicologist Wilfrid Perrett reported to an audience at the Royal Musical Association in London the words of an unnamed professor of Greek with musical leanings: "Nobody has ever made head or tail of ancient Greek music, and nobody ever will. That way madness lies."

1d

 

Satellites can advance sustainable development by highlighting poverty

A technique to extrapolate poverty levels in rural settings using satellite data and imaging has proven to be very promising. This paves the way for a much more efficient and cost-effective approach to identifying and addressing poverty.

1d

 

Heat therapy boosts mitochondrial function in muscles

A new study finds that long-term heat therapy may increase mitochondrial function in the muscles. The discovery could lead to new treatments for people with chronic illness or disease. The study–the first of its kind in humans–is published ahead of print in the Journal of Applied Physiology.

1d

 

River complexity maintains regional population stability

An international group of researchers has demonstrated that branching complexity of rivers affects regional population stability and persistence in nature, contrary to current theories which suggest the importance of an ecosystem's size.

1d

 

Platinum is key in ancient volcanic related climate change, says UC Nature publication

UC interdisciplinary research team looks at platinum for clues to stay ahead of future high magnitude volcanic related climate change.

1d

 

Nearly 120,000 displaced in Myanmar floods

Nearly 120,000 people have been displaced after floods submerged a vast swathe of southeastern Myanmar, killing 11 people and sending panicked residents fleeing for dry ground with children perched on their shoulders and few belongings in tow.

1d

 

NASA satellite shows California shrouded in smoke

NASA's Aqua satellite captured this natural color image of the fires in California and the resultant smoke that has shrouded the state and swept eastward as far as Salt Lake City and still moving. Dangerous and deadly fires have broken out across the state including the Carr fire inferno and the long-standing Ferguson fire near Yosemite National Park as well as the Mendocino Complex north of Santa

1d

 

Predatory sea corals team up to feed on stinging jellyfish

Cave-dwelling corals in the Mediterranean can work alongside one another to catch and eat stinging jellyfish, a study reveals.

1d

 

Genetically modifying rice to produce HIV-neutralizing proteins

A team of researchers from Spain, the U.S. and the U.K. has genetically modified a strain of rice to produce HIV-neutralizing proteins. In their paper published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes the technique by which they modified the rice and how it might be used to prevent HIV infections.

1d

 

Panasonic first-quarter profits up 17.6 percent

Japanese electronics giant Panasonic said Tuesday its first-quarter net profit jumped more than 17 percent thanks to growth in its automotive-related business.

1d

 

Gut bacteria byproduct protects against Salmonella

Researchers have identified a molecule that serves as natural protection against one of the most common intestinal pathogens. Salmonella causes about 1.2 million illnesses, 23,000 hospitalizations, and 450 deaths nationwide each year. Propionate, a byproduct of metabolism by a group of bacteria called the Bacteroides , inhibits the growth of Salmonella in the intestinal tract of mice, according t

1d

 

Chile's rock art llamas divulge secrets of ancient desert culture

Open air rock paintings in the world's driest desert pay testament to the importance of the llama to millennia-old cultures that traversed the inhospitable terrain.

1d

 

Nintendo first-quarter profits up 44 pct to $275 mn on Switch sales

Nintendo said Tuesday its quarterly net profit jumped 43.9 percent year-on-year to $275 million, driven by the global popularity of its Switch console and game titles.

1d

 

BMW to invest a billion euros in first factory in Hungary

BMW said Tuesday it will invest a billion euros ($1.2 billion) in a new factory in Hungary, as it follows its fellow German automakers into building cars in lower-wage central Europe.

1d

 

Sweden's wildfires abating, foreign firefighters leave

Wildfires that have been raging across Sweden are abating, Swedish authorities said Tuesday, as French, Italian and German firefighters who came to assist gradually leave the country.

1d

 

Lithuania warns Russian taxi app could be snooping on users

Lithuanian authorities are "strongly" urging consumers, especially public servants, not to install the app of a popular Russian taxi-booking service because it may unlawfully be collecting user data.

1d

 

Sony upgrades full-year forecast, logs brisk quarterly profit

Sony on Tuesday raised its full-year profit and sales forecasts after reporting a near-threefold increase in first-quarter profit, as its recovery continues under a new CEO.

1d

 

Two people got rat lungworm from eating raw centipedes. Could you be next?

Health The answer is yes—even if you don't like eating bugs. Rat lungworm isn’t confined to Asia and the Caribbean anymore: It’s in the U.S. And you don’t have to knowingly eat raw bugs for the disease to strike you.

1d

 

Giants of the Deep

Had you been alive in the early 19th century and in want of a sea monster, you might have summoned one via the apparatus of a dead whale . Take a colossal rib, a narwhal’s spiral tusk, a gray whale’s eyeballs, bristles of baleen stripped from a humpback’s jaw or armfuls of its spooling tongue—how disquieting these discards from the whaling industry must have appeared to those who had never seen a

1d

 

Risk for genetic errors swells at DNA ‘hotspots’

Researchers have identified “hotspots” in DNA where the risk for genetic mutations is significantly higher. These mutations arise because “typos” can occur as DNA replicates during cellular division. A recent analysis, which found that random mistakes in DNA play a large role in many cancer types, underscores the need to understand more about what triggers these errors. “Until now, I don’t think

1d

 

Seriously, We Need to Talk About Hannah Gadsby's 'Nanette'

It's been on Netflix for weeks, but people are still discussing this special. So are we.

1d

 

Climate Change Is Coming for Underwater Archaeological Sites

The second death of long-submerged shipwrecks.

1d

 

Panasonic Wireless Headphones (RP-HD605N) Review: Bose Beaters?

The RP-HD605N over-ear headphones with noise cancelling prove Panasonic's still got it.

1d

 

Why computers are so bad at comparing objects

New research sheds light on why computers are so bad at a class of tasks that even young children have no problem with: determining whether two objects in an image are the same or different. “There’s a lot of excitement about what computer vision has been able to achieve…” Computer vision algorithms have come a long way in the past decade. They’ve been shown to be as good or better than people at

1d

 

Why Hostility Can Bring People Closer Together

The surprising power of “hostile mediators” — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

 

Image of the Day: Medicinal Millipedes

Certain lemurs in the forests of Madagascar eat millipedes to protect themselves from parasitic infections of the gut.

1d

 

Women have more miscarriages than live births over their lifetime

A study that brings together many different findings concludes that miscarriages are even more common than we thought

1d

 

Terraforming Mars might be impossible due to a lack of carbon dioxide

We need lots of carbon dioxide to make Mars habitable for Earth life – and it turns out there isn’t enough on the Red Planet

1d

 

Where does space begin? Here’s why it’s closer than you think

The jump from Earth to space is often thought to happen 100 kilometres up, but it's time to think again and bring the boundary closer to home, says Jonathan McDowell

1d

 

Mass graves found on Scottish islands may be ancient tsunami victims

A rare tsunami may have struck the islands of Shetland and Orkney off the UK’s north coast 5500 years ago, killing dozens of people who had to be hastily buried

1d

 

Biodiversity may prove to be the defining issue of our age

It’s an error to think we’ve got bigger problems than extinction. We must take species loss seriously, or it will come back to haunt us

1d

 

Do whales sing for sex or sonar?

A new theory says whales may use their songs as a kind of sonar. This upends the conventional wisdom that whales sing to attract potential mates. In a new paper, Eduardo Mercado III, a professor in the psychology department at the University at Buffalo, focuses on how humpback whales perceive the song, which is among the most sophisticated acoustic performances in the animal kingdom. The paper ap

1d

 

HILDA reveals no real change in gender roles

Australian attitudes to gender roles are becoming more progressive, but these views are not translating into real change in the home and workplace, according to the latest release of the Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA) Survey.

1d

 

Does the El Niño Southern Oscillation actually matter for food security?

This time of year there's always a buzz about whether an El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) event is developing, and where it might affect the climate. ENSO refers to a coupling between equatorial Pacific Ocean sea surface temperatures and atmospheric conditions. Both El Niño and La Niña, the two phases of ENSO, influence rainfall, floods, and droughts across much of the world. But why should we

1d

 

Science is an Infinite-Sum Game

It’s a win-win endeavor with unlimited horizons for expanding our island of knowledge into the ocean of ignorance — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

 

Varmeudfordringen: Hjælp Søren med at køle den gamle bil

Journalist Søren Hebsgaard sveder i sin 20 år gamle Polo og har derfor konstrueret sin egen aircondition. Kan du hjælpe med at forbedre den?

1d

 

Are Stock Buybacks Starving the Economy?

Stock buybacks are eating the world. The once illegal practice of companies purchasing their own shares is pulling money away from employee compensation, research and development, and other corporate priorities—with potentially sweeping effects on business dynamism, income and wealth inequality, working-class economic stagnation, and the country’s growth rate. Evidence for that conclusion comes f

1d

 

Hope and Change in an Alabama Coal Mine

BESSEMER , Ala.—It was hulking, it was orange, and its name was Trump. Randy Johnson looked on as his new 220-ton excavator carved up the ground, clearing the field of rocks to help unearth the coal underneath. Four weeks earlier, the central Alabama mine’s 22 employees had gathered to christen the $2.7 million purchase, painting “TRUMP” in white block letters along the excavator’s side. The day

1d

 

Trump Is Squeezing the Koch Network Out of the GOP

Will the GOP be the party of Donald Trump or the party of Charles Koch? The question comes to mind as Koch, the billionaire businessman who has for decades devoted himself to libertarian causes, rallies his expansive network of right-of-center philanthropists to fight against the Republican embrace of protectionism, restrictionism, and deficit spending, the hallmarks of the Trump presidency so fa

1d

 

Hackers Target 3rd Dimension of Cyberspace: Users' Minds

The Russian attacks on the 2016 U.S. presidential election and the country's continuing election-related hacking have happened across all three dimensions of cyberspace – physical, informational and cognitive.

1d

 

What's a spider's favorite color? Study finds surprising answers

Scientists recently discovered the aptly named peacock jumping spiders have the color vision needed to appreciate the male's gaudy display.

1d

 

Sea-level rise report contains best projections yet for Washington's coasts

One certainty under climate change is that global ocean levels are rising. A new report led by Washington Sea Grant and the University of Washington's Climate Impacts Group provides the clearest picture yet of what to expect in Washington state.

1d

 

Why Do Paper Cuts Hurt So Much?

Consider, for a moment, the paper cut. It happens suddenly and entirely unexpectedly, usually just as you are finally getting somewhere on that task you had been putting off.

1d

 

First drug to prevent chronic migraines approved by EU

Manufacturer says patients will be able to get treatment privately from September under EU licence The first ever drug specifically designed to prevent a migraine has been given the green light by European health officials. Erenumab is now expected to be considered by English and Scottish health agencies to assess whether it is appropriate for NHS use. Continue reading…

1d

 

So long and thanks for all the clicks | Dean Burnett

After six years exactly, Dean Burnett’s Brain Flapping blog is coming to an end. It’s been emotional On 31 July, 2012, the very first Brain Flapping post appeared on the Guardian website. Exactly six years to the day later, here’s the very last one. To confirm, the Guardian is shutting down the science blog network , which includes Brain Flapping. Nothing personal, just more fallout from the ever

1d

 

Are Diplomas in Your DNA?

Last week researchers announced more than 1,000 genetic variants associated with how far a person gets through school—along with warnings for how *not* to use that data. But earlier results from the same group are already available in a consumer product.

1d

 

Despite Pledging Openness, Companies Rush to Patent AI Tech

Google, Facebook, Microsoft, and Amazon have made some artificial intelligence tools open source. But they're also working to claim ownership of some techniques.

1d

 

The Danger of Invisible Government Deeds

The well-functioning systems that allow us to trust our food and move us seamlessly from place to place are at risk of being devalued by technocratic, start-uppy thinking.

1d

 

BurnBox Makes Hidden Files Look Like You've Deleted Them

Cryptographers have developed a new technology designed to protect your secrets at the border.

1d

 

Platinum provides evidence for ancient volcanic-related climate change, says study

Supervolcanoes are one of Mother Nature's deadliest phenomena, and when they erupt, they can change the climate of the entire planet.

1d

 

Image: Soaring into an orbital sunrise

The International Space Station soars into a sunrise every 90 minutes, each and every day.

1d

 

Groundwater recharge project informs statewide sustainability efforts

The depletion of California's aquifers by overpumping of groundwater has led to growing interest in "managed aquifer recharge," which replenishes depleted aquifers using available surface waters, such as high flows in rivers, runoff from winter storms, or recycled waste water. At the same time, there is growing concern about contamination of groundwater supplies with nitrate from fertilizers, sept

1d

 

The Graphic Novel That Captures the Anxieties of Being Undocumented

Jérôme Ruillier’s latest graphic novel, The Strange , his first translated into English, opens cinematically with a masterfully compressed pre-title sequence. The story begins in medias res, with a bird’s-eye view of a townscape rendered in thick lines and set against a dense red background. When the nameless central character speaks, his language of unfamiliar symbols is translated for the reade

1d

 

Soggy 2017 was fifth warmest year in UK record

Despite a wet summer, 2017 was one of the warmest years according to Met Office records dating back to 1910.

1d

 

Spectacular frog identified as new species

One of the world's most spectacular frogs has been identified as a new species after 20 years of painstaking research at The University of Manchester.

1d

 

A Conversation with the Only Scientist in Congress

Representative Bill Foster weighs in on the most important science issues facing the country — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

 

Students develop free robot programming simulator

When it comes to programming actual robots, things get very expensive, very quickly.

1d

 

Researchers examine Turkey to assess the impact of 2015 Paris climate commitments on a national economy

On first glance, it could be a tall order for Turkey to fulfill its Paris Agreement pledge, which targets a reduction in the nation's greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by 21 percent below business-as-usual levels by 2030. Fossil fuels comprise nearly all of Turkey's energy mix, and low-carbon options have not yet gained traction. Wind and solar accounts for about 5 percent of energy generation and nu

1d

 

What Caused This Man's Scalloped Pupil?

When doctors examined the man's eyes, they saw something odd.

1d

 

9 Strange, Scientific Excuses for Why Humans Haven't Found Aliens Yet

Where are all the aliens? Scientists have some … unusual theories.

1d

 

Distress Calls Linked to Amelia Earhart Probably Don't Reveal Anything About Her Demise

The daring aviator Amelia Earhart may have sent distress calls from a tiny Pacific island by the light of the moon, talking urgently into her radio while she recharged her damaged plane at low tide, according to a new report.

1d

 

Maggots and rotting food waste—a new recipe for sustainable fish and animal feed

In a warehouse to the northeast of Cambridge are shelves upon shelves of trays teeming with maggots, munching their way through a meal of rotting fruit and vegetables. This may sound stomach-churning, but these insects could become the sustainable food of the future – at least for fish and animals – helping reduce the reliance on resource intensive proteins such as fishmeal and soy, while also mit

1d

 

How do religious ideologies spread?

Over the last 2000 years Christianity has grown from a tiny religious sect to the largest family of religions in the world. How did Christianity become so successful? Did Christianity spread through grass-roots movements or political elites? And what can the spread of Christianity tell us about how widespread social change happens?

1d

 

Fire is not all bad news in healthy sagebrush steppe ecosystems

Fire is not all bad news in healthy sagebrush steppe ecosystems, according to an Oregon State University study.

1d

 

Largest king penguin colony has shrunk nearly 90 percent

The world's biggest colony of king penguins is found in the National Nature Reserve of the French Southern and Antarctic Lands (TAAF). Using high-resolution satellite images, researchers from the Chizé Centre for Biological Studies (CNRS / University of La Rochelle) have detected a massive 88 percent reduction in the size of the penguin colony, located on Île aux Cochons, in the Îles Crozet archip

1d

 

Exposure to high-frequency electromagnetic fields at work not associated with brain tumors

No clear associations were found between occupational exposure to high frequency electromagnetic fields (EMF) and risk of glioma or meningioma, in one of the largest epidemiological studies performed to date and led by ISGlobal, an institution supported by 'la Caixa' Foundation. However, the findings highlight the need for further research on radiofrequency magnetic fields and tumor promotion, as

1d

 

Paul Manafort’s Trial Won’t Be All About Russia

The first trial arising from Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation into Russia’s election interference is set to begin this week. But the topic won’t be a conspiracy between President Donald Trump’s campaign and Moscow—and the government says its witnesses may not even utter the word Russia . Instead, prosecutors will outline the alleged financial crimes committed by Trump’s former campa

1d

 

The 2020 Census Is Already in Big Trouble

Nobody will write songs about the census. Among the fabled pillars underpinning the country’s democracy, the great American head count is often relegated to a dusty corner. In the nine interstitial years between each tally, analysis and development of a more perfect instrument take place mostly hidden from public view. There have been only 22 U.S. censuses—Presidents Ronald Reagan, John F. Kenned

1d

 

Why Do Supreme Court Nominees Have ‘Sherpas’?

When Donald Trump nominated Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court, one of the first items of business was selecting someone who would guide the judge through the Senate’s ritualistic confirmation process. Former Senator Jon Kyl of Arizona was tapped for the job: He would be Kavanaugh’s “sherpa.” Last year, former Senator Kelly Ayotte of New Hampshire served as the sherpa for Neil Gorsuch in his ow

1d

 

Pungent tasting substance in ginger reduces bad breath

The pungent compound 6-gingerol, a constituent of ginger, stimulates an enzyme in saliva that breaks down foul-smelling substances. It thus ensures fresh breath and a better aftertaste. Citric acid, on the other hand, increases the sodium ion content of saliva, making salty foods taste less salty. To find out more about food components, a team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the

1d

 

Study reveals the Great Pyramid of Giza can focus electromagnetic energy

An international research group has applied methods of theoretical physics to investigate the electromagnetic response of the Great Pyramid to radio waves. Scientists predicted that under resonance conditions, the pyramid can concentrate electromagnetic energy in its internal chambers and under the base. The research group plans to use these theoretical results to design nanoparticles capable of r

1d

 

Optical fibers that can sense the materials around them

In recent years optical fibers have served as sensors to detect changes in temperature, like a thermometer, and pressure, like an artificial nerve. This technique is particularly useful in structures such as bridges and gas pipelines.

1d

 

Diversity and education influence India's population growth

Differences within India's population influence population projections for years to come, according to research conducted by IIASA and the Asian Demographic Research Institute. This information could help India and its workforce to catch up to more developed Asian countries with higher GDP per capita.

1d

 

A breakthrough of monitoring energy storage at work using optical fibers

A fiber optic sensing system developed by researchers in China and Canada can peer inside supercapacitors and batteries to observe their state of charge.

1d

 

Three Children, Two Abortions

At this point in my 52 years, filling out the forms at the doctor’s office feels like writing a memoir. Any past surgeries? Why, yes. So many! Here we go, in alphabetical order, to the tune of “Twelve Days of Christmas”: one adenoidectomy, one appendectomy, two D-and-C’s, one frenectomy, one hysterectomy, one inguinal-hernia repair, one meniscectomy, one Morton’s-neuroma repair, one trachelectomy

1d

 

Climate taxes on agriculture could lead to more food insecurity than climate change itself

New IIASA-led research has found that a single climate mitigation scheme applied to all sectors, such as a global carbon tax, could have a serious impact on agriculture and result in far more widespread hunger and food insecurity than the direct impacts of climate change. Smarter, more inclusive policies are needed instead.

1d

 

Physicists study complex magnetism in a rare earth compound

Dysprosium germanide (DyGe3) is a silver-white rare Earth element that forms refractory oxides that are almost insoluble in water. In a recent study, scientists applied the pressure of eight GPa to obtain polycrystal samples of dysprosium germanide in a metastable state state of local thermodynamic equilibrium capable of changing to a more stable state under certain conditions.

1d

 

UK Group Threatens to Sue Facebook Over Cambridge AnalyticaFacebook US Accounts

Lawyers have served Facebook with a letter before claim, the first step for filing a class action lawsuit in the UK.

1d

 

Boosting the movement of fluorescent probes across the cell membrane

For decades, scientists have used fluorescent probes to detect molecules, monitor cellular activity and deliver drugs inside cells. Probes based on a compound called naphthalimide are especially popular because they can easily be made in large quantities and their fluorescence can be tweaked by changing their constituent atoms. But they are usually absorbed by cells only in small quantities, which

1d

 

Nyt trick: Hackere stjæler kryptovaluta for 7,7 mio. amerikanske dollars

Hackere fik kontrol over KICKICO smart-kontrakten og erobrede KickCoins til en værdi af 7,7 mio. amerikanske dollars. Siden mener KICKICO at have fået styr på deres smart-contract, og at de vil kunne erstatte alle stjålne tokens.

1d

 

Dansker misbruges til fake science

Pseudo-videnskabelige udgivere anvender etablerede forskeres navne til at blåstemple tvivlsomme tidskrifter og godkende indsendte studier uden forskernes viden og accept.

1d

 

Optical fibers that can 'feel' the materials around them

EPFL researchers have developed an optical fiber capable of detecting what sort of material or liquid they have come into contact with. Their research has been published in Nature Communications.

1d

 

Sølvmedaljer til danske gymnasieelever i international fysik-olympiade

For anden gang vendte det danske hold hjem fra International Physics Olympiad med to sølvmedaljer.

1d

 

Great tits have as much impulse control as chimpanzees

Biologists at Lund University in Sweden have shown that the great tit, a common European songbird, has a tremendous capacity for self-control. Until now, such impulse control has been primarily associated with larger cognitively advanced animals with far larger brains than the great tit. According to the new results, the great tits' capacity for self-control is almost the same as that of ravens an

1d

 

WATCH: Building A Probe That Will Survive A Trip To The Sun

The sun is responsible for all life on Earth, but we still have a lot to learn about it. So this summer, NASA is sending the Parker Solar Probe closer to the sun than we have ever been before. (Image credit: NPR/NPR)

1d

 

HHS Inspector General's Report Finds Flaws And Fraud In U.S. Hospice Care

Medicare pays more than $16 billion a year for hospice services. But a new report from the Department of Health and Human Services says hospice patients don't always get the care they're promised. (Image credit: Bromberger Hoover Photography/Getty Images)

1d

 

Voldsom kritik af Googles AI: Det meste er hype

Googles resultater med kunstig intelligens, der 'lærer selv', er vildledende, mener akademikere, der peger på, at forskning udført af firmaer sjældent ender med bemærkelsesværdige resultater.

1d

 

Skader på dødsdømt dæmning opdaget tre dage før kollaps

Først to dage efter virksomhederne bag et dæmningsbyggeri i Laos opdagede, at en dæmning var ved at kollapse, begyndte de at evakuere beboere i risikozonen. Myndighederne ventede endnu en dag.

1d

 

Uber hits brakes on self-driving trucks

Uber on Monday said it is hitting the brakes on self-driving trucks, shifting gears to focus just on autonomous cars.

2d

 

Samsung Electronics profit dips as phone sales fall

Samsung Electronics said Tuesday its second-quarter net profit dipped slightly from a year earlier, with a fall in smartphone sales mitigated by strong demand for its memory chips.

2d

 

Don't call dolphin hybrid spotted off Hawaii a 'wholphin'

Scientists are touting the first sighting of a hybrid between a melon-headed whale and a rough-toothed dolphin in the ocean off Hawaii. But don't call it a "wholphin," they say.

2d

 

New Species of Ebola Discovered

The Bombali Ebola virus was identified in bats in Sierra Leone, and there’s no evidence that it has infected people or causes human disease.

2d

 

Research into cell-to-cell signalling mechanism may lead to new cancer treatments

Pioneering new research into the way in which cells communicate with each other could hold the key to unlocking new, improved treatment for life-threatening diseases, including cancer.

2d

 

Juvenile justice practices in Europe can inform practices in the US

Vermont recently moved to extend the jurisdiction of its juvenile courts from age 18 to 20, and three other U.S. states (Connecticut, Illinois, and Massachusetts) are considering similar proposals. This comes amid growing awareness that 18- to 25-year-olds are a developmentally distinct group that should be treated differently by the justice system. New research examined juvenile justice in Europe

2d

 

Research into cell-to-cell signalling mechanism may lead to new cancer treatments

Pioneering new research into the way in which cells communicate with each other could hold the key to unlocking new, improved treatment for life-threatening diseases, including cancer.

2d

 

ScienceTake: Lassie Got Help, Would Your Dog?

Dogs with an opportunity to free a distressed owner turned in a mixed performance.

2d

 

After Doctors Cut Their Opioids, Patients Turn to a Risky Treatment for Back Pain

The drive to reduce opioid use has led patients to clinics offering off-label painkiller injections. Pfizer asked the F.D.A. to ban the treatment years ago.

2d

 

Cowabunga! Can Cow Therapy Cure Cancer?

A hospital in India offers to cure cancer in 11 days with Ayurveda and cow therapy, giving patients a drink of desi cow milk, yogurt, ghee, urine, and dung. It's very unlikely that cow therapy can cure cancer; but in another sense, the author of the book Holy Cancer says it "healed" him.

2d

 

Den store madpakkedyst: Sølvpapir, plastfilm eller brunt papir?

Du skal vælge din madindpakning med omhu, hvis du gerne vil gøre noget godt for din egen sundhed og for miljøet.

2d

 

Just two weeks' inactivity can trigger diabetic symptoms in vulnerable patients: Research

Just two weeks without much activity can have a dramatic impact on health from which it is difficult to recover, according to researchers who studied overweight older adults at risk of developing Type 2 diabetes.

2d

 

Juvenile justice practices in Europe can inform practices in the United States

New research examined juvenile justice in Europe, where most countries have special laws or procedures for 18- to 25-year-olds; the findings can inform US policymakers.

2d

 

Italy Dispatch: Ceramics Aren’t Enough. Bring on the Spaceships, Italian Town Says.

Italy decided that the ceramics center of Grottaglie — with its long runway and uneventful weather — had the right stuff to be Virgin Galactic’s next launchpad.

2d

 

Stort studie: KU-forskere tættere på at opklare høfebers sammenhæng med vores gener

Forskere fra Københavns Universitet har fundet 41 gener, som øger risikoen for høfeber. Den viden kan bruges til udvikling af behandlinger.

2d

 

Facts About Cadmium

Properties, sources and uses of the element cadmium.

2d

 

Routine genomic screening could find risks for cancer and heart disease in 3 to 4 million

Unbeknownst to them, at least 1 percent of the US population has an identifiable genetic risk for cancer or heart disease that could be detected and clinically managed through genomic screening. Researchers say that identifying those 3 to 4 million persons and effectively mitigating that risk are worthy goals, but more work is needed before genomic screening becomes routine in health care.

2d

 

Livestock treatment may offer solution to antibiotics crisis, say scientists

Dosing animals with antibodies from their own immune systems could prevent illness and reduce the need for antibiotics Using animals’ own immune systems may provide a way to reduce the overuse of antibiotics in farming , replacing the drugs with cheap farm byproducts and cutting the growing risk of resistance to common medicines , new research has suggested. Natural antibodies, produced by the im

2d

 

Classroom study sheds light on how ADHD drugs work

New research is filling in critical gaps in knowledge about how stimulants work to effectively treat Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Although stimulants have been in use for decades to treat ADHD in school-aged children, just how they work hasn’t been clear. “This is the first study to demonstrate that improving short-term working memory and the ability to inhibit are at least pa

2d

 

Donald Trump Is Falling in Love With Summits

Turns out that when Donald Trump recently warned Iran’s president on Twitter that more threats against the United States would bring “CONSEQUENCES THE LIKES OF WHICH FEW THROUGHOUT HISTORY HAVE EVER SUFFERED BEFORE,” it was just the first part of his message. The second was, essentially, “AND IF YOU’D RATHER TALK, I’D LOVE TO!” Or, as he put it on Monday at a press conference with Italy’s prime m

2d

 

Largest king penguin colony shrinks 90% in 30 years

The world's largest colony, in the Indian Ocean, has shrunk 90% over 30 years, research suggests.

2d

 

Test could give people decades to prevent osteoporosis

A new genetic screen may predict a person’s future risk of osteoporosis and bone fracture, according to new research. Specifically, the study, one of the largest of its kind, identified 899 regions in the human genome associated with low bone-mineral density, 613 of which have never before been identified. People deemed to be at high risk—about 2 percent of those tested—were about 17 times more l

2d

 

How memories shape ideas about our present and future

Memories of past events play a key role in how our brains model what’s happening in the present and predict what is likely to occur in the future, according to a new study. “Memory isn’t for trying to remember. It’s for doing better the next time.” “Memory isn’t for trying to remember,” says Jeff Zacks, professor of psychology and brain sciences at Washington University in St. Louis and an author

2d

 

Some Crows Hit On Dead Companions

About 5 percent of crows will attempt to copulate with other crows that have joined the choir invisible. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2d

 

The Atlantic Daily: Building to the Point

What We’re Following Russian Relations: While discussing Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation of the 2016 election, President Trump’s lawyer Rudy Giuliani claimed not only that collusion with Russia would not have been a crime, but also that none had occurred. David A. Graham explains why these talking points don’t add up. And Natasha Bertrand reports that the Department of Homeland Sec

2d

 

This alternative film for fields actually biodegrades

Biodegradable films could be a more eco-friendly alternative to the thin polyethylene films common in agriculture in many countries. Eight million tons of plastic end up in the oceans every year. Plastic pollution also threatens agricultural soils. Farmers around the world apply enormous amounts of polyethylene (PE) mulch films onto soils to combat weeds, increase soil temperature, and keep the s

2d

 

Why Are Dozens of Dead Animals Washing Up on Florida Beaches?

A "red tide" in Florida is having a devastating impact on marine wildlife.

2d

 

Large Hadron Collider Just Spat Electron-ified Atoms to Almost the Speed of Light

The Large Hadron Collider accelerated lead nuclei with orbiting electrons along its tunnel for the first time, opening new scientific doors.

2d

 

Parental depression linked to kids' increased use of health services

Parental ill health, especially depression, is linked to heightened use of health services, including emergency care, among their children, finds research published today in the online journal BMJ Paediatrics Open.

2d

 

Brexit will be very bad for the NHS, survey of UK doctors reveals

UK doctors think Britain's exit from the European Union (EU), dubbed Brexit, will be very bad for the NHS, reveal the results of an anonymised survey of their political beliefs and voting patterns, published online in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health.

2d

 

Out There: Mars Is Frigid, Rusty and Haunted. We Can’t Stop Looking at It.

An oasis in the sky inspires the imagination. A series of discoveries refreshes our yearning for the red planet.

2d

 

How jumping genes hijack their way into the next generation of babies

Science Where do transposons do their transposing? A third genetic element is involved in the conception process—a hitchhiker whose existence and self-propagation may be essential to life as we know it.

2d

 

Vaginal ‘Rejuvenation’ Treatments May Be Unsafe, the F.D.A. Says

The agency told seven companies that sell lasers for cosmetic gynecology and related procedures to stop marketing them for unapproved uses.

2d

 

Global Health: Maybe You Were Thinking About Eating Raw Centipedes. Don’t.

Dried or powdered centipedes are used in Chinese traditional medicine. But uncooked specimens may contain a parasite that infects the brain, scientists report.

2d

 

Plate tectonics not needed to sustain life

There may be more habitable planets in the universe than we previously thought, according to geoscientists, who suggest that plate tectonics — long assumed to be a requirement for suitable conditions for life — are in fact not necessary.

2d

 

States suing Trump administration, company over 3-D guns

Eight states are filing suit against the Trump administration over its decision to allow a Texas company to publish downloadable blueprints for a 3D-printed gun, contending the hard-to-trace plastic weapons are a boon to terrorists and criminals and threaten public safety.

2d

 

San Francisco Is Poised To Ban Plastic Straws. That's Got Bubble Tea Shops Worried

Over 200 city shops sell the drink, also known as boba tea, which features large tapioca balls meant to be sucked through a straw. Boba shops say paper straws are much pricier and don't work as well. (Image credit: Samantha Shanahan/KQED)

2d

 

Stinky 'corpse flower' expected to bloom in California (Update)

A so-called corpse flower known for the rotten stench it releases appeared close to blooming Monday at the Huntington Library in Southern California.

2d

 

Plate tectonics not needed to sustain life

There may be more habitable planets in the universe than we previously thought, according to Penn State geoscientists, who suggest that plate tectonics—long assumed to be a requirement for suitable conditions for life—are in fact not necessary.

2d

 

Nokia to help with T-Mobile superfast telecom network

Nokia will help T-Mobile deploy a superfast "5G" mobile internet network across the United States in a $3.5-billion deal, the companies announced Monday.

2d

 

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Rudy on Duty

Written by Elaine Godfrey ( @elainejgodfrey ), Maddie Carlisle ( @maddiecarlisle2 ), and Olivia Paschal (@ oliviacpaschal ) Today in 5 Lines President Trump doubled down on his threat to shut down the government if Congress doesn’t agree to fund a border wall. “If we don’t get border security, after many, many years of talk within the United States, I would have no problem doing a shutdown,” he t

2d

 

This tiny Google product could help secure your accounts

Technology But you can tap into similar powers without a device. Easy steps for making your online life more secure.

2d

 

Is Getting Your Genome Screened at a Doctor's Appointment a Good Idea?

An opinion piece published today in the journal Annals of Internal Medicine argues that genomic screening should over time become a more mainstream part of medical care. But an expert urged caution.

2d

 

Plate tectonics not needed to sustain life

There may be more habitable planets in the universe than we previously thought, according to Penn State geoscientists, who suggest that plate tectonics — long assumed to be a requirement for suitable conditions for life — are in fact not necessary.

2d

 

A medical mystery reveals a new host for the rat lungworm parasite

Doctors report that A. cantonensis was transmitted to two people who ate raw centipedes, but you can get it from other creatures as well.

2d

 

How craft is good for our health

Depression, post-traumatic stress, workplace stress and fatigue are only some of the mental health problems that crafting can help relieve. Read More

2d

 

New study claims ‘Medicare For All’ would ruin the USA financially. Ummm …

'Medicare for all', also known as Single Payer Health Care, will be hotly debated this year, and more and more U.S. voters support the idea. Read More

2d

 

World's largest king penguin colony has declined by 90%

Number of king penguins on the remote Île aux Cochons has fallen from 2m to 200,000, warn scientists The planet’s largest colony of king penguins has declined by nearly 90% in three decades, researchers have warned. The last time scientists set foot on France’s remote Île aux Cochons – roughly half way between the tip of Africa and Antarctica – the island was blanketed by 2m of the penguins, whic

2d

 

Canada using genealogical sites to identify deportees

Canadian authorities said Monday they have been quietly collecting DNA of migrants and matching it to distant relatives using genealogical websites in order to establish their nationality.

2d

 

Better way found to determine the integrity of metals

Researchers at the University of Waterloo have found a better way to identify atomic structures, an essential step in improving materials selection in the aviation, construction and automotive industries.

2d

 

DNA repair after CRISPR cutting not at all what people thought

Despite high hopes and high investment in CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing, scientists still have a lot to learn about how it works in humans.

2d

 

Number of US newspaper newsroom employees down sharply: survey

The number of employees in US newspaper newsrooms has declined by 45 percent over the past decade, according to a survey published on Monday.

2d

 

Geometry Has a New Shape. Meet the 'Scutoid.'

This shape is new to math, but not to nature

2d

 

Vanishing in the Wild, These Salamanders Found Refuge in a Convent

The achoques have nearly disappeared from Lake Pátzcuaro in Mexico. A colony in the care of Dominican nuns offers hope the species can be saved.

2d

 

A Toxic Tide Is Killing Florida Wildlife

Toxic algal blooms are not unusual off the state’s coast, but the current episode is the longest in more than a decade.

2d

 

A Math Theory for Why People Hallucinate

submitted by /u/NaiveSkeptic [link] [comments]

2d

 

DNA repair after CRISPR cutting not at all what people thought

Scientists discovered that a well-known DNA repair pathway, the Fanconi anemia pathway, surprisingly plays a key role in repairing double-strand DNA breaks created by CRISPR-Cas9. It acts as a traffic cop to steer repair to simple end-joining or to patching the cut with new, single-strand DNA. Scientists could potentially tweak proteins involved in the pathway to preferentially steer the outcome t

2d

 

Lack of a single molecule may indicate severe and treatment-resistant depression

Researchers find that a deficiency of acetyl-L-carnitine is associated with a particular subtype of depression. Individuals with very low levels of this molecule often have highly severe symptoms and don't respond to traditional antidepressants.

2d

 

Potent antibodies against three Ebola viruses

Researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center and their colleagues are a step closer to developing a broadly effective antibody treatment against the three major Ebola viruses that cause lethal disease in humans.

2d

 

Better way found to determine the integrity of metals

Researchers at the University of Waterloo have found a better way to identify atomic structures, an essential step in improving materials selection in the aviation, construction and automotive industries.

2d

 

DNA repair after CRISPR cutting not at all what people thought

UC Berkeley scientists discovered that a well-known DNA repair pathway, the Fanconi anemia pathway, surprisingly plays a key role in repairing double-strand DNA breaks created by CRISPR-Cas9. It acts as a traffic cop to steer repair to simple end-joining or to patching the cut with new, single-strand DNA. Scientists could potentially tweak proteins involved in the pathway to preferentially steer t

2d

 

Cannabinoid improves survival rates of mice with pancreatic cancer

Mice with pancreatic cancer that were treated with a naturally occurring constituent of medicinal cannabis alongside chemotherapy, survived almost three times longer than those treated with chemotherapy alone, a new study reports.

2d

 

3D printing the next generation of batteries

3D printing can be used to manufacture porous electrodes for lithium-ion batteries — but because of the nature of the manufacturing process, the design of these 3D printed electrodes is limited to just a few possible architectures. Until now, the internal geometry that produced the best porous electrodes through additive manufacturing was what's known as an interdigitated geometry — metal prongs

2d

 

Harnessing hair loss gene could improve cancer immunotherapy

Researchers at Columbia found that a gene associated with an autoimmune form of hair loss may be activated to boost cancer immunotherapy.

2d

 

'Smart' machine components alert users to damage and wear

Scientists have used advanced additive manufacturing technology to create 'smart' machine components that alert users when they are damaged or worn.

2d

 

Sequencing a malaria mosquito's motherline

A team led by scientists from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health has sequenced and annotated the first complete mitochondrial genome of Anopheles funestus, one of the main vectors of malaria in sub-Saharan Africa.

2d

 

How Oropouche virus replicates in human cells

Results point to potential targets worth exploring in effort to halt infection by the emerging virus, which is transmitted by the C. paraensis midge. Oropouche's strategy of 'hijacking' the Golgi complex in order to replicate itself has never been described before, state the researchers.

2d

 

New model reveals rips in Earth's mantle layer below southern Tibet

Seismic waves are helping researchers uncover the mysterious subsurface history of the Tibetan Plateau, possibly lending insight to future earthquake activity in the region.

2d

 

2d

 

Mexican experts find seeds, cloth around mummified child

A CAT scan of a rolled-up straw mat found in a northern Mexico cave has revealed the mummified remains of a 1 ½ year-old boy.

2d

 

Substance in cannabis 'could boost pancreatic cancer treatments'

Scientists say cannabidiol could extend patients’ lives by a matter of years A substance found in cannabis plants might boost treatments for patients with pancreatic cancer, research in mice has suggested. Cannabidiol , or CBD, is not psychoactive, meaning it does not produce feelings of being high in those who take it. It is extracted from hemp plants and is legal in the UK, although a CBD produ

2d

 

Study: Student loans hamper wealth accumulation among black, Hispanic adults

Black and Hispanic adults who graduate college owing money on student loans have significantly lower net worth at age 30 than students who don't borrow to pay for college, a new study suggests.

2d

 

New model reveals rips in Earth's mantle layer below southern Tibet

Seismic waves are helping researchers uncover the mysterious subsurface history of the Tibetan Plateau, possibly lending insight to future earthquake activity in the region.

2d

 

Sequencing a malaria mosquito's motherline

A team led by scientists from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health has sequenced and annotated the first complete mitochondrial genome of Anopheles funestus, one of the main vectors of malaria in sub-Saharan Africa. This milestone, published in June in Scientific Reports, offers a glimpse inside this insect's genetic diversity, ancestral history, and evolution—information that resea

2d

 

Diet matters less than evolutionary relationships in shaping gut microbiome

In the largest published comparative dataset of non-human primate gut microbiomes to date, a new study set out to find whether leaf-eating primates have similar gut microbes that help them break down their leafy diet, which is full of fiber and toxins.

2d

 

Poor mental health days may cost the economy billions of dollars

Poor mental health may cost businesses nearly as much as physical health problems, according to researchers. A single extra poor mental health day in a month was associated with a 1.84 percent drop in the per capita real income growth rate, resulting in $53 billion less total income each year.

2d

 

Discuss religion, spirituality when treating young adults with severe mental illness

A majority of young adults with severe mental illness — bipolar disorder, schizophrenia or major depression — consider religion and spirituality relevant to their mental health, according to a new study.

2d

 

New approach to terpene syntheses

Terpenes are natural products that are often very difficult to synthesize in the laboratory. Chemists have now developed a synthesis method that mimics nature. The decisive step takes place inside a molecular capsule, which enables the reaction.

2d

 

Inflammation inhibitor delivered directly to kidneys reverses course of destructive nephritis

Using a humanmade version of a human antibody to directly deliver a drug that inhibits a powerful driver of inflammation, can reverse a disease course that often leads to kidney failure and dialysis, investigators report.

2d

 

Nano-optic endoscope sees deep into tissue at high resolution

Experts in endoscopic imaging and pioneers of flat metalens technology have teamed up to develop a new class of endoscopic imaging catheters — termed nano-optic endoscopes — that overcome the limitations of current systems.

2d

 

Trapping light that doesn't bounce off track for faster electronics

Replacing traditional computer chip components with light-based counterparts will eventually make electronic devices faster due to the wide bandwidth of light.

2d

 

Solar flares disrupted radio communications during September 2017 Atlantic hurricanes

An unlucky coincidence of space and Earth weather in early September 2017 caused radio blackouts for hours during critical hurricane emergency response efforts, according to a new study in Space Weather, a journal of the American Geophysical Union. The new research, which details how the events on the Sun and Earth unfolded side-by-side, could aid in the development of space weather forecasting an

2d

 

'Smart' machine components alert users to damage and wear

Scientists at the United Technologies Research Center and UConn used advanced additive manufacturing technology to create 'smart' machine components that alert users when they are damaged or worn.

2d

 

Diet matters less than evolutionary relationships in shaping gut microbiome

Gut microbes provide many services for their hosts, including digesting their food. Researchers have long known that mammals with specialized diets, such as carnivores and anteaters, have special types of gut microbes that allow them to eat that diet.

2d

 

3D printing the next generation of batteries

3D printing can be used to manufacture porous electrodes for lithium-ion batteries–but because of the nature of the manufacturing process, the design of these 3D printed electrodes is limited to just a few possible architectures. Until now, the internal geometry that produced the best porous electrodes through additive manufacturing was what's known as an interdigitated geometry–metal prongs int

2d

 

Monkeys Pass on Brain Activity Patterns Linked to Anxiety

Humans might also inherit such brain changes, a new study suggests.

2d

 

Redneck Muslim

“I’m probably the only person here [at UNC Medical Center] whose grandfather taught them how to tie a noose,” says Shane Atkinson in Jennifer Taylor and Mustafa Davis’s short documentary, Redneck Muslim. Atkinson is a self-described “Muslim with a Southern accent who can talk about deer hunting.” Born to a Southern Baptist family in Mississippi, he was socialized in the culture of white supremacy

2d

 

Vanderbilt team finds potent antibodies against three Ebola viruses

Researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center and their colleagues are a step closer to developing a broadly effective antibody treatment against the three major Ebola viruses that cause lethal disease in humans.

2d

 

New model reveals rips in Earth's mantle layer below southern Tibet

Seismic waves are helping researchers uncover the mysterious subsurface history of the Tibetan Plateau, possibly lending insight to future earthquake activity in the region.

2d

 

Mars is missing a lot of this crucial terraforming ingredient

Space Time for a new plan. For people who dreamed of terraforming Mars using local greenhouse gases, this might be the situation they find themselves in—in possession of a detailed plan but…

2d

 

Solar flares disrupted radio communications during September 2017 Atlantic hurricanes

An unlucky coincidence of space and Earth weather in early September 2017 caused radio blackouts for hours during critical hurricane emergency response efforts, according to a new study. The new research, which details how the events on the Sun and Earth unfolded side-by-side, could aid in the development of space weather forecasting and response, according to the study's authors.

2d

 

2d

 

Study shows how Oropouche virus replicates in human cells

Results described in PLOS Pathogens point to potential targets worth exploring in effort to halt infection by the emerging virus, which is transmitted by the C. paraensis midge. Oropouche's strategy of 'hijacking' the Golgi complex in order to replicate itself has never been described before, state the researchers.

2d

 

Study: Student loans hamper wealth accumulation among black, Hispanic adults

Graduating college with student loan debt hampers wealth accumulation and asset building among black, Hispanic adults much longer than previously thought — at least until age 30, University of Illinois social work professor Min Zhan found in a new study co-written with Illinois alumna Xiaoling Xiang, now a professor of social work at the University of Michigan.

2d

 

Sequencing a malaria mosquito's motherline

A team led by scientists from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health has sequenced and annotated the first complete mitochondrial genome of Anopheles funestus, one of the main vectors of malaria in sub-Saharan Africa.

2d

 

Diversity and education influence India's population growth

Differences within India's population influence population projections for years to come, according to research conducted by IIASA and the Asian Demographic Research Institute. This information could help India and its workforce to catch up to more developed Asian countries with higher GDP per capita.

2d

 

Nanoparticle vaccine made with peptides effective against influenza virus, study finds

A new, double-layered nanoparticle vaccine made with peptides has been found to effectively protect mice against influenza A virus, according to a study led by Georgia State University.

2d

 

Lack of a single molecule may indicate severe and treatment-resistant depression

Researchers find that a deficiency of acetyl-L-carnitine is associated with a particular subtype of depression. Individuals with very low levels of this molecule often have highly severe symptoms and don't respond to traditional antidepressants.

2d

 

Depression linked to low blood levels of acetyl-L-carnitine

People with depression have low blood levels of a substance called acetyl-L-carnitine, according to a Stanford University School of Medicine scientist and her collaborators in a multicenter study

2d

 

Natural habitat can help farmers control pests, but not always a win-win

Natural habitat surrounding farm fields is not always an effective pest-control tool for farmers worldwide, according to analysis of the largest pest-control database of its kind.

2d

 

Fruit Fly Geneticist Bruce Baker Dies

The Stanford University professor was known for his work on sex determination and courtship in flies.

2d

 

Where's the Tomb of King Tut's Wife? Valley of the Kings Dig Leaves Mystery

Archaeologists found the foundation of an ancient Egyptian tomb that could have held the wife of King Tut.

2d

 

2d

 

Trapping light that doesn't bounce off track for faster electronics

A new protective metamaterial 'cladding' prevents light from leaking out of the very curvy pathways it would travel in a computer chip.

2d

 

Microfluidic system incorporates neuroinflammation into 'Alzheimer's in a dish' model

Building on their development of the first culture system to replicate fully the pathology behind Alzheimer's disease, a research team has now produced a system that includes neuroinflammation, the key biological response that leads to the death of brain cells.

2d

 

Silicon-based, tandem photovoltaic modules can compete in solar market

The dominant existing solar technology — silicon — is more than 90 percent of the way to its theoretical efficiency limit. More efficient technologies will be more expensive. New research identifies the efficiency vs. cost target.

2d

 

Peste des petits ruminants: A model for use in eradicating the disease

After rinderpest, it is peste des petits ruminants that the OIE, FAO and European Union want to eradicate by 2030. This highly contagious disease is currently found in Africa, Asia and the Middle East, and was recently detected in Bulgarie , on the border with Turkey. A new article suggests a model that serves to prioritize zones for vaccination. This is a welcome alternative to mass vaccination c

2d

 

A sleeping treasure in a university collection has turned out to be Japan’s iconic extinct mammal

After more than 60 years, the bone of an iconic extinct Japanese mammal has been rediscovered. With the help of an old label and local knowledge, two equally possible sites in the town of Tsuchiyu Onsen were identified. The 'dinosaur' bone was discovered during construction of a debris dam and identified as the 15.9-million-year-old femur of Paleoparadoxia, a genus of marine mammals.

2d

Vil du være med til at finde de mest interessante nyheder? Send email herom til BioNyt

Se nyheder fra en tidligere dato

Tegn abonnement på

BioNyt Videnskabens Verden (www.bionyt.dk) er Danmarks ældste populærvidenskabelige tidsskrift for naturvidenskab. Det er det eneste blad af sin art i Danmark, som er helliget international forskning inden for livsvidenskaberne.

Bladet bringer aktuelle, spændende forskningsnyheder inden for biologi, medicin og andre naturvidenskabelige områder som f.eks. klimaændringer, nanoteknologi, partikelfysik, astronomi, seksualitet, biologiske våben, ecstasy, evolutionsbiologi, kloning, fedme, søvnforskning, muligheden for liv på mars, influenzaepidemier, livets opståen osv.

Artiklerne roses for at gøre vanskeligt stof forståeligt, uden at den videnskabelige holdbarhed tabes.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


CAPTCHA Image
Reload Image