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Nyheder2018juni05

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Viden
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Grindehval havde slugt 80 plastikposer – kunne ikke reddesDe cirka otte kilo plastikposer i hvalens mave gjorde det umuligt for den at indtage føde.
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The Atlantic
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Nothing Unites a Team Like Getting Disinvited From the White HouseOf all the events that were almost unimaginable before Donald Trump took office, the disinvitation of the the Philadelphia Eagles to the White House less than 24 hours before their scheduled visit has to rank high. Traditionally, NFL games feature paroxysms of patriotism—the fading contrails of fighter jets; American flags the size of small nation-states—and the White House visit of the Super Bow
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Fungi-produced pigment shows promise as semiconductor materialResearchers are looking at a highly durable organic pigment, used by humans in artwork for hundreds of years, as a promising possibility as a semiconductor material.
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LATEST

BBC News – Science & Environment

How does plastic move around the oceans?BBC Science Editor David Shukman explains what happens to plastic once it gets into the sea.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Scientists analyze first direct images of dissolved organic carbon from the oceanIn a first, researchers have obtained direct images of dissolved organic carbon molecules from the ocean, allowing better analysis and characterization of compounds that play an important role in the Earth's changing climate.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Secret life of an enigmatic Antarctic apex predatorScientists have, for the first time, tracked the lives of leopard seals as they migrate around Antarctica. The team followed these formidable predators as they move from the frozen Antarctic sea-ice to the more northerly sub-Antarctic islands where they prey on penguins, seals and krill.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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One in four Americans develop insomnia each year: 75 percent of those with insomnia recoverAbout 25 percent of Americans experience acute insomnia each year, but about 75 percent of these individuals recover without developing persistent poor sleep or chronic insomnia, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Gut gas linked to diarrheaInvestigators have for the first time identified a gas produced in gut that could improve the diagnosis and treatment of patients with two common intestinal illnesses — small intestine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS).
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New on MIT Technology Review
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Walmart’s experimental Amazon Prime competitor aims for Alexa nextFor recently launched Jetblack, text ordering is only the testing grounds
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)
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What if we replaced politicians with randomly selected people? | Brett HennigIf you think democracy is broken, here's an idea: let's replace politicians with randomly selected people. Author and activist Brett Hennig presents a compelling case for sortition democracy, or random selection of government officials — a system with roots in ancient Athens that taps into the wisdom of the crowd and entrusts ordinary people with making balanced decisions for the greater good of
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The Atlantic
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DeVos Says There’s One Thing Her School-Safety Commission Won't Be Studying: GunsWhat should be on the list of tasks for President Trump’s newly minted school-safety commission, charged with studying what can be done to prevent campus violence? Perhaps the commission, chaired by U.S. Education Secretary Betsy DeVos, should look at mental-health resources and student-discipline practices. And perhaps it should consider the design of campus facilities. One thing that would seem
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Big Think
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Don’t confuse neurodiversity with cognitive diversityTwo popular terms, “neurodiversity” and “cognitive diversity” could hardly be more different, even though they sound similar. “Neurodiversity” celebrates the positive value of autism. “Cognitive diversity” represents an attempt to avoid conventional diversity. Read More
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Big Think
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The Japanese population is crashing faster than any other country. Why?The societal and economic costs are beginning to exact a toll. Read More
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Popular Science
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NASA is sending a spacecraft to investigate the ‘bubble’ that protects our solar systemSpace You map, IMAP, we all map. Researchers would like to know more about the heliosphere—the bubble of solar wind that encircles our solar system.
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Live Science
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How Did Easter Island Statues Get Their Massive 'Hats?'Archaeologists have answers about how the Easter Island statues got their enormous stone "hats."
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Feed: All Latest
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What Will Microsoft's GitHub Buy Mean For Controversial Code?The tech giant will officially acquire the legendary developer platform. The question now is what happens to some of the code it hosts.
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The Atlantic
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The Risky Promises Remote Owners Are Making to Rural HospitalsCEDARVILLE, Calif.—Beau Gertz faced a crowd of worried locals at the town senior center, hoping to sell them on his vision for their long-beloved—but now bankrupt—hospital. In worn blue jeans and an untucked shirt, the bearded entrepreneur from Denver pledged at a town-hall meeting in March to revive the Surprise Valley Community Hospital—a place many in the audience counted on to set their broke
32min
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Fungi-produced pigment shows promise as semiconductor materialResearchers at Oregon State University are looking at a highly durable organic pigment, used by humans in artwork for hundreds of years, as a promising possibility as a semiconductor material.
35min
Science : NPR
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Rethinking Chemotherapy In Some Breast Cancer CasesA new study released Sunday says that many women with early-stage breast cancer may not necessarily need chemotherapy as part of their treatment. (Image credit: Chris Hondros/Getty Images)
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Live Science
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Scientists Find Dozens of Hidden Earthquakes Buried Under Antarctica's IceA team of scientists spent months flying around East Antarctica to prove that the frozen continent really does have earthquakes.
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Live Science
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Dinosaur Sells for Over $2 Million at Auction. Why Paleontologists Are DismayedThe nearly complete skeleton of a meat-eating dinosaur fetched a whopping $2.36 million at the Aguttes auction house in Paris yesterday (June 4), much to the dismay of many paleontologists.
52min
The Atlantic
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The Invisible Melania TrumpFirst Lady Melania Trump may have spent 24 days out of the public eye , but it was the 33rd first lady, Bess Truman, who said : “I am not the one who is elected. I have nothing to say to the public.” Truman gave exactly one press conference as first lady, during which she replied “no comment” to each policy question. But things were different in 1945. Public figures were seen differently, quite l
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The Atlantic
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Which America Is Trump Celebrating?Here’s the thing about the pilgrimages that championship sports teams make to the White House each year. It’s a tradition rooted in efforts to achieve national unity. Like the broader American project, at their best these visits promote an expansive vision of America, a diverse society finding commonality in shared symbols and common rituals. But the first such visit was rooted in a very differen
54min
The Atlantic
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Miss America 2.0: The Inner Beauty Pageant?The New York Times ’s breaking news alert went like this: “The Miss America pageant will end its swimsuit competition. ‘We are not going to judge you on your outward appearance,’ the chairwoman said.” The chairwoman in question is Gretchen Carlson, the former Fox News host, the Miss America for 1989, and now the head of the Board of Trustees for the Miss America Organization. And the news in ques
54min
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Cedars-Sinai research identifies gut gas linked to diarrheaCedars-Sinai investigators have for the first time identified a gas produced in gut that could improve the diagnosis and treatment of patients with two common intestinal illnesses — small intestine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS).
56min
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

One in four Americans develop insomnia each yearAbout 25 percent of Americans experience acute insomnia each year, but about 75 percent of these individuals recover without developing persistent poor sleep or chronic insomnia, according to a study from researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania which will be presented Monday at SLEEP 2018.
56min
Feed: All Latest
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WWDC 2018: Tech Addiction and the Paradox of Apple's 'Screen Time' ToolsApple, like much of Silicon Valley, wants to cure the disease it caused. But it could go further.
1h
Live Science
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The Amount of Gray Matter in Your Brain May Predict If You'll Stick to Your DietThe amount of gray matter in your prefrontal cortex could dictate how much self-control you exhibit
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The Atlantic
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What Is Paul Manafort Doing?When the news broke that Paul Manafort, under indictment by Special Counsel Robert Mueller, repeatedly tried to contact witnesses in the case against him despite round-the-clock electronic surveillance, many were asking the same question: What was he thinking? “As counsel, you are repeatedly advising a client to steer clear of witness tampering,” said Jacob Frenkel, a white-collar criminal-defens
1h
Popular Science
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It's easier to convey anger in your second languageScience Our emotions shape which language we decide to use. There is a scientific explanation for why we often demonstrate greater emotional detachment in a foreign language. While this detachment can make it easier for us to say…
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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New study provides information on the secret life of an enigmatic Antarctic apex predatorScientists from British Antarctic Survey (BAS) have, for the first time, tracked the lives of leopard seals as they migrate around Antarctica. The team followed these formidable predators as they move from the frozen Antarctic sea-ice to the more northerly sub-Antarctic islands where they prey on penguins, seals and krill. The study is published this week in the journal PLOS ONE.
1h
Big Think
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Apple slaps Facebook with iOS 12 "anti-Facebook" measuresApple's privacy controls just got a big boost with iOS 12. Read More
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Study finds possible deep faults, possible earthquake sourceScientists may have found previously unmapped faults in Oklahoma that could be contributing to a sharp increase in induced earthquakes in the state, according to a report on a study that used magnetic imaging to explore the rock formations below the earth's surface.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
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Dogs carry a surprising variety of flu virusesDogs in China carry a wider variety of flu viruses than previously thought, and may be capable of passing the flu to humans.
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Feed: All Latest
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Why Apple Can’t Tackle Digital Wellness in a VacuumThe company has unveiled a suite of time-management tools to help balance your digital and real lives—*without* consulting researchers.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Scientists reveal structure of amino acid transporter involved in cancerThe human glutamine transporter ASCT2 is upregulated in several forms of cancer. It is also the docking platform for a wide range of pathogenic retroviruses. A team of University of Groningen scientists have used cryo-electron microscopy to elucidate the structure of the protein, which may generate leads for drug development. The results were published in Nature Structural & Molecular Biology on 5
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

UCI scientists analyze first direct images of dissolved organic carbon from the oceanIn a first, researchers from the University of California, Irvine – as well as Switzerland's University of Zurich, IBM Research-Zurich and UC Santa Cruz – have obtained direct images of dissolved organic carbon molecules from the ocean, allowing better analysis and characterization of compounds that play an important role in the Earth's changing climate.
1h
New on MIT Technology Review
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AI needs to start pulling its weight and controlling our shopping cartsManuela Veloso is tired of dumb items on wheels.
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Futurity.org
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How would alien civilizations deal with climate change?New research asks a big question: Is there such a thing as a sustainable civilization, perhaps one that lies far beyond our own galaxy? Or are all civilizations doomed to destroy themselves? “If we’re not the universe’s first civilization, that means there are likely to be rules for how the fate of a young civilization like our own progresses.” In the face of climate change, deforestation, and bi
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cognitive science
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Deep in the Pentagon, a secret AI program to find hidden nuclear missilessubmitted by /u/trot-trot [link] [comments]
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Viden

Verdens Miljødag: Del dit tip – hvordan begrænser du forbrug af plastik?FN vil bekæmpe plastikforurening. Det kræver, at vi genanvender og mindsker vores forbrug. Men hvordan? Send dit bedste tip, så deler vi det med DRs brugere.
1h
New on MIT Technology Review
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We still don’t know much about the jobs the AI economy will make—or takeExperts think companies need to invest in workers the way they do for other core aspects of their business they’re looking to future-proof.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
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What we know — and don’t know — about a new migraine drugA migraine prevention drug was recently approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. But some questions about the therapy remain.
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New study provides information on the secret life of an enigmatic Antarctic apex predatorScientists from British Antarctic Survey (BAS) have, for the first time, tracked the lives of leopard seals as they migrate around Antarctica. The team followed these formidable predators as they move from the frozen Antarctic sea-ice to the more northerly sub-Antarctic islands where they prey on penguins, seals and krill. The study is published this week in the journal PLOS ONE.
2h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Study suggests Earth could have supported continental crust, life earlier than thoughtThe early Earth might have been habitable much earlier than thought, according to new research from a group led by University of Chicago scientists.
2h
The Atlantic
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Trump Can’t Disown His Immigration Policies NowAhead of the Iraq War, Secretary of State Colin Powell warned colleagues about how the U.S. would be forced to spend years fixing Iraq if it invaded, citing what he called the “Pottery Barn Rule”: You break it, you own it. On immigration, something different has happened to President Trump—something more like traditional buyer’s remorse. He aggressively and successively made hardline immigration
2h
Scientific American Content: Global
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Treating Tourette Syndrome without DrugsBehavior intervention therapy can work as well as medication, without the risk of side effects — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Popular Science
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Last week in tech: iOS 12, Screentime, and everything else Apple announced at WWDC 2018Technology Catch up on all the news from Apple's annual developers conference. Apple announced updates for all its major software at WWDC 2018, including iOS, MacOS, and WatchOS.
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Correction for Lemos et al., CRISPR/Cas9 cleavages in budding yeast reveal templated insertions and strand-specific insertion/deletion profiles [Correction]GENETICS Correction for “CRISPR/Cas9 cleavages in budding yeast reveal templated insertions and strand-specific insertion/deletion profiles,” by Brenda R. Lemos, Adam C. Kaplan, Ji Eun Bae, Alexander E. Ferrazzoli, James Kuo, Ranjith P. Anand, David P. Waterman, and James E. Haber, which was first published February 13, 2018; 10.1073/pnas.1716855115 (Proc Natl…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

In This Issue [This Week in PNAS]Hydrogel helps restore artworks and reveals hidden inscription (Left) Detail from the Ascesa dei Beati by Michelangelo from the Sistine Chapel; (Right) 16th-century drawing reproducing the same detail and showing the inscription (artist unknown). Many ancient and contemporary artworks are marred by pressure-sensitive tapes, which are composed of an adhesive,…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Field studies of psychologically targeted ads face threats to internal validity [Social Sciences]We applaud Matz et al. (1) for using field studies on Facebook to investigate the effectiveness of psychologically targeted messages, building on prior, largely laboratory-based research. That said, this comparison of Facebook ad campaigns does not randomly assign users to conditions, which threatens the internal validity of their findings and…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Reply to Eckles et al.: Facebook’s optimization algorithms are highly unlikely to explain the effects of psychological targeting [Social Sciences]We thank Eckles et al. (1) for their thoughtful comments. The authors point out that the optimization algorithms of Facebook’s advertising platform constitute a potential confound of campaign outcomes. We agree, in general, that such algorithms could pose a threat to the validity of field studies since they introduce unintended…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Multicellular survival as a consequence of Parrondo’s paradox [Biological Sciences]In the face of inevitable aging and death, Nelson and Masel (NM) (1) argue that alternating life history stages between multicellularity and unicellularity enable the survival of multicellular lineages. This is exactly parallel to the game-theoretic Parrondo’s paradox (2), in which two individually losing strategies are temporally intercalated to yield…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Reply to Cheong et al.: Unicellular survival precludes Parrondo’s paradox [Biological Sciences]Parrondo’s paradox is a scenario in game theory in which a combination of two losing strategies (“losing” here defined as population decline) can result in a “winning” strategy (population persistence) when different strategies are used in different conditions (1). For example, hares that are constitutively either brown or white may…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

QnAs with Caroline Dean [QnAs]As winter gives way to spring, many plants erupt in a riot of colors in a bid to attract pollinators and set seed. As if by clockwork, these species time their bloom, delaying flowering until the onset of spring, when conditions favor fertilization and seed development. Researchers have long known…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Proinflammatory enzyme soluble epoxide hydrolase bridges obesity to colonic inflammation and potential carcinogenesis [Pharmacology]Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase: A Mechanistic Link Between Obesity and Colonic Inflammation Obesity and chronic inflammation are two well-recognized risk factors for the development of colorectal cancer (CRC). In PNAS, Wang et al. (1) use lipidomic profiling analysis to identify a significant mechanistic link between obesity and colonic inflammation via enhancing…
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Importance of dispersal in the assembly of the Neotropical biota [Evolution]The origin of Neotropical diversity has intrigued scientists since Humboldt and Wallace. Species radiations in this region have been associated with major biogeographic events such as Quaternary climatic changes (1), Neogene geological changes such as the Andean uplift, closure of the Panamanian isthmus, Miocene Marine incursions, and the formation of…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Revisiting sources of left-handedness in multiple-birth individuals [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]Multiple births have been celebrated by many couples, yet they pose moderate to severe physical hazards to both mothers and infants, one being infants’ lower birthweight relative to nontwins. Low birthweight, often linked to premature birth, is a recognized risk factor for a range of developmental delays known to be…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Electrochemical trapping of metastable Mn3+ ions for activation of MnO2 oxygen evolution catalysts [Chemistry]Electrodeposited manganese oxide films are promising catalysts for promoting the oxygen evolution reaction (OER), especially in acidic solutions. The activity of these catalysts is known to be enhanced by the introduction of Mn3+. We present in situ electrochemical and X-ray absorption spectroscopic studies, which reveal that Mn3+ may be introduced…
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Stabilized single-injection inactivated polio vaccine elicits a strong neutralizing immune response [Applied Biological Sciences]Vaccination in the developing world is hampered by limited patient access, which prevents individuals from receiving the multiple injections necessary for protective immunity. Here, we developed an injectable microparticle formulation of the inactivated polio vaccine (IPV) that releases multiple pulses of stable antigen over time. To accomplish this, we established…
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Coordination of the leucine-sensing Rag GTPase cycle by leucyl-tRNA synthetase in the mTORC1 signaling pathway [Biochemistry]A protein synthesis enzyme, leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LRS), serves as a leucine sensor for the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), which is a central effector for protein synthesis, metabolism, autophagy, and cell growth. However, its significance in mTORC1 signaling and cancer growth and its functional relationship with other suggested…
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

cAMP-inducible coactivator CRTC3 attenuates brown adipose tissue thermogenesis [Biochemistry]In response to cold exposure, placental mammals maintain body temperature by increasing sympathetic nerve activity in brown adipose tissue (BAT). Triggering of β-adrenergic receptors on brown adipocytes stimulates thermogenesis via induction of the cAMP/PKA pathway. Although cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) and its coactivators—the cAMP-regulated transcriptional coactivators (CRTCs)—me
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
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Xenoprotein engineering via synthetic libraries [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Chemical methods have enabled the total synthesis of protein molecules of ever-increasing size and complexity. However, methods to engineer synthetic proteins comprising noncanonical amino acids have not kept pace, even though this capability would be a distinct advantage of the total synthesis approach to protein science. In this work, we…
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Systematic prediction of genes functionally linked to CRISPR-Cas systems by gene neighborhood analysis [Biophysics and Computational Biology]The CRISPR-Cas systems of bacterial and archaeal adaptive immunity consist of direct repeat arrays separated by unique spacers and multiple CRISPR-associated (cas) genes encoding proteins that mediate all stages of the CRISPR response. In addition to the relatively small set of core cas genes that are typically present in all…
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Arginine methylation is required for canonical Wnt signaling and endolysosomal trafficking [Cell Biology]Arginine methylation has emerged as a widespread and reversible protein modification with the potential to regulate a multitude of cellular processes, but its function is poorly understood. Endolysosomes play an important role in Wnt signaling, in which glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) becomes sequestered inside multivesicular bodies (MVBs) by the…
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Oocyte stage-specific effects of MTOR determine granulosa cell fate and oocyte quality in mice [Developmental Biology]MTOR (mechanistic target of rapamycin) is a widely recognized integrator of signals and pathways key for cellular metabolism, proliferation, and differentiation. Here we show that conditional knockout (cKO) of Mtor in either primordial or growing oocytes caused infertility but differentially affected oocyte quality, granulosa cell fate, and follicular development. cKO…
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Human plasma and serum extracellular small RNA reference profiles and their clinical utility [Medical Sciences]Circulating extracellular RNAs (exRNAs) have the potential to serve as biomarkers for a wide range of medical conditions. However, limitations in existing exRNA isolation methods and a lack of knowledge on parameters affecting exRNA variability in human samples may hinder their successful discovery and clinical implementation. Using combinations of denaturants,…
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Encephalitis is mediated by ROP18 of Toxoplasma gondii, a severe pathogen in AIDS patients [Medical Sciences]The neurotropic parasite Toxoplasma gondii is a globally distributed parasitic protozoan among mammalian hosts, including humans. During the course of infection, the CNS is the most commonly damaged organ among invaded tissues. The polymorphic rhoptry protein 18 (ROP18) is a key serine (Ser)/threonine (Thr) kinase that phosphorylates host proteins to…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

T7 phage factor required for managing RpoS in Escherichia coli [Microbiology]T7 development in Escherichia coli requires the inhibition of the housekeeping form of the bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP), Eσ70, by two T7 proteins: Gp2 and Gp5.7. Although the biological role of Gp2 is well understood, that of Gp5.7 remains to be fully deciphered. Here, we present results from functional and…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
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Activity-dependent aberrations in gene expression and alternative splicing in a mouse model of Rett syndrome [Neuroscience]Rett syndrome (RTT) is a severe neurodevelopmental disorder that affects about 1 in 10,000 female live births. The underlying cause of RTT is mutations in the X-linked gene, methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2); however, the molecular mechanism by which these mutations mediate the RTT neuropathology remains enigmatic. Specifically, although MeCP2 is…
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Postsynaptic {delta}1 glutamate receptor assembles and maintains hippocampal synapses via Cbln2 and neurexin [Neuroscience]The δ1 glutamate receptor (GluD1) was cloned decades ago and is widely expressed in many regions of the brain. However, its functional roles in these brain circuits remain unclear. Here, we find that GluD1 is required for both excitatory synapse formation and maintenance in the hippocampus. The action of GluD1…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Deletion of LRRTM1 and LRRTM2 in adult mice impairs basal AMPA receptor transmission and LTP in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons [Neuroscience]Leucine-rich repeat transmembrane (LRRTM) proteins are synaptic cell adhesion molecules that influence synapse formation and function. They are genetically associated with neuropsychiatric disorders, and via their synaptic actions likely regulate the establishment and function of neural circuits in the mammalian brain. Here, we take advantage of the generation of a…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Mistimed food intake and sleep alters 24-hour time-of-day patterns of the human plasma proteome [Physiology]Proteomics holds great promise for understanding human physiology, developing health biomarkers, and precision medicine. However, how much the plasma proteome varies with time of day and is regulated by the master circadian suprachiasmatic nucleus brain clock, assessed here by the melatonin rhythm, is largely unknown. Here, we assessed 24-h time-of-day…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Epigenetic switch from repressive to permissive chromatin in response to cold stress [Plant Biology]Switching from repressed to active status in chromatin regulation is part of the critical responses that plants deploy to survive in an ever-changing environment. We previously reported that HOS15, a WD40-repeat protein, is involved in histone deacetylation and cold tolerance in Arabidopsis. However, it remained unknown how HOS15 regulates cold…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Characterization of gossypol biosynthetic pathway [Plant Biology]Gossypol and related sesquiterpene aldehydes in cotton function as defense compounds but are antinutritional in cottonseed products. By transcriptome comparison and coexpression analyses, we identified 146 candidates linked to gossypol biosynthesis. Analysis of metabolites accumulated in plants subjected to virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) led to the identification of four enzymes…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase governs steroidal specialized metabolites structural diversity and toxicity in the genus Solanum [Plant Biology]Thousands of specialized, steroidal metabolites are found in a wide spectrum of plants. These include the steroidal glycoalkaloids (SGAs), produced primarily by most species of the genus Solanum, and metabolites belonging to the steroidal saponins class that are widespread throughout the plant kingdom. SGAs play a protective role in plants…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
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Direct evidence of a large Northern European Roman period martial event and postbattle corpse manipulation [Anthropology]New archaeological excavations at Alken Enge, Jutland, Denmark, have revealed a comprehensive assemblage of disarticulated human remains within a 75-ha wetland area. A minimum of 82 individuals have been uncovered. Based on the distribution, the total population is estimated to be greater than 380 individuals, exclusively male and predominantly adult….
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Associated patterns of insecticide resistance in field populations of malaria vectors across Africa [Applied Biological Sciences]The development of insecticide resistance in African malaria vectors threatens the continued efficacy of important vector control methods that rely on a limited set of insecticides. To understand the operational significance of resistance we require quantitative information about levels of resistance in field populations to the suite of vector control…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Recombinant Escherichia coli as a biofactory for various single- and multi-element nanomaterials [Applied Biological Sciences]Nanomaterials (NMs) are mostly synthesized by chemical and physical methods, but biological synthesis is also receiving great attention. However, the mechanisms for biological producibility of NMs, crystalline versus amorphous, are not yet understood. Here we report biosynthesis of 60 different NMs by employing a recombinant Escherichia coli strain coexpressing metallothionein,…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Amorphous boron oxide at megabar pressures via inelastic X-ray scattering [Applied Physical Sciences]Structural transition in amorphous oxides, including glasses, under extreme compression above megabar pressures (>1 million atmospheric pressure, 100 GPa) results in unique densification paths that differ from those in crystals. Experimentally verifying the atomistic origins of such densifications beyond 100 GPa remains unknown. Progress in inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS) provided…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Strong and highly variable push of ocean waves on Southern Ocean sea ice [Applied Physical Sciences]Sea ice in the Southern Ocean has expanded over most of the past 20 y, but the decline in sea ice since 2016 has taken experts by surprise. This recent evolution highlights the poor performance of numerical models for predicting extent and thickness, which is due to our poor understanding…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Oxygen radicals, nitric oxide, and peroxynitrite: Redox pathways in molecular medicine [Biochemistry]Oxygen-derived free radicals and related oxidants are ubiquitous and short-lived intermediates formed in aerobic organisms throughout life. These reactive species participate in redox reactions leading to oxidative modifications in biomolecules, among which proteins and lipids are preferential targets. Despite a broad array of enzymatic and nonenzymatic antioxidant systems in mammalian…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

VirB8 homolog TraE from plasmid pKM101 forms a hexameric ring structure and interacts with the VirB6 homolog TraD [Biochemistry]Type IV secretion systems (T4SSs) are multiprotein assemblies that translocate macromolecules across the cell envelope of bacteria. X-ray crystallographic and electron microscopy (EM) analyses have increasingly provided structural information on individual T4SS components and on the entire complex. As of now, relatively little information has been available on the exact…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Structural basis of O-GlcNAc recognition by mammalian 14-3-3 proteins [Biochemistry]O-GlcNAc is an intracellular posttranslational modification that governs myriad cell biological processes and is dysregulated in human diseases. Despite this broad pathophysiological significance, the biochemical effects of most O-GlcNAcylation events remain uncharacterized. One prevalent hypothesis is that O-GlcNAc moieties may be recognized by “reader” proteins to effect downstream signaling. Ho
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Structure of an EIIC sugar transporter trapped in an inward-facing conformation [Biochemistry]The phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system (PTS) transports sugar into bacteria and phosphorylates the sugar for metabolic consumption. The PTS is important for the survival of bacteria and thus a potential target for antibiotics, but its mechanism of sugar uptake and phosphorylation remains unclear. The PTS is composed of multiple proteins, and…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Efficient collective swimming by harnessing vortices through deep reinforcement learning [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Fish in schooling formations navigate complex flow fields replete with mechanical energy in the vortex wakes of their companions. Their schooling behavior has been associated with evolutionary advantages including energy savings, yet the underlying physical mechanisms remain unknown. We show that fish can improve their sustained propulsive efficiency by placing…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Topography of epithelial-mesenchymal plasticity [Biophysics and Computational Biology]The transition between epithelial and mesenchymal states has fundamental importance for embryonic development, stem cell reprogramming, and cancer progression. Here, we construct a topographic map underlying epithelial–mesenchymal transitions using a combination of numerical simulations of a Boolean network model and the analysis of bulk and single-cell gene expression data. The…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Extant fold-switching proteins are widespread [Biophysics and Computational Biology]A central tenet of biology is that globular proteins have a unique 3D structure under physiological conditions. Recent work has challenged this notion by demonstrating that some proteins switch folds, a process that involves remodeling of secondary structure in response to a few mutations (evolved fold switchers) or cellular stimuli…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Uncovering universal rules governing the selectivity of the archetypal DNA glycosylase TDG [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Thymine DNA glycosylase (TDG) is a pivotal enzyme with dual roles in both genome maintenance and epigenetic regulation. TDG is involved in cytosine demethylation at CpG sites in DNA. Here we have used molecular modeling to delineate the lesion search and DNA base interrogation mechanisms of TDG. First, we examined…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Two Ck1{delta} transcripts regulated by m6A methylation code for two antagonistic kinases in the control of the circadian clock [Cell Biology]The N6-methylation of internal adenosines (m6A) in mRNA has been quantified and localized throughout the transcriptome. However, the physiological significance of m6A in most highly methylated mRNAs is unknown. It was demonstrated previously that the circadian clock, based on transcription-translation negative feedback loops, is sensitive to the general inhibition of…
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

CK1{delta}/ϵ protein kinase primes the PER2 circadian phosphoswitch [Cell Biology]Multisite phosphorylation of the PERIOD 2 (PER2) protein is the key step that determines the period of the mammalian circadian clock. Previous studies concluded that an unidentified kinase is required to prime PER2 for subsequent phosphorylation by casein kinase 1 (CK1), an essential clock component that is conserved from algae…
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Sulfur monoxide thermal release from an anthracene-based precursor, spectroscopic identification, and transfer reactivity [Chemistry]Sulfur monoxide (SO) is a highly reactive molecule and thus, eludes bulk isolation. We report here on synthesis and reactivity of a molecular precursor for SO generation, namely 7-sulfinylamino-7-azadibenzonorbornadiene (1). This compound has been shown to fragment readily driven by dinitrogen expulsion and anthracene formation on heating in the solid…
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Synergy between Fe and Ni in the optimal performance of (Ni,Fe)OOH catalysts for the oxygen evolution reaction [Chemistry]The oxygen evolution reaction (OER) is critical to solar production of fuels, but the reaction mechanism underlying the performance for a best OER catalyst, Fe-doped NiOOH [(Ni,Fe)OOH], remains highly controversial. We used grand canonical quantum mechanics to predict the OER mechanisms including kinetics and thus overpotentials as a function of…
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Imaging nanobubble nucleation and hydrogen spillover during electrocatalytic water splitting [Chemistry]Nucleation and growth of hydrogen nanobubbles are key initial steps in electrochemical water splitting. These processes remain largely unexplored due to a lack of proper tools to probe the nanobubble’s interfacial structure with sufficient spatial and temporal resolution. We report the use of superresolution microscopy to image transient formation and…
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Restoration of paper artworks with microemulsions confined in hydrogels for safe and efficient removal of adhesive tapes [Chemistry]The presence of pressure-sensitive tapes (PSTs) on paper artworks, either fortuitous or specifically applied for conservation purposes, is one of the most frequent and difficult issues encountered during restoration. Aged PSTs can damage or disfigure artworks, compromising structural integrity, readability, and enjoyment. Current procedures are often inherently hazardous for artistic…
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Steroid signaling mediates nutritional regulation of juvenile body growth via IGF-binding protein in Drosophila [Developmental Biology]Nutritional condition during the juvenile growth period considerably affects final adult size. The insulin/insulin-like growth factor signaling (IIS)/target of rapamycin (TOR) nutrient-sensing pathway is known to regulate growth and metabolism in response to nutritional conditions. However, there is limited information on how endocrine pathways communicate nutritional information to different meta
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Hamartin regulates cessation of mouse nephrogenesis independently of Mtor [Developmental Biology]Nephrogenesis concludes by the 36th week of gestation in humans and by the third day of postnatal life in mice. Extending the nephrogenic period may reduce the onset of adult renal and cardiovascular disease associated with low nephron numbers. We conditionally deleted either Mtor or Tsc1 (coding for hamartin, an…
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

News Feature: Life after the asteroid apocalypse [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]Sixty-six million years ago, an asteroid wiped out a huge swath of life on planet Earth. Could similar impacts have helped kick-start life itself? “Wow, she’s really high above the water,” Sean Gulick thought as his ship chugged toward a drilling platform some 30 kilometers off Mexico’s Yucatan Peninsula. Perched…
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Time-dependent view of an isotope effect in electron-nuclear nonequilibrium dynamics with applications to N2 [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]Isotopic fractionation in the photodissociation of N2 could explain the considerable variation in the 14N/15N ratio in different regions of our galaxy. We previously proposed that such an isotope effect is due to coupling of photoexcited bound valence and Rydberg electronic states in the frequency range where there is strong…
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Abrupt global-ocean anoxia during the Late Ordovician-early Silurian detected using uranium isotopes of marine carbonates [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]Widespread marine anoxia is hypothesized as the trigger for the second pulse of the Late Ordovician (Hirnantian) mass extinction based on lithologic and geochemical proxies that record local bottom waters or porewaters. We test the anoxia hypothesis using δ238U values of marine limestones as a global seawater redox proxy. The…
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Global patterns of protection of elevational gradients in mountain ranges [Ecology]Protected areas (PAs) that span elevational gradients enhance protection for taxonomic and phylogenetic diversity and facilitate species range shifts under climate change. We quantified the global protection of elevational gradients by analyzing the elevational distributions of 44,155 PAs in 1,010 mountain ranges using the highest resolution digital elevation models available….
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Trait overdispersion and the role of sociality in the assembly of social spider communities across the Americas [Ecology]Among the factors that may lead to differences in resource use among closely related species, body size and morphology have been traditionally considered to play a role in community assembly. Here we argue that for animals that live and forage in groups, level of sociality, reflecting differences in group size…
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Physiology underlies the assembly of ecological communities [Ecology]Trait-based community ecology promises an understanding of the factors that determine species abundances and distributions across habitats. However, ecologists are often faced with large suites of potentially important traits, making generalizations across ecosystems and species difficult or even impossible. Here, we hypothesize that key traits structuring ecological communities may be…
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Growth of sedimentary Bathyarchaeota on lignin as an energy source [Environmental Sciences]Members of the archaeal phylum Bathyarchaeota are among the most abundant microorganisms on Earth. Although versatile metabolic capabilities such as acetogenesis, methanogenesis, and fermentation have been suggested for bathyarchaeotal members, no direct confirmation of these metabolic functions has been achieved through growth of Bathyarchaeota in the laboratory. Here we demonstrate,…
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Paleocene Ipomoea (Convolvulaceae) from India with implications for an East Gondwana origin of Convolvulaceae [Evolution]The morning glory family, Convolvulaceae, is globally important in medicine and food crops. The family has worldwide distribution in a variety of habitats; however, its fossil record is very poorly documented. The current fossil record suggests an origin in North America, which is in contrast to molecular data that indicate…
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Amazonia is the primary source of Neotropical biodiversity [Evolution]The American tropics (the Neotropics) are the most species-rich realm on Earth, and for centuries, scientists have attempted to understand the origins and evolution of their biodiversity. It is now clear that different regions and taxonomic groups have responded differently to geological and climatic changes. However, we still lack a…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Biological species in the viral world [Evolution]Due to their dependence on cellular organisms for metabolism and replication, viruses are typically named and assigned to species according to their genome structure and the original host that they infect. But because viruses often infect multiple hosts and the numbers of distinct lineages within a host can be vast,…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Continuous intrathecal orexin delivery inhibits cataplexy in a murine model of narcolepsy [Medical Sciences]Narcolepsy–cataplexy is a chronic neurological disorder caused by loss of orexin (hypocretin)-producing neurons, associated with excessive daytime sleepiness, sleep attacks, cataplexy, sleep paralysis, hypnagogic hallucinations, and fragmentation of nighttime sleep. Currently, human narcolepsy is treated by providing symptomatic therapies, which can be associated with an array of side effects. Alt
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

C-4 sterol demethylation enzymes distinguish bacterial and eukaryotic sterol synthesis [Microbiology]Sterols are essential eukaryotic lipids that are required for a variety of physiological roles. The diagenetic products of sterol lipids, sterane hydrocarbons, are preserved in ancient sedimentary rocks and are utilized as geological biomarkers, indicating the presence of both eukaryotes and oxic environments throughout Earth’s history. However, a few bacterial…
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Riboswitches for the alarmone ppGpp expand the collection of RNA-based signaling systems [Microbiology]Riboswitches are noncoding portions of certain mRNAs that bind metabolite, coenzyme, signaling molecule, or inorganic ion ligands and regulate gene expression. Most known riboswitches sense derivatives of RNA monomers. This bias in ligand chemical composition is consistent with the hypothesis that widespread riboswitch classes first emerged during the RNA World,…
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Robustness and universality of surface states in Dirac materials [Physics]Ballistically propagating topologically protected states harbor exotic transport phenomena of wide interest. Here we describe a nontopological mechanism that produces such states at the surfaces of generic Dirac materials, giving rise to propagating surface modes with energies near the bulk band crossing. The robustness of surface states originates from the…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Mutations in a subfamily of abscisic acid receptor genes promote rice growth and productivity [Plant Biology]Abscisic acid (ABA) is a key phytohormone that controls plant growth and stress responses. It is sensed by the pyrabactin resistance 1 (PYR1)/PYR1-like (PYL)/regulatory components of the ABA receptor (RCAR) family of proteins. Here, we utilized CRISPR/Cas9 technology to edit group I (PYL1–PYL6 and PYL12) and group II (PYL7–PYL11 and…
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Structure of xyloglucan xylosyltransferase 1 reveals simple steric rules that define biological patterns of xyloglucan polymers [Plant Biology]The plant cell wall is primarily a polysaccharide mesh of the most abundant biopolymers on earth. Although one of the richest sources of biorenewable materials, the biosynthesis of the plant polysaccharides is poorly understood. Structures of many essential plant glycosyltransferases are unknown and suitable substrates are often unavailable for in…
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Chronic sleep curtailment, even without extended (>16-h) wakefulness, degrades human vigilance performance [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]Millions of individuals routinely remain awake for more than 18 h daily, which causes performance decrements. It is unknown if these functional impairments are the result of that extended wakefulness or from the associated shortened sleep durations. We therefore examined changes in objective reaction time performance and subjective alertness in…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Triplets, birthweight, and handedness [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]The mechanisms behind handedness formation in humans are still poorly understood. Very low birthweight is associated with higher odds of left-handedness, but whether this is due to low birthweight itself or premature birth is unknown. Handedness has also been linked to development, but the role of birthweight behind this association…
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Distinct encoding of decision confidence in human medial prefrontal cortex [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]Our confidence in a choice and the evidence pertaining to a choice appear to be inseparable. However, an emerging computational consensus holds that the brain should maintain separate estimates of these quantities for adaptive behavioral control. We have devised a psychophysical task to decouple confidence in a perceptual decision from…
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
2
Acoustic evolution of old Italian violins from Amati to Stradivari [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]The shape and design of the modern violin are largely influenced by two makers from Cremona, Italy: The instrument was invented by Andrea Amati and then improved by Antonio Stradivari. Although the construction methods of Amati and Stradivari have been carefully examined, the underlying acoustic qualities which contribute to their…
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Consistent and powerful non-Euclidean graph-based change-point test with applications to segmenting random interfered video data [Statistics]The change-point detection has been carried out in terms of the Euclidean minimum spanning tree (MST) and shortest Hamiltonian path (SHP), with successful applications in the determination of authorship of a classic novel, the detection of change in a network over time, the detection of cell divisions, etc. However, these…
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Distributed and dynamic intracellular organization of extracellular information [Systems Biology]Although cells respond specifically to environments, how environmental identity is encoded intracellularly is not understood. Here, we study this organization of information in budding yeast by estimating the mutual information between environmental transitions and the dynamics of nuclear translocation for 10 transcription factors. Our method of estimation is general, scalable,…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Correction for Ponce de Leon et al., Human bony labyrinth is an indicator of population history and dispersal from Africa [Correction]ANTHROPOLOGY Correction for “Human bony labyrinth is an indicator of population history and dispersal from Africa,” by Marcia S. Ponce de León, Toetik Koesbardiati, John David Weissmann, Marco Milella, Carlos S. Reyna-Blanco, Gen Suwa, Osamu Kondo, Anna-Sapfo Malaspinas, Tim D. White, and Christoph P. E. Zollikofer, which was first published…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Correction for Nepomnyachiy et al., Complex evolutionary footprints revealed in an analysis of reused protein segments of diverse lengths [Correction]BIOPHYSICS AND COMPUTATIONAL BIOLOGY Correction for “Complex evolutionary footprints revealed in an analysis of reused protein segments of diverse lengths,” by Sergey Nepomnyachiy, Nir Ben-Tal, and Rachel Kolodny, which was first published October 19, 2017; 10.1073/pnas.1707642114 (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 114:11703–11708). The authors note that the following statement should…
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Throw like a girl? No, he or she just hasn't been taught'You throw like a girl' is a sexist taunt that can instantly sour a kid on athletics and other healthy activities.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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New method enables high quality speech separationResearchers have developed a novel audio-visual model for isolating and enhancing the speech of desired speakers in a video. The team's deep network-based model incorporates both visual and auditory signals in order to isolate and enhance any speaker in any video, even in challenging real-world scenarios, such as video conferencing, where multiple participants oftentimes talk at once, and noisy ba
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
13
Decades of type 1 diabetes linked to mild drop in cognitionPeople who live with type 1 diabetes for very long duration show signs of mild decreases in cognitive abilities, primarily in memory, compared to those who don't have the disease.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
30
Use artificial intelligence to identify, count, describe wild animalsPhotographs that are automatically collected by motion-sensor cameras can be automatically described by deep neural networks. The result is a system that can automate animal identification for up to 99.3 percent of images while still performing at the same 96.6 percent accuracy rate of crowdsourced teams of human volunteers.
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The Atlantic
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A New Golden Age for the Tiki BarThere are no TV screens inside the Polynesian, the giant new tiki bar that opened three stories above Times Square over Memorial Day weekend. That means no news crawls, no Fox & Friends , no jaw-gritting headlines—nothing to break the illusion of a rum-fueled tropical oasis. The Polynesian’s splashy opening signals the arrival of more than just another themed bar serving $15 drinks in skull-head
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The Atlantic
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World Environment Day 2018: ‘Beat Plastic Pollution’June 5 is marked by the United Nations as World Environment Day , a day set aside since 1974 to promote “worldwide awareness and action for the protection of our environment.” This year’s theme is “beat plastic pollution.” In a message , U.N. Secretary-General António Guterres urged all people to reject single-use plastic items, and warned that growing levels of plastic waste were becoming unmana
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The Atlantic
8
Shohei Ohtani Is Proving Himself AlreadyOn the eve of this baseball season, Shohei Ohtani was a mystery. The 23-year-old Japanese phenom had arrived in the U.S. as a highly billed two-way star, supposedly capable of hitting and pitching at an All-Star level, but poor Spring Training stats and a sprained UCL had dampened optimism about his ability to thrive in the majors. Scouts dissed his hitting. Reporters questioned his pitching. Som
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Scientific American Content: Global
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Why Do Robots Look Like Animals and Humans?Boston Dynamic’s cute and uncannily realistic canine-bot is just one of many robots that are inspired by the natural world — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Big Think
5
Hawaii pledges to become carbon neutral by 2045Hawaii continues its history of progressive climate policy by pledging to become carbon neutral by 2045, a move that would make it the first such state in the country. Read More
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
18
Maternal fatty acid balance affects offspring obesity thorough gut microbial populationA new study finds that the balance between omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids in the tissues of female mammals, which previous research has suggested can impact the incidence of obesity in their offspring, may to do so through its effect on the microbial population of the infant's gastrointestinal tract.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
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Here’s a look at the world’s deadliest volcanoes — and the ways they killScientists gathered data on nearly 280,000 global volcano deaths from 1500 to 2017 and sorted fatalities by cause of death, such as lava flows or gas.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
Sex robots are already here, but are they healthy for humans?World, meet Harmony. Completely artificial and programmed by computer chips, the somewhat lifelike sex robot is marketed by sex doll maker Realbotix for $15,000. According to The Guardian, she's equipped for intimate relations but is also "the perfect companion," Realbotix says—able to quote Shakespeare and remember your birthday.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Sage grouse DNA study maps crucial mating grounds in US WestA DNA study of sage grouse has revealed a vast network of mating grounds in the U.S. West akin to interconnected regional airport hubs that the imperiled species is using to maintain genetic diversity across its entire range.
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The Scientist RSS

Medical Statistician Doug Altman DiesThe cofounder of the EQUATOR Network devoted his career to boosting transparency and improving the quality of clinical research.
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Viden

Sugerør og skruelåg: Halvdelen af skildpadder har plastik i kroppenNy undersøgelse viser også, at små fiskebåde er lige så farlige for skildpadder som industrielt fiskeri.
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New method enables high quality speech separationResearchers have developed a novel audio-visual model for isolating and enhancing the speech of desired speakers in a video. The team's deep network-based model incorporates both visual and auditory signals in order to isolate and enhance any speaker in any video, even in challenging real-world scenarios, such as video conferencing, where multiple participants oftentimes talk at once, and noisy ba
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Maternal fatty acid balance affects offspring obesity thorough gut microbial populationA Massachusetts General Hospital study finds that the balance between omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids in the tissues of female mammals, which previous research has suggested can impact the incidence of obesity in their offspring, may to do so through its effect on the microbial population of the infant's gastrointestinal tract.
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Throw like a girl? No, he or she just hasn't been taught'You throw like a girl' is a sexist taunt that can instantly sour a kid on athletics and other healthy activities.
3h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
New method enables high quality speech separationPeople have a natural knack for focusing on what a single person is saying, even when there are competing conversations in the background or other distracting sounds. For instance, people can often make out what is being said by someone at a crowded restaurant, during a noisy party, or while viewing televised debates where multiple pundits are talking over one another. To date, being able to compu
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
UK hands Comcast advantage in Sky takeover tussle with FoxBritain gave the edge Tuesday to US cable giant Comcast in a multi-billion-pound takeover battle with Rupert Murdoch's entertainment titan 21st Century Fox for pan-European TV group Sky.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
7
Fire in Chernobyl zone, Kiev says radiation levels safeUkrainian authorities on Tuesday said a bushfire had broken out in the exclusion zone around Chernobyl, scene of the world's worst nuclear accident in 1986, but radiation levels remained within safe limits.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Florida: Oriental fruit flies found in farmlands near MiamiAn invasive and destructive pest has been identified in the farmlands near Miami, Florida agriculture officials said Tuesday.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Researchers use artificial intelligence to identify, count, describe wild animalsA new paper in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) reports how a cutting-edge artificial intelligence technique called deep learning can automatically identify, count and describe animals in their natural habitats.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Tax hurts investment in medical device research and developmentNew research shows companies cut funding for research and development in response to a tax imposed on medical devices as part of the Affordable Care Act.
3h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
6
NASA analyzes no. Indian Ocean rainfall of soaking separate cyclonesNASA analyzed rainfall in two tropical cyclones that developed in the Northern Indian Ocean, each bringing heavy rainfall. Within a week, separate cyclones, Tropical Storm Sagar and Cyclone Mekunu, hit Somalia and nearby Oman, respectively, and both dropped heavy rainfall in a region that is not accustomed to it.
3h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
6
Surprising resurgence of red spruce likely result of cleaner air and warmer wintersRed spruce, for decades the forest equivalent of the canary in the coal mine signaling the detrimental effects of acid rain on northeastern forests, is making a comeback. New research by a team of scientists from the USDA Forest Service and the University of Vermont suggests that a combination of reduced pollution mandated by the 1990 Amendments to the Clean Air Act and changing climate are behind
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
70
Physicists devise method to reveal how light affects materialsPhysicists developed a way to determine the electronic properties of thin gold films after they interact with light. Nature Communications published the new method, which adds to the understanding of the fundamental laws that govern the interaction of electrons and light.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Rare Sulawesi bear cuscus born in captivity for first timeThe first Sulawesi bear cuscus to have been born in captivity is thriving at a zoo in Poland, but staff said they only realised the rare tiny marsupial had arrived when its mother's pouch began to move.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
30
Research illuminates inaccuracies in radiocarbon datingRadiocarbon dating is a key tool archaeologists use to determine the age of plants and objects made with organic material. But new research shows that commonly accepted radiocarbon dating standards can miss the mark—calling into question historical timelines.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
5
NASA finds some fragmented strength in Tropical Depression 05WNASA obtained an infrared look at Tropical Depression 05W as it continued moving through the South China Sea. NASA's Aqua satellite found very cold cloud top temperatures and strong storms in fragmented thunderstorms mostly east of 05W's center.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Engineers solve excessive heat removal from NASA's Webb TelescopeHow will NASA's James Webb Space Telescope shed the heat generated by its science instruments and their supporting electronics? To anyone who is not an engineer or scientist, the answer might be complex and "baffling," and it turns out the process is exactly that.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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New algorithm keeps data fresh in wireless networksAlgorithm provides networks with the most current information available while avoiding data congestion.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Surprising resurgence of red spruce likely result of cleaner air and warmer wintersWhen scientists found a resurgence of red spruce in northeastern forests, they had a lot of questions. Fifty years ago, red spruce was the equivalent of a canary in the coalmine signaling the effects of acid rain on forests. Researchers have identified two factors behind the tree's surprising recovery: reduced inputs of acid rain and warmer fall, winter and spring temperatures.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
9
Neutron tomography: Insights into the interior of teeth, root balls, batteries, and fuel cellsA team of researchers has now published a comprehensive overview of neutron-based imaging processes. The authors report on the latest developments in neutron tomography, illustrating the possible applications using examples of this non-destructive method. Neutron tomography has facilitated breakthroughs in so diverse areas such as art history, battery research, dentistry, energy materials, industr
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
21
Beyond superstition to general causality: AI nutcracker for real-world problemsReal-world problems in economics and public health can be notoriously hard nuts to find causes for. Often, multiple causes are suspected but large datasets with time-sequenced data are not available. Previous models could not reliably analyze these challenges. Now researchers have tested the first Artificial Intelligence model to identify and rank many causes in real-world problems without time-se
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
13
Researchers shine a light on more accurate way to estimate climate changeBy using satellite data from different major land-based ecosystems around the globe, researchers have found that the photosynthesis glow is the same across all vegetation, no matter the location. This first-of-its-kind global analysis could have significance in providing more accurate data for scientists working to model carbon cycle and eventually help better project climate change.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
14
20 years of Earth data now at your fingertipsPowerful Earth-observing instruments aboard NASA's Terra and Aqua satellites, launched in 1999 and 2002, respectively, have observed nearly two decades of planetary change. Now, for the first time, all that imagery—from the first operational image to imagery acquired today—is available for exploration in Worldview.
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Researchers use artificial intelligence to identify, count, describe wild animalsPhotographs that are automatically collected by motion-sensor cameras can be automatically described by deep neural networks. The result is a system that can automate animal identification for up to 99.3 percent of images while still performing at the same 96.6 percent accuracy rate of crowdsourced teams of human volunteers.
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

NASA analyzes no. Indian Ocean rainfall of soaking separate cyclonesNASA analyzed rainfall in two tropical cyclones that developed in the Northern Indian Ocean, each bringing heavy rainfall. Within a week, separate cyclones, Tropical Storm Sagar and Cyclone Mekunu, hit Somalia and nearby Oman, respectively, and both dropped heavy rainfall in a region that is not accustomed to it.
3h
The Atlantic
98
European Politicians Are Suddenly Quoting DostoyevskyLONDON—Is Europe having a Dostoyevsky moment? Or is it a Pushkin moment? French President Emmanuel Macron cited Dostoyevsky’s speech about Pushkin—in which the writer makes a dramatic appeal for Russian universalism—in a press conference with Vladimir Putin in Saint Petersburg on May 24. Then, on Tuesday, the prime minister of Italy’s new populist government, Giuseppe Conte, paraphrased—or perhap
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Spider glue research resolves sticky problemEver wonder why paint peels off the wall during summer's high humidity? Interfacial water, as it's known, forms a slippery and non-adhesive layer between the glue and the surface to which it is meant to stick, interfering with the formation of adhesive bonds between the two. The ability of the spider glue to overcome this problem is the key finding of new research.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
17
Tax hurts investment in medical device research and developmentNew research shows companies cut funding for research and development in response to a tax imposed on medical devices as part of the Affordable Care Act. The study found the tax reduced R&D investment by $34 million and also negatively affected sales revenue, gross margins and earnings.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Coffee helps teams work togetherGood teamwork begins with a cup of coffee for everyone, a new study suggests. Researchers found that people gave more positive reviews for their group's performance on a task — and their own contribution — if they drank caffeinated coffee beforehand. A second study showed that people talked more in a group setting under the influence of caffeinated coffee — but they also were more on-topic than
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New Scientist – News
86
The New Horizons probe is awake and ready for its next flybyFor the last 6 months, the New Horizons spacecraft that flew past Pluto in 2015 has been in hibernation, hurtling towards a distant rock – it has just woken up
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Researchers discover how colon cancer mutates to escape the immune systemA UCLA-led study has found how colon cancer alters its genes during development in order to avoid detection by the immune system, creating a specific genetic imprint in the process.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Decades of type 1 diabetes linked to mild drop in cognitionPeople who live with type 1 diabetes for very long duration show signs of mild decreases in cognitive abilities, primarily in memory, compared to those who don't have the disease, Joslin Diabetes Center researchers have shown.
4h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Groundwater pumping can increase arsenic levels in irrigation and drinking waterPumping an aquifer to the last drop squeezes out more than water. A new study finds it can also unlock dangerous arsenic from buried clays — and reveals how sinking land can provide an early warning and measure of contamination.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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What the size distribution of organisms tells us about the energetic efficiency of a lakeThe size distribution of organisms in a lake facilitates robust conclusions to be drawn on the energy efficiency in the food web, as researchers have now demonstrated empirically. This relationship enables scientists to gain a better and more direct understanding of biological processes and disturbances that impact aquatic ecosystems.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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More detailed data on thermal conditions of Arctic groundUnderstanding the thermal conditions of the ground in the Arctic is of utmost importance in order to assess the effects of climate change on the occurrence of permafrost, on the ecosystems and societies of the Arctic, and the global climate system.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Computer simulations identify chemical key to diabetes drug alternativesScientists have discovered a chemical compound that could lower sugar levels as effectively as the diabetes drug metformin but with a lower dose.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Transferring quantum information using soundScientists have found a new way to transfer quantum information. They propose using tiny mechanical vibrations. The atoms are coupled with each other by 'phonons' — the smallest quantum mechanical units of vibrations or sound waves.
4h
Scientific American Content: Global
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Judge Orders EPA to Produce Science behind Pruitt's Warming ClaimsThe EPA head has suggested humans are not the main cause of climate change — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Viden
3
Mudder afslører: Fortidens Grønland var overraskende varmEn ny opdagelse om Grønlands forhistoriske klima kan gøre os klogere på, hvordan Indlandsisen bliver påvirket i fremtiden.
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The Scientist RSS

New Insights to Improve CAR T Cells SafetyDrugs approved to treat rheumatoid arthritis block cytokines, the molecules responsible for severe side effects from the immunotherapy, and reduce symptoms in mice.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Surprising resurgence of red spruce likely result of cleaner air and warmer wintersWhen scientists found a resurgence of red spruce in northeastern forests, they had a lot of questions. Fifty years ago, red spruce was the equivalent of a canary in the coalmine signaling the effects of acid rain on forests. In a study published in the journal Science of the Total Environment, scientists with the USDA Forest Service and the University of Vermont identified two factors behind the t
4h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New algorithm keeps data fresh in wireless networksAlgorithm provides networks with the most current information available while avoiding data congestion.
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Science : NPR
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Can't Stand The Heat? Tell Us How You're Coping With Rising TemperaturesHave hotter days (and nights) changed your daily routines or long-term plans? Has your business had to adapt to higher temperatures? (Image credit: Matt York/AP)
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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New tool enables big-scale analysis of single cellsResearchers have developed a novel computational tool named BigSCale to analyze millions of single cells simultaneously. Their work analyzed 1.3 million cells and unraveled an unprecedented heterogeneity in rare cell populations during mouse brain development.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Common diabetes drug found safe for most diabetics with kidney diseaseResults of a large-scale study suggest that the oral diabetes drug metformin is safe for most diabetics who also have chronic kidney disease (CKD). The study of more than 150,000 adults found that metformin's association with the development of a life-threatening condition called lactic acidosis was seen only among patients with severely decreased kidney function.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Physicists devise method to reveal how light affects materialsPhysicists devised a way to determine the electronic properties of thin gold films after they interact with light. The finding may help pave the way for improvements in a range of optical devices.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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It's all in your head: Brain protein targeted for alcoholism cureA chemist is reporting a cure for alcoholism could be found in a protein inside the brain that plays a big role in developing tolerance to drinking.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Inaccuracies in radiocarbon datingRadiocarbon dating is a key tool archaeologists use to determine the age of plants and objects made with organic material. But new research shows that commonly accepted radiocarbon dating standards can miss the mark — calling into question historical timelines.
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The Atlantic
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The Last Words of Robert F. KennedyEditor’s Note: This is part of The Atlantic’s ongoing series looking back at 1968. All past articles and reader correspondence are collected here . New material will be added to that page through the end of 2018. Robert F. Kennedy was assassinated 50 years ago at the Ambassador Hotel in Los Angeles while celebrating victory in a primary for the Democratic presidential nomination. He was a senator
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Big Think
3
Why Oscar Wilde was a socialist anarchistWas Oscar Wilde—witty author, gay rights icon, and lover of champagne and material beauty—a radical socialist? Read More
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Tax hurts investment in medical device research and developmentNew Iowa State University research shows companies cut funding for research and development in response to a tax imposed on medical devices as part of the Affordable Care Act. The study found the tax reduced R&D investment by $34 million and also negatively affected sales revenue, gross margins and earnings.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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NASA finds some fragmented strength in Tropical Depression 05WNASA obtained an infrared look at Tropical Depression 05W as it continued moving through the South China Sea. NASA's Aqua satellite found very cold cloud top temperatures and strong storms in fragmented thunderstorms mostly east of 05W's center.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Research on spider glue resolves sticky problemEver wonder why paint peels off the wall during summer's high humidity? Interfacial water, as it's known, forms a slippery and non-adhesive layer between the glue and the surface to which it is meant to stick, interfering with the formation of adhesive bonds between the two. The ability of the spider glue to overcome this problem is the key finding of research at University of Akron, one with perh
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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A new material capable of the adsorption of organic pollutants in waterThe results show that the material C18-Mica-4 is capable of eliminating the majority of pollutants that were evaluated in urban waste water, as well as surface water and potable water. The study, also, provides data on the adsorption mechanism and establishes a significant correlation between the physical chemical properties of the selected criteria and emerging pollutants and the adsorption to th
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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What effect does transcranial magnetic stimulation have on the brain?Researchers have gained new insights on the question of how transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) effects functional interconnectivity of neurons. For visualization, they employed fluorescent dyes which provide information on the activity of neurons by light. Using this technique, they showed in an animal model that TMS predisposes neuronal connections in the visual cortex of the brain for proce
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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New algorithm enhances ptychographic image reconstructionResearchers have developed an algorithmic model that enhances the image reconstruction capabilities of an algorithmic framework and computer software used to reconstruct millions of phases of ptychographic image data per second.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Scientists find pre-earthquake activity in central AlaskaNew research may help future work in early warning systems for earthquakes. Scientists found evidence for accelerating activity before a 2016 earthquake in a laterally moving fault zone in central Alaska including a process that has previously only been seen in laboratory experiments.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Biomaterial particles educate immune system to accept transplanted isletsBy instructing key immune system cells to accept transplanted insulin-producing islets, researchers have opened a potentially new pathway for treating type 1 diabetes. If the approach is ultimately successful in humans, it could allow type 1 diabetes to be treated without the long-term complications of immune system suppression.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Dogs can be a potential risk for future influenza pandemicDogs are a potential reservoir for a future influenza pandemic, according to a new study. The study demonstrated that influenza virus can jump from pigs into canines and that influenza is becoming increasingly diverse in canines.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Money or altruism: What motivates people to donate their feces to medicine?Appealing to a concern for others is the best way to recruit most people to donate their stool for medicine, while cash rewards may be an additional motivator for some potential donors, according to new research.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Quantum stopwatch stores time in a quantum memoryPhysicists have developed a "quantum stopwatch"—a method that stores time (in the form of states of quantum clocks) in a quantum memory. In doing so, the method avoids the accumulation of errors that usually occurs when measuring the duration of a sequence of events. In this way, the quantum stopwatch increases the accuracy of measuring time at the quantum level, which is essential for application
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Arizona work law found to affect US-Mexico migrationThe current political environment has led to an increased focus on the issue of unauthorized migration from Mexico and Central America, with proposals ranging from reforming the U.S. immigration system to building a wall along the U.S.-Mexican border. A new study used data from a Mexican identification-card program to find that a relatively low-cost employment-focused system can reduce unauthorize
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Detecting the birth and death of a phononPhonons are discrete units of vibrational energy predicted by quantum mechanics that correspond to collective oscillations of atoms inside a molecule or a crystal. When such vibrations are produced by light interacting with a material, the vibrational energy can be transferred back and forth between individual phonons and individual packets of light energy, the photons. This process is called the
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Live Science
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Photos: The Sonoran Desert in BloomWildflowers, shrubs, indigenous trees and cacti all bloom during this season, turning the brown desert landscape of the Sonoran Desert into a kaleidoscope of color.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Researchers shine a light on more accurate way to estimate climate changeIt doesn't matter if it's a forest, a soybean field, or a prairie, all plants take up carbon dioxide during photosynthesis—the process where they use sunlight to convert water and carbon dioxide into food. During this changeover, the plants emit an energy "glow" that is not visible to the human eye, but can be detected by satellites in space. Now, researchers at the University of New Hampshire hav
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The Atlantic
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What Went Wrong With Spotify’s ‘Hateful Conduct’ Policy?The #MeToo movement is often talked about as a cultural shift , but it is also—or at least seeks to be—a shift in business practices. That’s not only because workplaces, in a post-#MeToo world, should be safer for women. Corporations also have to weigh ethics, PR, and the bottom line as they decide whether to ditch expensive talent and stop profiting off content made by abusers. For the #MeToo id
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Popular Science
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These U.S. Air Force pilots are ready for hurricane hunting seasonEnvironment They'll fly right into vicious storms all summer. When an individual storm begins to brew over the open ocean, another breed of weather trackers steps in to foretell its future.
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Big Think
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Schizophrenia may begin in the placentaA new study suggests that the genes that are associated with schizophrenia are switched on in the placenta when a pregnancy complication occurs. Read More
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New tool enables big-scale analysis of single cellsResearchers at the Centro Nacional de Análisis Genómico of the Centre for Genomic Regulation (CNAG-CRG) in Barcelona, Spain, developed a novel computational tool named BigSCale to analyze millions of single cells simultaneously. Their work, which is published in the June issue of Genome Research, analyzed 1.3 million cells and unraveled an unprecedented heterogeneity in rare cell populations durin
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Cornell research illuminates inaccuracies in radiocarbon datingRadiocarbon dating is a key tool archaeologists use to determine the age of plants and objects made with organic material. But new research shows that commonly accepted radiocarbon dating standards can miss the mark — calling into question historical timelines.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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It's all in your head: Brain protein targeted for alcoholism cureUniversity of Houston chemist Joydip Das is reporting a cure for alcoholism could be found in a protein inside the brain that plays a big role in developing tolerance to drinking.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Physicists devise method to reveal how light affects materialsPhysicists devised a way to determine the electronic properties of thin gold films after they interact with light. The finding may help pave the way for improvements in a range of optical devices.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Yellowstone study explores park's geothermal systemThe hot springs at Yellowstone National Park derive their heat from the supervolcano's active magma body that lies buried beneath the surface. But how much heat is actually leaving the surface at Yellowstone, and can this heat be used to estimate how much magma is entering the crust below the supervolcano?
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Common diabetes drug found safe for most diabetics with kidney diseaseResults of a large-scale study suggest that the oral diabetes drug metformin is safe for most diabetics who also have chronic kidney disease (CKD). The study of more than 150,000 adults by Johns Hopkins Medicine investigators found that metformin's association with the development of a life-threatening condition called lactic acidosis was seen only among patients with severely decreased kidney fun
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Stunting cell 'antennae' could make cancer drugs work againScientists have uncovered a completely new way to make cancers sensitive to treatment — by targeting antenna-like structures on cells.Their study found that drug-resistant cancer cells have more and longer antennae than those which are killed by treatment.Blocking the growth of antennae reactivated a range of cancer treatments that had stopped working, the team at The Institute of Cancer Research
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Blowing bubbles for cancer treatmentEmbolization — the use of various techniques to cut off the blood vessels that feed tissue growth — has gained traction over the past decades to treat cancerous tumors, and one specific version is gas embolotherapy. During this process, the blood supply is cut off using acoustic droplet vaporization, which uses microscopic gas bubbles induced by exposure to ultrasonic waves. Researchers have dis
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Research reveals how Tau aggregates can contribute to cell death in Alzheimer's diseaseNew evidence suggests a mechanism by which progressive accumulation of Tau protein in brain cells may lead to Alzheimer's disease.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Groundwater pumping can increase arsenic levels in irrigation and drinking waterPumping an aquifer to the last drop squeezes out more than water. A Stanford study finds it can also unlock dangerous arsenic from buried clays — and reveals how sinking land can provide an early warning and measure of contamination.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Does living near wind turbines negatively impact human health?Wind turbines are a source of clean renewable energy, but some people who live nearby describe the shadow flicker, the audible sounds and the subaudible sound pressure levels as 'annoying.' They claim this nuisance negatively impacts their quality of life. Researchers in Canada set out to investigate how residential distance from the wind turbines affects people's health; they report their new ana
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Microbiome differences between urban and rural populations start soon after birthAn analysis comparing the intestinal microbiomes of both infants and adults living in rural and urban areas of Nigeria has revealed that not only are there many differences in adults living in subsistence environments versus urban ones but also that these variations begin at a very young age. The study appears June 5 in the journal Cell Reports.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Google honors legendary marathoner Tom LongboatGoogle is using its logo Monday to celebrate one of Canada's most renowned marathon runners.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Listening to gut noises could improve diagnosis of irritable bowel syndromeUtilizing newly adapted artificial intelligence, researchers have developed an acoustic belt that offers a new way to diagnose irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) by listening to the noises in a patient's gut/
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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The key triggers of the costly 2017 wildfire seasonNew research shows that three major 'switches' affecting wildfire — fuel, aridity, and ignition — were either flipped on and/or kept on longer than expected last year, triggering one of the largest and costliest US wildfire seasons in recent decades.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Large igneous provinces contribute to ups and downs in atmospheric carbon dioxideModelling the location of large igneous provinces for the past 400 million years shows that their eruptions and subsequent weathering modulate global climate.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Rules about technology use can undermine academic achievementParents who restrict their children's use of new media technologies may be acting counterproductively in the long run, particularly if they invoke afterschool homework time as the reason. Their children's scholastic achievements at college lag behind the academic performance of same-age peers, a new study shows.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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New insight into Earth's crust, mantle and outer core interactionsA new study uses previously unavailable data to confirm a correlation between the movement of plate tectonics on the Earth's surface, the flow of mantle above the Earth's core and the rate of reversal of the Earth's magnetic field, which has long been hypothesized.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Red tide fossils point to Jurassic sea floodDinosaur-age fossilized remains of tiny organisms normally found in the sea have been discovered in inland, arid Australia — suggesting the area was, for a short time at least, inundated by sea water 40 million years before Australia's large inland sea existed.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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New theory on why more women than men develop autoimmune diseasesNew findings are now being presented on possible mechanisms behind gender differences in the occurrence of rheumatism and other autoimmune diseases. The study, published in Nature Communications, can be of significance for the future treatment of diseases
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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African-Americans still disproportionately affected by HIVAfrican-Americans are still much more likely to be diagnosed with HIV than white Americans. A new article on the HIV/AIDS epidemic in the African-American community shows that despite recent drops in HIV diagnoses across every population in the US, there are still great disparities between ethnic groups.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Ribavirin for treating Crimean Congo hemorrhagic feverIn a viral hemorrhagic disease where up to 40 percent of people developing it die, it is remarkable that doctors still do not agree whether the only recognized treatment, an antiviral drug called ribavirin, makes a difference.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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These fish are at the heart of California's water debate. But extinction could be closeAs a young biologist in the 1970s, Peter Moyle remembers towing nets behind boats in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta and catching 50 to 100 translucent, finger-length smelt in a matter of minutes.
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Feed: All Latest
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Elon Musk and the Unnerving Influence of Twitter's Power UsersTwitter has increasingly become a place where a small number of elite users commandeer huge followings—and they don't always use their power for good.
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The Atlantic
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Racial Resentment Can Motivate Opposition to WelfareIt’s a pretty well-known trope at this point: People who rely on government assistance programs are often the ones who oppose welfare most vociferously. Aside from the infamous “keep your government hands off my Medicare” line, examples abound of poor people who hate government assistance for poor people. A new study explores a surprising psychological motivation that might be underpinning this o
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Detecting the birth and death of a phononEPFL physicists have developed a new technique to probe elementary quantum excitations of atomic vibrations inside a diamond crystal under ambient conditions. The technique uses ultra-short laser pulses and detectors sensitive to single photons.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

UNH researchers shine a light on more accurate way to estimate climate changeBy using satellite data from different major land-based ecosystems around the globe, researchers have found that the photosynthesis glow is the same across all vegetation, no matter the location. This first-of-its-kind global analysis could have significance in providing more accurate data for scientists working to model carbon cycle and eventually help better project climate change.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Sleep disturbances more common for immigrants than non-immigrantsPreliminary data from a recent study show high levels of emotional distress could be causing immigrants to have more sleep disorder symptoms than non-immigrants.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Neutron tomography: Insights into the interior of teeth, root balls, batteries, and fuel cellsA team of researchers at Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB) and European Spallation Source (ESS) has now published a comprehensive overview of neutron-based imaging processes in the renowned journal Materials Today (impact factor 21.6). The authors report on the latest developments in neutron tomography, illustrating the possible applications using examples of this non-destructive method. Neutron tomo
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Beyond superstition to general causality: AI nutcracker for real-world problemsReal-world problems in economics and public health can be notoriously hard nuts to find causes for. Often, multiple causes are suspected but large datasets with time-sequenced data are not available. Previous models could not reliably analyze these challenges. Now researchers have tested the first Artificial Intelligence model to identify and rank many causes in real-world problems without time-se
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Transferring quantum information using soundA team of researchers from TU Wien and Harvard University has found a new way to transfer quantum information. They propose using tiny mechanical vibrations. The atoms are coupled with each other by 'phonons' — the smallest quantum mechanical units of vibrations or sound waves.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Coffee helps teams work together, study suggestsGood teamwork begins with a cup of coffee for everyone, a new study suggests. Researchers found that people gave more positive reviews for their group's performance on a task — and their own contribution — if they drank caffeinated coffee beforehand. A second study showed that people talked more in a group setting under the influence of caffeinated coffee — but they also were more on-topic than
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Computer simulations identify chemical key to diabetes drug alternativesJeremy Smith, Governor's Chair for Molecular Biophysics at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, and director of the Center for Molecular Biophysics at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, has worked with a research team from the UT Health Science Center to discover a chemical compound that could lower sugar levels as effectively as the diabetes drug metformin but with a lower dose.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Arizona work law found to affect US-Mexico migrationA new study used data from a Mexican identification-card program to find that a relatively low-cost employment-focused system can reduce unauthorized migration.
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)
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The critical role librarians play in the opioid crisis | Chera KowalskiPublic libraries have always been about more than just books — and their mission of community support has taken on new urgency during the current opioid epidemic. After witnessing overdoses at her library in Philadelphia, Chera Kowalski learned how to administer naloxone, a drug that reverses the effects of narcotics, and she's put it to use to save patrons' lives. In this personal talk, she shar
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Groundwater pumping can increase arsenic levels in irrigation and drinking waterFor decades, intensive groundwater pumping has caused ground beneath California's San Joaquin Valley to sink, damaging infrastructure. Now research published in the journal Nature Communications suggests that as pumping makes the ground sink, it also unleashes an invisible threat to human health and food production: It allows arsenic to move into groundwater aquifers that supply drinking water for
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Does living near wind turbines negatively impact human health?Wind turbines are a source of clean renewable energy, but some people who live nearby describe the shadow flicker, the audible sounds and the subaudible sound pressure levels as "annoying." They claim this nuisance negatively impacts their quality of life.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Microbubbles delivered via gas embolotherapy could provide a vehicle for cutting off blood supply and delivering drugsEmbolization—the use of various techniques to cut off the blood vessels that feed tissue growth—has gained traction over the past few decades to treat cancerous tumors.
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The Atlantic
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Bacteria Survive in NASA’s Clean Rooms by Eating Cleaning ProductsFew places are as hard for microbes to infiltrate as the clean rooms in which NASA assembles its spacecraft. Those drifting in through the air must run a gauntlet of filters. Those hitching a ride on employees find their paths barred by face masks and full-body hooded coveralls. Those that actually manage to land on a surface will find a world of famine and drought, devoid of water and nutrients.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
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New Horizons wakes up to begin Kuiper Belt explorationThe New Horizons spacecraft just woke up to get ready for its New Year’s Day flyby of the distant space rock Ultima Thule.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Swimming without an engineUsing nothing but 3D printing, scientists have developed a paddling submarine that requires no engine, propellant or power supply.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Unzipping graphene nanotubes into nanoribbonsIn a new study scientists provide a detailed analysis of how the flow of heat and electrons is affected at the interface between an 'armchair' shaped carbon nanotube and a zigzagging nanoribbon made up of a single-layer carbon honeycomb sheet of graphene. Applications of this method can help us understand the propagation of electrons and thermal flow in graphene and similar materials for electroma
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Maternal depressive emotion associated with children's sleep problemsMaternal depressive mood during the prenatal and postnatal periods is related to child sleep disturbances, according to recent pilot data from a longitudinal cohort study in kindergarten children.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Maker of fearsome animal robots slowly emerges from stealthIt's never been clear whether robotics company Boston Dynamics is making killing machines, household helpers, or something else entirely.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Unloved Airbus A380s to be stripped for partsTwo Airbus A380 superjumbos once flown by Singapore Airlines are to become the first of the iconic doubledeckers to be stripped for parts, after a German leasing firm failed to find a new operator for them.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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NASA chief in talks with companies about running ISS: reportThe head of the US space agency is in talks with several global companies about taking over day-to-day operations at the International Space Station in the coming years, US media said Tuesday.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Switch to e-cars will cost Germany 75,000 jobs: studyThe growing use of electrified vehicles is expected to cost Germany's crucial car sector some 75,000 jobs by 2030, a study found Tuesday, with smaller auto parts suppliers set to be worst hit.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Boston Dynamics' scary robot videos: Are they for real?If you've ever watched a YouTube video of a Boston Dynamics robot , you probably remember it. But you may not know what the videos leave out.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
The key triggers of the costly 2017 wildfire seasonNew University of Colorado Boulder-led research shows that three major "switches" affecting wildfire—fuel, aridity, and ignition—were either flipped on and/or kept on longer than expected last year, triggering one of the largest and costliest U.S. wildfire seasons in recent decades.
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Feed: All Latest
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WWDC 2018: Apple's Software Chief Details How iOS Apps Will Run on MacsIn an exclusive interview, Apple's Craig Federighi explains how developers will be able to get their iOS apps working on Macs.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Turtles can make great pets, but do your homework firstWhile turtles might seem like the perfect pet—less work than dogs and cats, more interactive than fish—there are a few things to keep in mind before buying one.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Large igneous provinces contribute to ups and downs in atmospheric carbon dioxideAbout 250 million years ago, a massive volcanic eruption flooded modern-day Siberia with lava, creating the Siberian Traps, giant plateaus made of multiple layers of lava. The eruption also released huge quantities of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere that rapidly altered the climate and triggered the Permian-Triassic mass extinction event that wiped out more than 90% of marine species and 70% of
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Unzipping graphene nanotubes into nanoribbonsIn a new study published in EPJ B, Basant Lal Sharma from the Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur provides a detailed analysis of how the flow of heat and electrons is affected at the interface between an 'armchair' shaped carbon nanotube and a zigzagging nanoribbon made up of a single-layer carbon honeycomb sheet of graphene.
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Quanta Magazine
28
Victoria Meadows’ Earthly Visions of Alien LifeOn a standard quarter-acre lot in Seattle, the astrobiologist Victoria Meadows has nurtured an Eden of apple and plum trees, blueberry bushes, strawberry undergrowth, a pair of 80-foot-tall western red cedars too big to hug, groves of Japanese maples and an alien-looking cycad tree. Lilac bushes mingle scents with a 30-foot climbing rose trained over an arch. Bamboo borders a reflecting pool. Bed
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

More detailed data on thermal conditions of Arctic groundUnderstanding the thermal conditions of the ground in the Arctic is of utmost importance in order to assess the effects of climate change on the occurrence of permafrost, on the ecosystems and societies of the Arctic, and the global climate system.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Penn Medicine GI bleeding research points to need for updated Medicare policiesPenn Medicine researchers are calling for greater precision in Medicare performance reporting for patients with GI bleeding following an evaluation of patients with the condition.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Religiosity plays a role in educational success of immigrant childrenA new study focuses on the role religion plays for the educational success of immigrant children. In the past, such studies have focused more on ethnicity, educational level and status of these children's parents. The result: in some circumstances religious attachment can have a conducive, in others a destructive effect on these children's school achievements.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

What effect does transcranial magnetic stimulation have on the brain?Researchers of the Ruhr-Universität Bochum have gained new insights on the question of how transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) effects functional interconnectivity of neurons. For visualization, they employed fluorescent dyes which provide information on the activity of neurons by light. Using this technique, they showed in an animal model that TMS predisposes neuronal connections in the visua
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

A new material capable of the adsorption of organic pollutants in waterThe results show that the material C18-Mica-4 is capable of eliminating the majority of pollutants that were evaluated in urban waste water, as well as surface water and potable water. The study, also, provides data on the adsorption mechanism and establishes a significant correlation between the physical chemical properties of the selected criteria and emerging pollutants and the adsorption to th
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

The key triggers of the costly 2017 wildfire seasonNew University of Colorado Boulder-led research shows that three major 'switches' affecting wildfire — fuel, aridity, and ignition — were either flipped on and/or kept on longer than expected last year, triggering one of the largest and costliest US wildfire seasons in recent decades.
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

What the size distribution of organisms tells us about the energetic efficiency of a lakeThe size distribution of organisms in a lake facilitates robust conclusions to be drawn on the energy efficiency in the food web, as researchers from the Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB) and international colleagues have now demonstrated empirically. This relationship enables scientists to gain a better and more direct understanding of biological processes and dis
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Futurity.org
2
Ancient rocks point to Earth’s crust forming way earlierCounting strontium atoms in rocks from northern Canada, researchers have discovered evidence that the Earth’s continental crust could have formed hundreds of millions of years earlier than previously thought. Continental crust is richer in essential minerals than younger volcanic rock, which would have made it significantly friendlier to supporting life. “Our evidence, which squares with emerging
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Futurity.org
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Probiotic, supplement combo extends fruit fly lifespanA combination of probiotics and an herbal supplement called Triphala extended the lives of fruit flies by 60 percent, report researchers. The study, published in Scientific Reports , adds to a growing body of evidence of the influence that gut bacteria can have on health. The researchers incorporated a symbiotic—made of probiotics with a polyphenol-rich supplement—into the diet of fruit flies. Th
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Scientists find pre-earthquake activity in central AlaskaEarth scientists consistently look for a reliable way to forecast earthquakes. New research from University of Alaska Fairbanks Geophysical Institute professor Carl Tape may help in that endeavor, due to a unique set of circumstances.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Using envy as a marketing tool can backfireFor decades, marketers have used envy to sell, attempting to cash in on consumers' desire to want what others have. But does it actually work?
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Zebrafish expose tumor pathway in childhood muscle cancerA popular aquarium fish may hold answers to how tumors form in a childhood cancer.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Neurons ripple while brains rest to lock in memoriesResearchers develop a computational tool to analyze waves of firing neurons in the hippocampus while animals are at rest and determine which neurons represent the recall or reactivation of patterns linked to specific memories.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Lighting intervention improves sleep and mood for Alzheimer's patientsA tailored lighting intervention in nursing homes can positively impact sleep, mood and behavior for patients with Alzheimer's disease, according to preliminary findings from a new study.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Thousands of turtles netted off South AmericaTens of thousands of sea turtles are caught each year by small-scale fishers off South America's Pacific coast, new research shows.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Mergers are good news for investorsShareholder value and market share improve when companies merge, confirms a new study.
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The Atlantic
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How Sanctions Feed AuthoritarianismThe United States has a long history of intervening overseas to solve one problem and inadvertently creating others. In the 1980s, the Reagan administration armed rebels fighting Afghanistan’s Soviet-backed government only to find that some of them later targeted the United States. During that same decade, America armed the government of El Salvador in a gruesome civil war against leftist rebels
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The Atlantic
32
The Unequal Geography of the Gig EconomyEditor’s Note: This article is the second in a series about how the gig economy is shaping the future of labor and what that means for workers. When Terrence Davenport first heard about the so-called gig economy, he was working at a free-meal program in his hometown of Dumas, Arkansas, a tiny village surrounded by cotton fields. Around 40 percent of Dumas’s roughly 5,000 residents lived in povert
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Futurity.org
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11 million may be taking the wrong drugs for heart healthMore than 11 million Americans may have incorrect prescriptions for aspirin, statins, and blood pressure medications, according to a new study. Researchers based their findings on an updated set of calculations—known as pooled cohort equations, or PCEs—used to determine the risk of a heart attack or stroke. The PCEs are the foundation for cardiovascular-disease-prevention guidelines in the United
5h
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Unzipping graphene nanotubes into nanoribbonsIn a new study published in EPJ B, Basant Lal Sharma from the Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur provides a detailed analysis of how the flow of heat and electrons is affected at the interface between an 'armchair' shaped carbon nanotube and a zigzagging nanoribbon made up of a single-layer carbon honeycomb sheet of graphene. Applications of this method can help us understand the propagation of
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Swimming without an engineUsing nothing but 3D printing, scientists have developed a paddling submarine that requires no engine, propellant or power supply.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Ribavirin for treating Crimean Congo hemorrhagic fever — latest Cochrane reviewIn a viral hemorrhagic disease where up to 40 percent of people developing it die, it is remarkable that doctors still do not agree whether the only recognized treatment, an antiviral drug called ribavirin, makes a difference. In a new Cochrane Review a team of authors at LSTM, along with colleagues in London, the Philippines and in Greece, evaluated the evidence to assess the effectiveness of tre
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New theory on why more women than men develop autoimmune diseasesNew findings are now being presented on possible mechanisms behind gender differences in the occurrence of rheumatism and other autoimmune diseases. The study, published in Nature Communications, can be of significance for the future treatment of diseases.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

African-Americans still disproportionately affected by HIVAfrican-Americans are still much more likely to be diagnosed with HIV than white Americans. A new paper on the HIV/AIDS epidemic in the African-American community shows that despite recent drops in HIV diagnoses across every population in the US, there are still great disparities between ethnic groups. The paper was led by Cato T. Laurencin of the University of Connecticut in the US and is publish
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Dogs can be a potential risk for future influenza pandemicDogs are a potential reservoir for a future influenza pandemic, according to a study published in the journal mBio. The study demonstrated that influenza virus can jump from pigs into canines and that influenza is becoming increasingly diverse in canines.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Women more likely to use other preventive health services after mammographyMedicare beneficiaries who undergo breast cancer screening with mammography are more likely than unscreened women to undergo other preventive health services like screening for cervical cancer and osteoporosis, according to a major new study.
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More breast cancers found with combined digital screeningA combination of digital mammography and tomosynthesis detects 90 percent more breast cancers than digital mammography alone, according to a new study.
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Physics Face-off: The Momentum Principle vs. Newton's 2nd LawWhich method is better? It’s complicated.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Rules about technology use can undermine academic achievementParents who restrict their children's use of new media technologies may be acting counterproductively in the long run, particularly if they invoke afterschool homework time as the reason. Their children's scholastic achievements at college lag behind the academic performance of same-age peers, a University of Zurich study shows.
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The Atlantic
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The Rapid Retraction of a School-Shooting Video GameActivists managed to quash a video game called Active Shooter before it was even released to the public, the culmination of a public uproar over what critics described as the game’s normalization of violence and glamorization of death. This, as it turns out, is not precisely the reason. After all, most video games contain violence, and in many the goal is to kill . What doomed this particular gam
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
New algorithm enhances ptychographic image reconstructionAn international team of researchers that includes scientists from Berkeley Lab's Computational Research Division (CRD) and Center for Advanced Mathematics for Energy Research Applications (CAMERA) continues to find new ways to improve ptychographic image reconstruction.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Berkeley Lab paves the way for real-time ptychographic data streamingWhat began nearly a decade ago as a Berkeley Lab Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) proposal is now a reality, and it is already changing the way scientists run experiments at the Advanced Light Source (ALS)—and, eventually, other light sources across the Department of Energy (DOE) complex—by enabling real-time streaming of ptychographic image data in a production environment.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
5
A little water could make a big difference for endangered salmonEven small amounts of running water—less than a gallon per second—could mean the difference between life or death for juvenile coho salmon in coastal California streams, according to a new study published in the journal Transactions of the American Fisheries Society.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
3
Red tide fossils point to Jurassic sea floodDinosaur-age fossilised remains of tiny organisms normally found in the sea have been discovered in inland, arid Australia — suggesting the area was, for a short time at least, inundated by sea water 40 million years before Australia's large inland sea existed.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Large igneous provinces contribute to ups and downs in atmospheric carbon dioxideModelling the location of large igneous provinces for the past 400 million years shows that their eruptions and subsequent weathering modulate global climate.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
New insight into Earth's crust, mantle and outer core interactionsA new study by the University of Liverpool, in collaboration with the Universities of Lancaster and Oslo, uses previously unavailable data to confirm a correlation between the movement of plate tectonics on the Earth's surface, the flow of mantle above the Earth's core and the rate of reversal of the Earth's magnetic field, which has long been hypothesized.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

PharmaMar presents at ASCO the ADMYRE study's adjusted overall survival with plitidepsinPharmaMar (MSE:PHM) has presented today how crossover has had an influence on the overall survival of the ADMYRE trial. The impact on overall survival of those patients that relapsed after receiving dexamethasone as a single agent and who were subsequently treated with plitidepsin in combination with dexamethasone was analyzed. Of the 84 patients treated from the comparator arm -dexamethasone as a
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Density gradient ultracentrifugation for colloidal nanostructures separation and investigationDensity gradient ultracentrifugation (DGUC), as an efficient way of sorting colloidal nanoparticles, can realize the separation according to their differences in chemistry, structure, size and/or morphology. A recent review systematically introduces the development of DGUC in colloid nanoparticles' separation, purification, ultraconcentration and reaction mechanism study.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Massive AI Twitter probe draws heat map of entrepreneurial personalityA QUT-led study using artificial intelligence has proved a Twitter-based personality estimate is as successful in predicting local differences in actual entrepreneurial activity as regional personality data collected by means of millions of standard personality tests.
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Live Science
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Pilot Whale Dies After Eating More Than 80 Plastic BagsMore than 80 plastic bags were found clogging the stomach of a small male pilot whale that died in Thailand on Friday (June 1), just days before World Ocean Day on June 8.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
20
Your reaction to pics of Leonardo DiCaprio, animals could unlock your next smartphoneTo overcome password fatigue, many smartphones include facial recognition, fingerprint scans and other biometric systems.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
5
Data 'hashing' improves estimate of the number of victims in databasesResearchers from Rice University and Duke University are using the tools of statistics and data science in collaboration with Human Rights Data Analysis Group (HRDAG) to accurately and efficiently estimate the number of identified victims killed in the Syrian civil war.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Cosmic voids and galaxy clusters could upend EinsteinIt will be possible to use new astronomical mappings of hundreds of thousands of cosmic voids and galaxy clusters to test Einstein's theory of relativity by looking for small deviations in gravity at vast distances – a possible explanation for the dark energy that is accelerating the expansion of the universe. This is shown in a new study from Uppsala University published in Physical Review D, a s
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Futurity.org
2
Why the Childish Gambino video feels so awkwardThe message of a dance performance can feel obscure, but what about when it’s viscerally uncomfortable to watch? In this quick video, Susan Koff, clinical professor of dance education at New York University’s Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development, answers the question: Why does the dancing in the new Childish Gambino music video make us cringe? If you haven’t yet seen “Th
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Live Science
80
These Migraine Treatments Work. So Why Do Most Patients Skip Them?Many people who experience migraines may not be taking advantage of behavioral treatments for the debilitating headaches, even if doctors recommend them.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
18
A little water could make a big difference for endangered salmonA trickle of water flowing through a stream could mean life or death for endangered coho salmon in coastal California.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
12
Using envy as a marketing tool can backfireFor decades, marketers have used envy to sell, attempting to cash in on consumers' desire to want what others have. But does it actually work? According to a new study, employing envy can boost brands but it can also completely backfire — and it depends on a consumer's self-esteem.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
15
Putting lungs under less stress: Ultra-protective mechanical ventilationOf the 200,000 Americans diagnosed with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) each year, 30 to 50 percent will die. But, clinical researchers identified a less-invasive treatment option for patients with severely impaired lung function.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
13
Clinical trials in a dish: A perspective on the coming revolution in drug developmentResearchers share perspective about Clinical Trials in a Dish (CTiD), a novel strategy that bridges preclinical testing and clinical trials.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Russian and Georgian universities unite to study properties of solitonsDr. Belashov explains, "We succeeded in mathematically proving the possibility of formation of solitons in plasma and in finding the conditions of their emergence and existence. The results have both fundamental and applied significance — they are important for space navigation computations and safety of space flights."
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
3
Rules about technology use can undermine academic achievementParents who restrict their children's use of new media technologies may be acting counterproductively in the long run, particularly if they invoke afterschool homework time as the reason. Their children's scholastic achievements at college lag behind the academic performance of same-age peers, a University of Zurich study shows.
6h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

A little water could make a big difference for endangered salmonA trickle of water flowing through a stream could mean life or death for endangered coho salmon in coastal California.
6h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Listening to gut noises could improve diagnosis of irritable bowel syndromeUtilizing newly adapted artificial intelligence, researchers have developed an acoustic belt that offers a new way to diagnose irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) by listening to the noises in a patient's gut, according to research presented at Digestive Disease Week® (DDW) 2018.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
5
Money or altruism: What motivates people to donate their poop to medicine?Appealing to a concern for others is the best way to recruit most people to donate their stool for medicine, while cash rewards may be an additional motivator for some potential donors, according to research scheduled for presentation at Digestive Disease Week® (DDW) 2018.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Biomaterial particles educate immune system to accept transplanted isletsBy instructing key immune system cells to accept transplanted insulin-producing islets, researchers have opened a potentially new pathway for treating type 1 diabetes. If the approach is ultimately successful in humans, it could allow type 1 diabetes to be treated without the long-term complications of immune system suppression.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Scientists find pre-earthquake activity in central AlaskaNew research from University of Alaska Fairbanks Geophysical Institute professor Carl Tape may help future work in early warning systems for earthquakes. Tape and his colleagues found evidence for accelerating activity before a 2016 earthquake in a laterally moving fault zone in central Alaska including a process that has previously only been seen in laboratory experiments. The results of the rese
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
New algorithm enhances ptychographic image reconstructionResearchers from Berkeley Lab's Computational Research Division, the University of Texas at Dallas and Tianjin Normal University have developed an algorithmic model that enhances the image reconstruction capabilities of an algorithmic framework and computer software used to reconstruct millions of phases of ptychographic image data per second.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Golden nanoglue completes the wonder materialIn a recent study, scientists at the University of Oulu have developed a nanojunction, joining one of the most promising novel materials, molybdenum disulfide, with nickel.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
What the size distribution of organisms tells us about the energetic efficiency of a lakeThe size distribution of organisms in a lake facilitates robust conclusions to be drawn on the energy efficiency in the food web, as researchers from the Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB) and international colleagues have now demonstrated empirically. This relationship enables scientists to gain a better and more direct understanding of biological processes and dis
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
6
Interactive map reveals how British Isles were affected by last glacial cycle 22,000 years agoAn interactive online map produced by researchers at the University of Sheffield reveals how major cities were affected by the last glacial cycle 22,000 years ago – when a kilometre-thick ice sheet covered Britain and Ireland.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
A new material capable of the adsorption of organic pollutants in waterThe appearance of emerging pollutants in water has caused the scientific community to research new solutions and alternatives. Along these lines, a group of University of Seville scientists has recently shown the effectiveness of two new absorbent materials capable of eliminating organic pollutants in solution in less than 24 hours.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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When did humans first learn to count?The history of math is murky, predating any written records. When did humans first grasp the basic concept of a number? What about size and magnitude, or form and shape?
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Using fungi to produce renewable energyEbru Alazi 'hacked' an enzyme-producing system in the fungus Aspergillus niger in order to produce renewable energy more easily. She manipulated the fungus, making it produce more pectinases: enzymes mainly used in the food industry and in the production of renewable energy, such as biofuels.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
Only 1 in 4 women who have been sexually harassed tell their employers. Here's why they're afraidOn May 30, a grand jury indicted Harvey Weinstein on charges he raped one woman and forced another to perform oral sex on him. And new allegations and lawsuits against the movie producer continue to pile up.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
25
Improved emission metric shows new path to innovative climate change policyNew research has outlined a better way to evaluate the contribution of methane and other gases to global warming, providing an important step towards developing strategies to achieve the goals of the Paris Agreement.
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New Scientist – News
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Bizarre state of matter to treat wounds instead of antibioticsPlasma is a state of matter, like liquid or gas, that is fatal to bacteria, so a new wearable plasma patch is being tested to dress wounds
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New Scientist – News
2
The most elusive whales reveal their secrets in their wakesWe know almost nothing about the enormous beaked whales because they spend so much time deep underwater, but a new DNA technique could unmask them
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
7
Psychedelic drug use associated with reduced partner violence in menIn a new study published in the Journal of Psychopharmacology, researchers from UBC's Okanagan campus have discovered that men who have used psychedelic drugs in the past have a lower likelihood of engaging in violence against their intimate partners.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Older adults with asthma are happier when they have more say in their careIt's clear an increasing number of people want a say in their medical care. A new study shows older people with asthma are among those no longer content to let their doctors be the sole decision-maker in their asthma care.
6h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

A better statistical estimation of known Syrian war victimsResearchers from Rice University and Duke University are using the tools of statistics and data science in collaboration with Human Rights Data Analysis Group to accurately and efficiently estimate the number of identified victims killed in the Syrian civil war.
6h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Using envy as a marketing tool can backfireFor decades, marketers have used envy to sell, attempting to cash in on consumers' desire to want what others have. But does it actually work?According to a new study from the UBC Sauder School of Business, employing envy can boost brands but it can also completely backfire — and it depends on a consumer's self-esteem.
6h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Why are migraine patients skipping effective behavioral treatments?Researchers from NYU School of Medicine found that about half of migraine patients who were referred by a headache center for specific behavioral treatment did not follow through with therapy. This occurred despite the fact that these treatments are considered first-line, safe and effective treatments by medical guidelines. Those who were referred but did not seek treatment most commonly cited lac
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Boosted Mini S Review: Pure JoyIt won't replace your car, but Boosted's entry-level board might be what you've been waiting for.
7h
Ingeniøren
1
Morfar-joke om AI-mareridt gjorde Elon Musk forelsketAmorinerne inkluderer verdens mest nedrige tankeeksperiment og et matematisk hovedbrud med en uovertruffen AI, som giver netop dig muligheden for at score en millioner kroner kvit og skattefrit.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Putting lungs under less stressOf the 200,000 Americans diagnosed with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) each year, 30 to 50 percent will die. But, clinical researchers at the University of Missouri School of Medicine's division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Environmental Medicine identified a less-invasive treatment option for patients with severely impaired lung function.
7h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Researchers lengthen intervals between blood draws for warfarin patientsA new study finds stable patients on blood thinners may not need to get their blood drawn as often as they currently do. Researchers were able to increase the number of people waiting longer than five weeks in between their INR blood draws from less than half (41.8 percent) to more than two-thirds (69.3 percent).
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Scientific American Content: Global
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The Quirkier Uses of GrapheneThe versatile carbon material can be used in everything from hair dye to running shoes — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
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Episode 1: Rookie Mistakes | Deadliest Catch: GreenhornMeet Luke and Landon, two rookies determined to succeed in the most dangerous job in the world: crab fishing on the Bering Sea. Luke has never finished anything he's started and Landon, he's only 10 days sober. Binge all episodes of Deadliest Catch: Greenhorn: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/deadliest-catch-greenhorn/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook
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Futurity.org
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These star clusters are a lot younger than anyone thoughtGlobular clusters could be up to 4 billion years younger than previously thought, according to new research. Comprised of hundreds of thousands of stars densely packed into a tight ball, globular clusters had been thought to be almost as old as the Universe itself—but thanks to new research models researchers showed that they could be as young as 9 billion years old rather than 13 billion. The di
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The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: That Toad Is PoisonThe introduction of the poisonous Duttaphrynus melanostictus into Madagascar could be fatally risky for the island's native predators.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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80 years since the first calculations showed that the Earth was warming due to rising greenhouse gas emissionsSome people argue that concern for global warming is a modern phenomenon. And that scientists and environmental activists invented these worries to raise awareness of rising greenhouse gases from burning fossil fuels.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Ocean carbon imaged on the atomic scaleDissolved Ocean Carbon (DOC) in the ocean is one of the largest pools of reduced carbon on Earth. It's about 200 times larger than the living biosphere and comparable in size to the atmospheric CO2 reservoir. Due to its complexity, less than 10 percent of dissolved organic carbon has been characterized. It's important to understand what this carbon pool is, so we can predict how this pool of carbo
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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To improve internships and placements, embed technology in their designWork integrated learning helps prepare students for the world of work. It involves students collaborating with industry and community partners as part of their degree program. It can be an immersed experience where students participate in internships, practicums or placements, or a virtual or on-campus experience where students are engaged in consulting, projects or simulations with industry partn
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Futurity.org
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This frog’s crazy colors are actually camouflageThe bright color pattern on poison dart frogs acts as camouflage, new research suggests. Poison dart frogs are well known for their deadly toxins and bright colors, which have made them a classic example of warning coloration. The Dyeing Dart Frog, for example, is highly toxic and warns its predators with a bright yellow-and-black pattern. However, the new, counterintuitive research have revealed
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Scientific American Content: Global
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Why Female Entrepreneurs Have a Harder Time Raising Venture CapitalThere is a subtle but important difference in the questions investors tend to ask — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Harnessing silicon nanoparticles to fight infectionsThere is an urgent need for better methods to treat bacterial infection in the race between developing new antibiotics and the emergence of drug-resistant bacteria.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
5
Personalised social engineeringAnybody can become the victim of a confidence trick, in the modern parlance they might succumb to social engineering. Through such illicit tools, a third party might gain access to the contents of one's hard drive, one's bank account, or even steal one's identity for nefarious purposes. Human behaviour and deception cut to the core of the modern hacker's approach to breaching so-called cyber secur
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Making composite material smart with precious metalDoping polymer brushes with gold nanoparticles results in a switchable composite material which changes its thickness depending on the pH value. The research by physicists at the TU Darmstadt, published in the journal Soft Matter, could be used to design chemical nanosensors in diagnostics or environmental analytics.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Saturn found to have noontime aurorasAn international team of researchers has found that Saturn's fast rotation speed makes it possible for the planet to experience noontime auroras. In their paper published in the journal Nature Astronomy, the group describes the factors that lead to creation of auroras and how Saturn's appear to arise.
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Popular Science
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What is keto flu, and how can I make it stop?Health Suddenly getting most of your calories from fat can wreak havoc on your body. Keto, the nickname fans have given to the ketogenic diet, has swept the country in a fat-burning storm and left many a groggy dieter in its wake.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Neurons ripple while brains rest to lock in memoriesResearchers at Rice University and Michigan Medicine develop a computational tool to analyze waves of firing neurons in the hippocampus while animals are at rest and determine which neurons represent the recall or reactivation of patterns linked to specific memories.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Zebrafish expose tumor pathway in childhood muscle cancerA popular aquarium fish may hold answers to how tumors form in a childhood cancer.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
Fuego volcano—the deadly pyroclastic flows that have killed dozens in GuatemalaDozens of people have been killed, and with many more missing, after Volcán de Fuego (Fuego) in Guatemala erupted on June 3 2018.
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Futurity.org
4
Why mean bosses get nice after lashing outWhile it may ruin your day when your boss yells at you, new research indicates that it can also ruin theirs, leading to behavioral changes that flip their attitudes at work. New research in the Journal of Applied Psychology takes prior workplace studies, which focused primarily on the impact abusive bosses have on their employees, and refocuses the lens to see how the bosses respond to their own
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
47
Research on spider glue resolves sticky problemEver wonder why paint peels off the wall during summer's high humidity? It's the same reason that bandages separate from skin when we bathe or swim.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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The misleading evidence that fooled scientists for decadesThere are surprisingly few proven facts in science. Instead, scientists often talk about how much evidence there is for their theories. The more evidence, the stronger the theory and the more accepted it becomes.
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Humans Tracked Iceland's Glaciers For Ages. Now, Tech DoesCitizen scientists have served as glacier trackers in Iceland—and witnesses to the ravages of climate change—for generations. Will they continue?
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The Atlantic
37
Satellite Images Can Harm the Poorest CitizensMapping a city’s buildings might seem like a simple task, one that could be easily automated by training a computer to read satellite photos. Because buildings are physically obvious facts out in the open that do not move around, they can be recorded by the satellites circling our planet. Computers can then “read” these satellite photographs, which are pixelated images like everyday photographs e
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Science : NPR
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Parents, Schools Step Up Efforts To Combat Food-Allergy BullyingUp to 32 percent of kids with food allergies have been taunted with foods that make them sick. Schools are moving beyond allergy awareness and "nut-free zones" to address this dangerous behavior. (Image credit: Janice Chang for NPR)
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Waste not, want not: a home-grown plan to turn plastic and tyres into fuelReduce, reuse, recycle. Like brushing your teeth after a meal, recycling is just the right thing to do.
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Scientific American Content: Global
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A Book That Bills Itself as "the Definitive Field Guide to Animal Flatulence"A new volume has breaking news — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Researchers develop new happiness indexA team of researchers at the Universitat Politècnica de València (UPV) and Universitat de València (UV) have developed a new index to measure a country's happiness. Named HAIN (HAppiness INdex), it is based on five areas – development, freedom, solidarity, justice and peace, each of which is evaluated based on quantitative variables taken from various official databases such as the UN's Human Deve
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Eye-tracking software makes insurance policies easier to understandResearchers at the University of Nottingham and insurance law firm Browne Jacobson LLP are using eye-tracking software to help insurers write policies that are much easier to read and understand.
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Dagens Medicin

Sundhedsminister undrer sig over brugen af særlige pladser i psykiatrienSundhedsministeren kalder det bekymrende, at de særlige pladser inden for psykiatrien ikke bliver brugt i større grad af kommunerne.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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NASA's Hi-C launches to study sun's coronaNASA and its partners launched a rocket-borne camera to the edge of space at 2:54 p.m. EST May 29, 2018, on its third flight to study the sun. The clarity of images returned is unprecedented and their analysis will provide scientists around the world with clues to one of the biggest questions in heliophysics – why the sun's atmosphere, or corona, is so much hotter than its surface.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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NASA's Aqua satellite captures heat signature and smoke from Buzzard fireNASA's Aqua satellite captured this image of the Buzzard fire in New Mexico on June 03, 2018. This fire began on May 22, 2018, and its cause is still under investigation, although it is thought that the fire was caused by an illegal campfire. At present the fire has consumed 34,709 acres and is 49% contained. This fire is located 10 miles east of Reserve, New Mexico and near the Gila Wilderness. T
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Experts build pulsed air rig to test 3-D printed parts for low carbon enginesResearchers designed a unique facility for testing 3-D printed engine parts, to help reduce carbon emissions worldwide. The new Transient Air System Rig (TASR) was designed and built by Dr. Aaron Costall and his team from Imperial College London's Department of Mechanical Engineering.
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The Atlantic
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Paul Manafort Loses His CoolAt the height of his powers as a political consultant, Paul Manafort was known for his cool. In fact, the value of his counsel increased at moments of crisis. While others panicked, Manafort rarely evinced a hint of frazzle. He could still think strategically, detach himself from emotion, and issue clearheaded guidance. But he could afford to keep his head at such moments, because the problems he
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Image: Fuego plumeOn 3 June 2018, the Copernicus Sentinel-5P satellite measured sulphur dioxide in the plume spewing from the Fuego volcano in Guatemala. The eruption has already claimed 25 lives and injured several hundred. It is reported to be Guatemala's deadliest such event since 1902 when the Santa Maria volcano erupted and killed thousands of people. The Fuego volcano, which is less than 40 km southwest of th
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Image: Layered deposits at the south pole of MarsThe ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter captured this view of part of the south polar ice cap on Mars on 13 May 2018.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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New insight into Earth's crust, mantle and outer core interactionsA new study by the University of Liverpool, in collaboration with the Universities of Lancaster and Oslo, sheds light on a longstanding question that has puzzled earth scientists.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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UN says world choking on plastic as environmental crisis growsUp to five trillion grocery bags are used each year and like most plastic garbage barely any is recycled, the UN said Tuesday as it warned the world was choking on trash.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Clinical trials in a dish: A perspective on the coming revolution in drug developmentResearchers share perspective about Clinical Trials in a Dish (CTiD), a novel strategy that bridges preclinical testing and clinical trials.
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BBC News – Science & Environment
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Heathrow Airport: Cabinet approves new runway planMinisters say "the time for action is now" with MPs set to vote on expansion in the coming weeks.
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Bringing on Self-Driving Cars Means Knowing How Humans RideResearchers at the University of Michigan are just the latest to use pokey driverless shuttles to study how people use, and feel about using, this new technology.
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A New Privacy Problem Could Deepen Facebook's Legal TroubleFacebook shared user data with the makers of smartphones and other devices, including Apple, Amazon, Microsoft, and Blackberry.
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The Fight to Upend Facebook's Black Market of Animal PartsIn Facebook groups, wildlife traffickers can hawk their wares to buyers across the globe. A team of whistleblowers hopes that an undercover sting—and a novel legal attack—can cut off the illicit trade where it lives online.
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Live Science
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'Sunbathing' Helps Fish Turn Up the HeatEven fish sometimes need to catch some rays.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
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Privacy and consumer genetic testing don’t always mixInterested in taking a direct-to-consumer genetic test? Here are some things you should know.
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The Atlantic
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How Instagram Threads Became the WikiHow for Gen ZWhen Sophie, a 13-year-old in Arizona, began eighth grade last year, she wanted to start things off on the right foot. Instead of picking up the latest issue of Teen Vogue or googling around for advice, she reached for her phone and followed a slew of “ thread ” accounts on Instagram. These accounts provide her, and the thousands of other teens and tweens who have become addicted to them, with a
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The Atlantic
500+
Here’s How Higher Education DiesMaybe higher education has reached its peak. Not the Harvards and Yales of the world, but the institutions that make up the rest of the industry—the regional public schools who saw decades of growth and are now facing major budget cuts and the smaller, less-selective private colleges that have exorbitant sticker prices while the number of students enrolling in them declines. Higher ed is often de
9h
The Atlantic
200+
The Kids Who Are Cleared to Leave Psychiatric Hospitals—But Can’tIn the spring of 2016, a 12-year-old named Gabriel Brasfield spent three and a half months in a psychiatric hospital in Chicago. His hair, which he liked to wear cropped, grew long and unkempt. He forgot what it felt like to wear shoes because he was allowed to wear only hospital socks. He missed months of school, and couldn’t go outside. He celebrated his 13th birthday at the hospital, where he
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The Scientist RSS
33
Companies to Help People Sell or Rent Out Their Health DataLuna DNA, Nebula Genomics, and other 'bio-brokers' will allow customers to make money by granting access to their genetic and personal information for research purposes.
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The Scientist RSS
1
A T-Cell Tweak Combats Advanced Breast CancerThe immunotherapy eliminated a woman's metastatic lesions and kept her disease-free for two years.
9h
New Scientist – News
7
What can game theory tell us about Trump’s threats of trade war?Theories of conflict and cooperation say the US risks self-harm if it sparks a big trade war. So what is Trump's real aim, wonders Petros Sekeris
9h
Live Science
62
Moldy Bread? Nope, It's a Photo of the Sahara Desert Taken from SpaceThe dramatic contrast between the burnt-orange dunes and the dull-blue hills of the Sahara Desert in northern Africa makes for a stunning view from the International Space Station, as seen in a new image shot from the ISS.
9h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
47
From sea urchin skeleton to solar cellResearchers at AMOLF have found a way of making calcium carbonate structures suitable for use in electronics. They do this by modifying the composition of the material so that it becomes a semiconductor without losing its shape. This could lead to more efficient and stable solar cells. This research was published in the journal Nature Chemistry on June 4, 2018.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Modern porous material resembles XIV Century Alhambra mosaicScientists from Spain and the U.S. have synthesized an unprecedented metal-organic-framework (MOF) that contains a perfectly linear bridging chain showing a beautiful resemblance with an XIV century Islamic mosaic of the Alhambra Palace in Granada (Spain).
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Earth could have supported crust, life earlier than thoughtThe early Earth might have been habitable much earlier than thought, according to new research from a group led by University of Chicago scientists.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
19
Red tide fossils point to Jurassic sea floodDinosaur-age fossilised remains of tiny organisms normally found in the sea have been discovered in inland, arid Australia – suggesting the area was, for a short time at least, inundated by sea water 40 million years before Australia's large inland sea existed.
9h
Scientific American Content: Global
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Gravitational Waves Reveal the Heart of Neutron StarsScientists are mapping the extreme interiors of exotic stars with unprecedented clarity, and setting new boundaries on the births of black holes — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
39
Grainyhead, a master regulator that controls DNA accessA team led by Prof. Stein Aerts (VIB-KU Leuven) has reported how access to relevant DNA regions is orchestrated in epithelial cells. These findings shed new light on the biological mechanisms of gene regulation and open up potential new avenues for cellular reprogramming.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
35
The role of cohesin in genome 3-D structure helps for a better understanding of tumor cellsIn recent years, it has become evident that the spatial organisation of the genome is key for its function. This depends on a number of factors, including the cohesin protein complex. This essential complex is present in the cells in two versions that contain either the SA1 or SA2 subunit. Scientists at the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO), the Centre for Genomic Regulation (CRG), an
9h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
5
New technique for simulation of extreme weather eventsPredictions of how climate change may affect extreme weather systems, such as typhoons, are usually conducted using general circulation models (GCMs), which represent physical processes in the atmosphere or oceans.
9h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
Researchers achieve 3-D underwater acoustic carpet cloak with 'Black Panther'-like featuresCloaking is one of the most eye-catching technologies in sci-fi movies. In two 2018 Marvel films, Black Panther and Avengers: Infinity War, the fiction country Wakanda, a technologically advanced African nation, is shielded from the outside world using the metal vibranium.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
5
Team invents world's first nickel-hydroxide actuating material that can be triggered by both light and electricityOver the past 30 years, researchers have studied actuating materials that can reversibly change their volume under various stimuli in order to develop micro- and biomimetic robots, artificial muscles and medical devices.
9h
NYT > Science
26
On a Clear Day You Can See an Ice Age: One Journalist’s View From the Upper West SideI had climbed to the roof of our apartment building to see what the day might bring. Suddenly, I realized that the faraway hill was no ordinary hill.
9h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
6
Novel gene in red blood cells may help adult newts regenerate limbsNewts are the only four-legged vertebrates that can regenerate their body parts, even as adults. When a newt loses a limb, a mass of cells called a blastema is generated at the stump, from which a new, fully functional limb is eventually regenerated. Can this remarkable ability be explained by genes shared by vertebrates, including humans, or by unique genes that the newt may have evolved?
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
New mechanisms discovered to separate air moleculesNanoscale holes in graphene (called "nanowindows") can selectively choose which type of air molecules can pass through.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Unconventional solution process for 2-D heterostructureSolution-processed transitional metal chalcogenide (TMD) nanosheets exhibit limited light absorption and low quantum efficiencies because of their atomic-scale thicknesses and large specific surface area accompanied with a high density of surface defects, which has restricted their applications in optoelectronics.
9h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Drought severity in the Yellow River basin over the last 55 yearsDrought occurs widely and frequently in China, causing considerable damage to the living environment of humans. The Yellow River basin (YRB) of China shows great vulnerability to drought in the major basins; thus, drought monitoring in the YRB is particularly important. A recent study reveals the temporal and spatial characteristics of the multi-scale drought in the Yellow River basin over the pas
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Dagens Medicin

PRO er ikke længere kun for ‘tordenskjolds soldater’Sidste år talte alle begejstret om et studie, der viste, at PRO forlængede overlevelsen signifikant for kræftpatienter i behandling med kemoterapi. På årets ASCO er PRO igen en varm kartoffel, og det glæder dansk PRO-ekspert at fokus allerede er på implementering af data i klinikken.
10h
Dagens Medicin

Økonomiaftale: Her er reaktionerneDagens Medicin har samlet de vigtigste reaktioner på nattens økonomiaftale.
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Dagens Medicin

Neoadjuverende immunterapi kan hjælpe blærekræft-gruppeKnap hver tredje patient med muskelinvasiv blærekræft opnår patologisk komplet respons på neoadjuverende immunterapi, viser to fase 2-studier. Resultaterne er interessante, da langt fra alle tåler standardbehandling med neoadjuverende cisplatin, lyder det fra dansk læge.
10h
Dagens Medicin

Nye data bekræfter effekten af nivolumab som adjuverende behandling i melanomTo års-opfølgningen på CheckMate 238-studiet bekræfter, at nivolumab fortsat er at foretrække i den adjuverende setting til melanom-patienter med stadium IIIB/C- og IV-sygdom. Nivolumab vedholder en forlænget recidivfri overlevelse sammenlignet med ipilimumab.
10h
Dagens Medicin

Lynch-syndrom er almindeligt blandt patienter med tumorer med høj MSIAlle patienter med MSI-H-tumorer bør blive testet for Lynch-syndrom, uanset kræftform og familiehistorik for kræft, siger klinisk direktør fra Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center.
10h
Science : NPR
81
Physicists Say They Have Evidence For A New Fundamental ParticlePhysicists' understanding of the nature of the universe has taken a blow. An experiment with neutrinos has produced a result that breaks the rules scientists think govern the subatomic world. (Image credit: Courtesy Fermilab)
10h
The Atlantic
500+
Melania Trump Derangement SyndromeLike Lewis Carroll’s White Rabbit, she has darted in and out through the looking glass of our twisted American Wonderland since Inauguration Day. Her profile was always low, her arrival in Washington delayed, her appearances sporadic. But the extended and unexplained disappearance of the first lady of the United States— 25 days, until her off-camera appearance at the White House on Monday—has bee
10h
The Atlantic
400+
Taxi-Driver Suicides Are a WarningI remember when, growing up in the outer boroughs of New York City, taking a cab was a rare treat. The one time I hailed a cab as a teenager, it was because I had returned home from a school trip in the wee hours of the morning, and my parents gave me special dispensation to do so. Alas, the cabdriver I flagged down refused to take me deep into the heart of Brooklyn, on the grounds that it would
10h
Ingeniøren
3
Efter problemfyldt start: Svensk by har været off-grid i 150 timerE.ON's svenske Simris-projekt har været plaget af mus og dårligt VE-vejr, men viser nu gode resultater. Der er dog brug for mere batterilagring.
10h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
11
Smart containers to reward people for recycling properlySmart recycling containers that reward people for proper use could help drive up the rate of plastic recycling, reducing the amount of plastic that goes into oceans and landfill, and creating business opportunities out of the challenge to cut back on waste.
10h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Germany's Continental bans WhatsApp from work phonesGerman car parts supplier Continental on Tuesday said it was banning the use of WhatsApp and Snapchat on work-issued mobile phones "with immediate effect" because of data protection concerns.
10h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
5
Malaysia says over 350,000 cars yet to change Takata airbagsMalaysia's transport minister said Tuesday that the government will take an active role in recalls to replace flawed Takata air bags after data from eight car manufacturers showed that more than 350,000 car owners have not responded.
10h
Dagens Medicin

Immun-aktivitet kan være en markør for behandlingseffektImmunsystemets respons på kræftbehandling kan vise sig at blive en essentiel markør til at forudsige behandlingseffekt. Det viser et dansk studie, som har undersøgt immun-aktiviteten på tværs af tre diagnosegrupper.
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Dagens Medicin

Blodprøve kan identificere tidlige stadier af lungekræftEksisterende undersøgelser for tidlige stadier af lungekræft er både dyre og besværlige, og derfor er der et behov for en hurtigere løsning.
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Dagens Medicin

Miljøet omkring tumor har betydning for overlevelsen ved kolorektalkræftKræftpatienter med en høj kollagenproduktion i miljøet omkring tumor, har signifikant dårligere overlevelse end patienter med et lavt niveau, viser nyt studie af patienter med kolorektalkræft. Årsagen er formentlig, at kollagen indkapsler tumor og beskytter den mod behandling.
10h
NYT > Science
47
Trilobites: Stick Insects Are Easy Bird Food, and That Might Help Them ReproduceThe tough eggs carried by bugs that mimic plants may be spread by hungry birds to new locations where they hatch.
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NYT > Science
4K
Whale’s Death in Thailand Points to Global Scourge: Plastic in OceansThe death of a whale with a belly full of bags is prompting calls for the Southeast Asian nation to take action against throwaway plastics, just as Europe is considering.
10h
New Scientist – News
42
Cosmic cooperation is just what space exploration needsQuestions such as whether Mars ever hosted life are too big to be left to any one nation – efforts to join forces on space missions are the future
10h
Dagens Medicin

Lægemiddel får lungekræftpatienter til at leve tre år længere uden forværringAlecensa kan hjælpe personer med ALK-positiv ikke-småcellet lungekræft til at leve i næsten tre år uden sygdomsprogression.
11h
Dagens Medicin

Sådan bliver nærhedsfinansieringenToprocentskravet skal erstattes af en såkaldt nærhedsfinansiering, der skal belønne regionerne, når opgaver flyttes tættere på borgerne. Få et overblik over modellen her.
11h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
9
Cleaning up the 'sacred lake': locals tackle Titicaca pollutionUnder a blazing sun on the arid banks of Lake Titicaca, high in the Andes Mountains, around a dozen indigenous women work tirelessly to collect cans, bottles and plastic bags.
11h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
46
Toll rises in Guatemala volcano as more bodies recoveredRescue workers pulled more bodies Monday from under the dust and rubble left by an explosive eruption of Guatemala's Fuego volcano, bringing the death toll to at least 69.
12h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
15
Plastic wasteland: Asia's ocean pollution crisisA Vietnamese mangrove draped with polythene, a whale killed after swallowing waste bags in Thai seas and clouds of underwater trash near Indonesian "paradise" islands—grim images of the plastic crisis that has gripped Asia.
12h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
5
Myanmar enterprise tries to make trash trendyWith creative flair the Myanmar-based social enterprise "Chu Chu" lets little go to waste as its staff turn discarded clothes and rubbish into handy accessories that get snapped up by tourists.
12h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
12
Next stop San Francisco as 'longest swim' embarks from TokyoBen Lecomte dived into the Pacific Ocean Tuesday, kicking off an epic quest to swim 9,000 kilometres (5,600 miles) from Tokyo to San Francisco, through shark-infested waters choking with plastic waste.
12h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
'Of course' top job at Qatar Airways is held by a man: CEOQatar Airways' chief sparked disbelief Tuesday by saying his carrier was led by a man because "it is a very challenging position"—even as airline bosses admitted more women should be in top roles.
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Ingeniøren
6
Spørg Scientariet: Hvorfor kan rejsekortet ikke automatisk tjekke ud via Bluetooth?En læser undrer sig over, at man skal tjekke ind og ud, hvis folk alligevel har mobiltelefoner på sig med Bluetooth, der kunne klare ærterne. Rejsekort A/S giver et svar.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
9
Bad air day: Indian city chokes on world's worst pollutionSoot turned the white handkerchief around Abhash Kumar Sharma's face to black as the police officer tried to direct gridlocked traffic in the Indian city with the world's dirtiest air.
12h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Manila 'trash bin' waterway choked with plasticThe blanket of trash on a creek that flows between the makeshift homes of a Manila slum is so dense it appears one could walk across it like a paved street.
12h
cognitive science
1
The Color Game: Challenges for app experimentssubmitted by /u/wintz [link] [comments]
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Recycling plastic—Japan styleAt a recycling plant outside Tokyo, workers in face masks pick through an unending torrent of plastic rubbish, fuelled by a national obsession with pristine packaging—and famously strict rules that ensure much of it is reclaimed and reused.
12h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
63
Apple touts privacy features of new operating systemsApple on Monday unveiled new operating systems for its iPhones and computers with features designed to thwart the use of secret trackers to monitor people's online activities.
12h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Microsoft embraces collaboration in $7.5B deal for GitHubGitHub Microsoft NadellaMicrosoft is paying $7.5 billion for the popular coder hangout GitHub as the maker of Windows further embraces the types of open-source projects it used to shun.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
Washington state sues Google, Facebook over campaign ad dataWashington Attorney General Bob Ferguson on Monday sued Google and Facebook, saying the companies failed to maintain information about political advertising as required by state law.
12h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
New Facebook privacy furor: What's at stake?Facebook is at the center of another privacy furor, this one over its sharing of user data with device makers such as Apple, Amazon, Samsung and others over the past decade
12h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Mergers are good news for investorsShareholder value and market share improve when companies merge, confirms a new study from the University of Waterloo.
12h
NYT > Science
300+
How the Ice Age Shaped New YorkLong ago, the region lay under an ice sheet thousands of feet thick. It terminated abruptly in what are now the boroughs, leaving the city with a unique landscape.
12h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
100+
Engineered cotton uses weed-suppression chemical as nutrientA newly developed fertilizer system will provide nutrition to engineered cotton crops worldwide and a deadly dose to weeds that are increasingly herbicide resistant, according to a Texas A&M AgriLife Research study.
12h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
9
Thousands of turtles netted off South AmericaTens of thousands of sea turtles are caught each year by small-scale fishers off South America's Pacific coast, new research shows.
12h
Science-Based Medicine
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Fake News about Fish OilAn ad for the dietary supplement Omega Rejuvenol is disguised as a news story in my local newspaper. It makes claims that are not supported by evidence.
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Dagens Medicin

Aftalen er i hus: En mia. kr. til sundheden og ny styringsmodelDanske Regioner og staten har indgået en økonomiaftale, der indebærer en mia. kr. ekstra, hvoraf 200 mio. kr. skal gå til psykiatrien. To-pct-kravet er lagt i graven og erstattet med 'nærhedsfinansiering'
14h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
500+
Alien apocalypse: Can any civilization make it through climate change?In the face of climate change, deforestation and biodiversity loss, creating a sustainable version of civilization is one of humanity's most urgent tasks. But when confronting this immense challenge, we rarely ask what may be the most pressing question of all: How do we know if sustainability is even possible? Astronomers have inventoried a sizable share of the universe's stars, galaxies, comets,
14h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
NASA spots tropical depression 05W approaching China's Hainan IslandIn July of 2016, Tropical Cyclone 05W was approaching Hainan Island, China. Now, two years later in 2018, another storm, also the fifth of the year in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean, Tropical Cyclone 05W is again approaching Hainan Island.
14h
Science | The Guardian
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Yuck! Why there’s more to disgust than not getting sickFrom rotten food to weeping sores, our sense of squeamishness can help save our lives. But why are some people more susceptible ​to disgust ​than others – and what does it mean? One of the fun parts of being a disgustologist – as researchers who study the emotion of disgust sometimes call themselves – must be coming up with revolting scenarios. Repulsive enough to test a theory, but not quite so s
15h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Mergers are good news for investorsShareholder value and market share improve when companies merge, confirms a new study from the University of Waterloo.
15h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Maternal depressive emotion associated with children's sleep problemsMaternal depressive mood during the prenatal and postnatal periods is related to child sleep disturbances, according to recent pilot data from a longitudinal cohort study in kindergarten children.
15h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Thousands of turtles netted off South AmericaTens of thousands of sea turtles are caught each year by small-scale fishers off South America's Pacific coast, new research shows.
15h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Lighting intervention improves sleep and mood for Alzheimer's patientsA tailored lighting intervention in nursing homes can positively impact sleep, mood and behavior for patients with Alzheimer's disease, according to preliminary findings from a new study.
15h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Sleep health and yoga intervention delivered in low-income communities improves sleepPilot study results indicate that a sleep and yoga intervention has promising effects on improving sleep disturbance, sleep-related impairment, and sleep health behaviors.
15h
New on MIT Technology Review
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Seeing the mind of a robot in augmented realityRoboticist Stefanie Tellex seeks new ways for robots and humans to work together.
16h
Science : NPR
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When Everything Clicks: The Power Of Judgment-Free LearningThere can be a lot of psychological noise involved in learning. And mental chit chat can make learning hard. One solution, silence it with a click. (Image credit: Angela Hsieh/NPR)
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BBC News – Science & Environment
2K
50 nations 'curbing plastic pollution'Levies and bans have been among the most effective strategies to curb plastic waste, a UN report says.
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BBC News – Science & Environment
500+
What do slugs hate? Home remedies put to the testTraditional remedies used by gardeners to deter slugs and snails are to be tested scientifically for the first time.
19h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
44
A rare but extremely distressing phenomenon: Patients being conscious during CPRResearchers aim to raise awareness of a rare but extremely distressing phenomenon: patients being aware during resuscitation following a cardiac arrest.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Teachers who give cookie rewards score better in evaluationsTeachers who reward their students with chocolate cookies can score significantly better in evaluation surveys.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
16
High schoolers who use heroin commonly use multiple other drugsHigh school seniors who use heroin commonly use multiple other drugs — and not just opioids, according to a new study.
20h
New Scientist – News
300+
Two meteors in two days lit up the sky in China and BotswanaOn 1 and 2 June, two meteors streaked across the sky, one in China and one in southern Africa. One of them was the third we’ve ever detected before it hit Earth
20h
cognitive science
1
Wireless system that can power devices inside the bodysubmitted by /u/davyeminy [link] [comments]
20h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Regular exercise may be more beneficial for men than post-menopausal womenThe blood vessels of middle-aged men and women adapt differently to regular exercise according to new research being presented today at the British Cardiovascular Society conference in Manchester.
20h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Male guppies grow larger brains in response to predator exposure — but not femalesMale guppies exposed to predators in the wild or in captivity have heavier brains than those living in relatively predator-free conditions, according to new research published in the journal Functional Ecology.
20h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Heart attack blood test sensitive enough to be used in portable deviceA new blood test being developed to diagnose heart attacks could one day be carried out on a simple handheld device, giving a rapid diagnosis in A&E departments without the need for samples to be sent to a lab, according to new research presented today at the British Cardiovascular Society Conference in Manchester.
20h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Cancer fighting effects of aspirin revealed in bowel tumor studyResearchers at the University of Edinburgh have shed light on how taking aspirin can help to stave off bowel cancer.
20h
Science | The Guardian
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Taking aspirin with acid reducers can slow advance of esophogeal cancerNew study looked at patients with Barrett’s esophagus, usually caused by stomach acid, which is considered a precancerous condition Taking aspirin with acid reducers can help patients with chronic acid reflux slow the advance of cancer of the esophagus, the tube from the throat to the stomach, a new study has found. Continue reading…
21h
Futurity.org
8
For older women, exercise may help avoid ‘destiny for obesity’Working out can reduce the influence that genes have on obesity for women over 70, according to a new study. “Our sample, which included older women, is the first to show that in the 70- to 79-year-old age group, exercise can mitigate the genetic effects of obesity,” says the study’s lead author Heather Ochs-Balcom, associate professor of epidemiology and environmental health in the University at
21h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
100+
Male guppies grow larger brains in response to predator exposure—but not femalesMale guppies exposed to predators in the wild or in captivity have heavier brains than those living in relatively predator-free conditions, according to new research published in the journal Functional Ecology.
21h
New on MIT Technology Review
100+
Your next potato chip could come from a 3-D printerAdditive manufacturing is creating everything from prototype potato chips to sports-car parts.
21h
BBC News – Science & Environment
500+
Why do we love to dance with each other?Dancing makes us feel good…but dancing together is even better
21h
Futurity.org
3
Disappearing lesions may actually mean MS is getting worseNew research shows that, for patients with multiple sclerosis, the disappearance of lesions into cerebrospinal fluid is a better indicator of who will develop disability than the appearance or expansion of the lesions. For decades, clinicians treating MS have interpreted the appearance of new or expanding brain lesions on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans as a sign that a patient’s disease i
21h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
19
Gap in substance abuse data could have long-term implicationsA policy of redacting Medicare claims that included diagnosis or procedure codes related to substance abuse was in effect from 2013-2017, just as the Affordable Care Act and the opioid epidemic were drastically changing the healthcare landscape. Researchers calculated the effects of such a significant data gap on Medicare spending and admissions estimates — including in one case a $6.8 billion un
21h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
20
Bright warning colors on poison dart frogs also act as camouflagePoison dart frogs are well known for their deadly toxins and bright colors, which have made them a classic example of warning coloration.
21h
Futurity.org
1
Worry about kids stresses out moms with advanced cancerParenting concerns contribute significantly to the psychological distress of mothers with late-stage cancer, according to a new study. Cancer is the leading cause of disease-specific death for parenting-age women in the United States, and women with incurable cancer who have children can have increased rates of depression and anxiety. To better understand how parenting concerns might relate to th
21h
Science | The Guardian
200+
Claims about social benefits of sex robots greatly overstated, say expertsThere is no evidence that AI robots will reduce the need for sex workers or provide a ‘safe’ outlet for paedophiles Sex robots are coming, but the argument that they could bring health benefits, including offering paedophiles a “safe” outlet for their sexual desires, is not based on evidence, say researchers. The market for anthropomorphic dolls with a range of orifices for sexual pleasure – the
21h
Science | The Guardian
67
Babies born with neonatal diabetes can now be treated with tablets instead of injectionsData from 10 year study shows that sulphonylurea tablets effectively controlled patients’ blood sugar over the long term The misery of giving tiny babies regular insulin injections is over. Babies born with diabetes can now be treated successfully with tablets instead of injections, a new study suggests. Scientists have examined data collected over the last decade from patients diagnosed with neo
21h
The Scientist RSS

Immunotherapy Drug Shows Promise for Melanoma, Lung CancerMerck's Keytruda extended the lives of lung cancer patients by several months and appeared to stop the progression of advanced melanoma.
21h
Feed: All Latest
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WWDC 2018: The Best Part of Apple's Keynote Is What Wasn't ThereTaking a pause to work on stability is exactly the right move for iOS 12 and macOS Mojave.
21h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
HIV study reveals new group of men at risk of infectionA study of HIV infection has identified a distinct group of men at risk of infection who have sex with other men, but are not open about their sexuality.
21h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

'Miracle treatment' long-term success for babies with diabetesHalf of all cases of neonatal diabetes are caused by a mutation in the KCNJ11 gene, involved in keeping insulin-producing cells in the pancreas working properly. This results in life threatening diabetes soon after birth. The new decade-long analysis of 81 patients from 20 different countries shows that these people can be treated successfully through sulphonylurea tablets, with excellent blood su
21h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
87
Millions could have incorrect statin, aspirin and blood pressure prescriptionsMore than 11 million Americans may have incorrect prescriptions for aspirin, statins and blood pressure medications, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
32
Stressful jobs are associated with a higher risk of heart rhythm disordersHaving a stressful job is associated with a higher risk of a heart rhythm disorder called atrial fibrillation, according to new research.
21h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
24
When it comes to school recess, a quality playground experience mattersPlayground safety, access to play equipment, peer conflict resolution and quality engagement between adults and students are among the factors that contribute to a quality recess experience, new research show.
21h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
18
Trauma from parents' youth linked to poorer health, asthma in their own childrenA new study found that for each type of adverse childhood experience a parent went through, their children had 19 percent higher odds of poorer health.
21h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
12
Engineered cotton uses weed-suppression chemical as nutrientA newly developed fertilizer system will provide nutrition to engineered cotton crops worldwide and a deadly dose to weeds that are increasingly herbicide resistant, according to a new study. The new system applies phosphite to cotton crops engineered to express a certain gene — a gene that makes cotton able to process the phosphite into nutrition while the same compound suppresses weeds that are
21h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
36
Medicaid expansion produces significant health benefitsThe first peer-reviewed comprehensive analysis of the effects of Medicaid expansion paints a picture of significant improvements in various health outcomes consistent with the original goals of the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare.
21h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
24
Preventable deaths from lack of high-quality medical care cost trillionsEight million largely preventable deaths from treatable diseases cost $6 trillion in lost economic welfare in low- and middle-income countries in 2015. If current conditions persist, low- and middle-income countries could lose collectively $11 trillion in gross domestic product by 2030, or 2.6 percent of total GDP in low-income countries.
21h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
14
Personalized cancer vaccine may increase long-term survival in patients with deadly brain cancerA new study has found that a personalized glioblastoma vaccine may increase long-term survival in some patients. Nearly 30 percent of patients in the current trial have now survived at least three years post-enrollment, with patients continuing to be followed over time.
21h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
62
Thank the moon for Earth's lengthening dayA new study that reconstructs the deep history of our planet's relationship to the moon shows that 1.4 billion years ago, a day on Earth lasted just over 18 hours. This is at least in part because the moon was closer and changed the way the Earth spun around its axis.
21h
The Atlantic
14
The Atlantic Daily: The Battlements of EgoWhat We’re Following Pardon Power: President Trump asserted on Twitter that he could pardon himself if indicted in Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation, thus implying the executive branch has no power to check presidential misdeeds—and unwittingly making the case for impeachment. Over the weekend, a new report from The New York Times revealed that Trump’s lawyers sent a letter to Muelle
21h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
54
Light exposure during sleep may increase insulin resistanceAccording to preliminary results from a new study, nighttime light exposure during sleep may affect metabolic function. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that light exposure at night during sleep adversely impacts metabolic outcomes.
22h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
17
I saw that. Brain mechanisms create confidence about things seenAt the threshold of what we call consciousness is a brain function that makes you feel confidently aware that you are actually seeing what you see. Psychologists have observed mechanisms involved in making it work.
22h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Alien apocalypse: Can any civilization make it through climate change?Does the universe contain planets with truly sustainable civilizations? Or does every civilization that may have arisen in the cosmos last only a few centuries before it falls to the climate change it triggers? Astrophysicists have developed a mathematical model to illustrate how a technologically advanced population and its planet might develop together, putting climate change in a cosmic context
22h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
17
Experimental drug restores some bladder function after spinal cord injury, study findsAn experimental drug that blocks abnormal neural communication after spinal cord injury could one day be the key to improving quality of life by improving bladder function, new research suggests.
22h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
7
Inflammatory signals in heart muscle cells linked to atrial fibrillationInterfering with inflammatory signals produced by heart muscle cells might someday provide novel therapeutic strategies for atrial fibrillation, according to an international team of researchers.
22h
Popular Science
100+
We may finally know how Easter Island’s giant statues got their jaunty stone hatsScience But there are still puzzles left to solve. Almost a thousand stone figures—each weighing tons—dot Easter Island. They have puzzled generations of Western anthropologists over the past two centuries…
22h
Feed: All Latest
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WWDC 2018: Apple Just Made Safari the Good Privacy BrowserThe next version of Safari takes on ad-trackers more aggressively than ever.
22h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
18
Pacific rats trace 2,000 years of human impact on island ecosystemsRats were carried on ships as humans settled the remote islands of the Pacific. Analysis of the rats' remains reveals changes humans made to the island ecosystems.
22h
The Atlantic
7
The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Once Upon a Mattress-Written by Elaine Godfrey ( @elainejgodfrey ) Today in 5 Lines President Trump said on Twitter that he has the “ absolute right ” to pardon himself and attacked the appointment of Special Counsel Robert Mueller as “totally UNCONSTITUTIONAL!” The Supreme Court ruled in favor of a Colorado baker who refused to sell a cake to a same-sex couple. In a series of interviews promoting his new book, form
22h
Live Science
29
A Teen's Muscle Soreness Turned Out to Be This Life-Threatening ConditionA Texas teen who felt extremely sore after a hard gym workout turned out to have a rare and potentially life-threatening condition.
22h
New on MIT Technology Review
100+
Want to robot-proof your job? Here are some tips from experts in the field.We must figure out how to work with robots, but it’s not going to be easy.
22h
Big Think
49
The coolest announcements at Apple's WWDC 2018 eventFrom Memojis to revamped and improved AR, here's the most interesting and useful new features from Apple. Read More
22h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
10
Childhood cancer: The four survival strategies of tumor cellsCancer cells in children tend to develop by following four main trajectories — and two of them are linked to relapse of the disease, new research shows. The four strategies can occur simultaneously in a single tumor, according to the study.
22h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
9
Rare aquatic beetles: Species distribution models guide field surveysThe known range of the narrow-footed Hygrotus diving beetle, which also can fly, is in central Wyoming, in the Powder River Basin and one site in the Wind River Basin. The sites are small, intermittent streams with disconnected pools and contain high concentrations of salt. These streams are in shortgrass prairie ecosystems that receive less than 400 millimeters of precipitation each year.
22h
Live Science
80
Many Women with Breast Cancer Don't Need ChemotherapyUp to 70 percent of women with a certain type of breast cancer may not need chemotherapy, a new study finds.
22h
New Scientist – News
500+
A day used to be less than 19 hours long 1.4 billion years agoThe moon is making days on Earth last longer and longer, and we can track the changes through climate effects seen in the geological record
23h
NYT > Science
500+
She Went to Jail for a Drug Relapse. Tough Love or Too Harsh?A Massachusetts case makes a novel challenge to probation: Is it unfair to require an addicted offender to remain drug-free or face prison?
23h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
12
High-sensitivity troponin test reduces risk of future heart attackThe newer high-sensitivity troponin test discovers smaller amounts of heart-specific proteins, troponins, than the older troponin test and thus identifies more myocardial infarction patients than before. A new study now shows that the risk of a future heart attack is lower in patients diagnosed with the new test.
23h
The Atlantic
30
Scaling Buildings With the ‘Russian Spiderman’Filmmaker Geoffrey Feinberg is afraid of heights. So when he first stumbled upon Kirill Oreshkin’s daredevil selfies, “they made me break out in a cold sweat,” Feinberg told The Atlantic . Oreshkin, a self-described urban explorer who has been dubbed the “Russian Spiderman,” frequently scales Moscow’s tallest buildings; at the top, he snaps a photo of himself perilously hanging, one-handed, from
23h
The Atlantic
100+
What We Know About Facebook’s Latest Data ScandalA new report in The New York Times contains a startling fact: Working with a 2013 BlackBerry device, a reporter was recently able to use special access Facebook had granted the phone manufacturer to glean some identifying information about 294,258 people . Facebook said this special access to data existed only for old devices that did not have a native Facebook application . These people were fri
23h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Trauma from parents' youth linked to poorer health, asthma in their own childrenA Drexel University study found that for each type of adverse childhood experience a parent went through, their children had 19 percent higher odds of poorer health.
23h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
3
When it comes to school recess, a quality playground experience mattersPlayground safety, access to play equipment, peer conflict resolution and quality engagement between adults and students are among the factors that contribute to a quality recess experience, new research from Oregon State University shows.
23h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
5
Light exposure during sleep may increase insulin resistanceAccording to preliminary results from a new study, nighttime light exposure during sleep may affect metabolic function. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that light exposure at night during sleep adversely impacts metabolic outcomes.
23h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

I saw that — brain mechanisms create confidence about things seenAt the threshold of what we call consciousness is a brain function that makes you feel confidently aware that you are actually seeing what you see. Psychologists at Georgia Tech have observed mechanisms involved in making it work.
23h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Medicaid expansion produces significant health benefits, study findsThe first peer-reviewed comprehensive analysis of the effects of Medicaid expansion paints a picture of significant improvements in various health outcomes consistent with the original goals of the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare.
23h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Experimental drug restores some bladder function after spinal cord injury, study findsAn experimental drug that blocks abnormal neural communication after spinal cord injury could one day be the key to improving quality of life by improving bladder function, new research suggests.
23h
Feed: All Latest
500+
WWDC 2018: Everything Apple Announced at the June 4 WWDC KeynoteApple's yearly developer keynote was all about software.
23h
BBC News – Science & Environment
2K
Guatemala volcano: Search after deadly eruptionThe most violent eruption to hit the country in more than a century is over for now, say volcanologists.
23h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
12
Checkpoint inhibitor shrinks advanced squamous cell skin cancerClinical trials show that an immune checkpoint inhibitor shrinks the tumors of nearly half of patients with an incurable, advanced form of a common skin cancer, an international team reports.
23h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
15
Precision medicine clinical trial releases new findingsThe largest precision medicine trial of its kind has achieved a milestone with the release of results from several treatment sub-studies of the trial. The new results offer findings of interest for future cancer research that could ultimately play a role in bringing targeted treatments to patients with certain gene abnormalities, regardless of their cancer type.
23h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
15
Does negative political advertising actually work?While many may dread campaign season because of pervasiveness of negative political advertising, a new study has found that negative political advertising actually works, but perhaps not in the way that many may assume.
23h
Big Think
300+
Supreme Court rules in favor of Colorado baker who refused to make cake for gay weddingOn Monday, the Supreme Court set aside the ruling against Jack Phillips, a baker who cited religious beliefs as the reason he refused to bake a cake for a same-sex wedding in 2012. Read More
23h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
30
Alien apocalypse: Can any civilization make it through climate change?Does the universe contain planets with truly sustainable civilizations? Or does every civilization that may have arisen in the cosmos last only a few centuries before it falls to the climate change it triggers? Rochester astrophysicist Adam Frank and his collaborators have developed a mathematical model to illustrate how a technologically advanced population and its planet might develop together,
23h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Engineered cotton uses weed-suppression chemical as nutrientA newly developed fertilizer system will provide nutrition to engineered cotton crops worldwide and a deadly dose to weeds that are increasingly herbicide resistant, according to a Texas A&M AgriLife Research study. The new system applies phosphite to cotton crops engineered to express a certain gene — a gene that makes cotton able to process the phosphite into nutrition while the same compound s
23h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
NASA spots tropical depression 05W approaching China's Hainan IslandIn July of 2016, Tropical Cyclone 05W was approaching Hainan Island, China. Now, two years later in 2018, another storm, also the fifth of the year in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean, Tropical Cyclone 05W is again approaching Hainan Island.
23h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
21
Mexico sets conditions for Bayer-Monsanto mergerMexican competition regulators said Monday they had ordered the German chemicals and pharmaceuticals giant Bayer to sell off its seed and pesticide businesses after a merger with US agriculture heavyweight Monsanto.
23h
Viden
86
Nu giver Apple dig indsigt i dit (overdrevne) iPhone-brugNæste styresystem til iPhone og iPad skal gøre os mindre afhængige og gøre ældre telefoner hurtigere.
23h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
26
Physicists use terahertz flashes to uncover state of matter hidden by superconductivityA research team has developed a new quantum switching scheme that gives them access to new and hidden states of matter. If researchers can learn to control the hidden state, further stabilize it and determine whether it's suitable for quantum logic operations, it could allow researchers to use it for quantum computing and other practical functions.
23h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
12
New cardiac pump device more effective, less costly than standard pumpInvestigators presented evidence that a next-generation cardiac pump device not only improves long-term outcomes but may also decrease cost of care over time for heart failure patients.
23h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
16
New way to estimate magma beneath Yellowstone supervolcanoResearchers have found a new way to estimate how fast magma is recharging beneath the Yellowstone supervolcano. While their findings offer no help in predicting if the volcano will erupt, they can now get a better understanding of a key factor — a pool of basalt magma recharging the system — in how it works.
23h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
23
Most women with early breast cancer do not benefit from chemotherapy, TAILORx trial findsNew findings show no benefit from chemotherapy for 70 percent of women with the most common type of breast cancer. The study found that for women with hormone receptor (HR)-positive, HER2-negative, axillary lymph node­-negative breast cancer, treatment with chemotherapy and hormone therapy after surgery is not more beneficial than treatment with hormone therapy alone.
23h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
59
Ancient Greenland was much warmer than previously thoughtAlthough researchers have long known that the last two interglacial periods experienced warming in the Arctic due to changes in the Earth's orbit, a mix of fly species preserved from these times in a rare lake sediment core shows that Greenland was even warmer than previously thought. This information could help researchers better gauge Greenland's sensitivity to warming, by testing and improving
23h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
8
Try togetherness: Study promotes cooperative weed management to curb herbicide resistanceIn the fight against herbicide resistance, farmers are working with a shrinking toolkit. Waterhemp, a weedy nemesis of corn and soybean farmers, has developed resistance to multiple herbicide modes of action, often in the same plant. Even farmers using the latest recommendations for tank mixtures are fighting an uphill battle, with long-distance movement of pollen and seeds bringing the potential
23h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Training the next generation of One Health professionalsThere are now at least 45 'One Health' programs in the U.S. alone. But very few have established core competencies or consistent standards for how they are applied. Analysis by the UC Davis One Health Institute provides guidance.
1d
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Inflammatory signals in heart muscle cells linked to atrial fibrillationInterfering with inflammatory signals produced by heart muscle cells might someday provide novel therapeutic strategies for atrial fibrillation, according to an international team of researchers.
1d
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Gap in substance abuse data could have long-term implications, study findsA policy of redacting Medicare claims that included diagnosis or procedure codes related to substance abuse was in effect from 2013-2017, just as the Affordable Care Act and the opioid epidemic were drastically changing the healthcare landscape. Researchers from The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice calculated the effects of such a significant data gap on Medicare spendin
1d
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
3
T cells alone are sufficient to establish and maintain HIV infection in the brainA new study by University of North Carolina School of Medicine researchers has found that T cells, a type of white blood cell and an essential part of the immune system, are sufficient by themselves to establish and maintain an HIV infection in the brain.
1d
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

BU: Medicaid expansion increases volume and quality of care in rural areasNew study from Boston University School of Public Health finds that the first two years of Medicaid expansion were associated with increased coverage, better quality care, and more service use at rural community health centers.
1d
Live Science
300+
World's Largest Atom Smasher Could Help Explain Where Mass Comes FromNew results from the world's largest atom smasher could help scientists understand the origins of mass.
1d
Feed: All Latest
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Microsoft’s GitHub Deal Is Its Latest Shift From WindowsGitHub Microsoft NadellaThe deal is the latest in a series of moves by Microsoft to move away from its Windows-first heritage and embrace open-source software.
1d
Feed: All Latest
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The Race to Send Robots to Mine the Ocean FloorAs worldwide development rises for electric vehicle batteries and wind turbines, the demand for metals from the bottom of the sea has spiked.
1d
New on MIT Technology Review
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Apple’s software improvements could make AR as universal as iOSApple AR ARKit iOS
1d
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
100+
Mars Curiosity's labs are back in actionNASA's Curiosity rover is analyzing drilled samples on Mars in one of its onboard labs for the first time in more than a year.
1d
Scientific American Content: Global
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Lava and Ash from Fuego Volcano Kills 33 in GuatemalaThe eruption is the Central American nation’s deadliest since 1902 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1d
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
200+
New approach to immunotherapy leads to complete response in breast cancer patient unresponsive to other treatmentsA novel approach to immunotherapy has led to the complete regression of breast cancer in a patient who was unresponsive to all other treatments.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
32
Collective gravity, not Planet Nine, may explain the orbits of 'detached objects'Bumper car-like interactions at the edges of our solar system — and not a mysterious ninth planet — may explain the dynamics of strange bodies called 'detached objects,' according to a new study.
1d
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
8
ChemMaps lets researchers navigate the chemical universeA new online service — ChemMaps — allows users to interactively navigate the chemical space of over 8,000 drugs and 47,000 environmental compounds in 3D and real time.
1d
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
9
Mixed signals from poisonous mothsPoisonous moths use bright red spots to warn predators to avoid them — but natural variation in these wing markings doesn't provide clear indications of how toxic individual moths might be — new research shows.
1d
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
8
Novel PET imaging noninvasively pinpoints colitis inflammationA novel positron emission tomography (PET) imaging method shows promise for noninvasively pinpointing sites of inflammation in people with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), which includes ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease.
1d
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
7
More frequent screening after prostate cancer treatment not linked to improved survivalA study assessed whether monitoring prostate cancer patients following treatment with a PSA test every three months versus once a year would provide a long-term survival benefit.
1d
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
33
Exercise mitigates genetic effects of obesity later in lifeA new study suggests, for the first time in women over age 70, that working up a sweat can reduce the influence one's genes have on obesity.
1d
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
35
Wireless system can power devices inside the bodyResearchers have developed a new way to power and communicate with devices implanted deep within the human body. Such devices could be used to deliver drugs, monitor conditions inside the body, or treat disease by stimulating the brain with electricity or light.
1d
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
21
Spooky quantum particle pairs fly like weird curveballsSome particles that can be in two places at the same time and are not just particles but also waves, in this case, fermions, appear to move in even weirder ways than previously thought. Theoretical physicists applied extreme computing power for a week to predict the movements of fermions by including quantum optics, or light-like, ideas in their mathematical, theoretical modeling.
1d

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