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Nyheder2018juni04

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BBC News – Science & Environment
21K
Guatemala volcano: Dozens die as Fuego volcano eruptsGuatemala Fuego VolcanoDeadly torrents of hot gas and volcanic debris engulf villages on the slopes of Fuego volcano.
3h
Science | The Guardian
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Doctors hail world first as woman’s advanced breast cancer is eradicatedImmune cells from the woman’s own body used to wipe out tumours A woman with advanced breast cancer which had spread around her body has been completely cleared of the disease by a groundbreaking therapy that harnessed the power of her immune system to fight the tumours. It is the first time that a patient with late-stage breast cancer has been successfully treated by a form of immunotherapy that
4h
Ingeniøren
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Danmark vedtager vildsvinehegnetMens EU-Kommissionen udtrykker bekymring over det danske hegn, vedtager danske politikere lovforslaget.
8h

LATEST

Live Science

Google Will End Its 'Evil' Partnership with US Military, But Not Until 2019The company will reportedly not renew its contract with the Department of Defense to develop AI imaging software for drones.
2min
Popular Science
5
Saturn's speedy rotation makes its daytime auroras possibleSpace Bright lights, big planet A new study published today in Nature Astronomy finds that magnetic outbursts on Saturn that explode around its noontime are powerful enough to drive auroras. This…
3min
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
SpaceX delays plans to send tourists around Moon: reportSpaceX will not send tourists around the Moon this year as previously announced, and will delay the project until the middle of next year, US media reported on Monday.
8min
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Rare dinosaur skeleton sells for two million eurosThe skeleton of an extremely rare form of dinosaur sold for more than two million euros ($2.3 million) at the Eiffel Tower in Paris on Monday.
8min
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Private equity group Advent takes control of Walmart BrazilWalmart announced Monday plans to hand over control of its Brazilian arm to private equity group Advent International.
8min
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
New iPhone features to include ways to use it lessApple introduced new controls for limiting how much time customers spend on their devices as the company tackles criticism that its devices are becoming increasingly addictive and distracting.
8min
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Researchers find new way to estimate magma beneath Yellowstone supervolcanoResearchers at Washington State University and the University of Idaho have found a new way to estimate how fast magma is recharging beneath the Yellowstone supervolcano. While their findings offer no help in predicting if the volcano will erupt, they can now get a better understanding of a key factor—a pool of basalt magma recharging the system—in how it works.
8min
The Atlantic
2
The Threat to Kim Jong Un Within North KoreaWe often hear that Kim Jong Un is unlikely to give up his nuclear weapons because he fears that could expose him to external attack—the way, say, Libyan leader Muammar al-Qaddafi was toppled by a U.S.-led military intervention only years after shipping away his nuclear program. But now there’s a reminder of the substantial internal obstacles to North Korean denuclearization. Ahead of nuclear talk
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The Atlantic
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The Court Slices a Narrow Ruling Out of Masterpiece CakeshopWhen the Supreme Court opened its October term last year, Masterpiece Cakeshop v. Colorado Civil Rights Commission — the “gay wedding cake” case—loomed as a blockbuster, a major step toward resolving conflicts between religious freedom and anti-discrimination laws protecting LGBT people in general and same-sex married couples in particular. But someone left the cakeshop in the rain. On Monday, th
10min
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Researchers find new way to estimate magma beneath Yellowstone supervolcanoResearchers at Washington State University and the University of Idaho have found a new way to estimate how fast magma is recharging beneath the Yellowstone supervolcano. While their findings offer no help in predicting if the volcano will erupt, they can now get a better understanding of a key factor — a pool of basalt magma recharging the system — in how it works.
12min
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New cardiac pump device more effective, less costly than standard pumpInvestigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital presented evidence that a next-generation cardiac pump device not only improves long-term outcomes but may also decrease cost of care over time for heart failure patients.
12min
New on MIT Technology Review
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Apple wants to be an AI leader againSiri Apple Shortcuts
13min
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Non-pharmacologic approaches improve outcomes for infants with neonatal abstinence syndromeA quality improvement (QI) initiative that focused on using non-pharmacologic approaches to care for infants with neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) yielded positive short-term outcomes for both the mothers and infants. The results showed a decrease in medication use, length of stay, and health care costs.
13min
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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This monkey can plan out their foraging routes just like a humanThey might not have mastered GPS technology, but vervet monkeys can solve multi-destination routes in the same way humans do.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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New understanding of hep B virus may lead to new drugsResearchers have gained new insights into the virus that causes hepatitis B — a life-threatening and incurable infection that afflicts more than 250 million people worldwide. The discovery reveals previously unknown details about the protein shell that encloses the virus' genetic blueprint and could lead to new drugs to treat the infection.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Findings could spur energy-saving electronics, quantum computingPhysicists has demonstrated a way to conduct electricity between transistors without energy loss, opening the door to low-power electronics and, potentially, quantum computing that would be far faster than today's computers. Their findings involved using a special mix of materials with magnetic and insulator properties.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Direct coupling of the Higgs boson to the top quark observedAn observation made by the CMS experiment at CERN unambiguously demonstrates the interaction of the Higgs boson and top quarks, which are the heaviest known subatomic particles. This major milestone is an important step forward in our understanding of the origins of mass.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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An abusive boss today might mean a better boss tomorrowWhen bosses yell at you, your day can be ruined. It can also ruin theirs, though, and lead to major behavioral changes that flip their attitudes at work. New research took prior workplace studies, which focused primarily on the impact abusive bosses have on their employees, and refocused the lens to see how the bosses respond to their own abusive behavior.
13min
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
7
'Carbon bubble' coming that could wipe trillions from the global economyUnlike current expectations, new research suggests that the prospects of the fossil-fuel industry are not bright, and that its demise may have profound economic and geopolitical consequences. Relying on ground breaking modelling techniques, researchers show that the consumption of fossil fuels will slow down or decline in the near future, as a result of ongoing technological change, potentially ex
13min
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Researchers study aquatic beetles native only to central WyomingUniversity of Wyoming researchers are shedding light on a rare aquatic beetle native only to central Wyoming.
14min
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Physicists use terahertz flashes to uncover state of matter hidden by superconductivityUsing the physics equivalent of the strobe photography that captures every twitch of a cheetah in full sprint, researchers have used ultrafast spectroscopy to visualize electrons interacting as a hidden state of matter in a superconductive alloy.
14min
New on MIT Technology Review
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Obama economist: We’re not preparing workers for changing jobsJason Furman, Obama’s top economist, says we need to learn from recent economic history and worry less about 20 years from now.
27min
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
7
Did extreme fluctuations in oxygen, not a gradual rise, spark the Cambrian explosion?Five hundred and forty million years ago, during the Cambrian period, life suddenly went nuts. 'Blossomed' is far too mild a word: instead, geologists call this sudden diversification an 'explosion.' But what exactly sparked the Cambrian explosion?
28min
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Guppies change their eye color to deter rivalsTiny fish called Trinidadian guppies turn their eyes black to warn other fish when they are feeling aggressive, new research shows.
28min
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Self-sustaining loop of chemical reactions could revolutionize drug productionExperts have created a self-sustaining circuit of reactions which is a greener and more efficient method of chemical production. They produce chemicals more efficiently through a looped set of reactions using enzymes in flow.
28min
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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New way to make light interact with matterResearchers have devised a new way to make light interact with matter. Reducing the wavelength of light could allow it to be absorbed or emitted by a semiconductor, their study suggests.
28min
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Capturing light in a waveguide arrayCheaper and more efficient photonic devices, such as lasers, optical fibers, and other light sources may be possible with confined light that is unaffected by imperfections in the material that confines it.
28min
Live Science
5
Earth's Magnetic Field is A Ruthless, Solar-Wind-Shredding MachineOnce again, we have Earth's magnetic field to thank for protecting us from our fire-breathing sun.
30min
Big Think
2
New study: The true cost of global warming? Much higher than estimatesCurrent climate change models are flawed when predicating the true cost to the world, new study says. Read More
30min
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Physicists use terahertz flashes to uncover state of matter hidden by superconductivityA research team led by Jigang Wang of Iowa State University and the Ames Laboratory has developed a new quantum switching scheme that gives them access to new and hidden states of matter. If researchers can learn to control the hidden state, further stabilize it and determine whether it's suitable for quantum logic operations, it could allow researchers to use it for quantum computing and other pr
33min
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Personalized cancer vaccine may increase long-term survival in patients with deadly brain cancerAn international Phase III study led by researchers at UCLA has found that a personalized GBM vaccine may increase long-term survival in some patients.
33min
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New NSF special report released ahead of World Oceans Day: Catch a Wave! The Science of SummerCatch a Wave! Join the National Science Foundation (NSF) for a look at the science behind the "sweet spot" we call summer.
33min
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Blood formation: Researchers engineer human bone marrow tissueResearchers have developed an artificial tissue in which human blood stem cells remain functional for a prolonged period of time. Scientists from the University of Basel, University Hospital Basel, and ETH Zurich have reported their findings in the scientific journal PNAS.
33min
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Functional MRI reveals memory in sleeping toddlersOur ability to remember past events develops rapidly in the first couple of years of life, but it's not clear exactly how this happens. Researchers at the UC Davis Center for Mind and Brain have now been able to carry out functional MRI brain scans of sleeping toddlers, and show for the first time how specific brain regions are activated during memory recall in two-year-olds.
33min
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Bright warning colors on poison dart frogs also act as camouflagePoison dart frogs are well known for their deadly toxins and bright colors, which have made them a classic example of warning coloration.
33min
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Thank the moon for Earth's lengthening dayA new study that reconstructs the deep history of our planet's relationship to the moon shows that 1.4 billion years ago, a day on Earth lasted just over 18 hours. This is at least in part because the moon was closer and changed the way the Earth spun around its axis.
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Science | The Guardian
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The days are getting longer – but very, very slowlyAs the moon pulls away from the Earth, our planet’s rotation is slowing, making our days 1/75,000 second longer each year If the day never seems long enough to get everything done, be grateful at least that times have changed. According to fresh calculations, a day on Earth was a full five hours and fifteen minutes shorter a billion or so years ago, well before complex life spread around the plan
41min
Live Science
9
Rotting Fish Art Explodes, Causes Fire in London GallerySomething was rotten in a London art gallery this week — an installation of sequin-embroidered decomposing fish sealed in clear plastic bags.
47min
The Atlantic
3
Bill Clinton Is Still Bitter About ImpeachmentSomehow, Bill Clinton didn’t see the question coming. The former president, now 20 years removed from the time congressional Republicans tried unsuccessfully to expel him from office, was sitting across from CBS’s Mo Rocca for one of several interviews he and James Patterson are doing to promote their co-authored new thriller, The President Is Missing . The book opens with the fictional president
54min
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Thank the moon for Earth's lengthening dayFor anyone who has ever wished there were more hours in the day, geoscientists have some good news: Days on Earth are getting longer.
56min
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Ancient Greenland was much warmer than previously thoughtA tiny clue found in ancient sediment has unlocked big secrets about Greenland's past and future climate.
56min
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Bright warning colors on poison dart frogs also act as camouflagePoison dart frogs are well known for their deadly toxins and bright colours, which have made them a classic example of warning coloration.
56min
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
5
Pacific rats trace 2,000 years of human impact on island ecosystemsChemical analysis of the remains of rats from archaeological sites spanning the last 2000 years on three Polynesian island systems has shown the impact of humans on local environments. The analysis by an international team of scientists allowed the researchers to reconstruct the rats' diets—and through them, the changes made by humans to local ecosystems, including native species extinctions and c
56min
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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New invention safely transports unknown, deep-dwelling fishes to the ocean's surfaceStrange and beautiful fishes from the ocean's deep and lesser-known twilight zone reefs are hitching a ride to the surface thanks to the newly invented SubCAS (or Submersible Chamber for Ascending Specimens). This ingenious pressurized chamber stretches two feet long and is used by scientific divers to collect and safely surface charismatic reef residents for further study and public display.
56min
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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New nanoparticles help to detect serious scarring of woundsA new way of seeing when heavy wound scars are forming, and providing doctors the chance to intervene, has been developed.
56min
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
25
Future robots need no motorsEngineers have created a novel actuating material that can be powered by visible light, electricity, and other stimuli, and which may replace traditional bulky motors and pneumatic actuators with ones similar to mammalian skeletal muscles in the future.
56min
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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New mechanisms discovered to separate molecules of airUnlike the window screens of your house, nanoscale holes in graphene (named as 'nanowindows') can selectively choose which type of air molecules can pass through. Scientists theoretically proved concerted motion of the nanowindow-rim to selectively allow molecules to pass, in an energy-efficiently and fast way. This brings up new possibilities to create an advanced molecular separation membrane te
56min
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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NOvA experiment sees strong evidence for antineutrino oscillationThe NOvA collaboration has announced its first results using antineutrinos, and has seen strong evidence of muon antineutrinos oscillating into electron antineutrinos over long distances, a phenomenon that has never been unambiguously observed.
56min
Viden

Vulkanudbrud fortsætter med at slå mennesker ihjelIndtil videre er mere end 25 mennesker døde af vulkanudbruddet ved Fuego i Guatemala. Man har ikke de rette metoder til at forudse vulkanudbrud i området, siger dansk forsker.
59min
New Scientist – News
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Mystery of why Stone Age villagers spent so much time underwaterHalf of the adults at a Stone Age village in Turkey had a strange ear condition most common today in keen surfers – but why did they spend so much time in water?
1h
New Scientist – News
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Quantum computers are weirder and more powerful than we thoughtA theoretical breakthrough has shown that quantum computers are not just faster versions of ordinary computers, but something much stranger
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Science | The Guardian
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'New' dinosaur species fetches €2m at Paris auctionScientists say 150m-year-old skeleton may be new species of carnivorous allosaurus The skeleton of an extremely rare form of dinosaur has been sold for more than €2m (£1.8m) at the Eiffel Tower in Paris. The bones of what scientists believe may be a new species of the carnivorous allosaurus were discovered during a dig in Wyoming, US, in 2013. Continue reading…
1h
The Atlantic
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Photos From the Deadly Eruption of Guatemala's Fuego VolcanoOn June 3, Fuego volcano erupted in Guatemala, sending hot pyroclastic flows and heavy ash down its slopes onto nearby villages, killing at least 33 people, according to the head of Guatemala’s disaster agency, via the Associated Press . Fuego, one of the most active volcanoes in Central America, continued to send up smaller eruptions today, hampering efforts by rescuers who struggled to reach ru
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Novel gene in red blood cells may help adult newts regenerate limbsAdult newts can repeatedly regenerate body parts. Researchers have identified Newtic1, a gene that is expressed in clumps of red blood cells in the circulating blood. These clumps are also newly generated in the stump region of amputated limbs of the adult newt. The study suggests, for the first time, an oxygen-independent delivery role for red blood cells in non-mammalian vertebrates.
1h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
9
The search for the origin of mast cellsA team of researchers has proven that not all of the immune system's important mast cells are produced in bone marrow, as was previously thought. Scientists found embryonic mast cells in mice with functions that are likely to be different than the mast cells found in adults.
1h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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The health effect of air pollution from trafficWhat would happen if all petrol and diesel-powered vehicles were removed from a smaller European city? Up to 4% of all premature deaths could be prevented, according to a new study. The researchers used Malmö, Sweden, as a case study to calculate the health costs of inner city traffic.
1h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
8
Biosensors: Resolving molecule information in dynamic lipid membrane with metasurfacesResearchers introduce a mid-infrared biosensor based on a novel multi-resonant metasurface, which, for the first time, is able to distinguish multiple analytes in heterogeneous biological samples non-destructively, in real-time and with high sensitivity.
1h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Designer materials with completely random structures might enable quantum computingTopological randomness may be the answer for lossless electronics and making the nuts and bolts of quantum computers. Complete randomness in the structures of superconductors and insulators could lower the requirements of pristine crystalline ordering — and make them more accessible to industry.
1h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Master regulator that controls DNA access unlockedScientists uncover how access to relevant DNA regions is orchestrated in epithelial cells. These findings shed new light on the biological mechanisms of gene regulation and open up potential new avenues for cellular reprogramming.
1h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
7
Two-step process underpins upkeep of key protein in cell divisionTwo complementary processes enable a critical protein, known as CENP-A, to be replenished to enable cells to divide, detailed analysis shows.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Dementia patients could remain at home longer thanks to ground breaking technologyInnovative new technology will enable people with dementia to receive round the clock observation and live independently in their own homes, a new study reports.
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Popular Science
18
Cleaner pig poop could reduce bacon's environmental burdenNexus Media News Genetically modified pigs produce fewer dangerous pollutants. Pigs can’t make three important enzymes they need to digest the polluting nitrogen and phosphorus in their feed, so scientists have come up with another way to fix the…
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Big Think
3
Study: 1 in 5 deaths in young adults is opioid relatedThe teenager statistics are even more shocking. Read More
1h
Inside Science

Are Cities Making Us Sad?Are Cities Making Us Sad? If you’re an urban dweller, you might be less happy than your suburban counterparts. Are Cities Making Us Sad? Video of Are Cities Making Us Sad? Human Monday, June 4, 2018 – 13:45 Alistair Jennings, Contributor About half the world’s population live in cities, and that will be two-thirds by 2050. But modern cities are not like any environment we’ve evolved to live in, s
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Live Science
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Lava and Ash from Fuego Volcano Kills 33 in GuatemalaA volcanic eruption in Guatemala that spewed out ashy plumes and scorching-hot lava on Sunday (June 3) has killed at least 33 people, according to news reports.
1h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Storm's coming: New technique for simulation of extreme weather eventsScientists have developed a new method for generating data for ensemble simulation of extreme weather phenomena. He tested the method in simulation of a typhoon and a global warming simulation, and successfully created the necessary range of data in each case. The method has high computational stability and can be applied to any type of extreme weather event or other types of problems such as land
1h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Potential 'Achilles heel' in brain cancerScientists believe they have uncovered an 'Achilles heel' of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most common and deadly form of brain cancer. Their study details how a mechanism that protects glioma stem cells can potentially be exploited to develop new and more effective treatments for GBM.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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How the food we eat affects biochemical signals in the gutFor years, researchers have studied how the body's microbiome impacts virtually every aspect of human health ranging from the immune system to mental wellness. But, a recent study sheds new light on how the food we eat can affect the biochemical signaling processes in the gut microbiome.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Study finds 2.6 percent mortality rate among children hospitalized for strokeA major international study has found that 2.6 percent of infants and children hospitalized for stroke die in the hospital.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

High-sensitivity troponin test reduces risk of future heart attackThe newer high-sensitivity troponin test discovers smaller amounts of heart-specific proteins, troponins, than the older troponin test and thus identifies more myocardial infarction patients than before. A new study from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden published in The Journal of the American College of Cardiology now reports that the risk of a future heart attack is lower in patients diagnosed wi
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Checkpoint inhibitor shrinks advanced squamous cell skin cancerClinical trials show that an immune checkpoint inhibitor shrinks the tumors of nearly half of patients with an incurable, advanced form of a common skin cancer, an international team led by a researcher at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center reports in the New England Journal of Medicine.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Digital, mobile advances will define future of cardiologyThe future of cardiovascular care will be transformed by advances in artificial intelligence, digital health technology, and mobile as a means to prevent and treat heart disease, according to several review articles published today in a Journal of the American College of Cardiology Focus Seminar on the Future Technology of Cardiovascular Care.
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Live Science
14
The Higgs Boson Has a New FriendThe Higgs boson appeared again at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), and this time, it revealed something new and exciting about its behavior.
1h
The Atlantic
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Bill Clinton Feels His Own Pain“I’ve had nothing but women leaders in my office since I left. You are giving one side and omitting facts.” That was Bill Clinton, on the Today show Monday morning , responding angrily to a question posed by NBC News’s Craig Melvin. The occasion for their interview: the release of The President Is Missing, the novel the former president co-authored with the mystery writer James Patterson. The con
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Scientific American Content: Global
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Run or Hide? Forecasters Struggle with Warnings as Disasters ChangeAs storms become stronger, safety instructions for threats can be contradictory — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Researchers study aquatic beetles native only to central WyomingThe known range of the narrow-footed Hygrotus diving beetle, which also can fly, is in central Wyoming, in the Powder River Basin and one site in the Wind River Basin. The sites are small, intermittent streams with disconnected pools and contain high concentrations of salt. These streams are in shortgrass prairie ecosystems that receive less than 400 millimeters of precipitation each year.
1h
New on MIT Technology Review
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Estonia on its planned crypto-token: Don’t call it a currency
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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In MS, disintegrating brain lesions may indicate the disease is getting worseFor decades, clinicians treating multiple sclerosis (MS) have interpreted the appearance of new or expanding brain lesions on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans as a sign that a patient's disease is getting worse. Now researchers are finding that it may be the atrophy or disappearance of these lesions into cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) that is a better indicator of who will develop disability.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Globular clusters 4 billion years younger than previously thoughtGlobular clusters could be up to 4 billion years younger than previously thought, new research has found.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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New algorithm fuses quality and quantity in satellite imageryUsing a new algorithm, researchers may have found the solution to an age-old dilemma plaguing satellite imagery — whether to sacrifice high spatial resolution in the interest of generating images more frequently, or vice versa. The team's new tool eliminates this trade-off by fusing high-resolution and high-frequency satellite data into one integrated product, and can generate 30-meter daily cont
2h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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A change in bacteria's genetic code holds promise of longer-lasting drugsBy altering the genetic code in bacteria, researchers have demonstrated a method to make therapeutic proteins more stable, an advance that would improve the drugs' effectiveness and convenience, leading to smaller and less frequent doses of medicine, lower health care costs and fewer side effects for patients with cancer and other diseases.
2h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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NFL teams play better during night games thanks to circadian advantagesPilot data from a recent study suggest that NFL teams have better performance during night games versus afternoon games due to advantages from circadian rhythms.
2h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Increase in lifestyle-related cancers over past decade spotlights need for preventionLifestyle-related cancers, such as lung, colorectal, and skin cancers, have increased globally over the past decade, according to the most comprehensive analysis of cancer-related health outcomes and patterns ever conducted.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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A major step towards individualized cancer therapyScientists have succeeded in establishing a versatile, powerful and convenient model to analyze human cancer.
2h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Study links screen time to insomnia symptoms and depressive symptoms in adolescentsPreliminary results from a new study indicate that greater amounts of daily screen time are associated with more insomnia symptoms and shorter sleep duration among adolescents.
2h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
7
Short and long sleep durations lnked with excess heart agePreliminary results from a new study show that excess heart age (EHA) appeared to be lowest among adults who reported sleeping seven hours per 24-hour period.
2h
iBiology (uploads) on YouTube

Shiv Pillai (Harvard) 3: IgG4-Related Disease: Collaboration Between B and T CellsShiv Pillai provides a historical perspective on the steps that led to formulate today’s model on how the immune system works and outlines the underpinnings of B cell development. https://www.ibiology.org/immunology/b-cell-development Talk Overview: Dr. Shiv Pillai provides a historical perspective on the steps that led to formulate today’s model on how the immune system works. Scientists observe
2h
iBiology (uploads) on YouTube

Shiv Pillai (Harvard) 2: Bruton Tyrosine Kinase SignalingShiv Pillai provides a historical perspective on the steps that led to formulate today’s model on how the immune system works and outlines the underpinnings of B cell development. https://www.ibiology.org/immunology/b-cell-development Talk Overview: Dr. Shiv Pillai provides a historical perspective on the steps that led to formulate today’s model on how the immune system works. Scientists observe
2h
iBiology (uploads) on YouTube

Shiv Pillai (Harvard) 1: Early B Cell Development: A Look at the Defining Questions in ImmunologyShiv Pillai provides a historical perspective on the steps that led to formulate today’s model on how the immune system works and outlines the underpinnings of B cell development. https://www.ibiology.org/immunology/b-cell-development/ Talk Overview: Dr. Shiv Pillai provides a historical perspective on the steps that led to formulate today’s model on how the immune system works. Scientists observ
2h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
20
Brain structure may predict diet successDifferences in the structure of the prefrontal cortex predict an individual's ability to make healthier food choices, according to a new analysis of previous research in healthy men and women. The article suggests an important role of these anatomical markers in decisions that have long-term effects on health and wellbeing.
2h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
11
How binging creates alcohol tolerance in fliesRepeated exposure to large quantities of alcohol may lead to tolerance by reducing the activity of a protein that regulates communication between neurons, according to a study of fruit flies.
2h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
10
Speed-accuracy tradeoff turns up gain in the brainWidespread changes in neural activity enable people to quickly make a decision by 'turning up the gain in the brain,' suggests a recent human study. The findings help to resolve a central issue in our understanding of decision-making.
2h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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How does alcohol influence the development of Alzheimer's disease?Research has found that some of the genes affected by alcohol and inflammation are also implicated in processes that clear amyloid beta — the protein that forms globs of plaques in the brain and which contributes to neuronal damage and the cognitive impairment associated with Alzheimer's disease.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
14
Mobile app for autism screening yields useful dataA new study of an iPhone app to screen young children for signs of autism has found the app easy to use, welcomed by caregivers and good at producing reliable scientific data. The app first administers caregiver consent forms and survey questions and then uses the phone's 'selfie' camera to collect videos of young children's reactions while they watch movies designed to elicit emotion and attentio
2h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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HIV vaccine elicits antibodies in animals that neutralize dozens of HIV strainsAn experimental vaccine regimen based on the structure of a vulnerable site on HIV elicited antibodies in mice, guinea pigs and monkeys that neutralize dozens of HIV strains from around the world.
2h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Global warming can be limited to 1.5°C by changing how we travel, heat homes, use devicesGlobal warming can be limited to 1.5°C by unprecedented improvements in the energy efficiency of everyday activities, according to new research.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Collective gravity, not Planet Nine, may explain the orbits of 'detached objects'Bumper car-like interactions at the edges of our solar system — and not a mysterious ninth planet — may explain the dynamics of strange bodies called 'detached objects,' according to a new study.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Brain structure may predict diet successDifferences in the structure of the prefrontal cortex predict an individual's ability to make healthier food choices, according to a new analysis of previous research in healthy men and women. The paper, published in JNeurosci, suggests an important role of these anatomical markers in decisions that have long-term effects on health and wellbeing.
2h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

How binging creates alcohol tolerance in fliesRepeated exposure to large quantities of alcohol may lead to tolerance by reducing the activity of a protein that regulates communication between neurons, according to a study of fruit flies published in eNeuro.
2h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Speed-accuracy tradeoff turns up gain in the brainWidespread changes in neural activity enable people to quickly make a decision by 'turning up the gain in the brain,' suggests a human study published in eNeuro. The findings help to resolve a central issue in our understanding of decision-making.
2h
The Atlantic
8
Bartolo Colón, One of the Last of His KindMuch of the attention paid to this Major League Baseball season has centered on the promise of youth and the intrigue of the future. The Los Angeles Angels’ Mike Trout, who despite his half-decade reign as the sport’s top player is still only 26, is having the best season of his career. And he’s joined, for good measure, by the 23-year-old rookie sensation Shohei Ohtani, the first viable pitcher/
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The Atlantic
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Just Say It’s RacistIt was a framing that might have worked with any other two presidents. On Friday, The New York Times published a comparison of how Donald Trump and his predecessor, Barack Obama, approached controversies over racism. “Obama offered balm. Trump drops verbal bombs. But both were accused, in a polarized country, of making racial tensions worse,” the paper tweeted. That bland equivalence between the
2h
Big Think
7
Trump says he has the ‘absolute right’ to pardon himself. Does he?President Donald Trump wrote on tweet on Monday claiming that he has the "absolute right to PARDON" himself, but many legal experts disagree. Read More
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Feed: All Latest
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On 'Ye,' Kanye West’s Ignorance Is Too Loud to IgnoreWest's eighth studio album is a portrait of the self as fragmented and damaged—of a man having failed his family, his fans, himself.
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Scientific American Content: Global
48
Should We Always Trust What We See in Satellite Images?People need to understand the technology’s limitations to avoid misinterpreting what they see — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Atlantic
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Trump and Giuliani Accidentally Make the Case for ImpeachmentPresident Trump isn’t much for giving apologies, but he’s becoming an aficionado of granting pardons. In a tweet Monday morning, the president asserted that he can pardon himself, though he hastened to add that he had “done nothing wrong”: As has been stated by numerous legal scholars, I have the absolute right to PARDON myself, but why would I do that when I have done nothing wrong? In the meant
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Childhood cancer: The four survival strategies of tumor cellsCancer cells in children tend to develop by following four main trajectories — and two of them are linked to relapse of the disease, research led by Lund University in Sweden shows. The four strategies can occur simultaneously in a single tumor, according to the study that is now published in Nature Genetics.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

ChemMaps lets researchers navigate the chemical universeA new online service — ChemMaps — allows users to interactively navigate the chemical space of over 8,000 drugs and 47,000 environmental compounds in 3D and real time.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Try togetherness: Study promotes cooperative weed management to curb herbicide resistanceIn the fight against herbicide resistance, farmers are working with a shrinking toolkit. Waterhemp, a weedy nemesis of corn and soybean farmers, has developed resistance to multiple herbicide modes of action, often in the same plant. Even farmers using the latest recommendations for tank mixtures are fighting an uphill battle, with long-distance movement of pollen and seeds bringing the potential
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Try togetherness: Study promotes cooperative weed management to curb herbicide resistanceIn the fight against herbicide resistance, farmers are working with a shrinking toolkit. Waterhemp, a weedy nemesis of corn and soybean farmers, has developed resistance to multiple herbicide modes of action, often in the same plant. Even farmers using the latest recommendations for tank mixtures are fighting an uphill battle, with long-distance movement of pollen and seeds bringing the potential
2h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
ChemMaps lets researchers navigate the chemical universeResearchers from North Carolina State University have created a new online service—ChemMaps—that allows users to interactively navigate the chemical space of over 8,000 drugs and 47,000 environmental compounds in 3-D and real time. ChemMaps is designed to be a central resource for students and researchers who want to easily visualize and study complicated sets of chemical structures.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
76
Collective gravity, not Planet Nine, may explain the orbits of 'detached objects'Bumper car-like interactions at the edges of our solar system—and not a mysterious ninth planet—may explain the dynamics of strange bodies called "detached objects," according to a new study.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
19
ALMA and VLT find too many massive stars in starburst galaxies, near and farAstronomers using ALMA and the VLT have discovered that both starburst galaxies in the early Universe and a star-forming region in a nearby galaxy contain a much higher proportion of massive stars than is found in more peaceful galaxies. These findings challenge current ideas about how galaxies evolved, changing our understanding of cosmic star-formation history and the build up of chemical elemen
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
5
International Environment Day: Plastic in AfricaThis year, plastic pollution is the main theme of International Environment Day, celebrated on June 5.
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New on MIT Technology Review
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Microsoft’s $7.5 billion purchase of GitHub will provoke a developer backlashGitHub Microsoft Nadella
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
An abusive boss today might mean a better boss tomorrowWhen bosses yell at you, your day can be ruined. It can also ruin theirs, though, and lead to major behavioral changes that flip their attitudes at work.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
Research could lead to more efficient electronicsA Rutgers-led team of physicists has demonstrated a way to conduct electricity between transistors without energy loss, opening the door to low-power electronics and, potentially, quantum computing that would be far faster than today's computers.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
5
Did extreme fluctuations in oxygen, not a gradual rise, spark the Cambrian explosion?Five hundred and forty million years ago, during the Cambrian period, life suddenly went nuts. "Blossomed" is far too mild a word: instead, geologists call this sudden diversification an "explosion." But what exactly sparked the Cambrian explosion?
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
16
The deadliest volcanic eruptions of the past 25 yearsGuatemala Fuego VolcanoAfter Guatemala's Fuego volcano erupted on Sunday killing at least 25 people, here is a list of the most deadly volcanic eruptions over the last quarter century.
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The Atlantic
200+
The Flaw in Trump's Obstruction-of-Justice DefensePresident Trump’s lawyers, in a letter released over the weekend, staked out bold the ground that the president can’t commit obstruction of justice in his interactions with the federal law-enforcement apparatus—neither by firing investigators nor by interfering with their performance of their duties. In the letter, written back in January to Special Counsel Robert Mueller and recently leaked to T
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
How does alcohol influence the development of Alzheimer's disease?Research from the University of Illinois at Chicago has found that some of the genes affected by alcohol and inflammation are also implicated in processes that clear amyloid beta — the protein that forms globs of plaques in the brain and which contributes to neuronal damage and the cognitive impairment associated with Alzheimer's disease.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

NCI-MATCH precision medicine clinical trial releases new findingsThe released data is from three treatment arms, all single-arm phase 2 studies: the drug taselisib in patients with mutations in the PIK3CA gene (Arm I); the drug ado-trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1) in patients with HER2-overexpressing tumors (Arm Q); and the drug AZD4547 in patients with mutations in the FGFR pathway (Arm W).
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New study finds plant protein, fiber, nuts lower cholesterol, improve blood pressureA new meta-analysis finds that a diet that includes plant protein, fiber, nuts, and plant sterols lowers cholesterol and improves other markers for heart health.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

An abusive boss today might mean a better boss tomorrowWhen bosses yell at you, your day can be ruined. It can also ruin theirs, though, and lead to major behavioral changes that flip their attitudes at work. New research from Michigan State University took prior workplace studies, which focused primarily on the impact abusive bosses have on their employees, and refocused the lens to see how the bosses respond to their own abusive behavior.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Did extreme fluctuations in oxygen, not a gradual rise, spark the Cambrian explosion?Five hundred and forty million years ago, during the Cambrian period, life suddenly went nuts. 'Blossomed' is far too mild a word: instead, geologists call this sudden diversification an 'explosion.' But what exactly sparked the Cambrian explosion?
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Non-pharmacologic approaches improve outcomes for infants with neonatal abstinence syndromeA quality improvement (QI) initiative at Boston Medical Center that focused on using non-pharmacologic approaches to care for infants with neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) yielded positive short-term outcomes for both the mothers and infants. The results, published in the Journal of Perinatology, showed a decrease in medication use, length of stay, and health care costs.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Increased follow-up does not benefit colorectal cancer patientsLogically, it would seem that more follow-up testing of cancer patients must be better than less – but this is not the case for patients who undergo surgery for colorectal cancer. This is an important conclusion from a study published in JAMA, where 2,509 patients with colorectal cancer were offered two and five follow-up tests in the form of CT scans combined with a blood test spread over the fir
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Direct coupling of the Higgs boson to the top quark observedAn observation made by the CMS experiment at CERN unambiguously demonstrates the interaction of the Higgs boson and top quarks, which are the heaviest known subatomic particles. This major milestone is an important step forward in our understanding of the origins of mass. Physicists at the University of Zurich made central contributions by incorporating sophisticated data analysis methods that all
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Proxies who watch advanced care planning video more likely to withhold feeding tubesResearchers from Hebrew SeniorLife's Institute for Aging Research (IFAR) and Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) have discovered that nursing home residents with advanced dementia are more likely to have advance directives that indicate they did should not get feeding tubes after their proxies viewed a 12-minute video on advance care planning.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Rutgers-led research could lead to more efficient electronicsA Rutgers-led team of physicists has demonstrated a way to conduct electricity between transistors without energy loss, opening the door to low-power electronics and, potentially, quantum computing that would be far faster than today's computers. Their findings, which involved using a special mix of materials with magnetic and insulator properties, are published online in Nature Physics.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Findings could lead to treatment of hepatitis BResearchers have gained new insights into the virus that causes hepatitis B — a life-threatening and incurable infection that afflicts more than 250 million people worldwide. The discovery reveals previously unknown details about the protein shell that encloses the virus' genetic blueprint and could lead to new drugs to treat the infection.
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Scientific American Content: Global
5
The New Science of Sex and GenderThe term “intersex” made headlines in 2009 through the story of South African track star Caster Semenya, who was forced to undergo invasive (and humiliating) tests to determine her gender… — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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NYT > Science
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The Ideal Subjects for a Salt Study? Maybe Prisoners.Leading scientists propose to track salt’s effects on health by controlling how much is given to inmate volunteers.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
8
Doubt cast on the predictive value of earthquake foreshocksA new study questions previous findings about the value of foreshocks as warning signs that a big earthquake is coming, instead showing them to be indistinguishable from ordinary earthquakes.
3h
Live Science
9
The Secret Backstory Behind Kazakhstan's Rocket Launch SiteOn June 6, three people will rocket into space from a cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. But why does this country of only 18 million people have a large space facility known as the Baikonur Cosmodrome?
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
Just like humans, these monkeys can plan their routes—but most prefer not toThey might not have mastered GPS technology, but vervet monkeys can solve multi-destination routes in the same way humans do.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
Does negative political advertising actually work?While many may dread campaign season because of pervasiveness of negative political advertising, a new study has found that negative political advertising actually works, but perhaps not in the way that many may assume.
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Quanta Magazine
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There Are No Laws of Physics. There’s Only the Landscape.Suppose Alice and Bob are both asked to prepare a meal. Alice likes Chinese, Bob likes Italian. They each pick their favorite recipe, shop at the local specialty store, and carefully follow the instructions. But when they take their dishes out of the oven, they are in for a big surprise. The two meals turn out to be identical. We can imagine the existential questions Alice and Bob must ask themse
3h
Live Science
9
Scientists Figured Out How to Make Ceramics That Bend and Mush Instead of ShatteringThe researchers zapped the ceramics with electric fields to prevent them from shattering (though under enough pressure they will still crack).
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Mixed signals from poisonous mothsPoisonous moths use bright red spots to warn predators to avoid them—but natural variation in these wing markings doesn't provide clear indications of how toxic individual moths might be—new research shows.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Researchers create tool to better evaluate implementation of science research proposalsResearchers at Boston University's Evans Center for Implementation and Improvement Sciences (CIIS) have developed a new scoring criteria for evaluating the quality of scientific research proposals. Termed ImplemeNtation and Improvement Sciences Proposals Evaluation CriTeria (INSPECT), this new approach aims to improve identification of high-quality proposed research that advances improvements in h
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
5
Army researchers envision third arm for soldiersWhen engineers from the U.S. Army Research Laboratory brainstormed on how to improve Soldier lethality, the idea of a third arm seemed like something that might help.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
15
Long thought silent because of ice, study shows east Antarctica seismically activeHalf of Antarctica has long thought to be seismically dormant, but a researcher tripled the number of recorded earthquakes by monitoring for just one year.
3h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
13
Gene linked to intellectual ability affects memory replay in miceResearchers have discovered that a gene associated with human intellectual ability is necessary for normal memory formation in mice. The study shows that mice with only one copy of the gene replay shorter fragments of their previous experiences during periods of rest, impairing their ability to consolidate memories.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
16
On the origins of agriculture, researchers uncover new cluesResearchers have uncovered evidence that underscores one long-debated theory: that agriculture arose out of moments of surplus, when environmental conditions were improving, and populations lived in greater densities.
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The Atlantic
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What It’s Like to Trip on the Most Potent Magic MushroomPaul Stamets, a mycologist I had come to visit in Washington State’s Olympic Peninsula to go mushroom hunting, had a gift he wanted to give me. We were in his office, looking at some images on his computer, when he pulled off the shelf a small pile of amadou hats, made of felt pressed from mushroom fibers. “See if one of these fits you.” Most of the mushroom hats were too big for me, but I found
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

This monkey can plan out their foraging routes just like a humanVervet monkeys can plan their foraging routes just like humans.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Wireless system can power devices inside the bodyMIT researchers have developed a new way to power and communicate with devices implanted deep within the human body. Such devices could be used to deliver drugs, monitor conditions inside the body, or treat disease by stimulating the brain with electricity or light.
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BBC News – Science & Environment
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Carbon 'bubble' could cost global economy trillionsTechnology and energy efficiency could see a rapid fall in demand for fossil fuels even without new climate policies.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
New algorithm fuses quality and quantity in satellite imageryUsing a new algorithm, University of Illinois researchers may have found the solution to an age-old dilemma plaguing satellite imagery—whether to sacrifice high spatial resolution in the interest of generating images more frequently, or vice versa. The team's new tool eliminates this trade-off by fusing high-resolution and high-frequency satellite data into one integrated product, and can generate
3h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Two-step process underpins upkeep of key protein in cell divisionScientists have shed light on a key aspect of healthy cell division, helping build a clearer picture of the complex mechanisms involved.
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Science | The Guardian
7
Did you solve it? World Cup arithmeticThe solutions to today’s puzzles On my puzzle blog earlier today I set you three football table challenges: 1) England, Tunisia, Belgium and Panama make up Group G in the 2018 World Cup. Imagine that once they have all played each other the table looks like this. Continue reading…
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Scientific American Content: Global
8
Volcanoes: Nature's Way of Letting Off SteamA slide show of eruptions and their impacts around the world — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
49
Globular clusters 4 billion years younger than previously thoughtGlobular clusters could be up to 4 billion years younger than previously thought, new research led by the University of Warwick has found.
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New Scientist – News
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Woman survives metastatic breast cancer thanks to new treatmentA therapy that targets the immune system has had dramatic results in people with four types of cancer in advanced stages that were previously untreatable
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The Atlantic
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Left Economy, Right EconomyJoe Dutra is feeling great about the Trump economy. The Reno-based owner of Kimmie Candy, maker of ChocoRocks and other treats, says that taxes are going down, growth is picking up, and the rising tide is lifting all boats. “The more jobs we can create, the better the economy is for everybody,” he told me. “It's a trickle-down effect: We hire people, then they’re buying gasoline and they're buyin
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Scientific American Content: Global
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What Causes a Volcano to Erupt and How Do Scientists Predict Eruptions?Volcanologists cannot yet predict a volcanic eruption — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Spooky quantum particle pairs fly like weird curveballsSome particles that can be in two places at the same time and are not just particles but also waves, in this case, fermions, appear to move in even weirder ways than previously thought. Theoretical physicists at Georgia Tech applied extreme computing power for a week to predict the movements of fermions by including quantum optics, or light-like, ideas in their mathematical, theoretical modeling.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Does negative political advertising actually work?While many may dread campaign season because of pervasiveness of negative political advertising, a new study in the INFORMS journal Marketing Science has found that negative political advertising actually works, but perhaps not in the way that many may assume.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Study: Exercise mitigates genetic effects of obesity later in lifeA new study suggests, for the first time in women over age 70, that working up a sweat can reduce the influence one's genes have on obesity.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
13
Preschool program preps kids for academic success through elementary schoolA program that helps low-income parents prepare their children for school has benefits that extend beyond kindergarten and into into third grade, including performing better academically, acquiring better social emotional skills and needing fewer additional school services.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
18
Toxic toad invasion puts Madagascar's predators at risk, genetic evidence confirmsThe recent introduction of the common Asian toad to Madagascar has led to fears that the toxic amphibian could wreak havoc on the island's already severely threatened fauna. Now, researchers report genetic evidence showing that those fears are well founded: virtually all predators native to Madagascar are highly sensitive to toad toxins. If they should eat the toads, it would be a potentially fata
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Atomic clock comparison confirms key assumptions of 'Einstein's elevator'By comparing different types of remote atomic clocks, physicists have performed the most accurate test ever of a key principle underlying Albert Einstein's famous theory of general relativity, which describes how gravity relates to space and time.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
12
Limited health literacy is a major barrier to heart disease prevention and treatmentLimited health literacy is a major barrier to heart health and managing heart disease and stroke. Health literacy is essential to navigate the health care system, use medication effectively and improve heart-healthy behaviors.
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New Scientist – News
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Zambia to kill 2,000 hippos because they might spread anthraxOver the next five years 2,000 hippos are to be culled in Zambia, supposedly to stop them giving people anthrax, but the cull may inadvertently fuel the trade in hippo ivory
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Popular Science
50
Everything you need to know about Apple's 2018 WWDC announcementsTechnology iOS 12, ARKit, and all the shiny new stuff from Apple. Watch Apple's 2018 WWDC keynote with us!
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

More frequent screening after prostate cancer treatment not linked to improved survivalA study by a UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researcher and colleagues assessed whether monitoring prostate cancer patients following treatment with a PSA test every three months versus once a year would provide a long-term survival benefit.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Preschool and school-age irritability predict reward-related brain functionPreschool irritability and concurrent irritability were uniquely associated with aberrant patterns of reward-related brain connectivity, highlighting the importance of developmental timing of irritability for brain function, finds a study published in the June 2018 issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (JAACAP).
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Novel PET imaging noninvasively pinpoints colitis inflammationA novel positron emission tomography (PET) imaging method shows promise for noninvasively pinpointing sites of inflammation in people with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), which includes ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. The University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), study is featured in the June issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Mixed signals from poisonous mothsPoisonous moths use bright red spots to warn predators to avoid them — but natural variation in these wing markings doesn't provide clear indications of how toxic individual moths might be — new research shows.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

English translation of IQWiG's updated General Methods now availableIQWiG published its updated methods in 2017, including new chapters on HTA topics proposed by the public and on the assessment of high-risk medical devices. An English translation is now available.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

First study of neoadjuvant use of PARP inhibitor shows promise for early-stage, BRCA+ breast cancer patientsIn a small Phase II study of early-stage breast cancer patients with BRCA1/2 mutations, researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center found that more than half of the women who took the PARP inhibitor talazoparib once daily prior to surgery had no evidence of disease at the time of surgery. If further validated in larger, confirmatory trials, the oral medication could replace ch
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The Atlantic
26
Cyberattacks Are 'Ticking Time Bombs' for GermanyBONN, Germany—It was a cyberattack that showed just how vulnerable Germany’s digital infrastructure truly is. In the summer of 2017, a group of hackers infiltrated NetCom BW, a regional telecommunications provider with about 43,000 subscribers in the state of Baden-Württemberg in Germany’s southwest. Given the company’s modest size, it may not seem like a prime target. But NetCom BW is a subsidia
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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New algorithm determines ideal caffeine dosage and timing for alertnessAccording to a recent study, a newly developed algorithm may be the key to optimizing alertness with caffeine.
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Futurity.org
5
13 signs your teen may have an eating disorderAbout 20 million women and 10 million men in the United States suffer from eating disorders, which range from the more commonly known anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa to the lesser known binge-eating and avoidant-restrictive-food-intake disorders. Untreated, these disorders can lead to grave and possibly fatal medical problems, including heart arrhythmia, tachycardia, and heart attacks. Among
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
25
Inadequate sleep could cost countries billionsInadequate sleep is a public health problem affecting more than one in three adults worldwide. A new study suggests that insufficient sleep could also have grave economic consequences.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
20
Hats on for Easter Island statuesHow do you put a 13-ton hat on a giant statue? That's what a team of researchers is trying to figure out with their study of Easter Island statues and the red hats that sit atop some of them.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
16
Sleep paralysis and hallucinations are prevalent in student athletesPilot data from a recent study suggest that sleep paralysis and dream-like hallucinations as you are falling asleep or waking up are widespread in student athletes and are independently associated with symptoms of depression.
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Popular Science
94
Volcano vocabulary to help you understand the most recent eruptionsGuatemala Fuego VolcanoEnvironment Spatters, clinkers, and lahars, oh my. The ongoing eruption of Kilauea in Hawaii has brought volcano jargon to the surface, like an effusion of mafic (that’s low-silica, oozing magma to you).
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Globular clusters 4 billion years younger than previously thoughtGlobular clusters could be up to 4 billion years younger than previously thought, new research led by the University of Warwick has found.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

In MS, disintegrating brain lesions may indicate the disease is getting worseFor decades, clinicians treating multiple sclerosis (MS) have interpreted the appearance of new or expanding brain lesions on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans as a sign that a patient's disease is getting worse. Now, University at Buffalo researchers are finding that it may be the atrophy or disappearance of these lesions into cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) that is a better indicator of who will
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New algorithm fuses quality and quantity in satellite imageryUsing a new algorithm, University of Illinois researchers may have found the solution to an age-old dilemma plaguing satellite imagery — whether to sacrifice high spatial resolution in the interest of generating images more frequently, or vice versa. The team's new tool eliminates this trade-off by fusing high-resolution and high-frequency satellite data into one integrated product, and can gener
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Unlocking the genomeA team led by Professor Stein Aerts (VIB-KU Leuven) uncovers how access to relevant DNA regions is orchestrated in epithelial cells. These findings shed new light on the biological mechanisms of gene regulation and open up potential new avenues for cellular reprogramming.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

A change in bacteria's genetic code holds promise of longer-lasting drugsBy altering the genetic code in bacteria, researchers at The University of Texas at Austin have demonstrated a method to make therapeutic proteins more stable, an advance that would improve the drugs' effectiveness and convenience, leading to smaller and less frequent doses of medicine, lower health care costs and fewer side effects for patients with cancer and other diseases.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Chemical traces from star formation cast light on cosmic historyFresh insight into intense star formation in distant galaxies is changing researchers' ideas about cosmic history.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Timing is everything to build kidneys from scratchPerfectly punctual or fashionably late, it takes all kinds to build a kidney. So it is for stem cells as USC scientists building kidney tissue discovered timing is critical as the precise arrival of progenitor cells dictates their form and function in the kidney. The finding will help fabricate kidney components for use in drug tests and treatment of renal disease.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New approach to immunotherapy leads to complete response in breast cancer patientA novel approach to immunotherapy developed by researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) has led to the complete regression of breast cancer in a patient who was unresponsive to all other treatments. This patient received the treatment in a clinical trial led by Steven A. Rosenberg, M.D., Ph.D., chief of the Surgery Branch at NCI's Center for Cancer Research (CCR), and the findings were p
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

The role of cohesin in genome 3D structure helps for a better understanding of tumor cellsThe genome spatial organization depends on a number of factors, the cohesin protein complex being one of them. This essential complex is present in two versions that contain either the SA1 or SA2 subunit. A study analyses in-depth the functions of both variants in 3D genome architecture and shows how the alteration of SA2 influences gene expression and may favor the loss of differentiation in tumo
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Capturing light in a waveguide arrayCheaper and more efficient photonic devices, such as lasers, optical fibers, and other light sources may be possible with confined light that is unaffected by imperfections in the material that confines it.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

MIT researchers devise new way to make light interact with matterResearchers at MIT and Technion have devised a new way to make light interact with matter. Reducing the wavelength of light could allow it to be absorbed or emitted by a semiconductor, their study suggests.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Self-sustaining loop of chemical reactions could revolutionize drug productionExperts from the University of Nottingham have created a self-sustaining circuit of reactions which is a greener and more efficient method of chemical production.In their paper 'Self-sustaining closed-loop multienzyme mediated conversion of amines into alcohols in continuous reactions,' published in Nature Catalysis, Drs. Francesca Paradisi and Martina Contente of the University of Nottingham prod
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Guppies change their eye color to deter rivalsTiny fish called Trinidadian guppies turn their eyes black to warn other fish when they are feeling aggressive, new research shows.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Global warming can be limited to 1.5°C by changing how we travel, heat homes, use devicesGlobal warming can be limited to 1.5°C by unprecedented improvements in the energy efficiency of everyday activities, according to new research from an international team of scientists at IIASA.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

ALMA and VLT find too many massive stars in starburst galaxies, near and farAstronomers using ALMA and the VLT have discovered that both starburst galaxies in the early Universe and a star-forming region in a nearby galaxy contain a much higher proportion of massive stars than is found in more peaceful galaxies. These findings challenge current ideas about how galaxies evolved, changing our understanding of cosmic star-formation history and the build up of chemical elemen
4h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Preschool home visiting program improves academic performanceA program of home visits designed to help families enhance school readiness for their preschool children had by the third grade improved academic performance, eased the social-emotional adjustment to school, and reduced problems at home for the children.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Does increased supervision of resident physicians reduce medical errors?Increased supervision of residents by attending physicians who joined patient rounds didn't significantly reduce medical errors but residents reported decreased autonomy.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Preschool program preps kids for academic success through elementary schoolA program that helps low-income parents prepare their children for school has benefits that extend beyond kindergarten and into into third grade, including performing better academically, acquiring better social emotional skills and needing fewer additional school services.
4h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
3
Stanford study casts doubt on the predictive value of earthquake foreshocksA Stanford-led study questions previous findings about the value of foreshocks as warning signs that a big earthquake is coming, instead showing them to be indistinguishable from ordinary earthquakes.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
On the origins of agriculture, researchers uncover new cluesResearchers have uncovered evidence that underscores one long-debated theory: that agriculture arose out of moments of surplus, when environmental conditions were improving, and populations lived in greater densities.
4h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Gene linked to intellectual ability affects memory replay in miceResearchers at the RIKEN Center for Brain Science in Japan have discovered that a gene associated with human intellectual ability is necessary for normal memory formation in mice. Published in Nature Neuroscience, the study shows that mice with only one copy of the gene replay shorter fragments of their previous experiences during periods of rest, impairing their ability to consolidate memories.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

HIV vaccine elicits antibodies in animals that neutralize dozens of HIV strainsAn experimental vaccine regimen based on the structure of a vulnerable site on HIV elicited antibodies in mice, guinea pigs and monkeys that neutralize dozens of HIV strains from around the world. The findings were reported today in the journal Nature Medicine by researchers at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health, and their c
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Long thought silent because of ice, study shows east Antarctica seismically activeHalf of Antarctica has long thought to be seismically dormant, but a Drexel University researcher tripled the number of recorded earthquakes by monitoring for just one year.
4h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

'Carbon bubble' coming that could wipe trillions from the global economy — studyMacroeconomic simulations show rates of technological change in energy efficiency and renewable power are likely to cause a sudden drop in demand for fossil fuels, potentially sparking a global financial crisis. Experts call for a 'carefully managed' shift to low-carbon investments and policies to deflate this 'carbon bubble'.
4h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

NIST atomic clock comparison confirms key assumptions of 'Einstein's elevator'By comparing different types of remote atomic clocks, physicists at the National Institute of Standardsand Technology (NIST) have performed the most accurate test ever of a key principle underlying AlbertEinstein's famous theory of general relativity, which describes how gravity relates to space and time.
4h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
'Carbon bubble' coming that could wipe trillions from the global economyUnlike current expectations, new research suggests that the prospects of the fossil-fuel industry are not bright, and that its demise may have profound economic and geopolitical consequences. Relying on ground breaking modelling techniques, researchers show that the consumption of fossil fuels will slow down or decline in the near future, as a result of ongoing technological change, potentially ex
4h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Toxic toad invasion puts Madagascar's predators at risk, genetic evidence confirmsThe recent introduction of the common Asian toad to Madagascar has led to fears that the toxic amphibian could wreak havoc on the island's already severely threatened fauna. Now, researchers report genetic evidence in the journal Current Biology on June 4 showing that those fears are well founded: virtually all predators native to Madagascar are highly sensitive to toad toxins. If they should eat
4h
The Atlantic
6
‘A Four-Star Dumpster Fire’: More on America’s Current Foreign PolicyIn this item , I argued that America’s relationship with China really mattered, and was being disastrously screwed up. Then two readers said : Actually, the relationship with Europe, and with Canada and Mexico, matters more, and is more grievously in peril. Here are three further entries in this cheery discussion. First, from a foreign-affairs writer now based in the United Kingdom: I agree with
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The Atlantic
54
‘More Than a Gag Rule’Late last month, the Trump administration proposed a new rule that could prohibit doctors who receive a type of federal funding called Title X from explicitly referring their patients to abortion providers. Under the new rule, only a pregnant woman who has already decided she wants an abortion—rather than one who is simply weighing her options—could be given a list of medical providers, and not a
4h
Dana Foundation

#WSF18: Harnessing the Power of NeuroplasticityThe World Science Festival in New York City, now in its 11 th year, offers fascinating talks on a variety of science disciplines, and notably for us, neuroscience. At last week’s talk on neuroplasticity, we heard from neurobiologist and Dana Alliance member Carla Shatz , developmental psychologist and Dana Alliance member Nim Tottenham , and neuroscientist Alvaro Pascual-Leone . Moderated by neur
4h
NYT > Science
49
This Knife-Wielding Mini-Monster Wants You to Back OffVenomous stonefish carry a bony, retractable blade in each cheek, scientists have discovered. It’s not just for looks.
4h
cognitive science
1
A paper in Cognitive Science explores how an actor's intentions affects judgments of the wrongness of an action.submitted by /u/markmana [link] [comments]
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)
500+
Why theater is essential to democracy | Oskar EustisTruth comes from the collision of different ideas, and theater plays an essential role in showing us that truth, says legendary artistic director Oskar Eustis. In this powerful talk, Eustis outlines his plan to reach (and listen to) people in places across the US where the theater, like many other institutions, has turned its back — like the deindustrialized Rust Belt. "Our job is to try to hold
4h
New on MIT Technology Review
100+
Humans are still crucial to Amazon’s fulfillment processThe secret to stopping the robot apocalypse? Popcorn butter.
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Feed: All Latest
41
Can a New Kind of Consumerism Help Fight Climate Change?In a global scenario called Low Energy Demand, a revolution in consumer energy efficiency could help us meet our climate goals. Could.
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Feed: All Latest
100+
These Physicists Watched a Clock Tick for 14 Years StraightIt was to test Einstein's theory of general relativity.
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Science : NPR
1K
Therapy Made From Patient's Immune System Shows Promise For Advanced Breast CancerAn experimental therapy seems to have eradicated cancer in a patient with metastatic breast cancer who had failed every other treatment. The goal is to reliably repeat that success in more people. (Image credit: Courtesy of Judy Perkins)
4h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Easter Islanders used rope, ramps to put giant hats on famous statuesThe ancient people of Easter Island, or Rapa Nui, were able to move massive stone hats and place them on top of statues with little effort and resources, using a parbuckling technique, according to new research from a collaboration that included investigators from Binghamton University, State University at New York.
4h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New findings demonstrate how the food we eat affects biochemical signals in the gutFor years, researchers have studied how the body's microbiome impacts virtually every aspect of human health ranging from the immune system to mental wellness. But, a recent study led by a multi-institutional research team sheds new light on how the food we eat can affect the biochemical signaling processes in the gut microbiome.
4h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

A great majority of Mozambican adolescent girls are willing to be vaccinated against HPVA study in Mozambique reveals that a majority of adolescent girls interviewed would be willing to get vaccinated against Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) if the vaccine was available in the country. These results are encouraging with regard to vaccine introduction and reducing mortality associated with cervical cancer in Mozambique. The investigation was led by the Manhiça Health Research Center (CISM)
4h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Dementia patients could remain at home longer thanks to groundbreaking technologyInnovative new technology will enable people with dementia to receive round the clock observation and live independently in their own homes, a new study in the Journal PLOS ONE reports.
4h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Two-step process underpins upkeep of key protein in cell divisionTwo complementary processes enable a critical protein, known as CENP-A, to be replenished to enable cells to divide, detailed analysis shows.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New study points to a potential 'Achilles heel' in brain cancerScientists at Virginia Commonwealth University believe they have uncovered an 'Achilles heel' of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most common and deadly form of brain cancer. Their study published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences details how a mechanism that protects glioma stem cells can potentially be exploited to develop new and more effective treatments for GB
4h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Hard yet profitableResearchers from the HSE Institute of Education surveyed teachers in vocational secondary schools in the Moscow Region, and compared the new advantages and disadvantages brought by the new conditions in their lives.
4h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
59
NIST atomic clock comparison confirms key assumptions of 'Einstein's elevator'By comparing different types of remote atomic clocks, physicists at the National Institute of Standardsand Technology (NIST) have performed the most accurate test ever of a key principle underlying AlbertEinstein's famous theory of general relativity, which describes how gravity relates to space and time.
4h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Toxic toad invasion puts Madagascar's predators at risk, genetic evidence confirmsThe recent introduction of the common Asian toad to Madagascar has led to fears that the toxic amphibian could wreak havoc on the island's already severely threatened fauna. Now, researchers report genetic evidence in the journal Current Biology on June 4 showing that those fears are well founded: virtually all predators native to Madagascar are highly sensitive to toad toxins. If they should eat
4h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
12
Long thought silent because of ice, study shows east Antarctica seismically activeBecause instruments were finally installed there, scientists can no longer say that East Antarctica is unusually seismically silent.
4h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
A change in bacteria's genetic code holds promise of longer-lasting drugsBy altering the genetic code in bacteria, researchers at The University of Texas at Austin have demonstrated a method to make therapeutic proteins more stable, an advance that would improve the drugs' effectiveness and convenience, leading to smaller and less frequent doses of medicine, lower health care costs and fewer side effects for patients with cancer and other diseases.
4h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
54
Chemical traces from star formation cast light on cosmic historyFresh insight into how stars are formed is challenging scientists' understanding of the Universe.
4h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
21
Study casts doubt on the predictive value of earthquake foreshocksNo one can predict when or where an earthquake will strike, but in 2011 scientists thought they had evidence that tiny underground tremors called foreshocks could provide important clues. If true, it suggested seismologists could one day warn people of impending temblors.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
11
On the origins of agriculture, researchers uncover new cluesThe invention of agriculture changed humans and the environment forever, and over several thousand years, the practice originated independently in a least a dozen different places. But why did agriculture begin in those places, at those particular times in human history?
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Physicists catch light in the eye of the stormSimilar to the eye of a hurricane, physicists of research institute AMOLF, the University of Amsterdam and the University of Texas at Austin, have captured light in the eye of an optical vortex. The research will be published on June 4th in the top journal Nature Photonics.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
200+
'Carbon bubble' coming that could wipe trillions from the global economy: studyFossil fuel stocks have long been a safe financial bet. With the International Energy Agency projecting price rises until 2040, and governments prevaricating or rowing back on the Paris Agreement, investor confidence is set to remain high.
4h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
21
Capturing light in a waveguide arrayCheaper and more efficient photonic devices, such as lasers, optical fibers, and other light sources may be possible with confined light that is unaffected by imperfections in the material that confines it, according to new research. A team of physicists from Penn State, the University of Pittsburgh, and the University of Illinois have demonstrated in a proof-of-concept experiment that they can co
4h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
13
Global warming can be limited to 1.5 C by changing how we travel, heat homes, use devicesGlobal warming can be limited to 1.5°C by unprecedented improvements in the energy efficiency of everyday activities, according to new research from an international team of scientists at IIASA.
4h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
200+
Researchers devise new way to make light interact with matterA new way of enhancing the interactions between light and matter, developed by researchers at MIT and Israel's Technion, could someday lead to more efficient solar cells that collect a wider range of light wavelengths, and new kinds of lasers and light-emitting diodes (LEDs) that could have fully tunable color emissions.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Self-sustaining loop of chemical reactions could revolutionize drug productionExperts from the University of Nottingham have created a self-sustaining circuit of reactions which is a greener and more efficient method of chemical production.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
27
Guppies change their eye color to deter rivalsTiny fish called Trinidadian guppies turn their eyes black to warn other fish when they are feeling aggressive, new research shows.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
11
Spironolactone may be an alternative to antibiotics in women's acne treatmentIn a finding that suggests the potential for practice change that would reduce the use of antibiotics in dermatology, researchers have found the diuretic drug spironolactone may be just as effective as antibiotics for the treatment of women's acne.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
8
Polarized cells give the heart its fully developed formWhen it first starts to develop, the heart is a simple tube. Researchers have now described how it forms itself into a its characteristic S-shape and how the ventricles and atria finally develop. Their findings will help scientists to better understand the development of congenital heart diseases.
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Viden

Danmarks første cannabis-forsøg er blevet godkendtForskere fra Aalborg Universitet skal nu undersøge, om cannabis kan lindre smerte og nedsætte betændelsestilstande i forbindelse med sygdom.
5h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
16
Upgrading the toolbox for Duchenne muscular dystrophy research with a new rabbit modelResearch to improve our understanding of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), and the development of new therapies, has previously relied on mouse models. However, physiological differences between the two species has limited how successfully findings in mice can be applied to humans. A newly developed rabbit model, created through the use of CRISPR/Cas-9 genome editing, exhibits greater clinical si
5h
Big Think
18
The stress around money is damaging to our health. How do we stop it?A new study from the Great Recession shows that anxiety around money is not helping us. How do we stop worrying? Read More
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Storm's coming: New technique for simulation of extreme weather eventsA Japanese researcher at Kanazawa University developed a new method for generating data for ensemble simulation of extreme weather phenomena. He tested the method in simulation of a typhoon and a global warming simulation, and successfully created the necessary range of data in each case. The method has high computational stability and can be applied to any type of extreme weather event or other t
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Chinese researchers achieve 3D underwater acoustic carpet cloak first with 'Black Panther'-like featuresA research team led by professor YANG Jun from the Institute of Acoustics (IOA) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences designed and fabricated a 3D underwater acoustic carpet cloak (UACC) using transformation acoustics.
5h
NYT > Science
57
China’s Giant Salamanders Pose a Conservation ConundrumMost of the animals now are found on farms in China. Giant salamanders released recently into the wild are genetically distinct from those that evolved there, a man-made “species.”
5h
Futurity.org
1
Writer Pete Hamill recalls RFK campaign and assassinationPete Hamill was in Ireland putting the finishing touches on his first novel when he received a telegram from Robert F. Kennedy. The New York senator was running for president and wanted Hamill to work on his campaign. Hamill, now a writer in residence at New York University’s Arthur L. Carter Journalism Institute, didn’t hesitate. He was on a plane back to New York the next day: March 15, 1968. A
5h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
8
SpaceX launches communication satellite, ditches old boosterSpaceX has launched another satellite for a Luxembourg communication company. But it ditched the recycled booster in the Atlantic following liftoff.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
26
A volcanologist's take on Fuego eruptionGuatemala Fuego VolcanoThe eruption of the Fuego volcano in Guatemala was likely a "pyroclastic surge" similar to the one that destroyed the ancient city of Pompeii, says volcanologist David Rothery of The Open University in England.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Facebook 'not aware of any abuse' of data by phone makersFacebook TNYT SamsungFacebook said Monday that it does not know of any privacy abuse by cellphone makers who years ago were able to gain access to personal data on users and their friends.
5h
Futurity.org
1
Sleepy worms shed light on why we need our shut-eyeNew research with roundworms may add to our understanding of the transitions between a wakeful active state and the stillness of sleep—and what the importance of sleep really is. “We spend more than a third of our life asleep. But we don’t really understand what it’s good for, and we don’t understand how it works…” A good night of sleep entails about eight hours of blissful immobility—a state of
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

A non-negligible role of supports in atomically dispersed catalysts direct involvement in catalysisAre the active sites of atomically dispersed catalysts limited to the dispersed metal atoms alone? Should metal-oxide supports of atomically dispersed metal catalysts play important roles other than serving as ligands to stabilize single-atom centers? A significant vicinal effect is now demonstrated (Science Bulletin, 2018, 11) to illustrate the possible direct involvement of support in the cataly
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
5
Designer materials with completely random structures might enable quantum computingTopological randomness may be the answer for lossless electronics and making the nuts and bolts of quantum computers. Complete randomness in the structures of superconductors and insulators could lower the requirements of pristine crystalline ordering — and make them more accessible to industry.
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
73
New invention safely transports unknown, deep-dwelling fishes to the ocean's surfaceStrange and beautiful fishes from the ocean's deep and lesser-known twilight zone reefs are hitching a ride to the surface thanks to the newly invented SubCAS (or Submersible Chamber for Ascending Specimens). This ingenious pressurized chamber, engineered by the scientists-turned-inventors at the California Academy of Sciences and the Monterey Bay Aquarium, stretches two feet long and is used by s
5h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
5
Predicting the outcomes of FIFA World CupFIFA World Cup Wi-FiOne of the favourites in soccer's upcoming 2018 FIFA World Cup, Germany, has just 13.3% chance of winning. And Australia has 14% chance of getting to the round of 16, but only 0.1% chance of winning. These are outcomes from an uncertainty model devised by University of Adelaide's Professor Steve Begg.
5h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
New invention safely transports unknown, deep-dwelling fishes to the ocean's surfaceStrange and beautiful fishes from the ocean's deep and lesser-known twilight zone reefs are hitching a ride to the surface thanks to the newly invented SubCAS (or Submersible Chamber for Ascending Specimens). This ingenious pressurized chamber, engineered by the scientists-turned-inventors at the California Academy of Sciences and the Monterey Bay Aquarium, stretches two feet long and is used by s
5h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Resolving molecule information in dynamic lipid membrane with metasurfacesDetecting biomolecules, such as lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids and their interactions in heterogeneous biological samples is crucial for understanding a multitude of biological mechanisms in health and disease. For instance, molecular signaling and transport in cells are governed by the association and insertion of proteins with the cell lipid membrane. However, current label-free techniques
5h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
21
Asthma and flu: A double whammyVaccinating asthmatic pre-schoolers against influenza would dramatically reduce their risk of being hospitalized after an attack.
5h
The Atlantic
100+
This Fish’s Eyes Turn Black When It Gets MadWhen Robert Heathcote dips his head into the rivers of Trinidad, he’ll often see little black dots moving through the water, even when it’s murky. Those dots are the eyes of small, inch-long fish called guppies. And those guppies are angry. Guppies are among the most popular aquarium fish in the world, but they originally hail from the Caribbean. In Trinidad, some populations live upstream of wat
5h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Facebook under scrutiny over data sharing after NYT reportFacebook TNYT SamsungFacebook is pushing back against a media report saying that it provided extensive information about its users and their friends to third parties like phone makers.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
6
Image: Testing the NIRSpec instrument on the WebbThis abstract image is a preview of the instrumental power that will be unleashed once the NASA/ESA/CSA James Webb Space Telescope will be in space.
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Big Think
300+
What the world will look like in the year 250,002,018This is what the world will look like, 250 million years from now Read More
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Latest Headlines | Science News
66
Take a virtual trip to an alien worldNASA’s Exoplanet Travel Bureau website lets you view what alien landscapes might look like.
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Feed: All Latest
100
The Trailblazing Women Who Fight California’s FiresChristie Hemm Klok photographed 45 women who work for the San Francisco Fire Department.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Beyond conventional solution-process for 2D heterostructureRecently, researchers from Nanjing Tech University, China, demonstrated a facile wet-chemical method to directly grow organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite (MAPbBr3, MA = CH3NH3+) NCs on surfaces of dispersible MoS2 nanosheets.
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Resolving molecule information in dynamic lipid membrane with metasurfacesResearchers at EPFL (Switzerland) and their colleagues from the USA introduce a mid-infrared biosensor based on a novel multi-resonant metasurface, which, for the first time, is able to distinguish multiple analytes in heterogeneous biological samples non-destructively, in real-time and with high sensitivity.
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

The health effect of air pollution from trafficWhat would happen if all petrol and diesel-powered vehicles were removed from a smaller European city? Up to 4% of all premature deaths could be prevented, according to a new study from Lund University in Sweden. The researchers used Malmö, Sweden, as a case study to calculate the health costs of inner city traffic.
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

NOvA experiment sees strong evidence for antineutrino oscillationThe NOvA collaboration has announced its first results using antineutrinos, and has seen strong evidence of muon antineutrinos oscillating into electron antineutrinos over long distances, a phenomenon that has never been unambiguously observed.
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Future robots need no motorsThe mechanical engineering team at the University of Hong Kong led by Professor Alfonso Ngan Hing-wan, Chair Professor in Materials Science and Engineering, have created a novel actuating material that can be powered by visible light, electricity, and other stimuli, and which may replace traditional bulky motors and pneumatic actuators with ones similar to mammalian skeletal muscles in the future.
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
New mechanisms discovered to separate airUnlike the windows of your house, nanoscale holes in graphene (named as 'nanowindows') can selectively choose which type of air molecules can pass through.Scientists from Shinshu University and PSL University, France, theoretically proved concerted motion of the nanowindow-rim to selectively allow molecules to pass, in an energy-efficiently and fast way. This brings up new possibilities to create
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

When and where did the drought occur severely in the Yellow River basin during the last 55 years?Drought is one of the severe natural disasters to impact human society and occurs widely and frequently in China. The Yellow River basin (YRB) shows great vulnerability to drought in the major basins. In the past 55 years, droughts characteristics were diverse in the YRB in the temporal and spatial scale. Now a recent study revealed the period, stage, frequency and intensity of drought in the YRB.
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Novel gene in red blood cells may help adult newts regenerate limbsAdult newts can repeatedly regenerate body parts. Researchers from Japan, including the University of Tsukuba, and the University of Daytona, have identified Newtic1, a gene that is expressed in clumps of red blood cells in the circulating blood. These clumps are also newly generated in the stump region of amputated limbs of the adult newt. The study suggests, for the first time, an oxygen-indepen
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
New nanoparticles help to detect serious scarring of woundsA new way of seeing when heavy wound scars are forming, and providing doctors the chance to intervene, has been developed by scientists from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) and Northwestern University in the United States.
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

The search for the origin of mast cellsA team of researchers from CNRS, INSERM and Aix-Marseille Université (AMU) at the Centre of immunology Marseille-Luminy, together with the Singapore Immunology Network, has proven that not all of the immune system's important mast cells are produced in bone marrow, as was previously thought. Scientists found embryonic mast cells in mice with functions that are likely to be different than the mast
5h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
People aren't using their vacation time—here's a way to fix thatWhen Kevin Corliss, Christopher Kenyon, and Douglas Franklin entered their first professional careers, they each encountered the same dilemma: Although they had earned paid vacation time, they were discouraged from using it.
5h
Ingeniøren

IDAs medlemmer bakker massivt op om OK18Flere end ni ud af ti offentligt ansatte medlemmer af Ingeniørforeningen siger ja til overenskomstaftalen med de offentlige arbejdsgivere.
6h
Ingeniøren
1
Fartøjernes sværvægter: 22.000 ton i enkelt løftNy løfteteknologi gør det muligt at løfte hele platformdæk på op til 48.000 ton.
6h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Microsoft says buying GitHub for $7.5 bnMicrosoft on Monday said it will buy software development platform GitHub, in a deal worth $7.5 billion.
6h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
German car sales plunge in May as diesel falls out of favourSales of new cars in Germany plunged in May, official figures showed Monday, dragged lower by public holidays and mounting uncertainty about the future of scandal-plagued diesel.
6h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Embattled Air France-KLM stock jumps as hotel group studies bidShares in Air France-KLM soared on Monday after French hotels group AccorHotels said it was weighing the purchase of a minority stake in the Franco-Dutch group.
6h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
23
T. Rex snarls at visitors to Paris botanical gardenTrix, an eight-tonne Tyrannosaurus rex, will find a home at Paris' Jardin des Plantes for three months from Wednesday, greeting visitors in attack mode, with her terrifying, toothy snarl mounted at eye level.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
8
NASA mathematician Katherine Johnson being honored in bronzeKatherine Johnson, the NASA mathematician whose calculations helped astronauts return to Earth, is being honored at her alma mater with a bronze statue and a scholarship in her time.
6h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
6
The health effect of air pollution from trafficWhat would happen if all petrol and diesel-powered vehicles were removed from a smaller European city? Up to 4% of all premature deaths could be prevented, according to a new study from Lund University in Sweden. The researchers used Malmö, Sweden, as a case study to calculate the health costs of inner city traffic.
6h
Science | The Guardian
100+
No chemo: the test that made me a lucky breast cancer patient | Joanna MoorheadNever has news been so joyous as the results of my oncotype DX, the test revolutionising treatment for thousands of women • Thousands of breast cancer patients could avoid chemo, study finds Having cancer involves getting a lot of news from a lot of doctors, and for a while the news is bad. First you have cancer; then they’re not sure whether it’s spread. You’re given worst-case scenarios because
6h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Childhood cancer survivors more likely to experience sleep problems as adultsPreliminary results from a study of childhood cancer survivors show that they are more likely to experience sleep problems and daytime sleepiness as adults, and those who report poor sleep have a greater likelihood of persistent or worsened emotional distress.
6h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Poor sleep at night could mean decreased work productivity in the morningPreliminary results from a new study suggest that several sleep-related symptoms are associated with decreased work productivity.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Sleep paralysis and hallucinations are prevalent in student athletesPilot data from a recent study suggest that sleep paralysis and dream-like hallucinations as you are falling asleep or waking up are widespread in student athletes and are independently associated with symptoms of depression.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New algorithm determines ideal caffeine dosage and timing for alertnessAccording to a recent study, a newly developed algorithm may be the key to optimizing alertness with caffeine.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

ASCO & NEJM: AI plus ovarian suppression yields benefit in high-risk younger breast cancer patientsPremenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive, HER2-negative breast cancer and a high risk of recurrence who are treated with an aromatase inhibitor plus ovarian function suppression may gain 10 to 15 percent improvement in freedom from distant recurrence at eight years, according to a new clinical trial analysis reported at the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Forced court appearances make cops more tired, generate more citizen complaintsResults from a new study conducted by researchers at Washington State University and Central Queensland University suggest that complaints against US police officers increase when they work consecutive night shifts.
6h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

TAILORx trial finds most women with early breast cancer do not benefit from chemotherapy"Before TAILORx, there was uncertainty about the best treatment for women with a mid-range score of 11-25 on the Oncotype DX Breast Recurrence Score test. The trial was designed to address this question, and provides a very definitive answer," said lead investigator Joseph A. Sparano, MD. "Any woman with early-stage breast cancer 75 years or younger should have the 21-gene expression test and disc
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
15
Researchers support project to detect particles from deep space on NASA balloon missionA team of researchers at The University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) has been awarded NASA funding as part of a large, five-year-long U.S. collaboration to fly an ultra-long duration balloon mission with three innovative ultra-sensitive telescopes to sense cosmic rays and neutrinos coming from deep space. Planned for launch in 2022, the second-generation Extreme Universe Space Observatory on a S
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Enhancing 'breath figures' using electric fieldsBreath figures are the typical condensation patterns we know from breathing on a cold surface. In physics, this term is used to describe dropwise condensation patterns. The evolution of these patterns and roll-off of droplets can be changed strongly under electric field effects 'electrowetting' – leading to higher heat transfer rates. Researchers of the University of Twente presented these finding
6h
Dagens Medicin

Stort flertal for ja til OK18-aftaleAkademikerne, som lægerne er er en del af, siger ja til OK18-aftalen.
6h
Dagens Medicin

Forhandlere strides om psykiatrienRegeringen vil give psykiatrien et løft, men regionerne har svært ved at se det offensive i det aftaleudkast, regeringen har præsenteret ved økonomiforhandlingerne. »Jeg har på fornemmelsen, at regeringen gemmer på sine ønsker og visioner,« siger Stephanie Lose (V) formand for regionerne.
6h
Popular Science
100+
Some 83,000 members of the U.S. military are missing. This group tries to bring them home.Military How elite military and scientific teams bring home fallen U.S. soldiers. Many searches begin in musty archives and digital databases. DPAA historians and archivists pore over battle reports, flight and ship logs, and other documents.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
5
Researchers aid groundbreaking test of serial crystallography techniqueRice University scientists used a rapidly pulsing X-ray laser to show how drug-resistant tuberculosis bacteria deactivate the antibiotic molecules intended to treat the deadly lung disease.
6h
The Scientist RSS

Infographic: Can Archaea Teach Us About the Evolution of Eukaroyotes?The discovery of copious new archaeal species is shedding light on the tree of life and revealing some unique cellular biology.
6h
The Scientist RSS

Infographic: Researchers Aim to Predict How Pathogens Jump SpeciesUnderstanding the factors that influence spillover could help forecast future epidemics.
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The Scientist RSS

Infographic: Caveolae Form and FunctionResearchers interrogate the cavernous structures on the surface of cells to better understand how they affect membrane function.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
91
Compact 3-D quantum memory addresses long-standing tradeoffPhysicists have designed a 3-D quantum memory that addresses the tradeoff between achieving long storage times and fast readout times, while at the same time maintaining a compact form. The new memory has potential applications in quantum computing, quantum communication, and other technologies.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
11
Seaweed, Indonesia's answer to the global plastic crisisThe impacts of global plastic use have reached an alarming level. Based on the latest data, 9 billion tonnes of plastics have been produced since the 1950s, creating 7 billion tonnes of waste. Plastic waste not only damages the environment and threaten animal life but also harms human populations.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Satellite imagery is revolutionizing the world. But should we always trust what we see?In 1972, the crew of Apollo 17 captured what has become one of the most iconic images of the Earth: the Blue Marble. Biochemist Gregory Petsko described the image as "perfectly representing the human condition of living on an island in the universe." Many researchers now credit the image as marking the beginning of environmental activism in the U.S.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Who gets their mass from the Higgs?The Higgs field is like an endless ocean through which all matter swims. Some particles are like sponges and sop up mass as they lumber along, while others are as sprightly as tiny minnows and dart right through.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Study links short and long sleep durations with excess heart agePreliminary results from a new study show that excess heart age (EHA) appeared to be lowest among adults who reported sleeping seven hours per 24-hour period.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Study links screen time to insomnia symptoms and depressive symptoms in adolescentsPreliminary results from a new study indicate that greater amounts of daily screen time are associated with more insomnia symptoms and shorter sleep duration among adolescents.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

NFL teams play better during night games thanks to circadian advantagesPilot data from a recent study suggest that NFL teams have better performance during night games versus afternoon games due to advantages from circadian rhythms.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Acute coronary syndrome patients with short sleep have double odds of hospital readmissionPilot data from a recent study suggest that patients with short sleep have over two times the odds of readmission than those with sufficient sleep duration during the month following acute coronary syndrome evaluation.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Upgrading the toolbox for Duchenne muscular dystrophy research with a new rabbit modelResearch to improve our understanding of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), and the development of new therapies, has previously relied on mouse models. However, physiological differences between the two species has limited how successfully findings in mice can be applied to humans. A newly developed rabbit model, created through the use of CRISPR/Cas-9 genome editing, exhibits greater clinical si
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Transformative technologyUC Davis neuroscientists have developed fluorescence sensors that are opening a new era for the optical recording of dopamine activity in the living brain.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Impacts from implementation of novel clinical pharmacist training program Changsha, ChinaIn the current issue of Family Medicine and Community Health (Volume 6, Number 2, 2018, pp. 89-92(4); the authors describe the first clinical pharmacy train-the-trainer program in China in collaboration with a Canadian university — the University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
The underwater adhesiveA special formula for epoxy resins has been developed at TU Wien, which can be used for fibre-reinforced composites in aerospace, shipbuilding and automotive manufacturing, or even for underwater renovation. This is achieved merely by irradiating any part of the resin with light.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Building the Starshot sail: A Q&A with Harry AtwaterWhen manmade probes finally reach other stars, they will not be powered by rockets. Instead, they may be riding on a gossamer-thin sail that is being blasted by a giant laser beam. Harry Atwater, Howard Hughes Professor of Applied Physics and Materials Science, is a project leader of the Breakthrough Starshot Program,which seeks to make these probes a reality. In a new paper published on May 7 in
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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New particle accelerators will probe how charged particles assume a new identity, or change 'flavor'Particle accelerators are powerful devices that use electromagnetic fields to propel charged particles like electrons or protons at speeds close to the speed of light, then smash them head-on. What happens in a blink of an eye during these high-speed collisions can tell us about some of the fundamental secrets of nature.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
53
Outflowing gas from galaxy supermassive black hole nucleiSupermassive black holes at the nuclei of most galaxies, including our Milky Way, develop gradually as material accretes onto the seed black hole. The physical processes that drive this growth – the so-called feeding and feedback processes – occur in the vicinity of the galaxy nucleus. When the accretion becomes active, radiation is emitted that illuminates and ionizes the gas in the vicinity of t
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Futurity.org
1
Tailored vaccine boosts survival for some brain cancer patientsIn a new multicenter clinical trial, a personalized vaccine improved the survival rates of some people with the deadly brain cancer glioblastoma. Currently, most people die less than 18 months after being diagnosed with the aggressive cancer. The phase three trial included 331 patients at more than 80 sites in four countries. Researchers randomly selected patients to receive standard therapy plus
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
Computational modeling may soon help researchers predict, and prevent, food insecurityImagine a world where scientists use computers to predict the impact of climate change and other stressors on international food security, migration, and civil conflict, and then use those predictions to increase the availability of vital resources.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Seeing all the colors of the plasma windWhen it comes to plasma winds in a tokamak, researchers are always looking for the Goldilocks solution—one that is just right. Winds that are too high or too low can reduce plasma efficiency. Researchers at the DIII-D National Fusion Center are using a new type of imaging to help get the wind moving at just the right speed. Plasma winds are more commonly referred to as flows. Researchers are using
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Dagens Medicin

Overlægernes lokale talsmand: Sundhedsplatform er skyld i lægeflugt i Region SjællandSundhedsplatformen er en af grundene til, at mange læger er smuttet fra Region Sjællands hospitaler, tror overlægernes lokale talsmand.
6h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
New transmission microscope for low-energy electronsPhysicist Daniël Geelen (Leiden University) has developed a new microscope that uses low-energy electrons. Those are less harmful to biological and organic materials. Geelen defended his Ph.D. thesis on May 31st.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Designer materials with completely random structures might enable quantum computingDesigning quantum materials with exotic and unprecedented electrical properties has the field of physics teeming with buzz. Researchers at Aalto University in Finland have now introduced a significant turn in this discussion by developing an amorphous material which exhibits topological superconductivity. Until this point, these materials have required highly regular structures to show desired ele
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Star Wars News: That Big 'Solo' Cameo Was a Last-Minute DecisionYes, that thing everyone is talking about almost didn't happen.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Simulations of magnetically confined plasmas reveal a self-regulating stabilizing mechanismThe hot ionized gas called a plasma is confined in a bagel-shaped tokamak by a strong magnetic field, part of which is generated by a strong electric current flowing through the plasma. Periodically, a sawtooth instability occurs. It causes the central plasma temperature to abruptly drop and then recover in a sawtooth pattern. The instability limits how much current can be concentrated in the cent
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Scientists studying nuclear spin make a surprising discoveryIn proton-proton smashups, more neutrons scatter to the right than the left relative to the proton spin direction. That was the accepted wisdom, and scientists thought the pattern would hold even when the protons struck larger nuclei. Painstaking new research shows that's not the case. Scientists analyzed collisions of spinning protons with different-sized atomic nuclei at the PHENIX detector at t
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Renewable solvents derived from lignin lowers waste in biofuel productionA closed-loop biorefinery could dramatically lower the cost of biofuels and related products. In this approach, the refinery produces the solvents it needs, rather than "importing" them. Scientists at the Joint BioEnergy Institute are developing a closed-loop biorefinery concept that uses waste lignin as a potential process solvent. How? They synthesized a new and renewable class of deep eutectic
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Simulating turbulent bubbly flows in nuclear reactorsInside nuclear reactors, boiling water, bubbles, and turbulent flows affect safety and efficiency. For many years, modeling turbulent bubbly flows was a challenging, time-consuming problem. Researchers were largely limited to experiments that yielded only a few bubbles at a time. Now, they can simulate the thousands of bubbles needed to model and predict the behavior of the flows in nuclear reacto
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
7
Making efficient use of biomassIndustrial facilities are generally located far away from extensive forest regions. Because wood requires efforts to transport, it sees only limited use as a raw material in industry. In the EU-funded SteamBio project, researchers from the Fraunhofer Institute for Interfacial Engineering and Biotechnology IGB have teamed up with various partners to change all that, developing a special steam dryin
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Astronomers detect a doubly eclipsing quadruple star systemUsing NASA's Kepler spacecraft, an international group of astronomers has discovered a doubly eclipsing, bound quadruple star system. The newly found system, designated EPIC 219217635, consists of stars similar in size to our sun, with masses ranging from 0.41 to 1.3 solar masses. The finding was presented May 24 in a paper published on arXiv.org.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Improved focus for office workersAround 40 percent of all employees in Germany work in an office. Often, however, office buildings do not meet the needs of modern workplace requirements which results in sensory overload, distraction and stress. International studies have shown that office workers perceive subpar acoustics as particularly distracting. On board this year's MS Wissenschaft, Fraunhofer researchers demonstrate how the
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Geographic and health system correlates of interprofessional oral health practiceIn the current issue of Family Medicine and Community Health (Volume 6, Number 2, 2018, pp. 77-84(8); DOI: https://doi.org/10.15212/FMCH.2018.0104, researcher Sean G. Boynes, The DentaQuest Institute, Westborough, MA, USA, and coresearchers Abigail Lauer and Amy Martin from Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, S.C., USA examine geographic, system, and organizational constructs that pr
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Family Medicine and Community Health Journal volume 6, issue number two publishesFamily Medicine and Community Health Journal volume 6, issue number two publishes.Beijing, May 31, 2018: The May 2018 issue includes four original research articles, a reflection article, a China Focus article and a Letter to the Editor addressing various topics in family medicine in both China and internationally.
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Scientific American Content: Global
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Speaking a Second Language May Give Low-Income Kids a BoostNew findings add fuel to the bilingual advantage debate — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
LED stool to combat back painSitting down for hours on end is hazardous to our health – whether it is in the office, at school, in the car or on the sofa. Backaches, obesity, diabetes and other conditions are the consequences of a lack of movement. It is important, therefore, to integrate dynamic sitting into our everyday lives. In a fun exhibition on the MS Wissenschaft science ship, Fraunhofer researchers are demonstrating
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
85
Photoexcited graphene puzzle solvedLight detection and control lies at the heart of many modern device applications, such as smartphone cameras. Using graphene as a light-sensitive material for light detectors can offer significant improvements with respect to materials being used nowadays. For example, graphene can detect light of almost any color, and it gives an extremely fast electronic response within one millionth of a millio
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
Hybrid overhead lines—more power, not more power linesSocial opposition to new high-voltage lines is delaying modernisation of the power grid. Two projects of the National Research Programmes "Energy Turnaround" and "Managing Energy Consumption" have determined the optimum design of hybrid overhead lines needed to increase the capacity of the power transmission grid and, at the same time, win popular acceptance for the new technology.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
The interface between two tin-oxide semiconductors can exhibit unexpected metallic propertiesMetal oxidation is harnessed in many industrial applications. KAUST researchers have modeled the boundary between two metal oxides to reveal their metallic properties, which could lead to positive applications in electronics.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
The long and the short of DNA replicationThe process of copying DNA is complex choreography that requires rapid speeds and pin-point precision. Discovering the intricate details of this process could identify new ways to target diseases, such as cancer, and KAUST scientists have just uncovered a crucial step.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
Demystifying the future of connected and autonomous vehiclesNo doubt the emergence of connected and autonomous vehicles (CAVs) will have new and exciting effects on patterns and modes of transportation, but when it comes to measuring those effects, the future gets a little hazier.
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The Atlantic
90
The Middle East’s Growing Space AmbitionsMore than a thousand years ago, Islamic scholars and thinkers embarked on an exciting period of scientific study. They translated Greek and Sanskrit works on astronomy into Arabic and used them to develop their own methods for observing the mysterious heavenly bodies twinkling in the night sky. They recorded the movements of the sun and the moon. They calculated the diameters of the Earth and the
7h
Futurity.org
1
Immunosuppressants may ward off Parkinson’sPeople who take drugs that suppress the immune system are less likely to develop Parkinson’s disease, according to a new study. The findings suggest that a person’s own immune system helps nudge him or her down the path toward Parkinson’s. Restraining the immune system with drugs potentially could prevent the neurological disorder, which is characterized by tremors, slow movements, stiffness, and
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Dagens Medicin

Ni overlæger har forladt psykiatrisk afdeling i RisskovSiden september har ni overlæge forladt afdeling på Risskov Psykiatrisk Hospital. Region arbejder på sagen.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
13
Thermal spin currents confirmed in both space and timeElectrons possess their own angular momentum. They turn on their own axis. In physics, the technical term for this property is spin. Such an electron spin is what makes electrons behave as magnets. However, what is special is that even when they maintain their position (i.e. do not move), electrons can pass on their spin to neighbouring electrons. This chain-reaction-like process in which a spin i
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
5
Role of kelp forests in mitigating climate change under threatA global study led by a team from The University of Western Australia and the Marine Biological Association of the UK has found that kelp forests take in more than twice the amount of carbon dioxide than previously thought, which can help mitigate the impact of climate change.
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The Scientist RSS

Pioneering Heart Transplant Program SuspendedThe move by Baylor St. Luke's Medical Center follows an investigative news report detailing surgical errors and poor research practices.
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The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: Coral ReefOcean acidification can alter coral reef communities by decreasing calcification, encouraging the growth of green algae, and increasing metabolic rates.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
Scientists link ocean dispersal of baby fish with ecology of adultsPopulations of fish in the ocean are notoriously variable, waxing and waning in often unpredictable ways. Knowing what drives changes in fish population sizes is important for managing fisheries and conserving species.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Hubble spots a green cosmic arcThis NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image shows a cluster of hundreds of galaxies located about 7.5 billion light-years from Earth. The brightest galaxy within this cluster, named SDSS J1156+1911, is visible in the lower middle of the frame. It was discovered by the Sloan Giant Arcs Survey, which studied data maps covering huge parts of the sky from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The survey found
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
A platform for extracting crucial information from satellite imagesEPFL start-up Picterra has devised a smart system that allows users to analyze drone or satellite images of a given territory: in a few clicks, they can extract information, statistics and representations of changes that have taken place in the area. The startup, which is based at EPFL Innovation Park, will present its system to sector professionals and the public tomorrow at GEOSummit, the Swiss
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Scientific American Content: Global
5
50/100/150 Years Ago: The Politics of Urban Riots in 1968Innovation and discovery as chronicled in Scientific American — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Live Science
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How Jesus Died: Rare Evidence of Roman Crucifixion FoundThe body of a man buried in northern Italy 2,000 years ago shows signs that he died after being nailed to a wooden cross.
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The Atlantic
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The Quietly Radical Mister Rogers’ NeighborhoodIt’s easy to think of Fred Rogers, and his show Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood , as the television equivalent of a mom-and-pop shop, a charming enterprise that stayed in business on the back of its singularly rustic community appeal. Hosted by an ordained minister who had worked as a puppeteer at his local public TV station, the show was produced out of Pittsburgh for its entire 912-episode run. Its
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Popular Science
37
Four intense ways insects sacrifice themselves for the good of the colonyAnimals When the going gets tough, the tough self-destruct. When predators threaten, these tropical ants pull the ultimate power move: disemboweling themselves to spew noxious chemicals onto their enemies.
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Science | The Guardian
20
Chemotherapy before surgery could extend pancreatic cancer patients' livesClinical trial finds those given chemoradiotherapy 10 weeks before surgery for deadly disease lived months longer Pancreatic cancer patients may live months longer if they receive chemotherapy before surgery, a new study has found. The cancer is one of the most deadly; just 5% of pancreatic cancer patients live five years after a diagnosis. Continue reading…
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
81
Spooky quantum particle pairs fly like weird curveballsCurvy baseball pitches have surprising things in common with quantum particles described in a new physics study, though the latter fly much more weirdly.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
Better access to production dataHow can companies master the mountains of Industrie 4.0 data? Specialists at the Fraunhofer Institute for Computer Graphics Research IGD are helping make production processes faster and assure quality. People who go on board the MS Wissenschaft (Motor Ship Science) 2018 can get an idea of how IGD researchers display all key information in one place and simplify decision-making processes with their
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New Scientist – News
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Guatemala volcano kills 25 as ash buries entire villagesThe Fuego volcano in Guatemala has exploded and spewed out molten rock and ash, killing at least 25 people in the country's most violent eruption for over a century
8h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Idera Pharmaceuticals presents clinical data from the ILLUMINATE-204 trial of the combination of tilsotolimod and ipilimumab for anti-PD-1 refractory metastatic melanoma at the 2018 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual MeetingIdera Pharmaceuticals Inc., a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company developing toll-like receptor and RNA therapeutics for patients with rare cancers and rare diseases, announced results from the ongoing ILLUMINATE-204 trial investigating tilsotolimod, Idera's intratumorally-delivered Toll-like Receptor 9 agonist, in combination with ipilimumab (Yervoy®). Current data show an overall response r
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The Atlantic
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The Celebrity PardonerCast your memory back to the bygone presidential campaign when a young, freshmen senator named Barack Obama was filling up stadiums with people chanting “Yes, we can.” His supporters saw an inspiring leader. For his detractors, the spectacle was absurd. The nation needed a statesman. And here were Democrats treating their nominee as if he was a celebrity. That negative perception ultimately becam
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
72
Peering at atomic structures with no more than pencil and paperWho would guess that cracking the mystery of how infinitesimally small atoms arrange themselves at the edges of crystals in advanced materials could be as simple as one, two, three?
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Live Science
100+
How Do DNA Ancestry Tests Really Work?23andme, ancestry.com and other services promise to unlock ancestry secrets hidden in your genetic code. But how do they work?
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
Growing cities face challenges of keeping the masses moving up, down and acrossCities worldwide face the problems and possibilities of "volume": the stacking and moving of people and things within booming central business districts. We see this especially around mass public transport hubs.
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New Scientist – News
66
A whole new type of cancer therapy helps treat liver cancerBy making a gene in the liver work harder, a completely new type of drug has shown promise for treating cases of advanced liver cancer in a small trial
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Dagens Medicin

Styrelsen for Patientsikkerhed skal tjekke SundhedsplatformenFlere læger mener, at medicinmodulet i Sundhedsplatformen kan være en trussel mod patientsikkerheden. På bl.a. den baggrund, vil Styrelsen for Patientsikkerhed undersøge Sundhedsplatformen.
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Save the Scooters, Redesign the Streets, and Save San FranciscoInstead of limiting scooters, officials should rebuild infrastructure with their riders in mind. Because a city made for scooters is a city made for freedom.
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The Responsibility of Immortality: Welcome to the New TranshumanismWhat used to be the province of acid-tripping tie-dye wearers has been co-opted by Silicon Valley—and we must be responsible about how we wield this new reality.
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Cosmic Ray Showers Crash Supercomputers. Here's What to Do About ItWhat happens when a national laboratory’s supercomputers start glitching?
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Latest Headlines | Science News
47
‘Outbreak’ puts the life cycle of an epidemic on displayAt the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History, the exhibit “Outbreak” highlights how infectious diseases shape our world.
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The Atlantic
88
'This Election in California May Make All the Difference'HUNTINGTON BEACH, Calif.—Scott Baugh stood on soft carpet inside the Meadowlark Golf Club before the monthly meeting of the Huntington Harbour Republican Women Federated. Golfers whacked at balls outside under a gray sky. A couple dozen older women and a few men had loaded their plates with fried chicken, coleslaw, and mac and cheese from the buffet and returned to their tables, and now applauded
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
59
Chemical-feasting bacteria remove likely carcinogen from contaminated waterWhile not featured on most product ingredient labels, the organic chemical stabilizer and manufacturing byproduct, 1,4-dioxane, can be found in countless everyday household items—from shampoos and cosmetics to laundry detergents and antifreeze.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
11
Supercomputer Astronomy: The Next GenerationThe supercomputer Cray XC50, nicknamed NS-05 "ATERUI II" started operation on June 1, 2018. With a theoretical peak performance of 3.087 petaflops, ATERUI II is the world's fastest supercomputer for astrophysical simulations. ATERUI Ⅱsimulates a wide range of astronomical phenomena inaccessible to observational astronomy, allowing us to boldly go where no one has gone before, from the birth of the
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
20
NEOWISE thermal data reveal surface properties of over 100 asteroidsNearly all asteroids are so far away and so small that the astronomical community only knows them as moving points of light. The rare exceptions are asteroids that have been visited by spacecraft, a small number of large asteroids resolved by NASA's Hubble Space Telescope or large ground-based telescopes, or those that have come close enough for radar imaging.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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NOvA experiment sees strong evidence for antineutrino oscillationFor more than three years, scientists on the NOvA collaboration have been observing particles called neutrinos as they oscillate from one type to another over a distance of 500 miles. Now, in a new result unveiled today at the Neutrino 2018 conference in Heidelberg, Germany, the collaboration has announced its first results using antineutrinos, and has seen strong evidence of muon antineutrinos os
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New Scientist – News
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Anti-swearing AI takes the edge off abuse on Reddit and TwitterArtificial intelligence created by IBM converts offensive abuse on sites like Reddit and Twitter into more polite patter
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
21
New study corroborates role of wildlife in regulating the world's plantsEveryone knows that plants are eaten by animals, but how important is this basic process in structuring plant communities? In a study published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, ASE Research Fellow Dr. Matthew Scott Luskin and co-authors, use data from across the world to investigate the impacts of plant-eating animals, known as herbivores, on land ecosystems.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
44
Bonobos have human-like sense of disgust, researchers findEven bonobos lose their appetites with enough if they experience disgust. These primates, known for their liberal attitudes toward sex, are also generally open-minded when it comes to new foods—as long as it's is clean.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Tiny asteroid discovered Saturday disintegrates over AfricaA boulder-sized asteroid designated 2018 LA was discovered Saturday morning, June 2, and was determined to be on a collision course with Earth, with impact just hours away. Because it was very faint, the asteroid was estimated to be only about 6 feet (2 meters) across, which is small enough that it was expected to safely disintegrate in Earth's atmosphere. Saturday's asteroid was first discovered
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Scientists propose new method to increase extraction of hard-to-recover hydrocarbonsMore than 40 percent of oil reserves in Russia are hard to recover. Scientists from the National Research Nuclear University MEPhI have proposed an effective method of increasing the production of such fields that does not harm the environment. Heating of a casing pipe by high-frequency electric current leads to melting of accumulated paraffin-resinous deposits.
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Scientific American Content: Global
1K
There's an "Inverse Piano" in Your HeadA Kavli Prize–winning scientist details the magic of transforming vibrations into sound in the inner ear — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Dagens Medicin

Databeskyttelse spænder ben for effektivt værktøjData fra et amerikansk studie viser, at mobilteknologi er et effektivt redskab til at indhente PRO. Brugen af den slags teknologi ligger imidlertid ikke lige til højrebenet i danske populationer, vurderer ekspert, som bl.a. udpeger økonomi og databeskyttelse, som forhindringer.
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Ingeniøren

Techtopia #55: GDPR efter stormenPodcast: De seneste uger har det været en udfordring at grave sig gennem mail-boksen, fordi den er sandet til i samtykke-mails om GDPR fra stort set alle, som man har været i berøring med på nettet.
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New Scientist – News
5
It’s time we stopped dismissing women’s health problemsControversy about cervical smear tests is just the latest in a series concerning women’s health. It’s time to talk about inequality in the doctor’s surgery
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Dagens Medicin

Operation kan undlades ved fremskreden nyrekræftMange patienter med fremskreden nyrekræft kan undlade at få bortopereret den ramte nyre, uden at de kompromitterer deres chancer for at overleve sygdommen.
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Dagens Medicin

Nyt studie bekræfter imponerende effekt af immunterapiPatienter med avanceret ikke-småcellet lungekræft vinder fire til otte måneder i overlevelse, når de får pembrolizumab frem for kemoterapi i første linje, viser Keynote-042-studiet. Der er dog stadig er patienter, som har mest gavn af initial kemoterapi, påpeger dansk ekspert.
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Dagens Medicin

Stort amerikansk studie bekræfter danske DBCG-retningslinjerMere end halvdelen af kvinder med den mest almindelige type brystkræft i tidligt stadie kan undvære adjuverende kemoterapi, viser stort amerikansk fase 3-forsøg. Det kommer imidlertid ikke til at influere på dansk praksis, da DBCG allerede har taget højde for, at det er en begrænset population, der bør anbefales adjuverende kemoterapi.
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Dagens Medicin

Fyr løs i kvalitetens tjenesteMon færre patienter skal være løsningen, næste gang virkeligheden indhenter administrationen på det nye ’supersygehus’?
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Dagens Medicin

Kvinder med hoved-halskræft får mindre intensiv behandlingAmerikansk analyser viser, at der er kønsforskelle på udfald og behandling af hoved-halskræft.
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Dagens Medicin

T-lymfocytter identificerer ny risikogruppe hos kolonkræftpatienterPatienter med kolonkræft med en lav forekomst af T-lymfocytter i tumorvævet har en dårligere prognose – også dem, som har mikrosatellit instabile tumorer. Det viser et nyt dansk studie, som antyder, at kvantificering af lymfocytter bør indgå i en samlet vurdering af patientgruppen.
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WWDC 2018 Liveblog: News and Updates From Apple's KeynoteApple WWDC iOS 2018Join us for live coverage of Apple's WWDC 2018 keynote at 9 am PDT on Monday, June 4.
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Ingeniøren
8
Galleri: Radikalt cykelkoncept giver tørre cykeltureForestil dig, at du kan sætte dig på cyklen, allerede inden du er trådt ud af døren derhjemme, og først stå af, når du er vel inde på kontoret.
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Ingeniøren
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Apple godkender Telegram-opdatering efter beskyldninger fra stifterDen krypterede beskedtjeneste Telegram fik i fredags godkendt en længe ventet opdatering af Apple. Dagen inden havde tjenestens stifter offentligt kritiseret Apple for at have forhindret opdateringer siden russisk forbud.
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Ingeniøren
4
Sikkerhedstjeneste frygter telefonovervågning af TrumpUSA's Homeland Security har gennemført en undersøgelse, som viser, at der formodentlig er blevet anvendt udstyr til aflytning af mobiltelefoner i Washington DC.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Earth's first giant predators produced killer babiesA new fossil study, led by Jianni Liu from the Northwest University in China, shows young radiodontan arthropods could be voracious predators, too.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
New perspectives on African migrationThe number of people in Africa moving from their home country is set to increase in line with population growth over the coming decades, according to the findings of a joint study from the JRC and the European Political Strategy Centre (EPSC).
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Physicists supervise the formation of higher manganese silicide filmsA team from Kirensky Institute of Physics (Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences) together with colleagues from Siberian Federal University have offered an approach for the controlled synthesis of semiconducting higher manganese silicide thin films. The films may be used in thermoelectric converters and other devices. The team also suggested other areas of application for these materi
10h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Chemical complex can enhance excretion of radioactive strontium from the body90Sr (t1/2 = 29.1 y) is one of the most important nuclear fission elements. After the nuclear power plant disasters of Chernobyl and Fukushima Daiichi, 90Sr was released into the atmosphere and the ocean. 90Sr is harmful to humans because it has a long half-life, and its daughter radionuclide, 90Y (t1/2 = 64.1 h), emits high-energy beta particles. It has been reported that internal exposure to 90S
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BBC News – Science & Environment
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Does Jurassic Park make scientific sense?How were the dinosaurs of Jurassic Park created, and what have we learned about them since?
10h
Dagens Medicin

Hyppige undersøgelse forbedrer kommunikationenRutinemæssige geriatriske udredninger af ældre med fremskreden kræft forbedre tydeligt kommunikationen mellem læger og patienter.
10h
Dagens Medicin

Kemo-strategi til behandling af rabdomyosarkom i spil til flere børnBørn med høj risiko for tilbagefald af rabdomyosarkom har bedre chance for at blive kureret, hvis de får tillagt seks måneders kemoterapi til standardbehandlingen, viser nyt fase 3-studie. Forlænget kemoterapi er allerede standard til højrisiko-patienter i Danmark, men flere får det tilbudt fremover, forudser dansk ekspert.
10h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
Airlines to step up fight against human traffickingAirlines are set to step up the fight against human trafficking, global industry body IATA said Monday as it released guidelines on how crews can act as "eyes and ears" to identify and report suspected cases.
10h
Ingeniøren
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Alternativet kalder minister i samråd om Baltic Pipe-projektetNorge og Polen burde have delt risikoen, når danskerne ikke har brug for nye rørledninger, mener partiet.
10h
Ingeniøren
3
Arkitekt vil have indendørs cykelparkeringUdformningen af bygninger skal vende op og ned på folks opfattelse af Oslo som cykelby.
10h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
7
A major step towards individualized cancer therapyFuyuhiko Tamanoi of Kyoto University's Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences (iCeMS) and colleagues in the US succeeded in establishing a versatile, powerful and convenient model to analyze human cancer.
10h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Polarized cells give the heart its fully developed formWhen it first starts to develop, the heart is a simple tube. Reporting in the journal Nature Communications, researchers at MDC have now described how it forms itself into a its characteristic S-shape and how the ventricles and atria finally develop. Their findings will help scientists to better understand the development of congenital heart diseases.
10h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Limited health literacy is a major barrier to heart disease prevention and treatmentLimited health literacy is a major barrier to heart health and managing heart disease and stroke. Health literacy is essential to navigate the health care system, use medication effectively and improve heart-healthy behaviors.
10h
NYT > Science
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Global Health: Nipah Virus, Dangerous and Little Known, Spreads in IndiaThe infection, an emerging threat, has killed virtually all of its victims so far in India.
10h
Ingeniøren
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Flertal uden om regeringen: Penge fra bilafgifter skal ikke tilbage til bilisterneEn ny måde at måle bilers brændstofforbrug ville koste danske bilejere 1,5 mia. kroner. Regeringen ville føre pengene tilbage til bilejerne, men politisk flertal har andre ideer.
11h
Nyheder – Forskning – Videnskab

Studie giver nyt håb i kampen mod genetisk bestemt overvægtEn stor gruppe med svær overvægt har en mutation i deres gener, som er årsagen til…
11h
Nyheder – Forskning – Videnskab

Forskere: ’Strømsvigt’ i dine fedtceller kan kortslutte dit helbredEnergiforbrændingen i kroppens såkaldte brune fedtceller bliver styret af fedtmolekylet cardiolipin….
11h
cognitive science
1
Hospital superbug uses tiny sticky fingers to infect medical tools and devicessubmitted by /u/davyeminy [link] [comments]
12h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Global airline body warns against protectionism, rising costsTrade wars and protectionism are key risk factors to airline profits already weakened by rising oil prices, the International Air Transport Association said Monday.
12h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
9
Swimmer faces sharks, massive garbage patch on record Pacific crossingHaving once vowed never to attempt such madness again, Ben Lecomte is set to take on giant waves, sharks and a pile of floating garbage the size of Texas in a perilous quest to swim across the Pacific Ocean.
12h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Global airport capacity crisis amid passenger boom: IATAGovernments need to urgently tackle a capacity crisis facing airports as demand for international travel grows, but they should be cautious about private sector involvement, airline industry group IATA warned Monday.
12h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Ticket service data breach disrupts music venuesConcert ticketing service Ticketfly says it's working to get its system back online after a data breach leaked users' personal information and disrupted services at live music venues.
12h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
47
Delhi slum drowning in plastic as Environment Day focuses on IndiaA sea of plastic spreads through the New Delhi slum of Taimur Nagar, a symbol of the grime and waste that makes the Indian capital one of the world's most polluted cities.
12h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
25
Bayer to ditch Monsanto name after mega-mergerGerman chemicals and pharmaceuticals giant Bayer will discard the name Monsanto when it takes over the controversial US seeds and pesticides producer this week, the group said Monday.
12h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
58
Guatemala volcano eruption kills 25Guatemala Fuego VolcanoAt least 25 people were killed when Guatemala's Fuego volcano erupted Sunday, belching ash and rock and forcing the capital's main airport to close.
12h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
Consortium buying Toshiba's memory business promises growthThe buyers of Toshiba Corp.'s memory device operations are promising to invest in technology development and manufacturing facilities to stay competitive, although they stopped short of giving a specific monetary amount or naming a new factory site.
12h
Viden
10
Nu går forskere på jagt efter dna i Loch Ness-søDer er tre danskere forskere med, når der skal tages prøver fra Loch Ness-søen i Skotland. De skal kortlægge, hvilke dyr og planter der er i søen.
12h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
100+
A filthy first—the six common types of disgust that protect us from disease revealedDisgust has long been recognised as an emotion which evolved to help our ancestors avoid infection, but now researchers have been able to show the human disgust system is likely to be structured around the people, practices and objects that pose disease risk.
12h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
6
Economic models significantly underestimate climate change risksPolicymakers are being misinformed by the results of economic models that underestimate the future risks of climate change impacts, according to a new journal paper by authors in the United States and the United Kingdom, which is published today (4 June 2018).
12h
Science-Based Medicine
500+
Right-to-try is now law. Let patients beware!Last week, President Trump signed the worst federal right-to-try bill under consideration by Congress into law. Its purpose was never to help terminally ill patients, and now that it's law there will be nothing the FDA can do to protect vulnerable terminally ill patients who choose it. That's a feature, not a bug. That's because right-to-try is the result of a collaboration between the quack-frien
12h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
100+
Hats on for Easter Island statuesHow do you put a 13-ton hat on a giant statue? That's what a team of researchers is trying to figure out with their study of Easter Island statues and the red hats that sit atop some of them.
13h
Science | The Guardian
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Can you solve it? World Cup arithmeticThe puzzle that shoots and scores UPDATE: Read the solutions here Hi guzzlers, The World Cup is almost upon us, so here’s a puzzle to get you in the mood. Continue reading…
13h
Science | The Guardian
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What is depression and why is it rising?It’s an illness that fills our news pages on an almost daily basis. Juliette Jowit asks what causes depression, who is susceptible and what the best treatment is Continue reading…
14h
Feed: All Latest
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'Westworld' Recap, Season 2 Episode 7: Decoding da VinciOn 'Westworld,' Robert Ford is a modern-day da Vinci, taking his inventions to their natural—possibly dangerous—conclusions.
14h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
11
Hats on for Easter Island statuesHow do you put a 13-ton hat on a giant statue? That's what a team of researchers is trying to figure out with their study of Easter Island statues and the red hats that sit atop some of them.
15h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
14
Spironolactone may be an alternative to antibiotics in women's acne treatmentIn a finding that suggests the potential for practice change that would reduce the use of antibiotics in dermatology, researchers in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania have found the diuretic drug spironolactone may be just as effective as antibiotics for the treatment of women's acne.
15h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
5
Inadequate sleep could cost countries billionsInadequate sleep is a public health problem affecting more than one in three adults worldwide. A new study in the journal SLEEP, published by Oxford University Press, suggests that insufficient sleep could also have grave economic consequences.
15h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
3
Doctors drive 3,000 miles to state conversation on male body imageWorking toward your fitness goals can have some great health benefits, but how much is too much? Extreme diets and fitness regimens are increasingly popular among those trying to achieve a better body — especially among one particular age group. A new national survey by Orlando Health found that millennials are most likely to use supplements and workout more than four times per week, something do
15h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Hepatitis C guideline recommends screening for all people born 1945-1975A key recommendation in a new Canadian guideline on managing chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) is to screen all people born between 1945 and 1975 for the disease, a departure from previous guidelines. The guideline, which contains comprehensive recommendations for diagnosing and managing the disease in diverse patient populations, is published in CMAJ.
15h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Improving patient transfer from ICU to ward: Resources, communication and cultureA new study has identified important factors that can improve the transfer of patients from the intensive care unit (ICU) to a general hospital ward, a high-risk transition in which breakdowns in communication, medical errors and adverse events resulting in readmission can occur. The research, published in CMAJ, includes patient and health care provider perspectives that identify resource availabi
15h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Asthma and flu: a double whammyVaccinating asthmatic pre-schoolers against influenza would dramatically reduce their risk of being hospitalized after an attack, Canadian researchers find.
15h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Ticks on migratory birds carriers of newly discovered hemorrhagic fever virusIn a new study, researchers at Uppsala University and other institutions have identified genetic material from the recently identified Alkhurma hemorrhagic fever virus in the tick species Hyalomma rufipes. The discovery was made after thousands of ticks were collected from migratory birds captured in the Mediterranean basin. The results indicate that birds could contribute to spreading the virus t
15h
Feed: All Latest
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WWDC 2018: How to Watch Apple's Keynote on Monday, June 4On Monday, Apple will lift the lid on its Worldwide Developers Conference. Here's how to tune in.
15h
Ingeniøren
44
Nye togsignaler til Aarhus må udskydes, så IC4 kan komme på værkstedTo af den danske jernbanes største problemsager, IC4-togene og signalprogrammet, tørner sammen på strækningen mellem Fredericia og Aarhus.
16h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
100+
Economic models significantly underestimate climate change risksPolicymakers are being misinformed by the results of economic models that underestimate the future risks of climate change impacts, according to a new article.
17h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
100+
More breast cancer patients can safely forgo chemotherapy: StudyA 21-gene test performed on tumors could enable most patients with the most common type of early breast cancer to safely forgo chemotherapy, according to a new study.
17h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
33
Why do some sleep-deprived people experience worse cognitive functioning than others?The key to predicting how someone is affected by sleep loss may be found in microRNAs (miRNAs), according to a new study.
17h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
23
Novel insulators with conducting edgesPhysicists are researching a new class of materials: Higher-order topological insulators. The edges of these crystalline solids conduct electric current without dissipation, while the rest of the crystal remains insulating. This could be useful for applications in semiconductor technology and for building quantum computers.
17h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
73
A sense of disgust in bonobos?Researchers investigate the adaptive system of disgust in bonobos to further understand the origins of it in humans. A bonobo's curiosity transforms into caution when food is presented with or near feces, soil, or bad smells.
17h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
45
A filthy first — the 6 common types of disgust that protect us from disease revealedPoor hygiene, insects or other animals that may carry disease and risky sexual behavior are among the distinct kinds of disgust that can help us to avoid disease and infection, according to new research.
17h
BBC News – Science & Environment
30
Meet the UN's nuclear inspectorsBBC News went to the IAEA’s labs at Seibersdorf near Vienna to find out how they inspect the world's nuclear sites.
20h
Futurity.org
8
What’s going on with the latest Ebola outbreak?On May 8, 2018, the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) declared a new outbreak of Ebola virus disease (EVD) centered on the market town of Bikoro, near the DRC’s border with the Republic of Congo. The Ebola virus, which spreads through contact with bodily fluids, causes severe illness which is often fatal if untreated. The 2014–2016 West Africa outbreak, the largest in history, killed more th
20h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
14
A filthy first — the 6 common types of disgust that protect us from disease revealedPoor hygiene, animals or insects carrying disease and risky sexual behavior are among the distinct kinds of disgust that can help us to avoid disease and infection, according to new research published in a special issue of the Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society.
20h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
28
Economic models significantly underestimate climate change risksPolicymakers are being misinformed by the results of economic models that underestimate the future risks of climate change impacts, according to a new journal paper by authors in the United States and the United Kingdom, which is published June 4, 2018.
20h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
37
A sense of disgust in bonobos?Kyoto University researchers investigate the adaptive system of disgust in bonobos to further understand the origins of it in humans. A bonobo's curiosity transforms into caution when food is presented with or near feces, soil, or bad smells.
20h
Futurity.org
12
Why the welfare backlash? Fear of lost racial statusFear of losing their socioeconomic standing in the face of demographic change may be driving white Americans’ opposition to welfare programs, even though whites are major beneficiaries of government poverty assistance, according to new research. Whites comprised 43% of Medicaid recipients, 36% of food stamp recipients, and 27% of the beneficiaries of Temporary Aid to Needy Families. While social
20h
Futurity.org
2
To test tricky butterflies, fool birds with 3,600 fakesNew research on butterflies aims to answer one of the biggest, most basic questions in biology: How do new species form? In the mid-1800s, an English naturalist and avid amateur entomologist named Henry Walter Bates traveled to the Amazon rain forest. He noted that distantly related species of butterfly often looked quite similar to one another, and that sometimes “palatable” butterflies—those th
20h
Futurity.org
7
Can graphic warnings steer us away from junk food?Graphic and negative messages on food packages could be a way to keep us from grabbing an unhealthy snack, a new study shows. Junk food has little to recommend it to the smarter parts of our brains, but to our impulsive side, taste is all that matters. We might strategically avoid the grocery store candy aisle, but we all have to pass through the checkout where the lure of the sugar fix can overs
21h
Futurity.org
1
Drug makes weight loss easier for people with genetic obesityAn already-available medication may help people with a certain type of genetically caused obesity lose weight and keep it off. Around two to six percent of all people with obesity develop it in early childhood; it’s in their genetic cards. Mutations in one of their “appetite genes” gives them a strong genetic predisposition for developing obesity, also called monogenic obesity. Their experience o
21h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
24
Study shows nail treatments do not affect readings of patients' oxygen levels, despite widespread concernNew research suggests that nail treatments such as acrylic nails or nail polishes do not, as previously thought, affect readings from digital pulse oximetry (DPO) devices used to monitor patients' blood oxygen saturation (SpO2) levels in hospital.
21h
Futurity.org
4
Waste time looking for your keys? Try this attention trickNew research shows that recent interactions with their environment can guide where people look. “We can’t fully process everything in a scene, so we have to pick and choose the parts of the scene we want to process more fully…” For example, do you waste time in the morning looking for your keys? You might have more luck finding them quickly by writing the word “KEYS” on a light switch you use eve
21h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
15
Study reveals hypnosedation as an effective alternative to general anesthesia for various surgeriesNew research presented at this year's Euroanaesthesia congress in Copenhagen, Denmark shows that hypnosedation is a valuable alternative to conventional general anesthesia.
21h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Study shows taking aspirin before or after coronaryNew research presented at this year's Euroanaesthesia congress in Copenhagen, Denmark shows that in patients undergoing a coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery, taking aspirin before and after surgery is associated with an 18 percent to 34 percent reduced mortality risk after four years.
21h
Science | The Guardian
33
Starwatch: Venus, a beacon in the twilight skyThe evening star will be travelling through Gemini this week to line up with Castor and Pollux This whole week, Venus shines in the western evening sky. It will be easy to see why the classical Greeks called it Hesperus or evening star. The reason is that it is so bright. It is travelling through the constellation Gemini , the twins, and by the weekend, it will line up with the stars Castor and P
23h
BBC News – Science & Environment
500+
Margaret Atwood: 'If the ocean dies, so do we'Speaking at a climate change conference in London, author Margaret Atwood supported a ban on single use plastic.
23h
Big Think
400+
Transgender brains more closely resemble brains of the sex they align with, rather than what they were born withGender studies are leaving the college halls and heading into the lab. Increasingly, there have been more rigorous studies into how transgender people neurologically relate to the sex they identify with rather than their biological sex. Read More
23h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
50
Inefficient fat metabolism a possible cause of overweightProtracted weight gain can, in some cases, be attributed to a reduced ability to metabolize fat, a new study shows. Sensitive individuals might need more intensive lifestyle changes if they are to avoid becoming overweight and developing type 2 diabetes, claim the researchers, who are now developing means of measuring the ability to break down fat.
23h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
54
Timing resuscitation compressions using the song 'La Macarena' or using a smartphone app improve compression qualityNew research presented at this year's Euroanaesthesia congress in Copenhagen, Denmark shows that the quality of chest compressions during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) can be improved by using either a smartphone app or by using the song 'La Macarena' as a mental memory aid.
23h

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