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Nyheder2018juni01

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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Scientists develop material that could regenerate dental enamelResearchers at Queen Mary University of London have developed a new way to grow mineralised materials which could regenerate hard tissues such as dental enamel and bone.
7h
Viden
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Danske ulve er udvandret til TysklandTre ud af de otte ulve, som sidste år blev født i Vestjylland, er vandret til Tyskland. En er død efter påkørsel.
6h
Ingeniøren
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Milliarddyr gasledning graver hele Danmark op for polakkernes skyldANALYSE: Ny gasledning til Polen hverken forbedrer forsyningssikkerheden eller fremmer den grønne omstilling i Danmark. Alligevel er der ingen debat om projektet.
13h

LATEST

Live Science

How Would the 'Mona Lisa' Look to an Eagle, a Cat and a Butterfly?We all live in the same world, but see it very differently.
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The Atlantic

Radio Atlantic: A White House Troll ‘Owning the Libs’A new generation of political activists have grown up more interested in provoking outrage from their fellow citizens than in winning them over. Among the most influential exemplars of the genre is Stephen Miller, a senior policy adviser to President Trump. What happens when the trolls run politics? What happens when they run the White House? Links – “Trump’s Right-Hand Troll” (McKay Coppins, May
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Scientific American Content: Global
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What Has Changed–And What Has Not–Since Paris Withdrawal AnnouncementFossil fuels are a bigger part of the climate conversation, though the coal industry is unlikely to be saved — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Live Science
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These 5 Social Media Habits Are Linked with DepressionYou might be familiar with the experience of scrolling through your Facebook feed, only to feel like everyone else's lives are better than yours.
11min
Live Science
3
2 Skeletons Decked Out in Bling Found Inside Sarcophagus in Ancient Roman CityA newly discovered sarcophagus holding two well-to-do Romans is brimming with treasures, including glass perfume bottles, gold jewelry and a silver mirror, archaeologists in Serbia report.
11min
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Despite fewer looking for work, gains continue for Americans with disabilitiesJob gains continued for Americans with disabilities in May, although fewer were looking for work, according to today's National Trends in Disability Employment – Monthly Update (nTIDE).
12min
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Breakthrough in controlling DNA-based robotsResearchers have devised a magnetic control system to make tiny DNA-based robots move on demand — and much faster than recently possible.
12min
Science | The Guardian

Cuba ‘sonic attack’ conspiracy theories and flawed science | LetterScience works best when qualified people can evaluate evidence without political pressure to draw poorly founded conclusions, say 15 neuroscientists and physicists As neuroscientists and physicists we have no reason to dispute that US diplomats living in Cuba heard loud noises, or that they reported feeling ill afterwards. Some US politicians have seized on these reports to construct conspiracy th
12min
TED Talks Daily (SD video)
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How we can turn the cold of outer space into a renewable resource | Aaswath RamanWhat if we could use the cold darkness of outer space to cool buildings on earth? In this mind-blowing talk, physicist Aaswath Raman details the technology he's developing to harness "night-sky cooling" — a natural phenomenon where infrared light escapes earth and heads to space, carrying heat along with it — which could dramatically reduce the energy used by our cooling systems. Learn more abou
13min
Science | The Guardian

How does 'holy grail' cancer test work and when will it be available?A new early detection blood test for 10 types of cancer could be used to screen for the disease before symptoms appear A type of early detection blood test for 10 different types of cancer has been hailed as a “holy grail” by researchers, with experts claiming such “liquid biopsies” could save lives. But how does it work, and when might it be rolled out? Why do we need early detection of cancers?
24min
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
FDA approves first artificial iris(HealthDay)—The first artificial iris has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for patients with aniridia.
27min
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Cleveland Clinic Cancer Center experts present data at 2018 ASCO Annual MeetingAt the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting in Chicago, researchers from Cleveland Clinic Cancer Center will present data from several new studies, including a prospective clinical trial examining non-small cell lung cancer cells' response to immunotherapy; research on germline testing for melanoma; and interim results from a study testing a vaccine for glioblastoma.
33min
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New perspectives on African migrationScientists at the Joint Research Centre, the European Commission's science and knowledge service, analyze past and present migration patterns from and within Africa, and the drivers behind them.
33min
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New in the Hastings Center Report, May-June 2018Genetic privacy, questions about medical artificial intelligence, and more in the May-June 2018 issue.
33min
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Mobile app for autism screening yields useful dataA Duke study of an iPhone app to screen young children for signs of autism has found the app easy to use, welcomed by caregivers and good at producing reliable scientific data. The app first administers caregiver consent forms and survey questions and then uses the phone's 'selfie' camera to collect videos of young children's reactions while they watch movies designed to elicit emotion and attenti
33min
Live Science
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Did Malala Get Crushed by a Tesla? No, But Her Response to SpaceX’s Elon Musk Is PerfectIn a satirical interaction almost too good to be true, activist and Nobel Peace Prize winner Malala Yousafzai confronted Elon Musk on Twitter.
37min
The Atlantic
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How a Tiny Website Became the Police's Go-To Genealogy DatabaseEver since investigators revealed that a genealogy website led police to arrest a man as California’s notorious Golden State Killer , interest in using genealogy to solve crimes has exploded. DNA from more than 100 crime scenes has been uploaded to the same genealogy site. A second man , linked to a double murder in Washington state, has been arrested. This is likely only the beginning. At the ce
42min
The Atlantic
78
The Antidote to Trump Is DecencyStart with what you already know: It’s hypocritical in the extreme for President Trump to denounce entertainers for using language demeaning to women. When he complains that Samantha Bee has spoken insultingly of his favorite daughter, he does so as a man who has said worse of literally dozens of women who irritated him, rebuffed his advances, or failed to meet his ideals of female beauty. Nobody
42min
The Atlantic
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Trump’s North Korea Gamble Is a Real-Time ExperimentIt may be difficult to discern given the high baseline of histrionic pronouncements by the White House, but President Trump’s policy toward North Korea is one of escalating claims for success. While non-proliferation experts and diplomats have cautioned that the administration needs to be more realistic in its expectations, the administration has been doing the exact opposite. Trump’s method has
55min
The Atlantic
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Another Shocking Opioid StatisticDespite everything I read as a health reporter, some statistics still floor me. Last year, it was the news that half of all murdered women are killed by their romantic partners. Here’s another: A fifth of all deaths among Americans aged 24 to 35 were due to opioids in 2016, a new study finds, up from just 4 percent in 2001, before this latest opioid epidemic began. Granted, 20- and 30-somethings
55min
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Reconstructing longest American water level, instrumented flood record, in Boston HarborUsing newly-discovered archival measurements to construct an instrumental record of water levels and storm tides in Boston since 1825, researchers at UMass Amherst and elsewhere report today that local averaged relative sea level rose by nearly a foot (0.28 meters) over the past 200 years, with the greatest increase occurring since 1920. The work also highlights tides and their significant effect
55min
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Phase I trial finds experimental drug safe in treating chronic lymphocytic leukemiaReporting results from a first-in-human phase I clinical trial, researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine have found that treatment with cirmtuzumab, an experimental monoclonal antibody-based drug, measurably inhibited the 'stemness' of chronic leukemia cancer (CLL) cells — their ability to self-renew and resist terminal differentiation and senescence.
55min
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

One in every 5 deaths in young adults is opioid-related in the United States: StudyOne out of every five deaths among young adults in the United States is related to opioids, suggests a study led by researchers in Canada.
55min
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Most hospitals now require workers to get flu shots — except those that treat veteransA new study shows a rapid rise in the percentage of hospitals that require their workers to be vaccinated against influenza — except among hospitals that focus on treating the nation's military veterans. The percentage of Veterans Affairs hospitals that have a flu vaccine mandate rose from 1 percent in 2013 to 4 percent in 2017. But at the same time, the percentage of non-VA hospitals requiring s
55min
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Stem cell-based phase I trial to repair spinal cord injuries produces encouraging resultsResearchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine report that a first-in-human phase I clinical trial in which neural stem cells were transplanted into participants with chronic spinal cord injuries produced measurable improvement in three of four subjects, with no serious adverse effects.
55min
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
China dispatches low-level official to security conferenceChina has dispatched a low-level military delegation to an annual security conference in Singapore that has dwelled heavily in past on Chinese activities in the South China Sea.
57min
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Fiat Chrysler to phase out diesel in Europe by 2021The clock is ticking for diesel at Fiat Chrysler, at least in its passenger cars in Europe and other key regions, CEO Sergio Marchionne said Friday.
57min
Popular Science
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Everything you need to know about the chemical one White House aide called a ‘public relations nightmare’Environment The EPA needs to take action. So why is the agency being so secretive? First discovered in the late 1930s by scientists at DuPont chemical company, these fluorochemicals were soon put to work for their water, stain, and grease resistant…
58min
Futurity.org
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Artificial nerves could let robots get touchy-feelyResearchers have developed an artificial sensory nerve system that can activate the twitch reflex in a cockroach and identify letters in the Braille alphabet. The work, reported in Science , is a step toward creating artificial skin for prosthetic limbs, to restore sensation to amputees and, perhaps, one day give robots some type of reflex capability. “We take skin for granted but it’s a complex
59min
Blog » Languages » English

Time vs. Space: Results!Excellent work, Team Space! You have carried the day. Congratulations to both sides on a battle well fought, and enjoy your bonuses! If physicists make up a nice short name for the fifth dimension, we can do a rematch. Artwork by Daniela Gamba
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The Scientist RSS

Cell Transplant Trial for Spinal Injury Is SafeThe first human experiment with neural precursor cells implanted to treat chronic spinal cord injury suggests the procedure is safe, and hints at a small benefit.
1h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
5
UAV aircrafts provide new insights into the formation of the smallest particles in ArcticInvestigations of the atmosphere by means of unmanned mini-airplanes can contribute significantly to the investigation of the causes of Arctic climate change, as they provide an insight into ground-level air layers that are not monitored by other measuring stations. This is the conclusion drawn by a German research team from current measurements that have just taken place on Spitsbergen. It was po
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Final Fruit-ier: Thailand sends smelly durian into spaceIt's one small step for Thailand, one giant leap for Southeast Asia's smelliest fruit.
1h
Live Science
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Can Machines Be Creative? Meet 9 AI 'Artists'How are neural networks "expressing themselves" through original paintings, songs and fiction?
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NYT > Science
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Trilobites: Ladybugs, Aphids and the Toxic Combat That Might Be Happening in Your GardenSome invasive ladybugs feast on other species of ladybugs, but not as much when a kind of toxic aphid is around.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Understanding hurricane risks—5 essential readsJune 1 marks the start of the 2018 Atlantic hurricane season, with some communities still rebuilding after last year's largest storms.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Google blames Wikipedia for linking California GOP to NazismGoogle is blaming "vandalism" at Wikipedia for search results that incorrectly said the ideology of the California Republican Party included "Nazism."
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Atomically thin nanowires convert heat to electricity more efficientlyWaste heat can be converted to electricity more efficiently using one-dimensional nanoscale materials as thin as an atom — ushering a new way of generating sustainable energy — thanks to new research by the University of Warwick.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Story tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, June 2018A direct brain-to-computer interface may be on the horizon. New insights into how quickly microorganisms break down organic matter in warming Arctic soil. Using liquid salt that contains FLiBe to cool molten salt reactors. Compact, powerful solar.
1h
The Atlantic
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Why Rich Kids Are So Good at the Marshmallow TestThe marshmallow test is one of the most famous pieces of social-science research: Put a marshmallow in front of a child, tell her that she can have a second one if she can go 15 minutes without eating the first one, and then leave the room. Whether she’s patient enough to double her payout is supposedly indicative of a willpower that will pay dividends down the line, at school and eventually at w
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The Atlantic
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The Slick but Empty True Crime of American AnimalsWhy did four privileged college students decide, in 2004, to pull off a violent art robbery at Kentucky’s Transylvania University, despite their lack of criminal expertise? That’s the underlying mystery of Bart Layton’s American Animals , a too-cute cross between a heist movie and a true-crime documentary that ends up borrowing the worst traits of both. It’s a film that tosses questions at the vi
1h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Ancient tooth shows Mesolithic ancestors were fish and plant eatersAnalysis of the skeletal remains of a Mesolithic man found in a cave on a Croatian island has revealed microscopic fish and plant remains in the dental plaque of a tooth — a first-time discovery for the period and region.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
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Future smart clothes could pack serious gadgetryCasual daywear may someday contain some serious tech. But engineers have to take conventional electronics and make them comfortable to wear.
1h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
13
New approach boosts effort to scale up biodiversity monitoringThe value of ecological biodiversity for maintaining ecosystem stability and function is well established, but a recent study points to a novel way to fine-tune our ability to measure it at larger scales. The study, published in Nature Ecology and Evolution, found that using an imaging tool to evaluate biodiversity is more effective than traditional methods premised on painstaking field work.
1h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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New AI program fights fire with dataA computer program that uses artificial intelligence to sort through historical meteorological data is being developed to help predict where and when future forest fires will take place so they can be prevented.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Image: Jovian jet streamSee a jet stream speeding through Jupiter's atmosphere in this new view taken by NASA's Juno spacecraft. The jet stream, called Jet N2, was captured along the dynamic northern temperate belts of the gas giant planet. It is the white stream visible from top left to bottom right in the image.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Research brief: New approach boosts effort to scale up biodiversity monitoringThe value of ecological biodiversity for maintaining ecosystem stability and function is well established, but a recent study points to a novel way to fine-tune our ability to measure it at larger scales.
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New study finds pitcher injuries increase as pitch count risesMore than half of high school baseball pitchers report experiencing pain in their throwing arm during the season. To better understand the cause of these injuries, researchers at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center conducted a new study to determine when and why overuse injuries were occurring.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Researchers uncover cell types of the human breast epitheliumResearchers from the University of California, Irvine School of Medicine, in collaboration with scientists at UCSF and Northwestern University, have profiled human breast epithelial cells, identifying three new distinct epithelial cell populations. The discovery of these cell populations could aid in understanding the origins of breast cancer and lead to improved early cancer detection, a slowing
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Micro-CT scans show 2,100-year-old 'hawk' mummy a stillborn babyA tiny Egyptian mummy long believed to be that of a hawk is actually a rare example of a near-to-term, severely malformed fetus.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
7
Cosmic collision lights up the darknessThough it resembles a peaceful rose swirling in the darkness of the cosmos, NGC 3256 is actually the site of a violent clash. This distorted galaxy is the relic of a collision between two spiral galaxies, estimated to have occured 500 millions years ago. Today it is still reeling in the aftermath of this event.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Widespread methane seeps off Oregon coastFor the past two years, scientists have surveyed the Pacific Northwest near-shore region mapping sites where underwater bubble streams signify methane gas is being released from the seafloor.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
23
Cell-like nanorobots clear bacteria and toxins from bloodEngineers have developed tiny ultrasound-powered robots that can swim through blood, removing harmful bacteria along with the toxins they produce. These proof-of-concept nanorobots could one day offer a safe and efficient way to detoxify and decontaminate biological fluids.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Nanoplastics accumulate in marine organisms and may pose harm to aquatic food chainsScientists have discovered that nanoplastics can accumulate in marine organisms over time. This could pose harm to aquatic food chains and human health.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Highly stretchable hydrogels for high resolution multimaterial 3D printingResearchers from SUTD and HUJI have developed the most stretchable 3D printed hydrogel in the world — it can be stretched up to 1300 percent. The hydrogel is also suitable for UV curing based 3D printing techniques, enabling it to be used for high resolution complex geometric printing.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Gut-inhabiting enterobacter increases subcutaneous fat massA research project performed at the universities of Jyväskylä and Turku studied the effects of a specific gut enterobacterium on body fat mass.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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iPhone X filmmaker gives three tips to budding directorsFor the past four years I've been experimenting with smartphone film production. I recently shot and directed Missed Call, the first short film to be shot on an iPhone X. As the camera technology on each new generation evolves, many directors have begun to experiment with smartphone filmmaking. In 2015, Sean Baker's Tangerine was shot on an iPhone 5. And Stephen Soderbergh's 2018 film Unsane was s
1h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Self-learning assistance system for efficient processesTo prevent long downtimes and high quantities of scrap, manufacturers must design production processes to be stable and efficient. Particularly successful outcomes are achieved when the experience of the people who operate the machines is taken into account. The Fraunhofer Institute for Process Engineering and Packaging IVV in Dresden is developing a self-learning assistance system that helps mach
1h
Ingeniøren

Georg Gearløs-raketmotor virker for første gangDet er lykkedes ukrainske og skotske ingeniører at regulere kraften i en usædvanlig motor med fast brændstof, der giver håb om raketter uden brændstoftanke.
1h
The Atlantic
5
The First Climate Refugees in the U.S.?The small island of Tangier sits 12 miles off the coast of Virginia. It’s a peaceful, salt-of-the-earth kind of place, with only 600 full-time residents, most of whom have known their neighbors—commercial crabbers, watermen, schoolteachers, parishioners—for generations. Shortly, however, that may all come to an end. As soon as 25 years from now, Tangier is expected to disappear into the sea. The
1h
The Atlantic
49
The Death of a Gig WorkerEditor’s Note: This article is the first in a series about how the gig economy is shaping the future of labor. An 8-year-old told me about Pablo Avendano’s death: “My dad’s friend was just killed riding his bike.” The 8-year-old was a friend of my son, Dai. I had taken the boys out for water ice in our neighborhood in Philadelphia. “He went out to work and he’s never coming back,” my son’s friend
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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SOFIA to study southern skies in New ZealandNASA's Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy, SOFIA, is heading to Christchurch, New Zealand, to study celestial objects best viewed from the Southern Hemisphere. Observations will include targets that are too low to observe or not visible at all from the Northern Hemisphere—including our neighboring galaxy the Large Magellanic Cloud, the center of our own Milky Way galaxy, and Saturn's
1h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Your personal space is no longer physical – it's a global network of dataIn the digital world, any action we do generates data – whether browsing the internet, answering emails or messaging our friends. Translated into radio waves, this information can travel almost effortlessly through space in a split second. Data are all around us, invisibly occupying the space between ourselves and other objects in the built environment. My colleagues and I conducted a study to und
1h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Toshiba completes $21 bn sale of chip unitEmbattled conglomerate Toshiba on Friday completed the $21 billion sale of its prized chip unit to an investment consortium, a move seen as crucial to keeping the Japanese firm afloat.
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Zn-InsP6 complex can enhance excretion of radioactive strontium from the bodyResearchers at Kanazawa University have found a new phenomenon that a complex of myo-inositol-hexakisphosphate (InsP6) with zinc enhances excretion of radioactive strontium from the body.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

When push comes to shove: Airway cells propel liver cancer spread to lungsKanazawa University-led Japanese researchers identified a crucial role for air sac-based scavenger blood cells, alveolar macrophages (AMs), in driving hepatocellular cancer metastasis in the lungs. AMs were found to be recruited by interstitial macrophages (IMs) through interactions between the IM-expressed signaling molecule CCL2 and its AM-expressed receptor. AMs then secrete leukotriene B4, whi
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New technology for enzyme designScientists at the University of Würzburg have chemically modified the enzyme levansucrase using a new method. The enzyme can now produce sugar polymers that are exciting for applications in the food industry and medicine.
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New surgery for groin pain found to be more effective than physiotherapyAs the FIFA World Cup approaches researchers have found that keyhole surgery could help get injured footballers back on the pitch faster than physiotherapy-led treatments.The team led by the University of Warwick has analysed two treatments for femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) syndrome which refers to a problem with the hip's ball and socket joint.
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Dagens Medicin

ASCO-præsident sætter præcisionsmedicin på dagsordenenBruce E. Johnson, der er præsident for ASCO, kommer til at svinge taktstokken på årets kongres under det overordnede tema ‘præcisionsmedicin’. Rigtig mange fremtidige kræftpatienter vil få gavn af præcisionsmedicin – vi har kun set toppen af isbjerget, lyder det fra præsidenten.
1h
Dagens Medicin

Kroman: »Det er vigtigt for mig at vise flaget på ASCO«Som cheflæge i Kræftens Bekæmpelse har det høj prioritet for Niels Kroman at deltage på ASCO – dels for at blive opdateret på, hvordan fremtiden for danske kræftpatienter vil forme sig, og dels for at vedligeholde og udvide sit faglige netværk.
1h
Live Science
14
4,000-Year-Old Jar Contains Italy's Oldest Olive OilAn egg-shaped ceramic jar covered with ceramic "rope" once held a prize delicacy: the oldest olive oil on record in Italy, a new study finds.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
5
The sombrero galaxy seen from citiesWe're happy to share with you an update from our partner Unistellar. The team has recently collected a pair of images of the glorious Sombrero Galaxy (M104 in the Messier Catalog) taken during one of their most recent observing runs.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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How to achieve a peaceful coexistence between wolves and humansThe persecution of wolves in order to remove them from human settlements has culminated in their near-disappearance in numerous European countries, like Spain and Sweden. Following a recovery of the species, a team of scientists has determined what geographic areas in the Scandinavian country would be most suitable for a redistribution of the specie's range, in the interests of increasing the soci
1h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
5
De Beers to sell synthetic diamonds—here's how they're madeThe world's biggest diamond company, De Beers, recently announced it would start selling synthetic diamond gemstones for the first time in its 130-year history. Artificial diamonds have been manufactured since the 1950s but De Beers has long resisted moving into the synthetic market. The company now believes that technology is efficient enough to produce large quantities of synthetic diamonds with
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Atomically thin nanowires convert heat to electricity more efficientlyWaste heat can be converted to electricity more efficiently using one-dimensional nanoscale materials as thin as an atom – ushering a new way of generating sustainable energy – thanks to new research by the University of Warwick.
1h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
Satellite data helps cut city heatOur cities are becoming hotter due to heat released by human activities. This is exacerbated by heat waves occurring more often due to climate change, altering the energy balance of urban areas and thus affecting the local environment and health of residents.
2h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
5
Is your dog happy? Ten common misconceptions about dog behaviourIt is difficult to refer to what dogs, as a collective, like and dislike and how they behave. Just as humans do, dogs all have their own personalities and learned preferences and so can differ dramatically in how they approach life and what they take from it.
2h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
40
New technology for enzyme designScientists at the University of Würzburg have chemically modified the enzyme levansucrase using a new method. The enzyme can now produce sugar polymers that are exciting for applications in the food industry and medicine.
2h
NYT > Science
75
A Year After Trump’s Paris Pullout, U.S. Companies Are Driving a Renewables BoomDozens of Fortune 500 companies are voluntarily investing billions in wind and solar energy.
2h
Feed: All Latest
76
4Chan Is Turning 15—And Remains the Internet's TeenagerThe chaotic message board is the soul of the internet, the deep source of its sights and sounds—for worse and, occasionally, for better.
2h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Study explores how emotions in facial expressions are understoodNew research by academics at the University of East Anglia (UEA) reveals how well fearful facial expressions are perceived in peripheral vision.Although human vision has the highest resolution when we look directly at something, we see a much wider view of the visual world in our lower resolution peripheral vision. In fact, detecting signals of potential danger in our periphery – especially moving
2h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

'Multiomics' and the newborn mouse heartThe heart of a neonatal mouse is capable of self-repair after tissue damage. However, this ability disappears during the first week of life. Researchers at the University of Helsinki, Finland, investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying myocardial regenerative ability. Advantages within the field could be of benefit, for example, in the development of novel treatments for patients to regain he
2h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
Smart app to diagnose Parkinson's diseaseParkinson's disease (PD) is a slow, progressive disorder of the central nervous system affecting between 7 and 10 million people worldwide. In Europe, there are 1.2 million people living with the disease, most of them over 50. PD develops gradually over time and early signs are so subtle that they often go unnoticed. Although we know that some symptoms set in years before the disease is diagnosed,
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Evidence found of magnetism at the edges of grapheneA team of researchers from the U.K., Germany and Russia has found evidence of magnetism at the edges of graphene. In their paper published in the journal Nature, the researchers describe how they made their discovery and why they believe it is important.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Food waste conversion to biomethane within the reach of four cities across EuropeFood waste conversion to biomethane is now within the reach of four cities across Europe, thanks to work conducted under the Bin2Grid project.
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Dagens Medicin

Vestlev: »Ingen revolutioner på brystkræft-området i år«Vi befinder os i en gænge, hvor små fremskridt dominerer dagsordenen, vurderer Peter Michael Vestlev. Han forventer derfor ikke at returnere fra ASCO med ny viden, der vil medføre drastiske ændringer i den kliniske praksis på brystkræft-området i Danmark.
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Dagens Medicin

Specht: »Al den vigtigste forskning bliver diskuteret på ASCO«Professor Lena Specht har i 20 år prioriteret at deltage på ASCO, da kongressen giver hende overblik over den vigtigste forskning inden for de områder af onkologien, hun arbejder med. I år er det især sessioner om immunterapi til hoved-halskræft og lymfomer, hun vil opsøge.
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Dagens Medicin

Steffensen: »Jeg ser frem til at få nyheder på PRO-området«Som leder af Center for Fælles Beslutningstagning på Vejle Sygehus har professor Karina Dahl Steffensen interesse i at indhente viden om PRO-data på ASCO. Især er hun nysgerrig på, hvordan patientrapporterede data kan integreres i den daglige praksis.
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New on MIT Technology Review
24
Waymo and GM just made big moves in the great self-driving-car race
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Big Think
5
Will we be able to trust our institutions again?Can we make progress in a world in which we don't trust our institutions? Read More
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Quanta Magazine
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Evidence Found for a New Fundamental ParticlePhysicists are both thrilled and baffled by a new report from a neutrino experiment at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory near Chicago. The MiniBooNE experiment has detected far more neutrinos of a particular type than expected, a finding that is most easily explained by the existence of a new elementary particle: a “sterile” neutrino that’s even stranger and more reclusive than the three know
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Video: Tackling the effects of climate change on berry cultivation in EuropeThe EU-funded project GoodBerry (Improving the stability of high-quality traits of berry in different environments and cultivation systems for the benefit of European farmers and consumers) has released a short animated film illustrating the project's background and approach. Raising awareness of the effects of climate change on berry cultivation, the film highlights the impact not only on berry p
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Carbon fibres from 'green' precursors and optimized processesSmart materials reply on composite components to offer the range of desired properties, yet in some ways current manufacturing processes have not developed since the late 1960s. The FIBRALSPEC project sought to bring these more up-to-date, addressing sustainability concerns, while enhancing performance.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Price competition for generic drugs linked to increase in manufacturing-related recallsResearchers have found that extreme price competition in the generic pharmaceutical market — designed to make medications more affordable — may be putting more patients at serious health risk, as evidenced by a higher number of product recalls caused by manufacturing-related problems.
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Futurity.org
2
A busy schedule really does tank your productivityToo many deadlines—such as upcoming appointments—makes us less efficient with our time, research shows. People facing upcoming appointments, meetings, tasks, etc., perceive they have less time than they actually do, an eight-test study shows. In addition, these boundaries result in people performing fewer tasks, and make people less likely to attempt extended-time tasks that could actually get do
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Futurity.org
5
A weird thing happened to men about 7,000 years agoStarting about 7,000 years ago, and extending over the next two millennia, recent studies suggest, the genetic diversity of men—specifically, the diversity of their Y chromosomes—collapsed. The collapse was so extreme it was as if there were only one man left to mate for every 17 women. Anthropologists and biologists were perplexed, but researchers now believe they’ve found a simple—if revealing—
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New on MIT Technology Review
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Walmart’s order-by-text service is a shot across Amazon Prime’s bow
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
Erosion-risk tools developed for fire-affected volcanic terrainVolcanic regions have high fertility soils that are susceptible to erosion caused by environmental disturbances, such as wildfires. Better understanding the soil behaviour has enabled improved erosion risk assessment and cost-effective stabilisation treatments.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Carpe solis – sunbathing fish defy the laws of natureThat sunbathing may require a refreshing swim to avoid overheating is a vacation experience shared by many. It has been assumed that this cooling effect of water prevents fish from reaping the rewards of sunbathing available to animals in terrestrial environments. New evidence on behavior of carp, published in the Royal Society journal Proceedings B,challenges this paradigm. Sunbathing fish can be
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
3
How to achieve a peaceful coexistence between wolves and humansThe persecution of wolves in order to remove them from human settlements has culminated in their near-disappearance in numerous European countries, like Spain and Sweden. Following a recovery of the species, a team of scientists has determined what geographic areas in the Scandinavian country would be most suitable for a redistribution of the specie's range, in the interests of increasing the soci
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Researchers: A power failure in your fat cells could short-circuit your healthThe energy metabolism of the body's so-called brown fat cells is controlled by the fat molecule cardiolipin, researchers from the University of Copenhagen have discovered in a new study. The research reveals that absence of cardiolipin in fat cells is causally linked to pre-diabetes and type 2 diabetes.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Study offers new hope for the fight against genetically determined obesityA large group of people with obesity have a genetic mutation that is causing their obesity. Common treatments for obesity only benefit these people to a limited extent, but now a new study conducted at the University of Copenhagen reveals that they can be treated effectively with the medicine liraglutide, which is a GLP-1 receptor agonist.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Federal home visiting program can be improved to better meet needs of familiesCompared with other countries, the United States often falls short on many maternal and child health outcomes. A federal program known as Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting (MIECHV) is designed to give pregnant women and families resources to help them raise healthy children. However, a team led by researchers at the University of Missouri School of Medicine examined an aspect of
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The Atlantic
27
The Tame Punk of How to Talk to Girls at PartiesOne of the worst ways to make a cult movie is to set out to make a cult movie. The true gems of the genre tend to be lucky—or, just as often, unlucky—accidents. They are films that aspired to be “normal,” or even “good,” but missed the mark and instead stumbled into some glorious and impossible-to-replicate combination of eccentricity, visceral shock, bewilderment, and/or outright awfulness. The
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
A new device for detecting gas leaksSensia, a spin-off company which Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M) has a share in, has developed a system that detects fugitive gas emissions which are harmful and pollutant to the environment. This technology minimises the chances of gas leaks occurring in industry and can also be used in the home environment.
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Scientific American Content: Global
82
EPA Science Advisors Question "Secret Science" Rule on Data TransparencyIndependent board will review agency decisions to repeal or change climate regulations and rules on the use of non-public data — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Dagens Medicin

Ellebæk: »Der sker meget inden for adjuverende behandling til melanom-patienter«Efter flere år med ‘breaking news’ på melanom-området, lader nyhederne vente lidt på sig i år, vurderer læge og ph.d. Eva Ellebæk. Hun ser dog frem til updates på ASCO af tidligere præsenterede data og til at få viden om nye immuno-onkologiske kombinationsbehandlinger.
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Dagens Medicin

Ny ASCO-deltager: »Jeg håber at rende ind i nogle spændende personligheder«Læge og ph.d. Thomas Urup deltager på ASCO for første gang. Han skal lørdag eftermiddag præsentere en poster om glioblastom, og han håber, at præsentationen kan blive en indgang til at falde i snak med eksperter inden for hans eget forskningsfelt.
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Dagens Medicin

Økonomiaftale ventes inden for få dageEn aftale om regionernes økonomi ventes at falde på plads omkring Grundlovsdag. Der er dog endnu ikke kommet tal på bordet.
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Dagens Medicin

Få alle nyheder fra verdens største kræftkongresOm et øjeblik åbner kræftkongressen ASCO – vi er på plads i Chicago
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Structure of protein pair provides blueprint for future drugsWalter and Eliza Hall Institute researchers have visualized for the first time how the protein SOCS1 'switches off' cell signalling to dampen immune responses and block cancer growth.The atomic-level structure of SOCS1 binding to its partner protein JAK could guide the development of drugs that alter disease-causing cell signalling pathways, and may have applications for treating some blood cancer
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Irradiating chest lymph nodes in patients with early stage breast cancer improves survival without increasing side effectsGiving radiation therapy to the lymph nodes located behind the breast bone and above the collar bone to patients with early stage breast cancer improves overall survival without increasing side effects, and this effect continues for 15 years, researchers have found.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Researchers create new programmed shape-morphing scaffolds enabling facile 3-D endothelializationA research team led by Dr. DU Xuemin at the Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology (SIAT) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences created a new shape-morphing scaffold, enabling programmed deformation from a 2-D planar cell-laden structure to a well-defined 3-D tubular shape, which facilitated the facile 3-D endothelialization of small-diameter vascular grafts.
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The Atlantic
4
Porn’s Uncanny Valley“It’s a phantom-limb penis syndrome,” said a tall, British man who goes by the name Adam Sutra. Adam is the CEO of CamasutraVR, a company that makes, among other products, virtual-reality pornography. He was trying to explain to me what it’s like when you’re a man, you’re immersed in virtual reality, and you look down at yourself. Adam works in a downtown Los Angeles loft that was arranged like a
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BBC News – Science & Environment
9
Seal injured by plastic and rope off Norfolk coastThe RSPCA says the grey seal nearly died after being found with rope and plastic around its neck.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
A fresh sensation in sensing technologyThe Internet of Things (IoT) is a technology classification that includes home appliances and other items embedded with electronics, software, sensors, and actuators that connect and exchange data. One key IoT technology is optical fiber sensing.
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Futurity.org
1
This gene could be the link between iron and prostate cancerNew research may explain the link between a high level of iron in the body and prostate cancer. The researchers uncovered the role of the iron storage gene FTH1 and its pseudogenes in regulating iron levels in cells and slowing down prostate cancer growth. The new findings could pave the way for future developments in prostate cancer diagnostics and therapeutics. “Targeting or restoring proper ir
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Fix for synchrotron research flaw could improve resultsUniversity of Saskatchewan researchers have found that chemicals commonly used to protect samples in synchrotron experiments actually help to damage those samples, potentially misleading scientists around the world.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
6
Phasing out nuclear energy could affect safetyThe way in which the phase-out of nuclear power plants in Germany is currently planned could negatively influence the safety of the facilities. Those involved could increasingly favor their own interests as the shutdown date approaches, argue scientists from the University of Basel and the Max Planck Institute for Human Development in Berlin in the journal Behavioral Science & Policy. They base th
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Ingeniøren

Ødelagde gødningsudslip miljøet? »Nej,« siger computermodellerMiljøministeriet konkluderer – på baggrund af modelberegninger – at gødningsudslip i Lillebælt »ikke fik stor indvirkning på miljøet«. Men modeller og virkelighed er ikke det samme, lyder kritikken.
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Feed: All Latest
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Why Scientists Turned This Taxidermy Bird Into a RobotSpoiler: It’s a sage grouse sexbot.
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Scientific American Content: Global
25
How Google Could Help End WarBy renouncing military contracts, Google could catalyze a much-needed discussion about how the U.S. and other nations can move beyond militarism. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
6
Cosmic blast takes rest at lastLast year, the first detection of gravitational waves linked to a gamma-ray burst triggered a vast follow-up campaign with ground and space telescopes to study the aftermath of the neutron star merger that gave rise to the explosion. ESA's XMM-Newton observations, obtained a few months after the discovery, caught the moment when its X-ray emission stopped increasing, opening new questions about th
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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When space launchers come cleanThe upper stages of space launchers are typically loaded with sensors that could theoretically tell engineers everything they need to know about the launcher's status and possible vulnerabilities. Yet, limited on-board computing capabilities and bandwidth to ground have so far made it impossible to acquire most of this data.
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Scientific American Content: Global
4
In Case You Missed ItTop news from around the world — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

In nearly zero energy buildings special attention must be paid to window designFor the last two years TTÜ Nearly Zero Energy Buildings Research Group led by Professor Hendrik Voll (currently holding the position of TTÜ Vice-Rector for Academic Affairs), with support from personal research funding (PUT, i.e. funding for high level research projects), has been seeking solutions for daylight and solar shading for nearly zero energy buildings in cold climates.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

UAV aircrafts provide new insights into the formation of the smallest particles in ArcticInvestigations of the atmosphere by means of unmanned mini-airplanes can contribute significantly to the investigation of the causes of Arctic climate change, as they provide an insight into ground-level air layers that are not monitored by other measuring stations. This is the conclusion drawn by a German research team from current measurements that have just taken place on Spitsbergen.
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Nyheder – Forskning – Videnskab

Nye læringsformer kan sikre småfagEt svigt af fællesnordiske relationer, et tab af en ”uerstattelig kulturarv” og et…
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New Scientist – News
3
Vultures that feed on rubbish dumps are making themselves sickA study looking at the health of birds that supplement their diets at rubbish dumps and landfill sites suggests they may be paying heavy price for easy calories and weight gain
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New Scientist – News
35
So-called ‘holy grail’ cancer test would miss thousands of casesNewspaper reports have hailed a blood test for detecting several types of cancer as the “holy grail of cancer research”, but it is far from accurate enough
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
17
Cambrian Sixtymile Formation of Grand Canyon yields new findingsThe Grand Canyon is one of the supreme geologic laboratories on Earth and, after about 140 years of geologic investigation, one might think that its secrets have been mostly resolved. This is especially true of the flat-lying layered rocks that are so visible from both rims within Grand Canyon National Park.
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Dagens Medicin

Lægeflugt i Sjælland efter Sundhedsplatformens indførelse258 læger. Det er det antal af læger, der siden Sundhedsplatformens indførelse har forladt Region Sjællands sygehuse. Det er en markant stigning i forhold til året
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
Why Elon Musk is wrong about nanotechnologyYou might expect Elon Musk, the business magnate, engineer and serial entrepreneur would be a fan of all things techy. After all, his radical enterprises are built on pushing science to its limit. He's behind a raft of visionary projects ranging from Tesla's driverless electric cars and SpaceX's self-landing reusable rockets to plans for 1,000kph "hyperloop" trains. But it appears there is a size
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
How can criminals manipulate cryptocurrency markets?Cryptocurrencies like bitcoin are based on systems that are supposed to be inherently protected from fraud. Yet the U.S. Department of Justice has opened a criminal investigation into manipulation of bitcoin prices. How is that sort of activity even possible?
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Fussy fruit flies can detect bad genesResearchers at The University of Western Australia have demonstrated the sexual attractiveness of male fruit flies isn't just about how big they are or how nice they smell; it's also about how many mutations they carry.
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The Scientist RSS

In Utero Transplant in First Clinical Trial SuccessfulDoctors treated the fetus, who has alpha thalassemia major, with cells from her mother's bone marrow.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Why nanotechnology is more than just a buzzwordWhat does the word "nanotechnology" conjure up for you?
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Dagens Medicin

Sundhedsminister: Arbejde mod overbelægning går ikke hurtigt nokSygehusene skal skrue op for tempoet med implementeringen af Sikkert Patientflow, der skal forhindre overbelægning på sygehusene, mener sundhedsminister Ellen Trane Nørby (V).
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Popular Science
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Avoiding GMO food might be tougher than you thinkHealth Labels are about to become mandatory, but what does that really mean? It’s unclear how many Americans will actually be looking to avoid GM food in the future. But even if you want to keep your pantry GMO-free, doing so could prove…
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Marine litter expert supports efforts to eliminate plastic pollution from the Galapagos IslandsScientists from the University of Plymouth have joined an international research expedition to the Galapagos Islands in an attempt to reduce the impact of marine litter on the region's wildlife.
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Ingeniøren
1
Vandrende pindes æg overlever turen gennem fuglens maveJapanske forskere har måske løst et problem, som Darwin kæmpede med i forhold til arters spredning på Jorden.
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The Scientist RSS

New Study Contradicts Previous Idea About Origins of South AmericansDivergent human lineages of North America intermingled before setting off to establish populations of Central and South America.
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The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: Cuddle BuddiesResearchers studying macaques in Morocco find that socialization improves the monkeys' odds of surviving the winter.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
X-ray laser scientists develop a new way to watch bacteria attack antibioticsTuberculosis, a lung disease that spreads in the air through coughs or sneezes, now kills more people worldwide than any other infectious agent, according to the World Health Organization's latest global tuberculosis report. And in hundreds of thousands of cases each year, treatment fails because the bacteria that cause Tb have become resistant to antibiotics.
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Feed: All Latest
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As Rental Cars Fade Away, Avis Will Try Anything to SurviveThe 72-year-old company is ready to try just about anything, from bikes to robots, to stick around.
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Feed: All Latest
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Lifeproof Squamish 20L Review: One Dry BackpackLifeProof's first backpack has a lot to recommend it, but falls short of the mark.
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Science | The Guardian
80
Britons 'risking skin damage and cancer due to SPF ignorance'Many consumers are unaware the SPF rating on suncreams does not measure all-round sun protection, scientists say Britons are putting themselves at risk of sunburn, long-lasting skin damage and even cancer as a result of their ignorance about how to choose and use suncare protection, England’s senior pharmacists have warned. Amid rising skin cancer rates in the UK, the Royal Pharmaceutical Society
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
29
Scientists map the earliest Icelandic genomeAround 870 CE, Norsemen crossed the North Atlantic to reach Iceland, which they spent the next five decades colonising.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Stable isotopes suggest earliest tetrapods were euryhaline creaturesA team of researchers from several institutions in France and China has found evidence that some of the earliest creatures to walk on land likely emerged from estuaries or deltas. In their paper published in the journal Nature, the group describes studying certain stable isotopes in fossil specimens to determine the salinity in which they lived.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
7
Quantum is key to securing blockchain, say researchersAlthough blockchain is traditionally seen as secure, it is vulnerable to attack from quantum computers.
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New Scientist – News
15
Some scorpions can hiss by rubbing themselves with ‘sandpaper’Club-tailed scorpions in the Americas make a hissing sound, warning potential predators to back off, by rubbing a “comb” against a sheet of sandpaper-like exoskeleton
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Dagens Medicin

Aalborg Universitetshospital har ansat ny lægefaglig direktørMichael Braüner Schmidt tiltræder som lægefaglig direktør på Aalborg Universitetshospital. Han kommer fra en stilling som lægefaglig direktør på Hospitalsenhed Midt.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Plant scientists use big data to map stress responses in cornPlant scientists at Iowa State University have completed a new study that describes the genetic pathways at work when corn plants respond to stress brought on by heat, a step that could lead to crops better capable of withstanding stress.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
11
Farmers drop organic labels over certification process, access to markets, study saysMidwestern fruit and vegetable farmers are more likely than their counterparts in other regions to give up federal organic certification, according to a Purdue University study. Access to organic markets and consumers as well as the demands of obtaining and retaining certification seem to be the most significant drivers of their decisions.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Image: Exposed bedrock on the Red Planet's hale craterThis image from MRO, NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, shows the Red Planet's Hale Crater, a large impact crater (more than 62 miles, or 100 kilometers, across) with a suite of interesting features such as active gullies, active recurring slope lineae (long markings that are dark or bright) and extensive icy ejecta flows.
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Ingeniøren

Den seneste VR-trend: Fanger virkeligheden med volumetrisk videoNorsk virksomhed satser på hologrammer.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
10
NASA invested in cracking Earth's carbon puzzleIt's a scientific conundrum with huge implications for our future: How will our planet react to the increasing levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere?
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
76
Multiple metals – and possible signs of water – found in unique exoplanetAn international team of researchers has identified 'fingerprints' of multiple metals in one of the least dense exoplanets ever found.
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Scientific American Content: Global
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How to Convert Your Wall into a Giant Touch ScreenSmart walls could track people’s gestures or monitor appliances — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
Direct visualization of dynamic structures of protein disaggregation molecular machinesClpB, an ATP-fueled protein molecular machine, disentangles and reactivates aggregated proteins. By using high-speed atomic force microscopy, conformational dynamics of ClpB were visualized for the first time. ClpB forms open- and closed-ring, and the closed-ring was further classified into three forms: round, spiral, and twisted half-spiral. These structures transformed each other during ATPase-c
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Dagens Medicin

Professor undersøger fremtidens kunstige hjerterProfessor Finn Gustafsson er spændt på, hvad fremtiden vil bringe for danske hjertepatienter. Han håber at kunne bidrage til fremtidens hjertetransplantation.
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The Atlantic
59
'This Is Not a Reform. It Is Terrible.'There isn’t much that unites Nancy Pelosi and Kevin McCarthy these days, but the two most powerful Californians in American politics agree wholeheartedly on this: They both despise their state’s “top two” primary, a system adopted by voters in 2010 that dispenses with party labels and has wreaked havoc for Democrats and Republicans alike. “This is not a reform. It is terrible,” Pelosi, the House
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The Atlantic
100+
The Age of Grandparents Is Made of Many TragediesWhen Barb’s son showed up at her house with his daughter Avery, 2, on a frigid night in February, it was long past the toddler’s bedtime. So Barb (who asked me to use only first or middle names for her and her family) hustled them inside and set them both up in the guest room. The next day, Valentine’s Day, she searched Craigslist and found a used crib for her granddaughter. She thought the arran
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Critically endangered Singapore freshwater crab lives in genetically isolated populationsResearchers from NUS and National Parks Board (NParks) have established that the critically endangered Singapore freshwater crab (Johora singaporensis) does not mix or breed between different populations, and has overall low genetic diversity.
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New Scientist – News
2
Can an app tell if you have dementia years before your doctor?Many games and apps claim to identify the earliest signs of dementia – if they work, we might be able to catch the condition early enough to treat it
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
6
The right squeeze for quantum computingA new theoretical model involves squeezing light to just the right amount to accurately transmit information using subatomic particles. Scientists at Hokkaido University and Kyoto University report that this theoretical approach to quantum computing is 10 billion times more tolerant to errors than current theoretical models. Their method has application in quantum computers that use the diverse pr
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Latest Headlines | Science News
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Here’s why scientists are questioning whether ‘sonic attacks’ are realSonic attacks would be hard to pull off and a terrible way of incapacitating diplomats, experts say.
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Feed: All Latest
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The Key to Cracking Cold Cases Might Be Genealogy SitesA forensic DNA firm that works with law enforcement says it has uploaded 100 files to GEDmatch, the site that helped identify the alleged Golden State Killer.
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Feed: All Latest
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Apple WWDC 2018: Here's What to ExpectThe Worldwide Developers Conference kicks off on Monday, which means an avalanche of news from Apple.
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Feed: All Latest
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The Man Who Says Science Blew Its Best Shot at an AIDS VaccineBurt Dorman says that the scientific mainstream missed the chance to wipe out AIDS and save the lives of 35 million people. Now he wants another try.
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Feed: All Latest
68
How San Quentin Inmates Built JOLT, a Search Engine for PrisonAfter learning to code from nonprofit The Last Mile, four inmates built JOLT, a search engine to help further their studies.
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Live Science
34
What Would Happen If You Were to Drink Five 5-Hour Energy Drinks at Once?Would you gain 25 hours of energy? Or would the consequences be more severe?
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Live Science
12
What Caused Helen Keller to Be Deaf and Blind? An Expert Has This TheoryA first-of-its-kind analysis looks into the likely cause of Helen Keller's disability.
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Live Science
6
Waterslides Can Literally Be a Pain in the ButtA waterslide can be a great way to cool off in the scorching heat of summer, but gliding down one comes with a hidden risk: an injured tailbone.
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Science-Based Medicine
2
Is Firing Vaccine-Hesitant Families Unfair? Definitely…I think.Is the dismissal of vaccine-hesitant families from a pediatric practice unethical? Could it be unfair to other pediatric healthcare providers and increase risk to the community? Three medical ethicists who wrote a recent JAMA Pediatrics opinion piece believe so.
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Scientific American Content: Global
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Privacy, Europe's Newest Luxury ExportThe E.U.’s new rules aim to make companies treat your privacy as a right rather than a good to be bargained with — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
400+
A 3-D printer that can print data sets as physical objectsA team of researchers from MIT and Harvard University has come up with a way to get 3-D printers to print objects using data sets rather than geometric representations. In their paper published on the open access site Science Advances, the group describes their new technique and some of the ways they believe it could be used.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Hospital superbug uses tiny sticky fingers to infect medical tools and devicesThe antibiotic-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii bacterium is one of the most globally harmful bacteria that causes nosocomial infections. Researchers at the University of Turku have discovered that the bacterium attaches to plastic medical devices using tiny finger-like structures. The researchers were able to develop antibodies that prevent the bacterial spread.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
Dolphin algorithm could lead to better medical ultrasoundsMillions of years of evolutionary fine-tuning have made dolphins phenomenally good at using echolocation to orient themselves, find food and communicate with one another. But how do they actually do it? New research from Lund University in Sweden shows that they emit two intertwined ultrasound beam components at different frequencies—and with slightly different timing.
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Scientific American Content: Global
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Thanksgiving Dinner Can End Sooner If Guests Pass the Gravy across a Partisan DivideA new study shows election politics pushed Americans to cut family festivities short in 2016 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Team develops highly stretchable hydrogels for high resolution multimaterial 3-D printingHydrogels, hydrophilic networks of polymeric chains capable of retaining a large amount of water, have been widely used in a variety of applications. Recent advances in highly stretchable hydrogels have extended their applications into the fields of soft robotics, transparent touch panels and other applications requiring large deformation.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
7
Nanoplastics accumulate in marine organisms and may pose harm to aquatic food chainsPlastic nanoparticles, tiny pieces of plastic less than 1 micrometre in size, could potentially contaminate food chains, and ultimately affect human health, according to a recent study by scientists from the National University of Singapore (NUS). They discovered that nanoplastics are easily ingested by marine organisms, where they accumulate over time, with a risk of being transferred up the food
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
20
Prototype nuclear battery packs 10 times more powerRussian researchers from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (MIPT), the Technological Institute for Superhard and Novel Carbon Materials (TISNCM), and the National University of Science and Technology MISIS have optimized the design of a nuclear battery generating power from the beta decay of nickel-63, a radioactive isotope. Their new battery prototype packs about 3,300 milliwatt-hour
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
6
Study expands possibilities for treating neurological diseasesResearchers in Japan have gained valuable insights into 'stress granules'—clumps of RNAs and proteins that form when cells are stressed by factors such as heat, toxins and viruses, deepening the understanding of proteins associated with neurodegenerative diseases. The findings could open up new treatment approaches for disorders including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and amyotrophic la
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
The Lancet: A warning and an opportunity: The WHO Independent High-Level Commission on non-communicable diseasesThe World Health Organisation (WHO) Independent High-Level Commission has proposed six bold recommendations to accelerate action and tackle the growing epidemic of non-communicable diseases (NCDs). The report, which presents these recommendations to the WHO Director-General and to Heads of State and Government, will be published in The Lancet and launched at the WHO headquarters on Friday, June 1.
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The Atlantic
59
A Radical Pick for the National Security CouncilOn Wednesday, National-Security Adviser John Bolton chose Fred Fleitz—who for the last five years served as a senior vice president at the Center for Security Policy—to be the National Security Council’s executive secretary and chief of staff. What makes that choice extraordinary is that, for more than a decade, the Center for Security Policy (CSP) has been arguing that American Muslims who obser
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The Atlantic
400+
Mutually Nonconsensual SexIs it possible for two people to simultaneously sexually assault each other? This is the question—rife with legal, anatomical, and emotional improbabilities—to which the University of Cincinnati now addresses itself, and with some urgency, as the institution and three of its employees are currently being sued over an encounter that was sexual for a brief moment, but that just as quickly entered t
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New Scientist – News
300+
The gene that led to the human intelligence boom has been foundA gene that evolved in humans over 3 millions years ago accelerated brain growth – but it came with a serious catch
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
Song from the distant past, a new fossil pheasant from China preserves a super-elongated windpipeA well preserved, nearly complete skeleton of a new extinct species of pheasant that lived between seven and 11 million years ago adjacent to the northeastern edge of the Tibetan Plateau in China preserves the oldest evidence of a bird having modified and specialized its vocalization sounds (songs or calls).
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Law firms do not encourage men to take parental leavesThe professional ethos of law firms discourages men from taking parental leave, a new Finnish-Canadian study shows. Carried out by the University of Eastern Finland and TÉLUQ University in Quebec, the study found that the professional culture in law firms rests on traditional masculine ideology, with men regarded as the providers for their families. This view does not encourage men to combine thei
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
7
Researchers develop electronic skins that wirelessly activate fully soft robotsA research team of Seoul National University has developed a skin-like electronic system that is soft, thin, lightweight and can wirelessly activate soft robots through a simple lamination process.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
7
Bacteria ensure square meal for bloodsucking ticksHow do ticks live solely on blood? A study presented in Current Biology (May 31, 2018) has elucidated the crucial role played by symbiotic bacteria that synthesize B vitamins. These nutrients are scarcely found in the blood ticks ingest but are essential to their life cycle. Thus ticks cannot survive to adulthood or reproduce without their bacterial symbionts. The study conducted by CNRS and CIRAD
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Ingeniøren
40
Samlet opposition slæber tavs minister i samråd om forværret vandmiljøHele rød blok vil have svar på, hvad den nye miljøminister vil gøre for at leve op til de ambitioner om et rent vandmiljø, som er på vej til at smuldre.
6h
Ingeniøren
1
Ugens podcast: Gasledning er en tvivlsom forretning for DanmarkDebatten om anlægget af den polsk-danske gasledning Baltic Pipe har glimret ved sit fravær. Men nu kritiserer energiforskere den spinkle business case i projektet, der mest er til gavn for polakkerne.
6h
Science : NPR
100+
Let's Stop Talking About The '30 Million Word Gap'It's one of the most famous studies ever done on kids. It's often cited as a reason children from poor families struggle in school. But it may be neither 30 million words, nor exactly a gap. (Image credit: Chelsea Beck/NPR)
6h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
7
Statisticians say Brazil will play Germany in the FIFA World Cup finalThe favorites for this year's World Cup title are Brazil and Germany. The two teams are almost on a par with their chances of winning, as statisticians around Achim Zeileis from the University of Innsbruck show. With their statistical model based on bookmakers' odds, the researchers have successfully predicted several tournaments in the past, among them the correct world champion Spain in the 2010
6h
Ingeniøren

Ugen i data: Graph-databaser, GDPR-sager og gode grunde til at være data scientistDatatech samler op på ugen der dig i dataens verden. Blandt andet er de første anmeldelser efter GDPR trådte i kraft allerede faldet.
6h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
49
Sugarcane pest produces foam to protect itself from heatTiny balls of froth can often be seen near the roots of plants in sugarcane plantations in Brazil during summer. The foam protects nymphs of the root spittlebug Mahanarva fimbriolata, a major pest of crops and pasture throughout the Neotropics.
6h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
EU biofuel regulation is not sustainable long-termEU biofuel regulation does not guarantee reduced climate impact—nor does it address the core issue of substantially reducing transport emissions, according to a new doctoral thesis from Lund University in Sweden.
6h
BBC News – Science & Environment
31
Trump election shortens US Thanksgiving family dinnersFamily Thanksgiving visits in 2016 were much shorter due to increased political divisions say researchers.
6h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Direct visualization of dynamic structures of protein disaggregation molecular machinesClpB, an ATP-fueled protein molecular machine, disentangles and reactivates aggregated proteins. By using high-speed atomic force microscopy, conformational dynamics of ClpB was visualized for the first time. ClpB forms open- and closed-ring, and the closed-ring was further classified into three forms; round, spiral, and twisted-half-spiral. These structures transformed each other during ATPase-cy
6h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
13
Scientists develop material that could regenerate dental enamelResearchers at Queen Mary University of London have developed a new way to grow mineralised materials which could regenerate hard tissues such as dental enamel and bone.
6h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Wait for it: Serotonin and confidence at the root of patience in new studySerotonin keeps mice hanging on if they are sure of getting rewards, but not sure when.
6h
New Scientist – News
11
The dreams you forget are the most important for learningDreams help us store memories, enabling us to learn. Now a study has revealed that it’s the boring dreams we have during deep sleep that are the most important
7h
Ingeniøren

Forskere: Vi skal (måske) bruge gas-nettet i fremtidenEr det danske naturgasnet værd at bruge penge på frem mod 2050? Både ja og nej, siger energiforskere.
7h
Ingeniøren
7
Datalæk afslører alle medlemmer af TandlægeforeningenUdover at lække følsomme persondata i form af tilhørsforhold til fagforeningen kan de mange private informationer om tandlægerne give tandlægerne problemer med utilfredse kunder, erkender foreningen.
7h
Science : NPR
100+
Study Aims To Show Transplants Between HIV-Positive Patients Are Safe, Save LivesHundreds of otherwise viable organs that are HIV-positive are wasted each year, while HIV-positive patients in need of transplants languish on waiting lists. Researchers want to change that. (Image credit: Courtesy of Johns Hopkins Medical)
7h
Dagens Medicin

Reumatologisk Selskab har fået ny formandOliver Hendricks overtager posten efter Mette Holland-Fischer.
7h
Ingeniøren

Nu bliver danske adresser og vejnavne samlet for første gangEfter fem års arbejde er alle danske adresser og vejnavne nu samlet i Danmarks Adresseregister (DAR), hvor kvaliteten af de eksisterende adressedata forbedret efter en grundig datavask og hvor mere 100.000 nye adresser er oprettet.
7h
cognitive science
1
Sorry, Mom and Dad, Toys Cannot Supercharge Your Baby: Hundreds of toys promise to help babies read, learn, do math and walk earlier than expected—many without scientific backingsubmitted by /u/parrishthethought [link] [comments]
7h
Dagens Medicin

Arbejdsgruppe skal udarbejde fælles retningslinjer for brug af biomarkørerMedicinrådet ønsker national enighed om, hvilke målemetoder der skal bruges til at vurdere, om kræftpatienter har gavn af immunterapi. Arbejdsgruppe forventes klar til august.
7h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
Detector improvements upgrade science capabilities of SNS and HFIR instrumentsWhen a neutron beam meets a sample, neutrons ricochet away from the material in various directions in a process called "neutron scattering." The scattered neutrons interact with specialized detectors that enable mapping of the particles' speed and trajectory to deduce where atoms of interest are and how they're behaving.
8h
Dagens Medicin

Hyldest til den totale dedikationVist er der også meget galt og meget at tage fat på i både almen praksis og på sygehusene. Men vi skal huske at anerkende og fremhæve så mange gode eksempler som muligt.
8h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
31
On a deserted island, risk-taking lizards survive better. With predators? Not so muchSome people argue that animals have personalities: shy, bold, aggressive.
8h
Dagens Medicin

Hjertepatienter med depression og angst bliver oversetHver femte patient med iskæmisk hjertesygdom rapporterer symptomer på depression og/eller angst på et niveau, hvor det bør behandles. Med en stigende forekomst af patienter med iskæmisk hjertesygdom er der øget behov for behandling og systematisk screening af hjertepatienter for psykologisk komorbiditet, mener professor i kardiologisk psykologi.
8h
Dagens Medicin

Nok er nokHvis lovene og beslutningerne er decideret skadelige for folkesundheden, er det vores pligt som sundhedsprofessionelle at råbe 'nok er nok'.
8h
Dagens Medicin

Lægeforeningen snorksover ikke, når det gælder etik og patienterVi understreger i alle mulige sammenhænge vigtigheden af samtykke
8h
Dagens Medicin

Forhenværende formand for DCS modtager fornem prisOverlæge Jan Kyst Madsen fik på Dansk Cardiologisk Selskabs årsmøde tilkendt selskabets hæderslegat. Han har i sin karriere sat et betydeligt præg på DCS og på dansk kardiologi, lød begrundelsen fra selskabets formand.
8h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
World's highest ER battles to save lives on EverestAs word came over the radio that a Sherpa had been struck on the head by a falling rock high on Everest, the three doctors at base camp jumped into action, fully aware that saving him would be a life-or-death race against the unpredictable mountain.
9h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
8
'Mission impossible' for US cities that want to respect Paris climate dealWhen President Donald Trump announced the US exit from the Paris climate deal one year ago, the mayor of Philadelphia was among those who vowed to keep carrying the torch.
9h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
8
Greece wages losing battle against Albanian herb raidersAfter seeing its best minds lured to greener pastures during eight years of economic crisis, Greece is now waging an uphill battle to keep its aromatic plants from being plundered too.
9h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
7
Lebanon's spearfishers fight to preserve stocksHunting fish with spear guns may seem like a counterintuitive way to save Lebanon's dwindling marine life, but a growing community of freedivers argues it is a potent awareness-raising tool.
9h
Dagens Medicin

Høj forekomst af aortaaneurismer hos danske mændDen store danske screeningsundersøgelse for hjerte-kar-sygdomme DANCAVAS nærmer sig sin afslutning. Undersøgelsen er endnu ikke opgjort, men delresultater peger på en overraskende høj forekomst af abdominale aortaaneurismer.
9h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
17
Indonesia's Merapi volcano ejects towering column of ashIndonesia's Mount Merapi shot a towering plume of ash about 6 kilometers (4 miles) high Friday in an eruption authorities said lasted two minutes.
9h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
31
Cautious prawns win battle for foodPrawns have personalities—and cautious crustaceans do better in the battle for food, new research shows.
9h
Nyheder – Forskning – Videnskab

Ny analyse: Vi er på vej mod et demokratisk A- og B-holdKvinderne, de højtuddannede, og borgere med job og dansk statsborgerskab er gode til at udnytte…
9h
Dagens Medicin

Den skotske patientMens Danmark fortsat venter på et udspil fra regeringen om det nære og sammenhængende sundhedsvæsen, tog Skotland i 2016 skridtet til den største nationale sundheds- og socialreform i 70 år og arbejder fortsat på at få konstruktionen til at fungere. Det er en vanskelig opgave at integrere opgaverne i hospitals- og primærsektoren under én fælles organisation og ledelse, som også omfatter kommunern
9h
Ingeniøren

Datacentre er for sløve til IoT-enheder og selvkørende biler‘Edge computing’ er behandling af data i lokale mikrotårne – og måske svaret på forbrugernes krav om lynhurtig regnekraft til f.eks. selvkørende biler og VR-tjenester.
10h
Live Science
8
What is Augmented Reality?Augmented reality is technology that not only interacts with you, but enhances your senses with images, information and audio.
10h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
4
Walking faster could make you live longer: researchResearchers call for walking pace to be emphasized in public health messages, as analysis of over 50,000 walkers finds a faster pace is associated with lower risk of cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality.
10h
Science | The Guardian
17
Finding a voice: why we sound unique – Science Weekly podcastEach and everyone of us has a voice that is unique. As a result, we make a lot of assumptions about someone from just the way they speak. But are these judgements fair? And what if they’re wrong? Nicola Davis explores Subscribe and review on Acast , Apple Podcasts , Soundcloud , Audioboom and Mixcloud . Join the discussion on Facebook and Twitter Your voice is unique to you, much like your finger
11h
Live Science
100+
Cauliflower: Health Benefits & Nutrition FactsOften maligned for being bland, cauliflower, when prepared properly, can be flavorful as well as healthful.
11h
Ingeniøren

Leder: En kæmpe tak for nye dataregler – det er effektivt at stå sammen
11h
The Guardian's Science Weekly

Finding a voice: why we sound unique – Science Weekly podcastEach and everyone of us has a voice that is unique. As a result, we make a lot of assumptions about someone from just the way they speak. But are these judgements fair? And what if they’re wrong? Nicola Davis explores
11h
The Scientist RSS

From Little Things Big Things GrowWe should take comfort in the fact that life on Earth had such unassuming, shared beginnings.
11h
The Scientist RSS

How Corpse-Eating Beetles Avoid InfectionSome beetle species may have evolved to tunnel into the ground to escape the pathogens that abound on dead and rotting animals.
11h
The Scientist RSS

Surveying Biodiversity with LeechesScientists are searching for signatures of mammals within the blood meals of the invertebrates.
11h
The Scientist RSS

Why Bats Make Such Good Viral HostsThe bat version of the STING protein helps dampen the mammals' immune response to infection, researchers have found.
11h
The Scientist RSS

Researchers Grow Veggies in SpaceExperiments to cultivate greens on the International Space Station and in simulated Martian environments pave the way for feeding crews during deep space missions.
11h
The Scientist RSS

Opinion: Archaea Is Our Evolutionary Sister, Not MotherThe ancient organisms appear to be more closely related to eukaryotes than previously appreciated.
11h
The Scientist RSS

Gene Expression Analysis Turns to GasSoil scientists use a gas-producing reporter system to assess gene activity in bacteria.
11h
The Scientist RSS

Condensin Folds DNA Through Loop ExtrusionBy observing the activity of a protein complex in real time, researchers have uncovered new evidence for a long-standing theory.
11h
The Scientist RSS

Trauma Biologist: A Profile of Israel LiberzonThe University of Michigan neuroscientist has developed therapies for patients with PTSD and laboratory models to understand its basis.
11h
The Scientist RSS

Youssef Belkhadir Deciphers Plants Signaling SoundtrackAn entrepreneurial attitude helped this Vienna-based researcher begin to unravel the complex receptor network that Arabidopsis uses to develop and defend itself.
11h
The Scientist RSS

Productivity ParadoxDuring the last ice age, there wasn't much plant matter to eat on northern steppes, but herbivorous woolly mammoths were abundant. How did they survive?
11h
The Scientist RSS

Incomplete ImmunityBy combining experimental data with computer models, researchers were able to predict a pathogen's evolution toward more virulence.
11h
The Scientist RSS

Using Mimics to Get Around Antibodies LimitationsSynthetic and natural alternatives to traditional antibodies offer more control, specificity, and reproducibility.
11h
The Scientist RSS

Bringing the Internet of Things into the LabThe IoT can link up many facets of research – from laboratory equipment to ideas – but scientists must be ready for the questions its implementation could raise.
11h
The Scientist RSS

Chinas Flowers, 1922-1949Austrian-American botanist Joseph Rock collected thousands of plant samples in his 27 years in the Middle Kingdom, leaving after the Communist Party's takeover.
11h
The Scientist RSS

Race Is Not a Genomic PhenomenonRather, DNA sequencing can help us parse our ancestry, a subtle but important distinction.
11h
The Scientist RSS

Ten-Minute SabbaticalTake a break from the bench to puzzle and peruse.
11h
The Scientist RSS

Infographic: Gassy GenesSoil scientists get bacteria to report on what their neighbors are up to.
11h
The Scientist RSS

Can Archaea Tech Us About the Evolution of Eukaroyotes?The discovery of copious new archaeal species is shedding light on the tree of life and revealing some unique cellular biology.
11h
The Scientist RSS

Researchers Aim to Predict How Pathogens Jump SpeciesUnderstanding the factors that influence spillover could help forecast future epidemics.
11h
The Scientist RSS

Caveolae Form and FunctionResearchers interrogate the cavernous structures on the surface of cells to better understand how they affect membrane function.
11h
The Scientist RSS

June 2018 TS CrosswordTry your hand at a sciency brain teaser.
11h
The Scientist RSS

June 2018 TS Crossword Puzzle AnswersSee how well you did.
11h
The Scientist RSS

PTSD CircuitsWatch profilee Israel Liberzon of the University of Michigan discuss his work trying to piece together the neurological routes of post-traumatic stress disorder.
11h
The Scientist RSS

Meet the LeechmeisterSee the American Museum of Natural History curator Mark Sidall explain his fascination with leeches, which he and other scientists are using to infer biodiversity in some far-flung places.
11h
The Scientist RSS

Far Out GardeningBlast off into orbit, where researchers on the International Space Station are growing plants in systems that may one day sustain astronauts travelling far across the solar system and beyond.
11h
The Scientist RSS

Archaea Family Tree Blossoms, Thanks to GenomicsIdentification of new archaea species elucidates the domain's unique biology and sheds light on its relationship to eukaryotes.
11h
The Scientist RSS

New Technologies Shed Light on CaveolaeThe functions of the cellular invaginations identified more than half a century ago are now beginning to be understood in detail.
11h
The Scientist RSS

Predicting Future Zoonotic Disease OutbreaksA step-by-step study of diseases that jump species gives subtle clues about future epidemics.
11h
The Scientist RSS

Infographic: Packing DNAResearchers watch the protein condensin in action.
11h
The Scientist RSS

Stars of the Show: The Immune System Plays a Pivotal Role in Tumor Formation, Development, and MetastasisLearn which immune cells are involved in the body's natural response against cancer along with their mechanisms of action in this poster from The Scientist and Bethyl Laboratories, Inc.
11h
The Scientist RSS

Mouse Powered Progress: Producing Humanized Monoclonal Antibodies With Transgenic MiceLearn about the benefits humanized monoclonal antibodies and how to produce them using transgenic mice with this poster from The Scientist and Trianni, Inc.
11h
BBC News – Science & Environment
200+
Planting a forestUzbekistan has an ambitious plan to stop widespread health problems that developed when the Aral Sea disappeared.
11h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Cautious prawns win battle for foodPrawns have personalities — and cautious crustaceans do better in the battle for food, new research shows.
11h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
New machine learning approach could accelerate bioengineeringScientists from the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) have developed a way to use machine learning to dramatically accelerate the design of microbes that produce biofuel.
11h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Dieting associated with risky behaviors in teenage girlsTeenage girls who diet are more likely to engage in other health-compromising behaviours, including smoking, binge drinking, and skipping breakfast, a University of Waterloo study recently found.
11h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Psychiatric disorders shouldn't disqualify youth with severe obesity from weight loss surgeryPsychiatric disorders, a common comorbidity of severe obesity, especially for youth, should not disqualify an adolescent with severe obesity from bariatric surgery. According to a forthcoming study in Pediatrics, identifying anxiety, depressive disorders, ADHD, and eating disorders, while still a crucial pre-surgical evaluation step, had no predictive value for how much post-surgical weight loss a
11h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Immunocompromised patients with sepsis may face higher mortality at hospitals treating small numbersImmunosuppressed patients with sepsis appear more likely to die if they are treated in a hospital caring for a relatively small number of these patients, according to new research published online in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society.
11h
Scientific American Content: Global
400+
We Should Teach All Students, in Every Discipline, to Think Like ScientistsOnly if colleges and universities teach all students to think like scientists — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
12h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
15
This is your brain detecting patternsDetecting patterns is an important part of how humans learn and make decisions. Now, researchers have seen what is happening in people's brains as they first find patterns in information they are presented.
13h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
3
Sugarcane pest produces foam to protect itself from heatBrazilian researchers found that the root spittlebug nymph produces bubbles by feeding on sap, to form a thermal insulator foam that maintains an optimal body temperatures during development. Knowledge of the foam's physical and chemical properties can pave the way for research on compounds that could destabilize the bubbles and eliminate the pests' nymphs in the process.
13h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
7
Paving the way for safer, smaller batteries and fuel cellsEngineers have found a new and versatile kind of solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) that has twice the proton conductivity of the current state-of-the-art material. Such SPEs are currently found in proton-exchange membrane fuel cells, but the researchers' new design could also be adapted to work for the lithium or sodium-ion batteries found in consumer electronics.
13h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
16
Getting conservationists and fishers on the same pageHistorically, fisheries and the conservation community have struggled to find common ground. Now, a new online tool provides daily computer-generated maps to help fishers target productive fishing spots while alerting them to areas likely to harbor protected species.
13h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
4
Alternative inflation rate may offer more accurate economic guidanceConsumer prices may be more volatile than are represented in current inflation indexes, which are used to guide a range of economic decisions, including guidance on interest rates and Social Security cost-of-living adjustments.
13h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
21
Your brain is multitasking, using a hunger peptide that tells you when to eatScientists have figured out how your brain tells you that you are hungry. They found that a neuropeptide associated with appetite is sent into the cerebrospinal fluid to connect with neurons responsible for alerting hunger.
13h
NeuWrite San Diego

The Rise and Fall and Rise of Genetic MemoryWe are all products of our past, for better or for worse. At first glance, such a statement seems so obvious it hardly bears mentioning; our earlier experiences, both our successes and our failures, shape our current behavior. But dig just a bit deeper, and it becomes far murkier. What can you call your past? […]
13h
New Scientist – News
31
People with big brains have a different brain structure tooIf you have a large brain, certain regions are much bigger than expected and others are smaller – but we don’t know how this affects brain function yet
14h
New Scientist – News
100+
Methane ice and winds on Pluto make strange ‘sand’ dunesPluto doesn’t have much of an atmosphere, but it does have just enough wind to blow methane ice grains into a field of dunes at the foot of a huge mountain range
14h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

The brain is able to anticipate painful movements following injuryWhen people are injured, how does the brain adapt the body's movements to help avoid pain? New research published in The Journal of Physiology investigates this question.
14h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
13
Symptoms worsen around menses for people with borderline personality disorderSymptoms associated with borderline personality disorder — a severe and chronic mood disorder characterized by an inability to manage strong emotions — tend to worsen just before and during menses.
15h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
6
Bacteria ensure square meal for bloodsucking ticksHow do ticks live solely on blood? A study has elucidated the crucial role played by symbiotic bacteria that synthesize B vitamins. These nutrients are scarcely found in the blood ticks ingest but are essential to their life cycle. The study has also shown that the bacteria inherited their B vitamin synthesis pathways from a pathogenic ancestor whose genome underwent gradual degradation.
15h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
8
Atherosclerosis: Stopped on timeFor the first time, researchers are pointing out the influence of the internal clock on atherosclerosis. Their study gives an important indication on how the therapeutic approach can be improved.
15h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
23
Antifungal drug eliminates sleeping bowel cancer cells in miceAn antifungal medication, commonly prescribed for toenail infections, could help eliminate dormant cells within bowel tumors, according to new research.
15h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
19
Abnormal lipid metabolism in fat cells predicts future weight gain and diabetes in womenThe inefficient breakdown of fats predicts later weight gain and metabolic complications such as type 2 diabetes in women, researchers report. Low levels of hormone-stimulated lipolysis — a biochemical process by which triglycerides are broken down into energy-rich fatty acids — were associated with weight gain and metabolic problems 13 years later. The researchers also developed an algorithm to
15h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
13
Sintering solutions aboard the International Space StationA centuries-old materials bonding process is being tested aboard the International Space Station in an experiment that could pave the way for more materials research of its kind aboard the orbiting laboratory. Sintering is the process of heating different materials to compress their particles together.
15h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
32
News flash about hot flashes: They can last longer than you thinkMenopause symptoms are not just for midlife anymore, according to a new study.
15h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
7
'Why not take a risk' attitude widespread among patients and providersA new study finds the 'Why not take a risk?' mentality is widespread among patients and medical care providers.
15h
Blog » Languages » English
6
May Marathon: Results!Smashing work! You plowed through this first 1802-cube cell at a very respectable 15 hours 15 minutes and managed 7 hours exactly for the second 885-cube cell. Pat yourselves on the back, and make sure to join us after Happy Hour next week when we rename according to your votes. Players qualified to nominate a name or vote will receive e-mail(s) between now and Monday. Woohooooo!
15h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
31
Handgun purchaser licensing laws linked to fewer firearm homicides in large, urban areasState laws that require gun purchasers to obtain a license contingent on passing a background check performed by state or local law enforcement are associated with a 14 percent reduction in firearm homicides in large, urban counties.
15h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
32
Bigger human brain prioritizes thinking hub — at a costSome human brains are nearly twice the size of others — but how might that matter? Researcher have discovered that these differences in size are related to the brain's shape and the way it is organized. The bigger the brain, the more its additional area is accounted for by growth in thinking areas of the cortex, or outer mantle — at the expense of relatively slower growth in lower emotional, sen
15h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
21
Psychologists: Women are not to blame for the wage gapWomen should not be blamed for the gender wage gap in the United States, according to psychologists. To eliminate the gap, organizations must provide training, support and opportunities for growth, the researchers said.
15h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Researchers use blood serum markers to develop lupus risk indexResearchers at the Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, USA have developed an index that identifies the risk for lupus based on the presence and amount of Immunoglobin G (IgG) and Immunoglobin M (IgM) antibodies and levels of C1q, a protein complex associated with protection from lupus, in blood serum. The findings are published in the open-access journal Molecular Medicine.
15h
The Atlantic
300+
The Presidency Is BrokenAmerica’s biggest job is hard. But is it impossible? That’s the question posed by John Dickerson, a contributing writer for The Atlantic and a co-host on CBS This Morning , both in the pages of this magazine and in a recent interview with The Atlantic ’s editor in chief Jeffrey Goldberg. The presidency, Dickerson explains, has ballooned into something more complex than the Constitution’s framers
16h
Ingeniøren

Bagsiden: Instructables – verdens mest elendige nøddeknækkerUgens varme anbefaling
16h
Ingeniøren

Bagsiden: Hvem kender Peter Nicolai Fenger?Ugens efterlysning (fortsat)
16h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
38
For anxiety, a single intervention is not enoughNo matter which treatment they get, only 20 percent of young people diagnosed with anxiety will stay well, researchers report. The study followed 319 young people aged 10 to 25 who had been diagnosed with separation, social, or general anxiety disorders. They received evidence-based treatment, and then had follow-ups with the researchers every year for four years. This is the first study to reasse
16h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
8
Biosecurity reduces invasions of plant pathogens over a national borderA new study examines more than a century of fungal pathogens, finding well-aimed biosecurity measures cut the spread of unwanted fungi into a nation, even in the face of increased globalized trade.
16h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
10
New guidelines recommend earlier colorectal cancer screeningNew guidelines developed by the American Cancer Society recommend that screening for colorectal cancer for average-risk adults begin at age 45, five years earlier than the previous recommendation.
16h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
13
Hydropower in Cambodia could threaten food security of regionFarmers and anglers in Cambodia depend on the Mekong River's predictable seasonal patterns, but new dams for hydroelectricity are altering the hydrology of the river. These changes have the potential to threaten fish migration, livelihoods, and regional food security.
16h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
13
Combining experts and automation in 3D printingResearchers have developed a novel approach to optimizing soft material 3D printing. The researchers' Expert-Guided Optimization method combines expert judgment with an optimization algorithm that efficiently searches combinations of parameters relevant for 3D printing, enabling high-fidelity soft material products to be printed.
16h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
13
Impact of dengue virus on EthiopiaDengue, a mosquito-borne RNA virus, is one of the most serious and rapidly spreading arboviral diseases in the world. Now, researchers have provided the first baseline data on the prevalence and risk factors of the virus in Ethiopia.
16h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
10
Lego-like chemical building blocks self-assemble into catalyst for hydrogen fuel cellsWhat's better than platinum? In hydrogen fuel cells, the answer may be cofacial cobalt porphyrins. These self-assembled molecules — which are great at facilitating a chemical reaction needed to produce power from hydrogen and oxygen — could be the next advance in alternative energy.
16h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
19
How Earth slows the solar wind to a gentle breezeA new study describes the first observations of the process of electron heating in Earth's bow shock. The researchers found that when the electrons in the solar wind encounter the bow shock, they momentarily accelerate to such a high speed that the electron stream becomes unstable and breaks down. This breakdown process robs the electrons of their high speed and converts the energy to heat.
16h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
11
Cool weather can amplify attacks of tree-killing bark beetleNew research looks at how the destructive southern pine beetle reacts to cooler weather in its climate-induced, new northern ranges.
16h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
10
New findings link estrogen and T cell immune response to autoimmune inflammationWomen are more prone to the development of autoimmune diseases. The female hormone estrogen is likely to affect the immune system. A team of scientists reported new findings related to the involvement of estrogen hormone receptor in autoimmune diseases.
16h
Futurity.org
9
5 wage gap myths about women at workBlame for the gender wage gap in the United States shouldn’t fall on women, report researchers. In a review paper, they draw on existing psychological research to highlight myths regarding the gap between men and women and to offer possible explanations for why it exists. Mikki Hebl, chair of psychology in Rice University’s School of Social Sciences, and coauthors report their findings in the jou
16h
Science | The Guardian
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'Holy grail of cancer research': doctors positive about early detection blood testBlood tests called liquid biopsies show signs of finding 10 different types of cancer at an early stage A blood test for 10 different types of cancers could one day help doctors screen for the disease before patients show symptoms, researchers at the world’s largest gathering of oncologists have said. The test, called a liquid biopsy , screens for cancer by detecting tiny bits of DNA released by
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

One in four intensive care patients return to hospital, study showsA quarter of intensive care patients are readmitted to hospital shortly after returning home and some of these readmissions are avoidable, research suggests.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Green tea molecule could prevent heart attacksScientists from Lancaster University and the University of Leeds have discovered that a compound found in green tea, currently being studied for its ability to reduce amyloid plaques in the brain in Alzheimer's disease, also breaks up and dissolves potentially dangerous protein plaques found in the blood vessels.
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Science | The Guardian
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Green tea may help reduce risk of heart attacksInitial studies show that a molecule in the tea might reduce plaque build up inside arteries A substance found in green tea could help scientists find new ways to reduce the risk of heart attacks, research suggests, although experts say that doesn’t mean you should rush to put the kettle on. The study found that a molecule in green tea, known as EGCG, can bind to a protein that is found in plaque
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Futurity.org
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Colonoscopies lead to way more infections than experts thoughtColonoscopies and upper-GI endoscopies performed at outpatient specialty centers in the United States result in far more infections than previously believed, according to a new study. An analysis of data from 2014 shows that patients who had one of the common procedures at facilities known as ambulatory surgery centers were at greater-than-expected risk of bacterial infections, including E. coli
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Futurity.org
2
Tool locates the best fishing spots while avoiding turtlesA new software tool can help fishers locate the most productive fishing spots while avoiding unwanted or protected species such as sea turtles and dolphins. Worldwide, fishing fleets discard as many as two of every five sea creatures they catch. The new system, called EcoCast, combines satellite data of ocean conditions, records from fisheries observers, and species tracking data to pinpoint idea
17h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
10
Green tea molecule could prevent heart attacksGreen tea could hold the key to preventing deaths from heart attacks and strokes caused by atherosclerosis, according to research funded by the British Heart Foundation and published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
24
Secrets behind Pluto's dunes revealedScientists have discovered dunes on Pluto, and say they are likely to have been formed of methane ice grains released into its rarefied atmosphere.
17h
Futurity.org
3
‘Biochemical stomach’ digests leftover food to make energyResearchers have developed an anaerobic digester system that recycles food waste to produce electrical energy and heat. This digester system is self-sustaining, with the generated electricity and heat fully powering the system and its processes. “Unlike composting which is used in a lot of commercial waste food digesters, anaerobic digestion is relatively odorless…” In Singapore, food waste repor
17h
cognitive science
1
Scientist develop new RNA tool for correcting genetic diseasessubmitted by /u/davyeminy [link] [comments]
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
17
Ocean-migrating trout adapt to freshwater environment in 120 yearsSteelhead trout, a member of the salmon family that live and grow in the Pacific Ocean, genetically adapted to the freshwater environment of Lake Michigan in less than 120 years.
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SoftBank Flips the Venture-Capital Script Again With GM DealGM needs cash to build autonomous cars; SoftBank has more cash than it can spend. Hence, a marriage.
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Popular Science
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This common toothpaste ingredient could be wreaking havoc on your gutHealth Triclosan is everywhere, but its days seem to be numbered. Even if you’ve never heard of it, you almost certainly come across the chemical triclosan every single day. But its days seem to be numbered.
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Futurity.org
3
Protein ‘off-switch’ is vital to how we remember stuffMemory, learning, and cognitive flexibility depend on a protein “off-switch” in the brain, according to new research. This new knowledge could enable scientists to better understand and combat neurological diseases that inhibit memory, such as Alzheimer’s. Researchers found that the Arc protein—which increases in the brain during learning—needs to be rapidly switched off and removed shortly after
17h
The Atlantic
8
The Atlantic Daily: Life Did Its ThingWhat We’re Following North Korea Negotiations: U.S. and North Korean officials are meeting to discuss the agenda and logistics of the summit that President Trump abruptly canceled last week, suggesting that the meeting might be back on —and that Trump’s unorthodox maneuvers might have worked. Either way, Amy Zegart argues that the summit preparations are a valuable way to learn about how North Ko
18h
The Atlantic
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The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: I Beg Your Pardon?-Written by Elaine Godfrey ( @elainejgodfrey ) Today in 5 Lines President Trump reasserted on Twitter that he didn’t fire former FBI Director James Comey over the Russia investigation. The New York Times reported on Wednesday that Andrew McCabe, the former acting FBI director, turned over a detailed memo on Comey’s firing to Special Counsel Robert Mueller. The Trump administration announced that
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Number of wild mountain gorillas exceeds 1,000A recent census of the critically endangered mountain gorillas conducted in the Virunga Volcanoes found a minimum of 604 individuals. In combination with the 400 individuals living in the only other population in Bwindi Impenetrable National Park, Uganda, these new results push the total number of wild mountain gorillas in the world to over 1000.
18h
Inside Science
5
BRIEF: Sleep Helps Players Excel in NBA FinalsBRIEF: Sleep Helps Players Excel in NBA Finals Changes in attitudes toward sleep in elite athletes are enhancing their performance. Lebron-James_cropped.jpg Image credits: meunierd via Shutterstock Sports Thursday, May 31, 2018 – 16:45 Chris Gorski, Editor (Inside Science) — The Cleveland Cavaliers will face the Golden State Warriors in game one of the NBA Finals tonight. It's the fourth straigh
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Drowsy worms offer new insights into the neuroscience of sleepScientists studying worms have discovered a group of cells that help the body transition from wakefulness to slumber.
18h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Scientists rethink co-evolution of marine life, oxygenated oceansResearchers have confirmed that rising oceanic and atmospheric oxygen levels co-evolved with marine life hundreds of millions of years ago.
18h
Popular Science
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Black Ember used laser-cutting and bonding to make a rugged, waterproof backpackTechnology We tried out their Citadel Minimal pack. Urban commuters who like to bike through all kinds of weather and want a backpack with a special-ops feel to it could consider a new pack made by Black Ember.
18h
BBC News – Science & Environment
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Methane ice dunes found on Pluto by Nasa spacecraftScientists say they have found evidence of dunes of frozen methane on Pluto.
18h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Study examines concerns of living kidney donorsAmong living kidney donors, the post-donation concern that was considered most important was kidney health, followed by the surgical, lifestyle, functional, and psychosocial impacts of donation. The hypothetical long-term risks associated with kidney removal — including mortality and cardiovascular disease — were of relatively lower importance.
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The Atlantic
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Can America Survive Tribalism?Since President Trump’s election, the term “tribalism” has become ubiquitous. Media outlets, including this one , used the word to explain the president’s victory. And reporters weren’t alone in their hypothesis that tribalism, and the mindset it implies, might help explain a swelling sentiment that contributed to his win. According to a forthcoming memoir by former Barack Obama aide Ben Rhodes,
19h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
21
Ailing weather satellite produces sharp snapshot of EarthDespite a serious cooling problem, the newest U.S. weather satellite has produced a sharp snapshot of Earth.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Bigger human brain prioritizes thinking hub — at a costSome human brains are nearly twice the size of others — but how might that matter? Researcher have discovered that these differences in size are related to the brain's shape and the way it is organized. The bigger the brain, the more its additional area is accounted for by growth in thinking areas of the cortex, or outer mantle — at the expense of relatively slower growth in lower emotional, sen
19h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Handgun purchaser licensing laws linked to fewer firearm homicides in large, urban areasState laws that require gun purchasers to obtain a license contingent on passing a background check performed by state or local law enforcement are associated with a 14 percent reduction in firearm homicides in large, urban counties.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
73
An artificial nerve system gives prosthetic devices and robots a sense of touchResearchers have developed an artificial nervous system that could give prosthetic limbs or robots reflexes and the ability to sense touch.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
21
Mother knows best — how plants help offspring by passing on seasonal cluesNew research has delved into the genetic memory systems through which plants pass seasonal information down to their seeds to give them the best chance of reproductive success.
19h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Gravitational wave event likely signaled creation of a black holeThe spectacular merger of two neutron stars that generated gravitational waves announced last fall likely did something else: birthed a black hole. This newly spawned black hole would be the lowest mass black hole ever found.
19h
The Scientist RSS

Researchers Identify Biomarkers for Obesity Risk in WomenLow levels of a biochemical process involved in fat breakdown predicts weight gain and metabolic complications more than a decade later.
19h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
55
Dawn mission: new orbit, new opportunitiesNASA's Dawn spacecraft is maneuvering to its lowest-ever orbit for a close-up examination of the inner solar system's only dwarf planet.
19h
Science | The Guardian
15
Spacewatch: all aboard, China's open invitation to boldly goWith US funding for the International Space Station in doubt, Beijing is proposing that UN member states use its new orbiting research lab Working through the United Nations Office for Outer Space Affairs , the Chinese Manned Space Agency (CMSP) has invited applications from UN member states to conduct experiments on China’s space station. It is expected to launch next year and be ready for opera
19h
Big Think
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Why Walmart employees can now attend college for $1 a dayWalmart announced Wednesday that it will pay for its 1.4 million employees to attend college, a move that could help the company's tainted image. Read More
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cognitive science
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Machine Yearning – The Rise of Thoughtful Machinessubmitted by /u/makepizzanotwar [link] [comments]
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Dana Foundation

Alliance Members Awarded Kavli Prize in NeuroscienceThe 2018 Kavli Prize in Neuroscience, which recognizes neuroscientists for pioneering advances in our understanding of existence at its biggest, smallest, and most complex scale, was presented to Dana Alliance member A. James Hudspeth , of The Rockefeller University, Robert Fettiplace , of the University of Wisconsin, Madison, and Dana Alliance member Christine Petit , of Collège de France/Pasteu
19h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Walmart goes upscale with personal shopper service (Update)Walmart on Thursday unveiled a new concierge shopping service enabling customers to get quick deliveries and advice from a personal assistant, going upscale in the retail giant's battle with Amazon.
19h
Feed: All Latest
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Google Search Labeled the California GOP as Nazis, But It's No ConspiracyNo, Big Tech isn't trying to defame conservatives. But Google did make a big mistake.
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Live Science
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There Are Two Kinds of Water in Every Glass, Thanks to Quantum PhysicsThere are two kinds of water in every glass, they're different from one another, and scientists managed to separate them and study the differences between them.
19h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

For anxiety, a single intervention is not enoughNo matter which treatment they get, only 20 percent of young people diagnosed with anxiety will stay well, UConn Health researchers report. The study followed 319 young people aged 10 to 25 who had been diagnosed with separation, social, or general anxiety disorders. They received evidence-based treatment, and then had follow-ups with the researchers every year for four years. This is the first st
19h
The Atlantic
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A Prime Opportunity to Get Inside Kim Jong Un’s HeadFollowing news updates about President Trump’s on-again, off-again nuclear summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un can make it feel as if the White House is prepping for the opening night of a Vegas show: If only the curtain goes up, all will be fine. And for the moment, it does look like the summit in Singapore will happen . As diplomats around the world rush about trying to make the meeting
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
5
Hydropower in Cambodia could threaten food security of regionFarmers and anglers in Cambodia depend on the Mekong River's predictable seasonal patterns, but new dams for hydroelectricity are altering the hydrology of the river. These changes have the potential to threaten fish migration, livelihoods, and regional food security.
19h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
A new understanding of how glucose makes you fatGlucose is the energy that fuels cells, and the body likes to store glucose for later use. But too much glucose can contribute to obesity, and scientists have long wanted to understand what happens within a cell to tip the balance.
19h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
11
Deep breath: New 'rebreather' helps navy divers beneath the wavesThe muscular U.S. Navy diver hoisted a 60-pound life-support regulator onto his back, then donned a 30-pound metal helmet.
19h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
5
Firing up a new alloy: Sintering solutions aboard the ISSA centuries-old materials bonding process is being tested aboard the International Space Station in an experiment that could pave the way for more materials research of its kind aboard the orbiting laboratory. Sintering is the process of heating different materials to compress their particles together.
19h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Combining experts and automation in 3D printingResearchers in CIT have developed a novel approach to optimizing soft material 3D printing. The researchers' Expert-Guided Optimization method combines expert judgment with an optimization algorithm that efficiently searches combinations of parameters relevant for 3D printing, enabling high-fidelity soft material products to be printed.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
5
Study finds US Forest Service lands underused by minorities193 million acres throughout the United States—are a national treasure intended for use by everyone. But a new study by San Francisco State University Professor of Recreation, Parks & Tourism Nina Roberts and the U.S. Forest Service finds that many ethnic minorities are not using or enjoying these places.
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Science | The Guardian
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'Riot of processes': dunes of frozen methane detected on Pluto's surfaceDwarf planet’s methane dunes, located near a glacier of nitrogen, come as a surprise to scientists Scientists have detected a large field of dunes on the surface of the distant, frigid dwarf planet Pluto apparently composed of windswept, sand-sized grains of frozen methane. The dunes, spotted on images taken by Nasa’s New Horizons spacecraft during its 2015 flyby, sit at the boundary between a he
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Quanta Magazine
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CRISPR Gene-Editing Pioneers Win Kavli Prize for NanoscienceDespite being introduced only a half dozen years ago, the simple and powerful DNA editing tool called CRISPR- Cas is now routinely hailed as one of the greatest biotechnology advances of the past century. This morning, three pioneers in the development of this nanotechnology — Emmanuelle Charpentier of the Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology in Berlin, Jennifer Doudna of the University of
20h
Popular Science
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What’s hiding in the outer solar system?Space Is there a planet—or even planets—waiting to be discovered out there? As our understanding of the outer solar system has grown, we’re facing new questions. And it’s renewing talks about planets past Neptune. And not Pluto, Eris, Makemake,…
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The Scientist RSS

Artificial Nerve Senses Pressure, Moves Cockroach LegThe device could one day help enable prosthetics deliver richer touch information to users.
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New on MIT Technology Review
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Automation is hitting small US businesses, and—surprise!—it’s not all badWe talk about the future of work at small firms with MIT professor Liz Reynolds.
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Live Science
36
Researchers Crack the Code of 'Flying Doughnuts'Toroids! Toroids! Toroids!
20h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Drowsy worms offer new insights into the neuroscience of sleepScientists studying worms have discovered a group of cells that help the body transition from wakefulness to slumber.
20h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Two ancient populations that diverged later 'reconverged' in the AmericasA new genetic study of ancient individuals in the Americas and their contemporary descendants finds that two populations that diverged from one another 18,000 to 15,000 years ago remained apart for millennia before mixing again. This historic ;reconvergence; occurred before or during their expansion to the southern continent.
20h
Big Think
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Can a machine be ethical? Why teaching AI ethics is a minefield.Artificial intelligence will soon be powerful enough to operate autonomously, how should we tell it to act? What kind of ethics should we teach it? Read More
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Science current issue
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When facts are not enough
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Scientists aim to smoke out wildfire impacts
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Will U.S. academies expel sexual harassers?
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Science current issue
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New copies of old gene drove brain expansion
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Science current issue

Europe's science spending set for another big boost
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Science current issue

United Kingdom unveils ambitious air pollution plan
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Science current issue
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The galaxy builders
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Decision-making in a storm of discontent
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Dunes across the Solar System
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The nutrient environment affects therapy
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Science current issue
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Ancient human genomes–keys to understanding our past
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Science current issue

Neuromorphic circuits impart a sense of touch
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Science current issue
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A new view of embryo development and regeneration
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Science current issue
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Student-centered, modernized graduate STEM education
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The accessible predator
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Probing the microbial
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Science current issue
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Call to restrict neonicotinoids
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Science current issue

U.S. budget targets fish and wildlife work
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Science current issue

Science transcends cultures in Taiwan
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Controls on seed dormancy
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Science current issue

The global impacts of food production
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Predation favors the unadventurous
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Triggering quakes in a geothermal space
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Science current issue

Curtailed conversations
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1
Arenes get a light boost onto copper
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A leg up for neuroprosthetics
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Science current issue

Unexpected basophil activation
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Mapping the vertebrate developmental landscape
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Methane ice dunes on Pluto
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I've got a feeling
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Science current issue

Founder effects in modern populations
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Science current issue

Glyphosate: Menace or savior?
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Metabolic plasticity foils drug development
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Reducing bycatch while sustaining harvests
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Strength and stability through opposition
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Acetylene in, PAHs out
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Keeping stress granules in check
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Island life
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Bacteria restricted via C3-mediated autophagy
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Structured in a flash
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A (dis)course in postdoc identities
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Overcoming working memory limitations
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Science current issue
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Single-cell mapping of gene expression landscapes and lineage in the zebrafish embryoHigh-throughput mapping of cellular differentiation hierarchies from single-cell data promises to empower systematic interrogations of vertebrate development and disease. Here we applied single-cell RNA sequencing to >92,000 cells from zebrafish embryos during the first day of development. Using a graph-based approach, we mapped a cell-state landscape that describes axis patterning, germ layer fo
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Science current issue
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Reducing foods environmental impacts through producers and consumersFood’s environmental impacts are created by millions of diverse producers. To identify solutions that are effective under this heterogeneity, we consolidated data covering five environmental indicators; 38,700 farms; and 1600 processors, packaging types, and retailers. Impact can vary 50-fold among producers of the same product, creating substantial mitigation opportunities. However, mitigation i
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Science current issue
63
Dunes on PlutoThe surface of Pluto is more geologically diverse and dynamic than had been expected, but the role of its tenuous atmosphere in shaping the landscape remains unclear. We describe observations from the New Horizons spacecraft of regularly spaced, linear ridges whose morphology, distribution, and orientation are consistent with being transverse dunes. These are located close to mountainous regions
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Science current issue
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A bioinspired flexible organic artificial afferent nerveThe distributed network of receptors, neurons, and synapses in the somatosensory system efficiently processes complex tactile information. We used flexible organic electronics to mimic the functions of a sensory nerve. Our artificial afferent nerve collects pressure information (1 to 80 kilopascals) from clusters of pressure sensors, converts the pressure information into action potentials (0 to
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Science current issue
4
The November 2017 Mw 5.5 Pohang earthquake: A possible case of induced seismicity in South KoreaThe moment magnitude ( M w ) 5.5 earthquake that struck South Korea in November 2017 was one of the largest and most damaging events in that country over the past century. Its proximity to an enhanced geothermal system site, where high-pressure hydraulic injection had been performed during the previous 2 years, raises the possibility that this earthquake was anthropogenic. We have combined seismo
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Science current issue
5
Assessing whether the 2017 Mw 5.4 Pohang earthquake in South Korea was an induced eventThe moment magnitude ( M w ) 5.4 Pohang earthquake, the most damaging event in South Korea since instrumental seismic observation began in 1905, occurred beneath the Pohang geothermal power plant in 2017. Geological and geophysical data suggest that the Pohang earthquake was induced by fluid from an enhanced geothermal system (EGS) site, which was injected directly into a near-critically stressed
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Science current issue

A radical approach to the copper oxidative addition problem: Trifluoromethylation of bromoarenesTransition metal–catalyzed arene functionalization has been widely used for molecular synthesis over the past century. In this arena, copper catalysis has long been considered a privileged platform due to the propensity of high-valent copper to undergo reductive elimination with a wide variety of coupling fragments. However, the sluggish nature of oxidative addition has limited copper’s capacity
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Science current issue
5
Feedback regulation of COOLAIR expression controls seed dormancy and flowering timePlants integrate seasonal signals, including temperature and day length, to optimize the timing of developmental transitions. Seasonal sensing requires the activity of two proteins, FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC) and FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT), that control certain developmental transitions in plants. During reproductive development, the mother plant uses FLC and FT to modulate progeny seed dormancy in resp
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Science current issue
32
Predator-driven natural selection on risk-taking behavior in anole lizardsBiologists have long debated the role of behavior in evolution, yet understanding of its role as a driver of adaptation is hampered by the scarcity of experimental studies of natural selection on behavior in nature. After showing that individual Anolis sagrei lizards vary consistently in risk-taking behaviors, we experimentally established populations on eight small islands either with or without
20h
Science current issue

The effect of partisanship and political advertising on close family tiesResearch on growing American political polarization and antipathy primarily studies public institutions and political processes, ignoring private effects, including strained family ties. Using anonymized smartphone-location data and precinct-level voting, we show that Thanksgiving dinners attended by residents from opposing-party precincts were 30 to 50 minutes shorter than same-party dinners. Th
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Science current issue
45
Ancient human parallel lineages within North America contributed to a coastal expansionLittle is known regarding the first people to enter the Americas and their genetic legacy. Genomic analysis of the oldest human remains from the Americas showed a direct relationship between a Clovis-related ancestral population and all modern Central and South Americans as well as a deep split separating them from North Americans in Canada. We present 91 ancient human genomes from California and
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Science current issue
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Ancient genomes from Iceland reveal the making of a human populationOpportunities to directly study the founding of a human population and its subsequent evolutionary history are rare. Using genome sequence data from 27 ancient Icelanders, we demonstrate that they are a combination of Norse, Gaelic, and admixed individuals. We further show that these ancient Icelanders are markedly more similar to their source populations in Scandinavia and the British-Irish Isle
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Science current issue

New Products
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Finding a community in the lab
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Single-cell reconstruction of developmental trajectories during zebrafish embryogenesisDuring embryogenesis, cells acquire distinct fates by transitioning through transcriptional states. To uncover these transcriptional trajectories during zebrafish embryogenesis, we sequenced 38,731 cells and developed URD, a simulated diffusion-based computational reconstruction method. URD identified the trajectories of 25 cell types through early somitogenesis, gene expression along them, and t
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Science current issue

The dynamics of gene expression in vertebrate embryogenesis at single-cell resolutionTime series of single-cell transcriptome measurements can reveal dynamic features of cell differentiation pathways. From measurements of whole frog embryos spanning zygotic genome activation through early organogenesis, we derived a detailed catalog of cell states in vertebrate development and a map of differentiation across all lineages over time. The inferred map recapitulates most if not all d
20h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
6
Hydropower in Cambodia could threaten food security of regionFarmers and anglers in Cambodia depend on the Mekong River's predictable seasonal patterns, but new dams for hydroelectricity are altering the hydrology of the river. These changes have the potential to threaten fish migration, livelihoods, and regional food security. A new paper from the University of Illinois and Iowa State University urges a participatory approach for managing the Mekong River
20h
The Atlantic
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A Month of Anti-Government Protest in NicaraguaWidespread protests against Nicaraguan President Daniel Ortega's government, which began on April 18, have devolved into deadly violence several times. A march organized yesterday, on Nicaragua’s Mother’s Day, took place to commemorate those mothers who had lost their children during the ongoing demonstrations. Reuters reports that “witnesses said pro-government armed groups opened fire on the ma
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48
Big Tech Trades Splashy Conference Demos for IntrospectionAt the conference where Steve Jobs sparred with Bill Gates, tech executives grapple with their place in a changed world.
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Live Science
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This 'Hawk Mummy' Was Actually HumanTurns out, beneath the carefully wrapped cartonnage was a stillborn fetus from ancient Egypt.
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The Atlantic
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What Virginia's Vote Means for the Future of Medicaid ExpansionLost in the manifold dramas of the Trump administration is the fact that one of the main sagas of the Obama administration is finding its way to a close. After the Affordable Care Act expanded Medicaid in 2010 to the whole of the American poor, it launched a struggle that would play out in hospitals, courts, and statehouses around the country. Expansion would soon become a referendum on the proje
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Popular Science
47K
Spiders are secretly great roommatesAnimals So please stop killing them I know it may be hard to convince you, but let me try: Don’t kill the next spider you see in your home. Why? Because spiders are an important part of nature and our…
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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AI researchers design 'privacy filter' for your photosAs concerns over privacy and data security on social networks grow, researchers have created an algorithm to dynamically disrupt facial recognition systems.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
A new understanding of how glucose makes you fatGlucose is the energy that fuels cells, and the body likes to store glucose for later use. But too much glucose can contribute to obesity, and scientists have long wanted to understand what happens within a cell to tip the balance.
21h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New guidelines recommend earlier colorectal cancer screeningNew guidelines developed by the American Cancer Society (ACS) recommend that screening for colorectal cancer for average-risk adults begin at age 45, five years earlier than the previous recommendation.
21h
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The 'Thanksgiving Effect' and the Creepy Power of Phone DataResearchers used smartphone-location data and polling results to peer into millions of people's personal lives. Could bad actors do the same?
21h
TED Talks Daily (SD video)
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How vultures can help solve crimes | Lauren PharrCan a bird that symbolizes death help the living catch criminals? In this informative and accessible talk, forensic anthropologist Lauren Pharr shows us how vultures impact crime scenes — and the assistance they can provide to detectives investigating murders. (This talk contains graphic images.)
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Big Think
400+
6 logical fallacies politicians often use—and how to guard yourself against themLogical fallacies will be everywhere this election season. Here's how to find the bad arguments and beat them. Read More
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Live Science
500+
A Giant Blue Whale Just Turned Up In the Red SeaHow did this whale find itself between Egypt, Israel, and Saudi Arabia?
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NYT > Science
500+
Matter: The Great Breakup: The First Arrivals to the Americas Split Into Two GroupsThe earliest populations in the Americas would not mingle again for thousands of years. Why they separated is still a mystery.
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NYT > Science
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Thanksgiving Got Shorter After the 2016 Election, Study Says. You Can Guess Why.Americans who went to areas of opposite political leanings cut 30 to 50 minutes off family gatherings, an analysis of smartphone data showed.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Symptoms worsen around menses for people with borderline personality disorderSymptoms associated with borderline personality disorder — a severe and chronic mood disorder characterized by an inability to manage strong emotions — tend to worsen just before and during menses, according to a study in Psychological Medicine.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Discovery reveals how cells try to control levels of key HIV proteinSalk scientists uncover potential new targets for antiviral drugs using novel laboratory method.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

SF State study finds US Forest Service lands underused by minoritiesA new study by San Francisco State University and the US Forest Service finds that Forest Service lands are underused by minorities. The study recommends that public agencies improve their outreach to and hiring of minorities.
21h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
An artificial nerve system gives prosthetic devices and robots a sense of touchStanford and Seoul National University researchers have developed an artificial nervous system that could give prosthetic limbs or robots reflexes and the ability to sense touch.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
4
The genes from Icelanda's first settlers reveal the origin of their population in detailIn just over 1,000 years, Icelanders have gone through numerous changes in their gene pool, to the extent that Icelanda's first settlers, who came to the island from Norway and the British and Irish isles between the years 870 and 930, are much more similar to the inhabitants of their original home countries than to Iceland's present-day inhabitants.
21h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Mother knows best — how plants help offspring by passing on seasonal cluesNew research has delved into the genetic memory systems through which plants pass seasonal information down to their seeds to give them the best chance of reproductive success.
21h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Scientists rethink co-evolution of marine life, oxygenated oceansResearchers in the Department of Earth Sciences at Syracuse University have confirmed that rising oceanic and atmospheric oxygen levels co-evolved with marine life hundreds of millions of years ago.
21h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Flexible organic electronics mimic biological mechanosensory nervesResearchers at Seoul National University and Stanford University developed artificial mechanosensory nerves using flexible organic devices to emulate biological sensory afferent nerves. They used the artificial mechanosensory nerves to control a disabled insect leg and distinguish braille characters. The research describes artificial mechanosensory nerves based on flexible organic devices to emula
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Researchers document another cost of 2016 election: Shorter Thanksgiving visitsScientists at UCLA and Washington State University are seeing America's polarization play out at the family dinner table, with Thanksgiving visits that were 30 to 50 minutes shorter after the presidential election of 2016.Economists Keith Chen and Ryne Rohla also saw that visits were even shorter for travelers from media markets with intense political advertising. Their findings appear in the late
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Study finds two ancient populations that diverged later 'reconverged' in the AmericasA new genetic study of ancient individuals in the Americas and their contemporary descendants finds that two populations that diverged from one another 18,000 to 15,000 years ago remained apart for millennia before mixing again. This historic ;reconvergence; occurred before or during their expansion to the southern continent.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Two genetic stories of human migration into Iceland and the AmericasTwo separate studies — both benefiting from ancient DNA — paint detailed pictures of the founding, migration, and evolution of human populations in Iceland and the Americas, respectively.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Massive analysis reveals ways to make food earth-friendly againA novel and potentially unrivalled meta-analysis of global food production cycles and their environmental impacts around the world may serve as a critical resource for policymakers, food producers and consumers alike, helping reveal data-supported opportunities to reduce food's impact on the environment. More than 570 million farms produce crops in almost all the world's climates and soils, causin
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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New Horizons data reveals dunes made of methane on PlutoDunes are known to form on Earth, Mars, Venus, Titan and Comet 67P — and now on the dwarf planet Pluto, according to a new study, the latest discovery from New Horizons.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Political tension during the 2016 US Election cut many Thanksgiving dinners shortIn November 2016 in the United States, just after the last presidential election, Thanksgiving — a time that often unites family members of opposing political views — looked a little different, according to a study that's explored political polarization at the household level; namely, groups of people who had opposing political views spent 20 to 50 minutes fewer at the Thanksgiving table than po
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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The making of a human population uncovered through ancient Icelandic genomesIn a study published today, scientists at deCODE Genetics report new findings about the founding of the Icelandic population, and its subsequent evolution, based on ancient DNA. The study appears today in the online edition of Science.
21h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Synthetic 'tissues' build themselvesHow do complex biological structures — an eye, a hand, a brain — emerge from a single fertilized egg? This is the fundamental question of developmental biology, and a mystery still being grappled with by scientists who hope to one day apply the same principles to heal damaged tissues or regrow ailing organs.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Research reveals how the same foods create markedly different environmental impactsResearch published in the journal Science highlights the environmental impacts of thousands of food producers and their products, demonstrating the need for new technology to monitor agriculture and environmental labels on food products.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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First peoples: Study finds two ancient ancestries 'reconverged' with settling of South AmericaNew research using ancient DNA finds that a population split after people first arrived in North America was maintained for millennia before mixing again before or during the expansion of humans into the southern continent.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Scientists reveal the secrets behind Pluto's dunesScientists have discovered dunes on Pluto, and say they are likely to have been formed of methane ice grains released into its rarefied atmosphere.
21h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Research shows biosecurity reduces invasions of plant pathogens over a national borderA major new study appearing in PLOS Biology on May 31 examines more than a century of fungal pathogens, finding well-aimed biosecurity measures cut the spread of unwanted fungi into a nation, even in the face of increased globalized trade.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Dormant cytomegalovirus resides in eyes of healthy mice long after infectionInfection with cytomegalovirus triggers long-lasting eye inflammation and establishes a dormant pool of the virus in the eyes of mice with healthy immune systems, according to new research presented in PLOS Pathogens by Valentina Voigt of the Lions Eye Institute in Western Australia and colleagues.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Study gauges impact of dengue virus on EthiopiaDengue, a mosquito-borne RNA virus, is one of the most serious and rapidly spreading arboviral diseases in the world. Now, researchers reporting in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases have provided the first baseline data on the prevalence and risk factors of the virus in Ethiopia.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Stronger biosecurity measures slow the spread of plant pathogens despite trade increasesBiosecurity measures can effectively curb the rate of invasive plant pathogen introductions, even as trade and travel increase, according to a study publishing on May 31 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology. The article is authored by Benjamin Sikes, now at the University of Kansas, and is a collaborative project between New Zealand's Bio-Protection Research Centre and Manaaki Whenua-Landcare R
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Big Think
36
Hate dealing with passwords? You might like the next version of Chrome.Google Chrome boasts 310 million active users across the world, and it might just kill off the usage of passwords. Read More
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The Atlantic
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The Increasingly Intricate Story of How the Americas Were PeopledTens of thousands of years ago, the places that have since been named Russia and Alaska were not separated by water, but connected by a continuous bridge of land. People walked across that land, heading eastward from Asia. For a time, their journey was blocked by two gigantic ice sheets that smothered most of what is now Canada. But once the ice started melting, those early pioneers—the ancestors
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The Atlantic
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What Pluto and California Have in CommonWhen Jani Radebaugh saw a picture of Pluto a few years ago, she saw something that reminded her of Earth. She was examining one of the high-resolution images taken by New Horizons, the NASA spacecraft that swung by the dwarf planet in 2015 before coasting deeper into the solar system. In one spot, Pluto’s gray surface resembled the Mesquite Flat Sand Dunes, in California’s Death Valley, where the
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New Scientist – News
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Bent bird feathers repair themselves when soaked in waterElastic fibres inside a feather can spring back to their original shape when soaked in water, helping it straighten even after being bent nearly in half
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New Scientist – News
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US ‘right to try’ drugs law could hurt terminally ill peopleA new law in the US allows terminally ill people access to unproven medicine, but it’s not clear who will pay if treatments go horribly wrong
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Latest Headlines | Science News
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Never-before-seen dunes on Pluto spotted in New Horizons imagesImages from the New Horizons spacecraft reveal dunes on Pluto — but the sand-sized grains must have had an unusual boost to get moving.
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Viden
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Nordisk samarbejde skal sikre fremtidens lynhurtige mobilnet5G vil komme droner og selvkørende biler til gode. Nordens statsministre mødtes for nyligt og blev enige om en fælles strategi på området.
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Live Science
41
Why Can't We Remember Our Dreams?In waking life, such a case of quickly forgetting recent experiences would surely land you in a doctor's office. With dreams, however, forgetting is normal. Why?
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Applying ecological principles to gut healthWhen disturbances upset the balance of a forest, field, or stream, ecologists practice ecological restoration to assist ecosystem recovery. In 'Gut Microbiota and Human Health: Insights from Ecological Restoration' published in The Quarterly Review of Biology (June 2018), Matthew R. Orr, Kathryn M. Kocurek, and Deborah L. Young explore the potential applications of ecological restoration to medici
22h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Screening resident physicians entering training misses many at risk for sleep impairmentA Massachusetts General Hospital study finds that screening first year resident physicians to identify those with pre-existing sleep problems does not appear to provide useful data regarding risks of developing sleep impairment during subsequent months.
22h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Firing up a new alloyA centuries-old materials bonding process is being tested aboard the International Space Station in an experiment that could pave the way for more materials research of its kind aboard the orbiting laboratory. Sintering is the process of heating different materials to compress their particles together.
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Science : NPR
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Last Straw For Plastic Straws? Cities, Restaurants Move To Toss These SippersAs awareness grows about the environmental toll of single-use plastics, U.S. retailers and regulators alike are finding ways to decrease their use. And straws have become a prime target. (Image credit: Barbara Woike/AP)
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Mother knows best—how plants help offspring by passing on seasonal cluesNew research carried out by the John Innes Centre has delved into the genetic memory systems through which plants pass seasonal information down to their seeds to give them the best chance of reproductive success.
22h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
88
Scientists rethink co-evolution of marine life, oxygenated oceansResearchers in the Department of Earth Sciences at Syracuse University have confirmed that rising oceanic and atmospheric oxygen levels co-evolved with marine life hundreds of millions of years ago.
22h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Biologists program cells to self-organize into 3D-structures in a first step towards tissues that regrow and self-repairHow do complex biological structures—an eye, a hand, a brain—emerge from a single fertilized egg? This is the fundamental question of developmental biology, and a mystery still being grappled with by scientists who hope to one day apply the same principles to heal damaged tissues or regrow ailing organs.
22h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Research reveals how the same foods create markedly different environmental impactsResearchers at Oxford University and the Swiss agricultural research institute, Agroscope, have created the most comprehensive database yet on the environmental impacts of nearly 40,000 farms, and 1,600 processors, packaging types, and retailers. This allows them to assess how different production practices and geographies lead to different environmental impacts for 40 major foods.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Scientists reveal the secrets behind Pluto's dunesScientists have discovered dunes on Pluto, and say they are likely to have been formed of methane ice grains released into its rarefied atmosphere.
22h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
6
Research shows biosecurity reduces invasions of plant pathogens over a national borderA major new study appearing in PLOS Biology on May 31 examines more than a century of fungal pathogens, finding well-aimed biosecurity measures cut the spread of unwanted fungi into a nation, even in the face of increased globalized trade.
22h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
31
The making of a human population uncovered through ancient Icelandic genomesIn a study published today, scientists at deCODE Genetics report new findings about the founding of the Icelandic population, and its subsequent evolution, based on ancient DNA. The study appears today in the online edition of Science.
22h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
75
Researchers document another cost of 2016 election: Shorter Thanksgiving visitsScientists at UCLA and Washington State University are seeing America's polarization play out at the family dinner table, with Thanksgiving visits that were 30 to 50 minutes shorter after the presidential election of 2016.
22h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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First peoples: Study finds two ancient ancestries 'reconverged' with settling of South AmericaRecent research has suggested that the first people to enter the Americas split into two ancestral branches, the northern and southern, and that the "southern branch" gave rise to all populations in Central and South America.
22h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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From face recognition to phase recognitionScientists use approach analogous to facial-recognition technology to track atomic-scale rearrangements relevant to phase changes, catalytic reactions, and more.
22h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
16
Memory depends on protein 'off-switch'Memory, learning and cognitive flexibility depend on a protein 'off-switch' in the brain, according to a breakthrough discovery.
22h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
40
Insufficient vitamin D linked to miscarriage among women with prior pregnancy lossAmong women planning to conceive after a pregnancy loss, those who had sufficient levels of vitamin D were more likely to become pregnant and have a live birth, compared to women with insufficient levels of the vitamin, according to a recent analysis.
22h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Ban e-cig flavors and misleading advertisements to protect youth, says global respiratory groupRespiratory doctors and scientists from six continents have warned of the dangers posed to children and adolescents by electronic cigarettes. They are calling for an immediate ban on flavorings and on marketing e-cigarettes as lower risk alternatives to children and adolescents.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
3
Bees adjust to seasons with nutrients in flowers and 'dirty water'Researchers have discovered that honey bees alter their diet of nutrients according to the season. A spike in calcium consumption in the fall, and high intake of potassium, help prepare the bees for colder months when they likely need those minerals to generate warmth. A careful inventory of the bees' nutrient intake revealed shifting sources and how limitations in nutrient availability from these
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
10
Lego-like chemical building blocks self-assemble into catalyst for hydrogen fuel cellsWhat's better than platinum?
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
15
New study estimates the carbon footprints of 13,000 citiesCologne, Manchester, and Montreal rarely make the list of the world's megacities. Yet they are all in the top 100 worldwide in terms of their carbon footprint. A new study says it is these cities, as much as the Jakartas and New Delhis of the world, that drive the global carbon footprint.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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New study estimates the carbon footprints of 13,000 citiesMany see cities as the new front lines of the climate change fight. Identifying the mayors and city councils in cities with the biggest carbon footprints, and the most power to make big changes, could mobilize a wave of reinforcements.
22h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Lego-like chemical building blocks self-assemble into catalyst for hydrogen fuel cellsWhat's better than platinum? In hydrogen fuel cells, the answer may be cofacial cobalt porphyrins. These self-assembled molecules — which are great at facilitating a chemical reaction needed to produce power from hydrogen and oxygen — could be the next advance in alternative energy.
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Popular Science
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You should reboot and update your router to protect from malwareTechnology The FBI and several other security organizations want some help busting the VPNFile malware. VPNFile is a nasty bit of malware that can infect your router, so go reboot it ASAP.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Goodbye 'stress granules': Study expands possibilities for treating neurological diseasesCell biologists have deepened understanding of proteins associated with neurodegenerative diseases. The findings could open up new treatment approaches for disorders including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), among others.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Scientists boost crop production by 47 percent by speeding up photorespirationIncreasing production of a common, naturally occurring protein in plant leaves could boost the yields of major food crops by almost 50 percent, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Social ties could preserve memory, slow brain agingA strong social network could be the key to preserving memory. New research has found that mice housed in groups had better memories and healthier brains than animals that lived in pairs.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
12
Drugs that suppress immune system may protect against Parkinson'sA new study shows that people who take drugs that suppress the immune system are less likely to develop Parkinson's disease, which is characterized by difficulty with movement.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
11
Growth hormone may provide new hope for stroke survivorsLess fatigue and better recovery of cognitive abilities such as learning and memory. These may be the results of growth hormone treatment after a stroke, an experimental study of mice suggests.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
2
Whiskered auklets lack wanderlust, are homebodies insteadA new study presents some of the best evidence that whiskered auklets are an outlier in the auklet family by not migrating and instead staying close to 'home' (their breeding colonies) year-round.
22h
Big Think
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Is the new 'right-to-try' law libertarian quackery or lifesaving hope?President Donald Trump signed a 'right-to-try' bill on Wednesday, but some think the new law will do more harm than good. Read More
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
14
Hawaii has 5 other active volcanoes in addition to KilaueaHawaii's Kilauea volcano has captivated people around the world by shooting lava high into the sky and sending rivers of molten rock pouring down hillsides into the ocean over the past month.
22h
The Atlantic
77
So Is the North Korea Summit Back On, or What?Just one week after Donald Trump abruptly canceled his summit with Kim Jong Un, a flurry of diplomatic activity suggests the meeting is back on. U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo is meeting with one of Kim Jong Un’s top advisers, Kim Yong Chol, in New York, while lower-level U.S. officials huddle with their North Korean counterparts on the northern side of the demilitarized zone, to negotiate t
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Feed: All Latest
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You've Never Seen Waves Like This BeforePhotographer Rachael Talibart spends months waiting for the perfect shot.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Telegram accuses Apple of blocking updatesSecure messaging app Telegram accused Apple on Thursday of blocking its updates for users worldwide after Russian authorities imposed a ban on Telegram for refusing to hand over keys to decrypt messages.
22h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
Blue whale sighted in Red Sea for first time: EgyptA rare blue whale, the largest animal on Earth, has been sighted in the Red Sea's Gulf of Aqaba for the first time, Egypt's environment ministry said Thursday.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Waymo adds 62,000 vehicles for autonomous taxi serviceGoogle-owned Waymo is adding as many as 62,000 Fiat Chrysler minivans to its autonomous fleet in an expanded collaboration announced by the companies on Thursday.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Cool weather can amplify attacks of tree-killing bark beetleNew research looks at how the destructive southern pine beetle reacts to cooler weather in its climate-induced, new northern ranges.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

For American Indian youth, risk is higher for alcohol, drug use, say CSU researchersSince 1975, Colorado State University social scientists have studied rates of drug and alcohol use among American Indian youths living on or near reservations. Their latest published results underscore a trend that has persisted over many decades: Native adolescents are more likely to use alcohol and illicit drugs than non-Native adolescents in the United States.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Cool weather can amplify attacks of tree-killing bark beetleAs a warming climate invites the destructive southern pine beetle to expand its northern range, the cooler weather in this new habitat can potentially increase the lethality of the insect's assault on trees, according to a new study from Dartmouth College.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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NASA adds up Alberto's soaking rainfall in the US Southeast and Tennessee ValleySubtropical Storm Alberto brought soaking rainfall to the southeastern U.S. up through the Tennessee and Ohio Valleys. Using a variety of resources to gather data, including the Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite, NASA estimated the rainfall Alberto created over its path.
22h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
11
Psychologists: Women are not to blame for the wage gapWomen should not be blamed for the gender wage gap in the United States, according to psychologists at Rice University. To eliminate the gap, organizations must provide training, support and opportunities for growth, the researchers said.
23h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Engineers design new solid polymer electrolyte, paving way for safer, smaller batteries and fuel cellsFuel cells and batteries provide electricity by generating and coaxing positively charged ions from a positive to a negative terminal which frees negatively charged electrons to power cellphones, cars, satellites, or whatever else they are connected to. A critical part of these devices is the barrier between these terminals, which must be separated for electricity to flow.
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Science | The Guardian
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Vera Evison obituaryExpert on Anglo-Saxon graves and glass The archaeologist Vera Evison, who has died aged 100, expanded knowledge of the crucial period in British history that saw the transition from Roman Britain to Anglo-Saxon England, the fifth to seventh centuries AD. She did this by pioneering the introduction of continental methods to develop the systematic study of Anglo-Saxon cemeteries. Connections between
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Ingeniøren
3
Kender du den kemiske forskel mellem ensrettet og modsatrettet vand?Ud over vand er to 100-års jubilæer for hhv. Richard Feynman og flip-floppen emnerne i denne uges Værd at Vide.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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From face recognition to phase recognition: Neural network captures atomic-scale rearrangementsIf you want to understand how a material changes from one atomic-level configuration to another, it's not enough to capture snapshots of before-and-after structures. It'd be better to track details of the transition as it happens. Same goes for studying catalysts, materials that speed up chemical reactions by bringing key ingredients together; the crucial action is often triggered by subtle atomic
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
6
International team studies world's last uncharted major river deltaWhen Cyclone Nargis struck Myanmar's Irrawaddy-Salween Delta in 2008, it killed nearly 140,000 people and left more than 2 million residents of this low-lying region homeless.
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Viden
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Ny opdagelse: Folk med fedme-gen kan tabe sig med den rette medicinNogle mennesker er genetisk bestemt til at blive fede. Men de kan nu få hjælp med den rette behandling, viser forskning.
23h
Live Science
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No, This Tiny Beast Is Not Half-Mammal, Half-Reptile (But It's Still Super Cool)Half-mammal, half-reptile? That's not a thing.
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Popular Science
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Carbon emissions are sucking the nutrition out of our foodEnvironment As CO2 rises, the nutrient content of many plants goes down. As CO2 rises, the nutrient content of many plants goes down. Pollution can make healthy food less nutritious and more sugary.
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The Atlantic
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Unfortunately, the Electric Scooters Are FantasticThey would understand my plight in Old Europe. In ancient, barbaric days when local vassals managed petite armies, brute knights often swept into villages, declaring the inhabitants subject to new laws and new lords before riding off again with the changing of the season. When this latest army invaded my village, it seemed no different than the rest. I had heard rumor of it for weeks, had feared
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The Atlantic
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Trump Is Weaponizing PardonsBeyond President Trump’s prolific dishonesty and extensive use of social media, it’s difficult to forecast what his administration’s enduring legacies may be for the presidency. But it’s becoming ever more likely that his innovative use of the pardon power will be one. On Thursday, President Trump announced ( on Twitter, of course ) that he will pardon Dinesh D’Souza, the conservative writer conv
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New on MIT Technology Review
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Oculus just kicked off an experiment in social VR
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NYT > Science
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A River of Warblers: ‘The Greatest Birding Day of My Life’At an observatory in Quebec, they were hoping for a 50,000-bird day. They saw more than half a million.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Memory depends on protein 'off-switch,' researchers findMemory, learning and cognitive flexibility depend on a protein 'off-switch' in the brain, according to a breakthrough discovery made by an international research collaboration co-led by the University of Warwick.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Labor exploitation is endemic in global tea and cocoa industries, international study findsLabor exploitation including forced labor is endemic at the base of global tea and cocoa supply chains, according to a pioneering international study published by researchers at the University of Sheffield today.
23h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

From face recognition to phase recognitionScientists use approach analogous to facial-recognition technology to track atomic-scale rearrangements relevant to phase changes, catalytic reactions, and more.
23h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
UMD-led study shows how Earth slows the solar wind to a gentle breezeA University of Maryland-led study describes the first observations of the process of electron heating in Earth's bow shock. The researchers found that when the electrons in the solar wind encounter the bow shock, they momentarily accelerate to such a high speed that the electron stream becomes unstable and breaks down. This breakdown process robs the electrons of their high speed and converts the
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Organoid profiling identifies treatments for pancreatic cancerPatient-derived organoids, hollow spheres of cells cultured from tumors, can quickly and accurately predict how patients with pancreatic cancer respond to a variety of treatments, facilitating a precision-medicine approach to the deadly disease.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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The genome guardian turns to the dark side: Opportunity for drug discovery against cancer?p53, known as the guardian of the genome, is a protein that blocks cancer development and progression. But mutated p53 adopts new roles and conformations that are catastrophic for the cell. A new study reports on innovative technique that traps p53 short-lived conformers.
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New on MIT Technology Review
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Gene therapy is saving children’s lives—but screening to discover who needs it is lagging behindStates in the US have been slow to test newborns for genetic conditions.
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The Economist: The world this week
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Politics this week
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The Economist: The world this week
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KAL’s cartoon
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The Economist: The world this week
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Business this week
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Scientific American Content: Global
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How the World Is Coping 1 Year after Trump Abandoned Paris Climate PactWithout U.S. participation, some experts worry other nations could relax their CO2 emissions reduction efforts — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Inside Science
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May's Stunning Space PicturesMay's Stunning Space Pictures Peruse pictures that peer at neighboring galaxies, distant lonely stars and the sky above an erupting volcano. 2_eruption_glow_tl_crop.jpg A time-lapse image of the sky above the Kīlauea volcanic eruption, as viewed by the Gemini North Telescope. Image credits: Gemini Observatory/AURA/NSF Space Thursday, May 31, 2018 – 12:00 Abigail Malate, Staff Illustrator (Inside
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Psychologists: Women are not to blame for the wage gapWomen should not be blamed for the gender wage gap in the United States, according to psychologists at Rice University. To eliminate the gap, organizations must provide training, support and opportunities for growth, the researchers said.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Making data matterThe advent of 3D printing has made it possible to take imaging data and print it into physical representations, but the process of doing so has been prohibitively time-intensive and costly.A new data processing method pioneered by the Wyss Institute and the MIT Media Lab removes that roadblock by converting various different forms of imaging data into a file type called 'dithered bitmaps,' which p
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

NASA adds up Alberto's soaking rainfall in the US Southeast and Tennessee ValleySubtropical Storm Alberto brought soaking rainfall to the southeastern U.S. up through the Tennessee and Ohio Valleys. Using a variety of resources to gather data, including the Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite, NASA estimated the rainfall Alberto created over its path.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

News flash about hot flashes: They can last longer than you thinkMenopause symptoms are not just for midlife anymore, according to a new Mayo Clinic study published this month in the Journal of the North American Menopause Society.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

'Why not take a risk' attitude widespread among patients and providers, GW study findsA new study led by David Broniatowski, an assistant professor in the George Washington University's department of engineering management and systems engineering, finds the 'Why not take a risk?' mentality is widespread among patients and medical care providers.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Meet three new genes that may have influenced human brain sizeThree brain development genes are found only in humans and may have helped drive the rapid expansion of the brain starting roughly three million years ago.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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New findings link estrogen and T cell immune response to autoimmune inflammationWomen are more prone to the development of autoimmune diseases. The female hormone estrogen is likely to affect the immune system. A team of scientists from Turku Center for Biotechnology and University of Georgia reported new findings related to the involvement of estrogen hormone receptor in autoimmune diseases.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Paving the way for safer, smaller batteries and fuel cellsResearch led by University of Pennsylvania engineers suggests a different way forward: a new and versatile kind of solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) that has twice the proton conductivity of the current state-of-the-art material. Such SPEs are currently found in proton-exchange membrane fuel cells, but the researchers' new design could also be adapted to work for the lithium or sodium-ion batteries
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Study shows how Earth slows the solar wind to a gentle breezeAs Earth orbits the sun at supersonic speed, it cuts a path through the solar wind. This fast stream of charged particles, or plasma, launched from the sun's outer layers would bombard Earth's atmosphere if not for the protection of Earth's magnetic field.
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New on MIT Technology Review
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Your phone’s camera could help self-driving cars navigate
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Human-Specific Genes Implicated in Brain SizeThree members of a gene family called NOTCH2NL may have been involved in the evolution of humans' big cortex.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Parasites affect flight ability of wild seabirds, new study findsA study has found that parasites affect flight ability of wild seabirds, which may make it harder for them to raise chicks.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Perception that antibiotics are harmless is widespreadA new study of decision-making about the use of antibiotics in medicine has found that the mistaken belief that antibiotics are harmless is widespread, especially among patients. Clinicians and patients alike are influenced by the general notion of 'why not take a risk,' a belief that there is potential benefit and very little risk in taking antibiotics, when in reality there are specific downside
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

The link between handgrip strength and healthy lungs in older womenResearch has linked handgrip strength to other health problems in older adults. Losing muscle strength as you age also means losing muscle strength in your respiratory system. However, little is known about the link between handgrip strength and lung function in older adults. A team of researchers recently decided to learn whether testing handgrip strength could help identify lung function in olde
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Cosmic collision lights up the darknessThough it resembles a peaceful rose swirling in the darkness of the cosmos, NGC 3256 is actually the site of a violent clash. This distorted galaxy is the relic of a collision between two spiral galaxies, estimated to have occured 500 millions years ago. Today it is still reeling in the aftermath of this event.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Lipid molecules can be used for cancer growthCancer cells can when the blood supply is low use lipid molecules as fuel instead of blood glucose. This has been shown in animal tumour models by researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden in a study published in Cell Metabolism. The mechanism may help explain why tumours often develop resistance to cancer drugs that inhibit the formation of blood vessels.
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Byd løs! Ung mand sælger ud af sine data på EbayHvorfor give sine værdifulde data væk gratis?
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The Atlantic
300+
Trump's New Blow to EuropeBefore the United States announced Thursday that it would impose steel and aluminum tariffs on the European Union, the Europeans had already resigned themselves to their fate. After months of lobbying Washington for a permanent waiver from the tariffs, the EU this week dropped expectations that it would receive any sort of exemption. Instead, it cautioned its members to “ prepare for the worst .”
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Scientific American Content: Global
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3 CRISPR Scientists Win Prestigious Award, Fanning Controversy over CreditThe tangled history over the genome-editing tool has played out in court and scientific circles — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Micro-CT scans show 2,100-year-old 'hawk' mummy a stillborn babyA tiny Egyptian mummy long believed to be that of a hawk is actually a rare example of a near-to-term, severely malformed fetus, says an examination led by mummy expert Andrew Nelson of Western University in London, Canada.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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ORNL ramps up production of key radioisotope for cancer-fighting drugThe Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory is now producing actinium-227 (Ac-227) to meet projected demand for a highly effective cancer drug through a 10-year contract between the U.S. DOE Isotope Program and Bayer.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Number of wild mountain gorillas exceeds 1,000"This represents one of the rare success stories in conservation. The population of mountain gorillas in the Virunga Volcanoes has more than doubled in the past three decades, despite intensive threats of poaching, habitat degradation, and civil conflict," stated Martha Robbins, research scientist and gorilla expert at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology. "This increase exemplif
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Cosmic collision lights up the darknessThough it resembles a peaceful rose swirling in the darkness of the cosmos, NGC 3256 is actually the site of a violent clash. This distorted galaxy is the relic of a collision between two spiral galaxies, estimated to have occurred 500 million years ago. Today it is still reeling in the aftermath of this event.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Mothers with high emotional, cognitive control help their children behaveA new parenting study finds that the greater emotional control and problem-solving abilities a mother has, the less likely her children will develop behavioral problems, such as throwing tantrums or fighting.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
16
The secret to longevity is in the microbiome and the gutMcGill University scientists fed fruit flies with a combination of probiotics and an herbal supplement called Triphala that was able to prolong the flies' longevity by 60 percent and protect them against chronic diseases associated with aging.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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AI researchers design 'privacy filter' for your photosAs concerns over privacy and data security on social networks grow, U of T Engineering researchers led by Professor Parham Aarabi and graduate student Avishek Bose have created an algorithm to dynamically disrupt facial recognition systems.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Got an appetite that won't subside? You've got hungry peptidesThe brain's sewer system is a channel of communication that tells you when you are hungry, scientists find.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Most surgical residents want personal financial education offered during medical trainingClose to 80 percent of resident respondents to one online survey said they think personal financial education is needed during residency, according to study findings in the Journal of the American College of Surgeons.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Conflicting guidance on opioid prescribing can jeopardize pain mgmt for patients with cancerPersistent pain and recurrent episodes of pain are common for those who are living with cancer, or for those undergoing cancer treatment. When used properly, prescription opioids have long been known to help combat pain experienced by people with cancer.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Inefficient fat metabolism a possible cause of overweightProtracted weight gain can, in some cases, be attributed to a reduced ability to metabolise fat, a new study from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden published in the esteemed journal Cell Metabolism shows. Sensitive individuals might need more intensive lifestyle changes if they are to avoid becoming overweight and developing type 2 diabetes, claim the researchers, who are now developing means of mea
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Atherosclerosis: Stopped on timeFor the first time, LMU researchers are pointing out the influence of the internal clock on atherosclerosis. Their study gives an important indication on how the therapeutic approach can be improved.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Neuroscientists discover roles of gene linked to Alzheimer'sMIT researchers found that the gene APOE4 promotes the aggregation of beta amyloid proteins that cause plaques seen in Alzheimer's patients. They also found they could eliminate signs of Alzheimer's in brain cells with APOE4 by editing the gene using CRISPR/Cas9 to turn it into the APOE3 variant.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Penn-developed approach could limit toxicity of CAR T therapy in acute myeloid leukemiaA new approach pioneered at the University of Pennsylvania's Abramson Cancer Center may provide a new path towards treating acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with CAR T cells.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Single protein on-off switch controls learning flexibility and acquisition of new memoriesScientists have for the first time shown how a single molecule expressed in the brain affects how we learn new tasks and acquire new memories. The discovery has profound implications for understanding why some older people, including those living with dementia and those with neurodegenerative conditions such as Alzheimer's, struggle in remembering recent facts (short-term memory) and adapting to n
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Bacteria ensure square meal for bloodsucking ticksHow do ticks live solely on blood? A study has elucidated the crucial role played by symbiotic bacteria that synthesize B vitamins. These nutrients are scarcely found in the blood ticks ingest but are essential to their life cycle. The study conducted by CNRS and CIRAD researchers has also shown that the bacteria inherited their B vitamin synthesis pathways from a pathogenic ancestor whose genome
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

This is your brain detecting patternsDetecting patterns is an important part of how humans learn and make decisions. Now, researchers have seen what is happening in people's brains as they first find patterns in information they are presented.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Genes found only in humans influence brain sizeThree nearly identical genes found only in humans appear to play a critical role in the development of our large brains, according to a study led by researchers at UC Santa Cruz. The genes appeared between 3 and 4 million years ago, just before the period when fossils show a dramatic increase in the brain sizes of human ancestors. In modern humans, the genes are involved in genetic defects associa
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Scientists use RFID chips to track biological samplesResearchers want to use radio frequency identification (RFID) chips for keeping track of organoids, samples of human tissue that mimic pieces of organs and are grown from stem cells. The organoids the researchers embedded with RFID chips functioned normally and withstood extreme conditions, suggesting that they could be a useful way to organize and identify the large quantities of organoids needed
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
24
Meet NOTCH2NL, the human-specific genes that may have given us our big brainsThe genetic changes behind the expansion of human brains that played an important role in our ability as a species to think, problem-solve, and develop culture have been elusive. But in a pair of papers publishing May 31 in Cell, two teams of researchers identify a gene family, NOTCH2NL, that appears to play an important role in human-specific cortex development and may have been a driving force i
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Abnormal lipid metabolism in fat cells predicts future weight gain and diabetes in womenThe inefficient breakdown of fats predicts later weight gain and metabolic complications such as type 2 diabetes in women, researchers report May 31 in the journal Cell Metabolism. Low levels of hormone-stimulated lipolysis — a biochemical process by which triglycerides are broken down into energy-rich fatty acids — were associated with weight gain and metabolic problems 13 years later. The rese
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
5
How did human brains get so large?The human brain is a remarkable organ, but how did it evolve to give us such unprecedented cognitive abilities? The research team of Pierre Vanderhaeghen (ULB, VIB-KU Leuven) turned to the genome for answers. In the latest edition of Cell, they report that a set of genes found only in humans and in no other living species, controls key steps of brain development.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
9
Faith leaders, Pygmies join forces in fight for Congo forestReligious groups and delegates of the Pygmy people indigenous to the Democratic Republic of Congo have met to push forward with a campaign to protect the Congo Basin rainforest, participants said.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Video: Why cake donuts and yeast donuts are so differentDonuts are universally beloved. But there's a significant sensory difference between biting into a cake donut and biting into a yeast-raised donut.
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The Atlantic
500+
A New Genetic Clue to How Humans Got Such Big BrainsIt started with some blobs of brain-like tissue, growing in a dish. Frank Jacobs , then at the University of California at Santa Cruz, had taken stem cells from humans and monkeys, and coaxed them into forming small balls of neurons. These “ organoids ” mirror the early stages of brain development. By studying them, Jacobs could look for genes that are switched on more strongly in the growing bra
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Live Science
19
One-Third of New Heroin Users Become Dependent on ItEvery day, an estimated 300 to 520 people in the U.S. try heroin. But how many develop a dependency?
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Popular Science
100+
Exploring the complicated link between volcanoes and religionScience Did an eruption turn Icelandic vikings into Christians? In his research article, Oppenheimer compared Eldgjá’s devastating eruption to accounts in the Icelandic poem Voluspá, written some 60 years later as Iceland was…
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Meet NOTCH2NL, the human-specific genes that may have given us our big brainsThe evolution of larger brains in the last 3 million years played an important role in our ability as a species to think, problem-solve, and develop culture. But the genetic changes behind the expansion that made us human have been elusive. In a pair of papers publishing May 31 in Cell, two teams of researchers identify a gene family, NOTCH2NL, that appears to play an important role in human-speci
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
48
Scientists use RFID chips to track biological samplesRadio frequency identification (RFID) chips are used today for everything from paying for public transit to tracking livestock to stopping shoplifters. But now, researchers in the U.S. and Japan want to use them for something else: keeping track of organoids, samples of human tissue that mimic pieces of organs and are grown from stem cells. The organoids the researchers embedded with RFID chips fu
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Beyond BRCA: Links between breast, second primary cancer and inherited mutationsRates of inherited mutations in genes other than BRCA1/2 are twice as high in breast cancer patients who have had a second primary cancer — including, in some cases, different types of breast cancer — compared to patients who have only had a single breast cancer.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Ocean-migrating trout adapt to freshwater environment in 120 yearsSteelhead trout, a member of the salmon family that live and grow in the Pacific Ocean, genetically adapted to the freshwater environment of Lake Michigan in less than 120 years.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
40
Micro-CT scans show 2,100-year-old 'hawk' mummy a stillborn babyA tiny Egyptian mummy long believed to be that of a hawk is actually a rare example of a near-to-term, severely malformed fetus, says an examination led by mummy expert Andrew Nelson of Western University in London, Canada.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
For patients with prostate cancer, dysfunction due to treatment side effects results in increased emotional distress — and vice versaA new study published in The Journal of Urology reports that men with prostate cancer who had worse urinary, bowel, and sexual function after surgery or radiotherapy than others experienced more emotional distress. Interestingly, the reverse was also true as experiencing more distress led to worse function. The likelihood of this reciprocal relationship highlights the importance of greater investm
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Kiel physicists achieve hitherto most accurate description of highly excited electronsIt is the 'drosophila' of modern physics: the uniform electron gas. Just as the fruit fly is used to describe the principles of genetics this model of a gas can be used to investigate important characteristics of electrons. A team of the Institute of Theoretical Physics and Astrophysics at Kiel University succeeded in describing the thermodynamic properties of electrons under extreme conditions. T
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Latest Headlines | Science News
55
Experts advise: Start colorectal screening at 45, not 50The American Cancer Society recommends that colorectal screening begin at the age of 45 for average-risk individuals.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
21
Oil and gas wastewater as dust suppressant less than idealAt the least, wastewater from oil and gas drilling should be treated in a waste treatment facility before it is used on dirt roads to suppress dust or deice roads. At the best, affordable, nontoxic dust suppressants should be developed and used, according to a multidisciplinary team of researchers.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
5
Pain expectation is pain reality for children, research findsThe study reinforces that pain expectation informs pain experience in children, significantly. The research used the application of thermal pain at varying temperatures, accompanied by verbal commands.
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)
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What gardening taught me about life | tobacco brownGardens are mirrors of our lives, says environmental artist tobacco brown, and we must cultivate them with care to harvest their full beauty. Drawing on her experience bringing natural public art installations to cities around the world, brown reveals what gardening can teach us about creating lives of compassion, connection and grace.
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Nyheder – Forskning – Videnskab

Ny analyse: Vi er på vej mod et demokratisk A- og B-holdKvinderne, de højtuddannede, og borgere med job og dansk statsborgerskab er gode til at udnytte…
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The Atlantic
300+
The Dazzling Failures of Super Mario Bros.There’s perhaps no better example of how different the Hollywood landscape was 25 years ago than the fact that Bob Hoskins was once Disney’s choice to launch a major new franchise. 1993’s Super Mario Bros. was produced for a robust $48 million, was released in the prestige summer slot of May 28, and was based on the best known video-game title in history at the height of its success. It also star
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Hospital superbug uses tiny sticky fingers to infect medical tools and devicesThe antibiotic-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii bacterium is one of the most globally harmful bacteria that causes nosocomial infections. Researchers at the University of Turku have discovered that the bacterium attaches to plastic medical devices using tiny finger-like structures. The researchers were able to develop antibodies that prevent the bacterial spread.
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Ingeniøren
15
Pensionist: Danmark spillede dobbeltspil med atomreaktor under indlandsisenPensionist siger, at han under den kolde krig var udstationeret på Camp Century af forsvarets efterretningstjeneste og afrapporterede om USA’s planer om atomreaktorer og missiler i Grønland.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Soaking up the water and the sweat — a new super desiccantUNSW Sydney scientists have developed a new carbon-based material that could revolutionise moisture control in applications as diverse as electronics, packaging and air conditioning — and which could even be used to keep footwear fresh. The new super dessicant, made from graphene oxide, significantly outperforms current drying agents, and is twice as absorbent as the industry standard, silica gel
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
5
Number of wild mountain gorillas exceeds 1,000A recent census of the critically endangered mountain gorillas conducted in the Virunga Volcanoes found a minimum of 604 individuals. In combination with the 400 individuals living in the only other population in Bwindi Impenetrable National Park, Uganda, these new results push the total number of wild mountain gorillas in the world to over 1000.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
OSU, NOAA researchers document widespread methane seeps off Oregon coastFor the past two years, scientists from Oregon State University and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) have surveyed the Pacific Northwest near-shore region mapping sites where underwater bubble streams signify methane gas is being released from the seafloor.
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Futurity.org
3
Creating human-chicken embryos clarifies ‘organizer’ cellsNew research clarifies the outcomes of cells within a human embryo. Why, for example, does one stem cell become a neuron rather than a muscle cell? And why does another decide to build cartilage rather than cardiac tissue? New research illuminates the molecular circuitry that determines a cell’s fate. The work, which appears in Nature , establishes a new platform for studying the earliest stages
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The Atlantic
100+
What Richard Pryor’s Stand-Up Can Teach WritersBy Heart is a series in which authors share and discuss their all-time favorite passages in literature. See entries from Colum McCann, George Saunders, Emma Donoghue, Michael Chabon, and more. Doug McLean One of Richard Pryor’s many gifts, his friend the comedian Paul Mooney once said, was an ability to “lose himself”: to channel characters with such eerie totality that he almost seemed to disapp
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New Scientist – News
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Scientists turned a car into a giant flytrap to count insectsThe experience of having your windscreen spattered with dead insects has inspired an innovative new study designed to look at what effect traffic has on local insects
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Popular Science
500+
Burial is becoming the most boring thing to do with your dead bodyTechnology Death is more personal(ized) than ever. New technology and a willingness to experiment means the death industry, typically so reluctant to change, is finally being disrupted.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Facebook sinking fast among US teens: surveyFacebook YouTube InstagramFacebook is rapidly losing ground against rival internet platforms in attracting and keeping US teenagers, a survey showed Thursday.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
German spy agency can keep tabs on internet hubs: courtGermany's spy agency can monitor major internet hubs if Berlin deems it necessary for strategic security interests, a federal court has ruled.
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Feed: All Latest
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Sony Xperia XZ2 Review: Great Camera, OK PhoneSony's latest Android phone is a little awkward, but snaps some beautiful shots. Our full WIRED review.
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Ingeniøren
1
Aktivister indgiver GDPR-klager over Apple, LinkedIn og AmazonDen franske privatlivsgruppe 'La Quadrature du Net' har klaget over Facebook, Google, Apple, LinkedIn og Amazon til de franske myndigheder, fordi virksomhederne angiveligt overtræder GDPR-reglerne ved at betinge adgang til deres tjenester med brugerens samtykke.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Cocaine use alters gene expression in brain reward circuitsA study in Biological Psychiatry has identified unique genetic changes in the brain's reward circuitry that are associated with cocaine use, including first-time use, withdrawal, and re-exposure to the drug after prolonged withdrawal. The findings reveal important information on how cocaine addiction reprograms gene expression and provide insight into the molecular basis of cocaine addiction in un
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
3
Aerial robot that can morph in flightFrench researchers have drawn inspiration from birds to design an aerial robot capable of altering its profile during flight. To reduce its wingspan and navigate through tight spaces, it can reorient its arms, which are equipped with propellers that let it fly like a helicopter. It paves the way for a new generation of large robots that can move through narrow passages, making them ideal for explo
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Understanding immune system interplay to improve organ transplant successA rare opportunity to analyze both blood and tissue samples from human transplant recipients may lead to improved ways of identifying transplant recipients at risk of rejection and treating autoimmune disease.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Probe into farm animals could help treat drug-resistant bacteriaGrowing threats to public health could be addressed by cutting-edge research that reveals how farm animals contribute to the spread of drug-resistant bacteria, a study suggests.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Gut-inhabiting enterobacter increases subcutaneous fat massA research project performed at the universities of Jyväskylä and Turku (Finland) studied the effects of a specific gut enterobacterium on body fat mass.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Prototype nuclear battery packs 10 times more powerOur next smartphone or electric vehicle might be powered by a nuclear battery instead of your usual lithium-ion cell thanks to a breakthrough made by Russian researchers. This piece describes the design of a nuclear battery generating power from the beta decay of nickel-63, a radioactive isotope. The new battery prototype packs about 3,300 milliwatt-hours of energy per gram, which is 10 times more
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Dolphin algorithm could lead to better medical ultrasoundsMillions of years of evolutionary fine-tuning have made dolphins phenomenally good at using echolocation to orient themselves, find food and communicate with one another. But how do they actually do it? New research from Lund University in Sweden shows that they emit two intertwined ultrasound beam components at different frequencies — and with slightly different timing.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
24
Deep learning extends imaging depth and speeds up hologram reconstructionDeep learning, which uses multi-layered artificial neural networks, is a form of machine learning that has demonstrated significant advances in many fields, including natural language processing, image/video labeling and captioning. In image processing, deep learning demonstrates significant potential for automated identification and labeling of features of interest, such as abnormal regions in a
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Futurity.org
17
See how we view the world vs. dogs, cats, and goldfishHuman eyes aren’t particularly adept at distinguishing colors or seeing in dim light, when compared to those of many other animals. But when it comes visual acuity, we’re able to see fine details that most animals can’t, researchers say. For a new study of animal vision, which appears in Trends in Ecology & Evolution , the researchers compiled previously published estimates of visual acuity for r
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
Studies of space, hearing and DNA attract $1 million awardsSeven scientists will share three $1 million prizes for studying the birthplace of stars, the mechanisms of hearing and a widely used tool for editing DNA.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
GM revs up autonomous car unit and dormant shares flyShares of General Motors posted their largest one-day gain since the company's rebirth from bankruptcy eight years ago, after Japanese technology conglomerate SoftBank decided to pump $2.25 billion into GM's autonomous car unit.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
12
Ancient tooth shows Mesolithic ancestors were fish and plant eatersPrevious analysis of Mesolithic skeletal remains in this region has suggested a more varied Medittaranrrean diet consisting of terrestrial, freshwater and marine food resources, not too dissimilar to what modern humans eat today.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
55
Old Maori village discovered by Otago archaeologistsA group of University of Otago archaeologists have uncovered the peripheries of a 14th century Māori village in Gisborne, New Zealand.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
41
Researchers document widespread methane seeps off Oregon coastFor the past two years, scientists from Oregon State University and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) have surveyed the Pacific Northwest near-shore region mapping sites where underwater bubble streams signify methane gas is being released from the seafloor.
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Softbank Pours $2.25 Billion Into GM's Self-Driving Car BizIt’s the biggest deal yet in a nascent but booming industry, and confirms the automaker’s status as one of the leading players.
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Dagens Medicin

Regeringen vil indføre tolkegebyr på 1.675 kr. for brug af tolk på hospitaletHar du boet i Danmark i tre år eller mere, kommer det til at koste 1.675 kr., hvis du har brug for en tolk på hospitalet.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Ancient tooth shows Mesolithic ancestors were fish and plant eatersAnalysis of the skeletal remains of a Mesolithic man found in a cave on a Croatian island has revealed microscopic fish and plant remains in the dental plaque of a tooth — a first-time discovery for the period and region.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

SUTD developed highly stretchable hydrogels for high resolution multimaterial 3D printingResearchers from SUTD and HUJI have developed the most stretchable 3D printed hydrogel in the world — it can be stretched up to 1300 percent. The hydrogel is also suitable for UV curing based 3D printing techniques, enabling it to be used for high resolution complex geometric printing.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Nanoplastics accumulate in marine organisms and may pose harm to aquatic food chainsA research team from the National University of Singapore discovered that nanoplastics can accumulate in marine organisms over time. This could pose harm to aquatic food chains and human health
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Why do older male birds father more illegitimate children?When female birds have chicks as the result of an extra-marital fling, the fathers are almost always older males, and scientists are finding out why.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Next-generation sequencing sheds light on rotavirus in IndonesiaRotavirus A causes acute diarrhea in young children, and infects both animals and humans worldwide. A Japanese research group has found that the acute gastroenteritis infecting children in Indonesia between 2015 and 2016 was caused by dominant strains of equine-like G3 rotavirus, genetically different from human strains of the virus. The findings could shed light on how the virus traveled to Indon
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Oil and gas wastewater as dust suppressant less than idealAt the least, wastewater from oil and gas drilling should be treated in a waste treatment facility before it is used on dirt roads to suppress dust or deice roads. At the best, affordable, nontoxic dust suppressants should be developed and used, according to a multidisciplinary team of researchers.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Old Maori village discovered by Otago archaeologistsA group of University of Otago archaeologists have uncovered the peripheries of a 14th century Maori village in Gisborne, New Zealand.
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Ingeniøren

Efter problemfyldt start: Svensk by har været off-grid i 150 timerE.ON's svenske Simris-projekt har været plaget af mus og dårligt VE-vejr, men viser nu gode resultater. Der er dog brug for mere batterilagring.
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Viden
2
Google og Uber overvejer førerløst taxa-samabejdeFirmaerne er i dialog om, at Googles autonome taxaer skal kunne tilkaldes via Ubers app, oplyser Ubers direktør.
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Popular Science
20
Four gadgets for creating a calm baby nurseryGadgets Keep baby—and parents—serene. An adorable baby makes home an exciting place, but new parents need an occasional break from that postpartum party for things such as, oh, eating and sleeping.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
35
Guide to the classics: Darwin's On the Origin of SpeciesCharles Darwin's On the Origin of Species (originally published in 1859) shares a deplorable fate with many other classics: it is known to everyone, yet rarely read.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
Cotton harvest surges in Ivory CoastCotton production in Ivory Coast rose by 25 percent, from 328,000 tonnes in the 2016-17 season to 412,000 tonnes in 2017-18, according to official figures.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
11
Less is more when it comes to predicting molecules' conductivityForward-thinking scientists in the 1970s suggested that circuits could be built using molecules instead of wires, and over the past decades that technology has become reality. Chemists present an innovative method that cuts computational costs and improves accuracy by calculating interactions between pairs of electrons and extrapolating those to the rest of the molecule.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
17
Study estimates increased death rate in Puerto Rico in months after Hurricane MariaThe mortality rate in Puerto Rico rose by 62 percent [95 percent confidence interval (CI) 11percent to 114 percent] after Hurricane Maria, according to a new study.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
The right squeeze for quantum computingA new theoretical model involving squeezing light to just the right amount to accurately transmit information using subatomic particles is bringing us closer to a new era of computing.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
6
Cell-like nanorobots clear bacteria and toxins from bloodEngineers at the University of California San Diego have developed tiny ultrasound-powered robots that can swim through blood, removing harmful bacteria along with the toxins they produce. These proof-of-concept nanorobots could one day offer a safe and efficient way to detoxify and decontaminate biological fluids.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Study suggests scientists can use microbial measurements to gauge river flowOregon State University scientists have created a tool that can predict the flow rate of Arctic rivers with a surprising degree of accuracy based on the makeup and abundance of bacteria in the water.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Antifungal drug eliminates sleeping bowel cancer cells in miceAn antifungal medication, commonly prescribed for toenail infections, could help eliminate dormant cells within bowel tumors, according to new research funded by Cancer Research UK and published in the Journal of Experimental Medicine today.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
11
Hamburg leads charge with Germany's first diesel banHamburg on Thursday became the first German city to ban older diesel vehicles from some roads, a measure that is largely symbolic but disputed by carmakers and the government.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Surging oil prices to hurt airlines' profits: IATASurging oil prices are forecast to dent airlines' profits and could significantly hurt their bottom lines next year, the boss of airline industry group IATA warned Thursday.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
The future is fenced for Australian animalsMany of Australia's mammals spend their entire lives imprisoned, glimpsing the outside world through tall chain-link fences and high-voltage wires. There are dozens of these enclosures across Australia. Many are remote, standing alone in the endless expanse of inland Australia, but others are on the outskirts of our largest cities – Melbourne, Perth, Canberra.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Indian government heads for airline auction flopIndia's government could be forced to rethink the auction of a majority stake in its debt-stricken airline Air India, with no bids yet received with a deadline looming Thursday.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Japan's SoftBank to sink $2.25B into GM autonomous car unitThe Japanese technology conglomerate SoftBank will spend $2.25 billion for a nearly a 20 percent stake in General Motors' autonomous vehicle unit.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
Study suggests scientists can use microbial measurements to gauge river flowOregon State University scientists have created a tool that can predict the flow rate of Arctic rivers with a surprising degree of accuracy based on the makeup and abundance of bacteria in the water.
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Big Think
93
Will blockchain technology solve our identity problems?Cybersecurity costs billions of dollars each year. Building on a blockchain could solve many of our security problems. Read More
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
5
How children's picturebooks can disrupt existing language hierarchiesThere are many factors that shape the value we place on different languages.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
200+
New quantum computer design to predict molecule propertiesThe standard approach to building a quantum computer with majoranas as building blocks is to convert them into qubits. However, a promising application of quantum computing—quantum chemistry—would require these qubits to be converted again into so-called fermions. Physicists from Leiden and Delft propose to turn majoranas directly into fermions, making computations more efficient. Their research w
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
21
Scientists boost crop production by 47 percent by speeding up photorespirationPlants such as soybeans and wheat waste between 20 and 50 percent of their energy recycling toxic chemicals created when the enzyme Rubisco—the most prevalent enzyme in the world—grabs oxygen molecules instead of carbon dioxide molecules. Increasing production of a common, naturally occurring protein in plant leaves could boost the yields of major food crops by almost 50 percent, according to a ne
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Feed: All Latest
100+
Silicon Valley Takes on the Future of FertilityNew start-ups use wearable technology and mail-order blood tests to help women get pregnant and make sense of their future baby-making options.
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Feed: All Latest
300+
Xbox Is Losing the Console War—But That's a Good ThingNot being on top makes it a lot easier for Microsoft to take risks with its hardware.
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Feed: All Latest
100+
*The Expanse*’s Epstein Drive Has Some Awesome Physics Baked InYou should never show a physicist a spaceship's control panel.
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Ingeniøren
12
Analyse: Derfor har amerikanske techgiganter opgivet at udvikle egne bilerBortset fra Tesla har de store techvirksomheder i Sillicon Valley opgivet at udvikle egne selvkørende biler.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
93
Two-faced star reveals a pulsar’s surprising bulkAn ultramassive pulsar is frying its stellar companion so that the star shows two different temperatures.
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Science-Based Medicine
40
Are generic drugs equivalent to brand-name drugs?Generic drugs cost a fraction of brand-name drugs. What gives us confidence they are equivalent? Science.
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
5
The American Chopper Guys Discuss "The Meme"#AmericanChopper – All New, Monday @10/9c Paul Sr., Paul Jr., and Mikey share a laugh over the "American Chopper Argument Meme" and discuss the impact it has had on themselves and others. Which one is your favorite? Watch live and catch up on DiscoveryGO: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/american-chopper/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
64
Marine heatwaves are getting hotter, lasting longer and doing more damageOn land, heatwaves can be deadly for humans and wildlife and can devastate crops and forests.
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Scientific American Content: Global
100+
Should Climate Scientists Fly?Wrong question; instead of scapegoating individual researchers, we should blame the centers of power, including corporations and political leaders — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Futurity.org
1
Website brings patients into lung cancer screening decisionsA new study could help personalize the lung cancer screening decision for every patient. The results could help doctors fine-tune their advice to patients, so that it’s based not just on a patient’s individual lung cancer risk and the potential benefits and harms of screening, but also a likely range of patient attitudes about looking for problems and dealing with the consequences. The study, whi
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
23
Climate change increasing risks of lightning-ignited firesFires ignited by lightning have and will likely continue to increase across the Mediterranean and temperate regions in the Southern Hemisphere under a warmer climate, according to a new study co-led by a Portland State University researcher.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
The complicated history of building pipelines in CanadaThe federal government's $4.5 billion decision to buy the Trans Mountain pipeline has set off a new debate about the controversial project.
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The Scientist RSS

Aging-Related Diseases May Be a Negative Outcome of Human EvolutionGenetic adaptations for human brain development also make us vulnerable to Alzheimer's disease, according to a new study.
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The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: Artificial CellResearchers made a synthetic cell that can photosynthesize and make proteins crucial for cellular structure.
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Dagens Medicin

Meget forskellige syn på psykiatrien i økonomiforhandlingerPsykiatrien er et af de store emner i økonomiforhandlingerne mellem regionerne og regeringen. Der er lang vej til enighed, siger regionernes formand.
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Dagens Medicin

Medicinrådet udvider anbefalinger af SpinrazaFlere børn med alvorlig muskelsvindsygdom kan tilbydes behandling med Spinraza, lyder ny anbefaling fra Medicinrådet.
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Dagens Medicin

Ny ledende overlæge til radiologisk afdeling på Slagelse og Næstved SygehusAnnette Midtgaard tiltræder 1. juni stillingen som ledende overlæge på Slagelse og Næstved Sygehus.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
A new family 'super court' may not save time or result in better judgmentsAttorney-General Christian Porter has just announced the proposed merger of the Family Court of Australia (FCA) and the Federal Circuit Court (FCC) to create a new "super court" with a mouthful of a name: the Federal Circuit and Family Court of Australia (FCFCA).
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
22
Virgin Galactic performs the second test of VSS Unity, reaching Mach 1.9When it comes to the dream of commercial space exploration and space tourism, a few names really stand out. In addition to Elon Musk and Jeff Bezos, you have Richard Branson – the founder and CEO of the Virgin Group. For years, Branson has sought to make space tourism a reality through Virgin Galactic, which would take passengers into suborbit using his SpaceShipTwo class of rocket planes.
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Live Science
1K
Why You Should Spend Time Doing Nothing, According to ScienceTechnology disturbs our leisure time, our family time – even our consciousness.
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Ingeniøren
3
Kronik: Vindmøller skal producere grønt brændstof til skibsmotorer
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Dana Foundation

Tips to Get Moving for National Senior Health and Fitness Day!Image: Shutterstock Whether you’re already physically active or looking to get started, today is a great day to get moving! It’s the 25 th anniversary of Senior Health & Fitness Day , the nation’s largest annual health promotion event for older adults. More than 1,000 local organizations in all 50 states are hosting activities such as fitness walks, low-impact exercises, health screenings, health
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Scientific American Content: Global
300+
How Much Can We Know?The reach of the scientific method is constrained by the limitations of our tools and the intrinsic impenetrability of some of nature's deepest questions — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Infection rates after colonoscopy, endoscopy at US specialty centers are far higher than expectedThe rates of infection following colonoscopies and upper-GI endoscopies performed at US outpatient specialty centers are far higher than previously believed, according to a Johns Hopkins study published online this month in the journal Gut.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Scientists boost crop production by 47 percent by speeding up photorespirationIncreasing production of a common, naturally occurring protein in plant leaves could boost the yields of major food crops by almost 50 percent, according to a new study led by scientists at the University of Essex published today in Plant Biotechnology Journal.
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The Atlantic
500+
Memes Are Becoming Harder to MonetizeWhen a new meme explodes, the race to transform it into merchandise is fierce. Within hours of the laurel vs. yanny controversy , for instance, Instagram meme pages were attempting to cash in by selling yanny-and-laurel-themed T-shirts, aprons, and more. But there was a time, from around 2008 to 2012, when seeing memes out in the world, plastered on books, merchandise, and T-shirts, was still nov
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Feed: All Latest
59
From Apple HomePod to Google Daydream: All the Things We Loved in MayA look back at everything we tested and liked this month, as well as the most promising updates to the stuff we're already using.
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Futurity.org
11
Team pinpoints the brain’s ‘home’ for spiritual experiencesScientists have identified a possible neurobiological home for the spiritual experience—the sense of connection to something greater than oneself. Activity in the parietal cortex, an area of the brain involved in awareness of self and others as well as attention processing, seems to be a common element among individuals who have experienced a variety of spiritual experiences, according to a study
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Scientific American Content: Global
13
Some Trees Beat Heat with SweatDuring extreme heat waves, a species of eucalyptus copes by releasing water and taking advantage of evaporative cooling. Other trees may do the same. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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New Scientist – News
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There’s no such thing as a ‘detox’ – so let’s ban the wordUsing the word detox to promote drinks such as tea as well as food and other products is essentially meaningless. Time to give it a rest, says Anthony Warner
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New Scientist – News
100+
Ambien can cause bizarre behaviour – but not racist tweetsRoseanne Barr has blamed the sleeping pill Ambien for her racial attack on a former Obama adviser. The drug is known to cause a range of strange side effects
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Ingeniøren

Vejrdrone skal give mere nøjagtige målinger og mindre forureningMen Norges Meteorologisk institutt tror, vejrballoner stadig vil have hovedrollen.
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Scientific American Content: Global
32
Sorry, Mom and Dad, Toys Cannot Supercharge Your BabyHundreds of toys promise to help babies read, learn, do math and walk earlier than expected—many without scientific backing — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Science | The Guardian
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Antibiotic resistance crisis worsening because of collapse in supplyPatients given wrong dose, wrong type, or poor quality medicines because supply is waning The antibiotic resistance crisis which is threatening to render many diseases untreatable is being fuelled not just by overuse of the drugs, but a fragile supply chain that is at risk of collapse, experts have warned. The authors of a white paper by the Dutch non-profit organisation Access to Medicine say a
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New Scientist – News
27
There is only one anti-shark tool for surfers that seems to workMagnetic bracelets, smelly wax, and electric field generators are all sold as shark deterrents, but only one of them halves the risk of getting munched
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The Atlantic
10K
Why No One Answers Their Phone AnymoreThe telephone swept into Americans’ lives in the first decades of the 20th century. At first, no one knew exactly how to telephone. Alexander Graham Bell wanted people to start conversations by saying, “Ahoy-hoy!” AT&T tried to prevent people from saying “hello,” arguing in Telephone Engineer magazine that it was rude. But eventually, Americans learned to say “hello.” People built a culture aroun
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The Atlantic
400+
The Bleak Truths of Unbreakable Kimmy SchmidtThe biggest joke of Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt , now in its fourth season on Netflix, is that Kimmy (Ellie Kemper) is still smiling. When she emerged in 2015 from her 15-year imprisonment in a bunker, dazed and bleary, Kimmy’s immediate response to finding the world (mostly) the same as she left it was a broad, irrepressible grin. And her sense of joy came to define the show’s aesthetic. Unbreakab
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Heavier astronauts have higher risk of post-flight eye changesNew research suggests that changes in the eye that occur during spaceflight may be related to how much an astronaut weighs. The study is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology–Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Drugs that suppress immune system may protect against Parkinson'sA new study shows that people who take drugs that suppress the immune system are less likely to develop Parkinson's disease, which is characterized by difficulty with movement.
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Live Science
500+
Here's How Much Exercise You Need to Give Your Brain a BoostAny physical exercise will improve thinking, as long as you do it somewhat consistently and stick with it long enough, according to an analysis of 98 previous studies.
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Feed: All Latest
300+
The Messy, Malodorous Mystery of Marin's Dead 60-Foot WhaleThe messy, malodorous mystery of a dead 60-foot whale—just one of three to wash up in a week.
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Feed: All Latest
200+
Airbus' H160 Helicopter Saves Pilots From Their Own MistakesIf the pilot ever loses their bearings, a double-tap to the yoke automatically returns the helicopter to a stable, controlled attitude.
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Feed: All Latest
200+
Suzanne Ciani's New LP Wraps You in Quadraphonic Surround SoundA new recording by synthesizer artist Suzanne Ciani is being released on a long-forgotten analog surround-sound format.
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Feed: All Latest
72
Obama's US Digital Service Survives Trump–QuietlyTeam created in 2014 to make the government more tech-friendly soldiers on, helping agencies work more efficiently and save money.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
47
Guidelines call for limits to whole genome testing for fetusesPowerful tests offer unprecedented detail about fetal genomes. But whole-genome tests aren’t ready for widespread use yet, doctors caution.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
10
From leaves to clouds—revealing how trees' emissions shape the air around usAs he gazed down on the Amazon from above, shining leaves formed waves of foliage. The wind rippled through them, creating eddies and pools of green. From this point of view, some people may have just seen trees. But from his lofty perch, Kolby Jardine, a researcher at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, saw more—the forest's complex ecological cycle. Starting f
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Scientific American Content: Global
100+
Where Will the Ad versus Ad Blocker Arms Race End?Advertisers and software developers have been trying to outdo one another for years. Is it time for a truce? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
How to draw a line narrower than a cold virusFor the first time, a team demonstrated a technique that creates tiny, precise metallic shapes. They rastered a beam from a helium-ion microscope through a liquid precursor to induce chemical reactions. The reactions locally deposit high purity platinum. In spelling out the acronym of their national laboratory, they formed a ribbon only 15 nanometers in diameter—narrower than a cold virus.
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BBC News – Science & Environment
500+
Plastic fragment found stuck in dead harp seal's stomachThe fragment found inside the harp seal found on Skye may have caused a range of health problems, scientists say.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Are water voles at risk from development?Professor David Macdonald and Dr. Merryl Gelling of Oxford's Wildlife Conservation Research Unit (WildCRU) discuss recent work which questions the efficacy of the mitigation technique and looks at ways to better protect one of Britain's most endangered wild mammals, the water vole.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Finding better magnets faster with 3-D metal printing prototypingThe U.S. Department of Energy's Critical Materials Institute (CMI) used laser 3D metal printing to optimize a permanent magnet material that may make an economical alternative to the more expensive rare-earth neodymium iron boron (NdFeB) magnets in some applications.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
Labour exploitation is endemic in global tea and cocoa industries, international study findsLabour exploitation including forced labour is endemic at the base of global tea and cocoa supply chains, according to a pioneering international study published by researchers at the University of Sheffield today (31 May 2018).
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
A new, data-based checklist to help boost women in science leadershipGender equity in academic science may seem like a pipe dream, with the percentage of scientific leadership positions held by women in institutions a mere 5-20%
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
11
Why do older male birds father more illegitimate children?When female birds have chicks as the result of an extra-marital fling, the fathers are almost always older males, and scientists are finding out why.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Massive AI Twitter probe draws heat map of entrepreneurial personalityA world's first QUT-led study has used artificial intelligence to analyse regional personality characteristics estimated solely from language patterns in 1.5 billion Twitter posts and uncover hotspots and cold spots of entrepreneurial personality and activity across the US.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
20
Ancient fossil fills a 75 million-year gap and rewrites lizard and snake historyAustralia is famous for its many lizards and snakes, but where do they all come from?
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The Atlantic
400+
What Starbucks Got Right—and ABC Got Wrong—About RacismOn Tuesday, as the corporate headquarters of ABC Entertainment were swept up in a race maelstrom of Roseanne Barr’s making, approximately 175,000 Starbucks employees were undergoing implicit-bias training across the country. The four-hour-long program was a corporate mea culpa after viral video captured the arrest of two black men in a Starbucks for, effectively, being black in a Starbucks. There
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The Atlantic
300+
The Real Reason Why Republicans Could Win in CaliforniaPreemptive finger-pointing is already starting among Democrats as they grow increasingly concerned that Tuesday’s California primary could deal a painful blow to their hopes of recapturing the House of Representatives. But the rising laments may all be missing the root cause of the gathering threat: a long-term failure by California Democrats to invest in building a network of credible local elec
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Ingeniøren

Ingeniørers pensionskasse meldt til bagmandspolitietFinanstilsynet mener, at pensionskassen ISP burde have orienteret sine medlemmer bedre om risiko ved omvalgsmulighed.
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Ingeniøren
12
I sidste øjeblik: Minister lover, at centrale kraftværker kan slukkesEnergi-, forsynings- og klimaminister Lars Chr. Lilleholt lovede, lige inden Folketinget vedtog en ny elforsyningslov, at centrale kraftværker ikke skal tvinges i gang uden grund.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
15
NASA dives deep into the search for lifeOff the coast of Hawaii's Big Island and more than 3,000 feet beneath the ocean surface lie the warm, bubbling springs of a volcano—a deep-sea location that may hold lessons for the search for extraterrestrial life.
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