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Nyheder2018juni06

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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
400+
Transferring quantum information using soundQuantum physics has led to new types of sensors, secure data transmission methods and researchers are working toward computers. However, the main obstacle is finding the right way to couple and precisely control a sufficient number of quantum systems (for example, individual atoms).
8h
Ingeniøren
78
Hormonforstyrrende stof skriver din bon – og erstattes af endnu etBisphenol A (BPA) bruges i termopapir, som er det papir, en bon udskrives på. Det bliver ulovligt i EU i 2020, men dets typiske afløser, bisphenol S (BPS) er også hormonforstyrrende.
15h
Futurity.org
6
Why ‘certainty’ is good for romanceUncertainty about a potential romantic partner’s interest in you may lead you to see the person as less sexually attractive, according to a new study. “People experience higher levels of sexual desire when they feel confident about a partner’s interest and acceptance…” “People may protect themselves from the possibility of a painful rejection by distancing themselves from potentially rejecting pa
2h

LATEST

Science | The Guardian

540m-year-old bug tracks are oldest footprints ever discoveredAncient prints bring scientists closer to understanding what were the first creatures to evolve pairs of legs The oldest known footprints on Earth, left by an ancient creepy-crawly more than 500 million years ago, have been discovered in China. The tracks were left by a primitive ancestor of modern-day insects or worms, according to scientists. Precisely what the creature looked like is a mystery
now
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
9
Scientists create 'genetic atlas' of proteins in human bloodAn international team of researchers has created the first detailed genetic map of human proteins, the key building blocks of biology. These discoveries promise to enhance our understanding of a wide range of diseases and aid development of new drugs.
4min
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
6
Opioid use may affect treatment for alcohol dependenceNew research indicates that opioid misuse and the use of cannabis and other drugs may compromise the effectiveness of treatments for alcohol use disorder.
4min
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
9
Pollution hits the fungi that nourish European treesPollution is changing the fungi that provide mineral nutrients to tree roots, which could explain malnutrition trends in Europe's trees.
4min
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
8
Excess zinc in muscles contributes to wasting syndrome in cancerA new study suggests that an overload of zinc in muscle leads to a debilitating wasting syndrome in cancer patients.
4min
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
10
Single molecular insulator pushes boundaries of current state of the artResearchers have synthesized the first molecule capable of insulating at the nanometer scale more effectively than a vacuum barrier. The team's insight was to exploit the wave nature of electrons. By designing an extremely rigid silicon-based molecule under 1 nm in length that exhibited comprehensive destructive interference signatures, they devised a novel technique for blocking tunnelling conduc
4min
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Options to optimize profit in broadband satellite constellationsSeveral large telecommunications companies have proposed plans to provide global broadband services by launching hundreds and even thousands of satellites into orbit. Although broadband for everyone sounds like a great idea, it also carries great financial risk, resulting in bankruptcy for some who've tried it. Recent research suggests a more cost-effective strategy using regional coverage and sta
4min
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Experts and AI help glioblastoma research and treatment effortsIt takes an 'A' team to make headway against glioblastoma, a highly aggressive type of brain cancer. Glioblastoma is the most common type of malignant brain tumor in adults. In addition to the caliber of the researchers involved, in this case 'A' also stands for atlas.
4min
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Mystery deepens over the cause of Alzheimer'sFor more than 20 years, much of the leading research on Alzheimer's has been guided by the 'amyloid hypothesis.' But with a series of failed clinical trials raising questions about this theory, some researchers are looking for deeper explanations into the causes of the disease and how it can be treated.
4min
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

What doctors wear really does matter, study findsHalf of patients surveyed in the clinics and hospitals of ten major medical centers said that what physicians wear is important to them — and more than one-third said that what a doctor wears influences their satisfaction with their care. The patients also picked their preferred attire for physicians in different settings and specialties.
4min
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
7
Killing bacteria by silencing genes may be alternative to antibioticsA new approach to killing C. difficile that silences key bacterial genes while sparing other bacteria may provide a new way to treat the most common hospital-acquired bacterial infection in the United States, according to researchers.
4min
Live Science
3
Today's Men Carry Traces of Ancient Wars in their GenesModern men's genes suggest that something peculiar happened 5,000 to 7,000 years ago
4min
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Researchers report the earliest fossil footprintsOn July 20, 1969, Neil Armstrong put the first human footprint on the moon. But when did animals leave the first footprint on Earth?
9min
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Late Pleistocene human mandibles from the Niah Caves may hint at ancient dietsThree human mandibles may provide new insight into the diet of Late Pleistocene hunter-gatherers in Borneo, according to a study published June 6, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Darren Curnoe from the University of New South Wales, Australia, and colleagues.
9min
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
New data-mining technique offers most-vivid picture of Martian mineralogyA team of scientists led by Carnegie's Shaunna Morrison and including Bob Hazen have revealed the mineralogy of Mars at an unprecedented scale, which will help them understand the planet's geologic history and habitability. Their findings are published in two American Mineralogist papers.
9min
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Patenting marine genetic resources: Who owns ocean biodiversity?Marine organisms have evolved to thrive in various ocean environments, resulting in unique adaptations that make them the object of commercial interest. Researchers from the Stockholm Resilience Centre and University of British Columbia have identified 862 marine species, with a total of 12,998 genetic sequences associated with a patent. They found that a single transnational corporation (BASF, th
9min
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Study on economics of fishing on the high seasAs much as 54 percent of the high seas fishing industry would be unprofitable at its current scale without large government subsidies, according to a new study by researchers from the National Geographic Society; the University of California, Santa Barbara; Global Fishing Watch; the Sea Around Us project at the University of British Columbia; and the University of Western Australia. The research,
9min
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Sex and social experience affect ultrasonic vocalizations in miceMale mice produce more vocalizations after being with other mice than after being alone, according to a study published June 6, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Kali Burke from University at Buffalo, SUNY, US, and colleagues.
9min
The Atlantic
2
The Confusing Information Colleges Provide Students About Financial AidThe cost of college is one of the main things students consider when deciding whether and where to enroll. So it makes sense that students, once admitted, would rely so much on the letters from colleges that tell them how much the institution can chip in. The problem is: Those letters, called financial-aid award letters, are often confusing and vary wildly from college to college. A new report fr
17min
The Atlantic

Stunning Time-Lapse Footage of Hawaii’s Kīlauea EruptionA volcanic eruption is often not the explosive, flash-flood-of-lava affair that persists in the popular imagination, largely thanks to the notorious event at Mount Vesuvius in 79 AD. Rather, volcanic eruptions can be disasters in slow motion. This is currently the case in Hawaii, where Kīlauea, a shield volcano, is releasing a ponderous lava flow that is wreaking havoc on local communities and ca
17min
Popular Science
14
NASA is learning the best way to grow food in spaceSpace Can gardens help astronauts go farther? Space gardening will be essential someday if space travelers are to go beyond low-Earth orbit or make more than a quick trip to the moon. They can't carry on all the…
18min
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
7
Scientists make normal bees behave like 'killer bees'Africanized honeybees, commonly known as 'killer bees,' are much more aggressive than their European counterparts. Now researchers have examined neuropeptide changes that take place in Africanized honeybees' brains during aggressive behavior. The researchers also showed they could turn gentle bees into angry ones by injecting them with certain peptides.
18min
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
7
Sensor detects whiff of bad breathEver wish you could do a quick "breath check" before an important meeting or a big date? Now researchers have developed a sensor that detects tiny amounts of hydrogen sulfide gas, the compound responsible for bad breath, in human exhalations.
18min
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
8
Inexpensive detector is like 'Velcro®' for cancer cellsResearchers have developed a new type of sensor that acts like Velcro® for prostate cancer cells, sticking them to a modified frosted glass slide, like those used in science classes, so that they can be identified from blood samples. The low-cost method could help doctors better diagnose and monitor the disease.
18min
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
7
New link identified between inflammation and depression in type-1 diabetesDepression in type-1 diabetes patients is associated with higher levels of the inflammatory protein galectin-3, according to new research. These findings suggest that galectin-3 levels may be useful for diagnosis of depression or may be a new target for treating depression associated with type-1 diabetes, which could lead to better patient care.
18min
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
8
New nuclear medicine method shows promise for better detection of neuroendocrine tumorsResearchers have shown that a new nuclear medicine procedure could safely and more effectively detect cancerous gastrointestinal and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors than current methods.
18min
Latest Headlines | Science News
5
Tropical cyclones have slowed over the last 70 yearsTropical cyclones are moving 10 percent slower, on average, than they did in the mid-20th century.
35min
The Atlantic
52
The Astonishing Tale of the Man Mueller Calls ‘Person A’In the early years of the century, as Paul Manafort made his way across Moscow and Kiev, he was followed by a diminutive man. With a generous slackening of the tape, the man measured just above 5 feet. This made for a striking contrast in physical frames, because Manafort and his expansive shoulders crowd a room. It also made the pair an almost slapstick spectacle. But over time, Manafort and the
39min
Scientific American Content: Global
7
Brain Science Ascends an Intellectual Mount Everest……but has yet to reach Base Camp 1 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
41min
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Airlines and passengers save billions through crew planningResearch explains the complex reality of airline crew scheduling and provides an inside look at the techniques used by carriers to avoid delays.
45min
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Stem-cell niche for 10 billion colon cells a dayResearchers at the University of Zurich have discovered the identity of the stem-cell niche of the colon. The niche comprises special cells that activate the stem cells of the adjacent intestinal epithelium and are responsible for its continuous renewal. Without the activation signal, the epithelium perishes. If it's constantly activated, early stages of cancer develop. The discovery helps to impr
45min
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

How plants work on the insideVascular tissue in plants distributes water and nutrients, thereby ensuring constant growth. Each newly developed cell needs to develop into its respective cell type in the vascular tissue. A team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now discovered how these cells know which cell type they should develop into.
45min
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Single molecular insulator pushes boundaries of current state of the artResearchers have synthesized the first molecule capable of insulating at the nanometer scale more effectively than a vacuum barrier. The team's insight was to exploit the wave nature of electrons. By designing an extremely rigid silicon-based molecule under 1 nm in length that exhibited comprehensive destructive interference signatures, they devised a novel technique for blocking tunnelling conduc
45min
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Pollution hits the fungi that nourish European treesPollution is changing the fungi that provide mineral nutrients to tree roots, which could explain malnutrition trends in Europe's trees.
45min
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Scientists create 'genetic atlas' of proteins in human bloodAn international team of researchers led by scientists at the University of Cambridge and MSD has created the first detailed genetic map of human proteins, the key building blocks of biology. These discoveries promise to enhance our understanding of a wide range of diseases and aid development of new drugs.
45min
Science : NPR
33
Hurricanes Are Moving More Slowly, Which Means More DamageHurricanes are moving more slowly than they used to. That means storms are dumping more rain and doing more damage when they make landfall, as Hurricane Harvey did when it lingered over Houston. (Image credit: Katie Hayes Luke for NPR)
45min
Live Science
7
Scott Pruitt Must Do His Job, Federal Judge RulesThe EPA must release evidence for Pruitt's claims that carbon dioxide is not a significant contributor to climate change, a federal court ruled.
48min
BBC News – Science & Environment
24
Pollution hits fungi that nourish trees – studyScientists say pollution could have unpredictable effects on Europe's forests by damaging fungi.
51min
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
5
200 missing as Guatemala volcano threatens new eruptionsExplosions boomed from Guatemala's fearsome Fuego volcano Wednesday, unleashing fresh torrents of molten mud and ash down slopes where officials said 75 people had been killed and 200 were still missing.
57min
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
Unhurried hurricanes: Study says tropical cyclones slowingTropical cyclones around the world are moving slightly slower over land and water, dumping more rain as they stall, just as Hurricane Harvey did last year, a new study found.
57min
New Scientist – News
74
Why are there so many devastating volcanic eruptions right now?High-profile volcanic eruptions in Hawaii and Guatemala are grabbing the headlines, but geophysics isn't responsible for connecting the two disasters
57min
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
11
A common electronic language for magnetic resonanceThe standards used to re-transcribed the collected data in organic chemistry is however specific to each laboratory, making it difficult to export the information electronically. An international team has developed a new common electronic language around two main features: it translates the data of each molecule in exactly the same way and makes it simple to export it from one information system t
1h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
12
Salt Lake's light rail trains are air quality sleuthsThe TRAX project is the only known transit-based mobile air quality network in North America. Some results are unsurprising, such as spikes of carbon dioxide and nitrogen dioxide, byproducts of gasoline combustion, at street intersections. But the sensors also found methane emissions patterns that didn't correlate to daytime working hours, suggesting possible fugitive methane leaks.
1h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
16
As solar wind blows, our heliosphere balloonsWhat happens when the solar wind suddenly starts to blow significantly harder? According to two recent studies, the boundaries of our entire solar system balloon outward — and an analysis of particles rebounding off of its edges will reveal its new shape.
1h
Viden

Ulovlig handel med skildpadder eksplodererPå to år er mere end 10.000 af bare én enkelt art af de mest truede skildpadder blevet beslaglagt fra smuglere i Asien, viser nye tal.
1h
Big Think
3
Canada set to legalize marijuana, provide $6bn annual boost to GDPOn June 7th, the Canadian Senate will vote on Bill C-45. It is expected to pass, making Canada the first of the G7 nations to do legalize marijuana. Read More
1h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Electric test plane crashes in Hungary killing twoAn electric plane powered by Siemens crashed during a test flight in Hungary, killing both pilots on board, the German industrial conglomerate said Wednesday.
1h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
Report: US high-tide flooding twice what it was 30 years agoA new report finds that high-tide flooding is happening across the United States at twice the rate it was just 30 years ago, and predicts records for such flooding will continue to be broken for decades as sea levels rise.
1h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
13
Risk assessment tools may increase incarcerations ratesThe use of risk assessment tools has increased considerably within criminal justice institutions in recent decades, and these tools have been viewed by many as a way to stop or even reverse the United States' heavy reliance on imprisonment. But new research from a Rice University sociologist suggests these tools may actually contribute to expanding the number of people caught up in the criminal ju
1h
Dana Foundation

#WSF18: They’ve Got the PowerIf you’re a science fiction lover who can’t get enough of Mr. Robot and Westworld and worry that robots might one day make us their slaves, the good news is that it’s not likely to happen anytime soon, but technology that falls into the wrong hands needs to be considered. That was the consensus of a discussion on artificial intelligence (AI) last Friday at the World Science Festival at New York U
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Risk assessment tools may increase incarcerations ratesNew research from a Rice University sociologist suggests risk assessment tools may contribute to expanding the number of people caught up in the criminal justice system.
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Recorded calls beat Facebook ads in getting residents to request free smoke alarmA new study from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health found automated phone calls were far more effective than Facebook ads in getting Baltimore City residents to request a smoke alarm through the city's free installation program.
1h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
Study explores options that optimize profit in broadband satellite constellationsSeveral large telecommunications companies have proposed plans to provide global broadband services by launching hundreds and even thousands of satellites into orbit. Although broadband for everyone sounds like a great idea, it also carries great financial risk, resulting in bankruptcy for some who've tried it. Recent research at the University of Illinois suggests a more cost-effective strategy u
1h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
6
Pollution hits the fungi that nourish European treesPollution is changing the fungi that provide mineral nutrients to tree roots, which could explain malnutrition trends in Europe's trees.
1h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
46
Single molecular insulator pushes boundaries of current state of the artEver shrinking transistors are the key to faster and more efficient computer processing. Since the 1970s, advancements in electronics have largely been driven by the steady pace with which these tiny components have grown simultaneously smaller and more powerful—right down to their current dimensions on the nanometer scale. But recent years have seen this progress plateau, as researchers grapple w
1h
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube

Back On Camera | American Chopper#AmericanChopper – All New, Monday @10/9c Paul Sr., Paul Jr., and Mikey discuss what it means to them to be back on TV. Watch live and catch up on DiscoveryGO: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/american-chopper/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Discovery From: Discovery
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
New tools reveal prelude to chaosPicture a herd of sheep or cattle emerging from a shed or barn to graze a field. They head straight out of their digs to the pleasure of the pasture pretty much as one entity, but as the land opens up and the "grass gets greener" they disperse randomly in a motion that has neither rhyme nor reason. Individual animals depart at different angles from the herd and then at different angles from their
1h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
10
New tools reveal prelude to chaosEngineers have developed tools that mathematically describe the kinetics in a system right before it dissolves into randomness.
1h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
8
Restricting unwanted immune reactionsResearchers have decoded a mechanism found at the beginning of almost every inflammatory response. Their study provides a new approach to develop novel treatment options for many inflammatory disorders with many fewer side effects compared to current drugs.
1h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
10
Scientists stunned by decline of birds during epic Southern African roadtripA two year project repeating a famous bird survey by driving over 20,000 km in a 4×4 across Botswana has confirmed researchers' fears: many birds of prey are fast disappearing from one of Africa's last great wilderness areas. Reported sightings of iconic species of eagle and vulture declined by as much as 80% compared with the previous survey, while some migrant species recorded last time have van
1h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
10
World's most efficient production of succinate from carbon dioxideSuccinate is widely used as a raw ingredient for petrochemicals, and there is high demand for a way of producing succinate that is renewable and environmentally benign. A Japanese researcher has discovered that succinate production levels increase when cyanobacteria is grown above the ideal temperature for cell growth. He used insights into the metabolic pathway engineering to achieve the world's
1h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
11
Seeing the light? Study illuminates how quantum magnets mimic lightWhat is light? It sounds like a simple question, but it is one that has occupied some of the best scientific minds for centuries.
1h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
8
Male vervet monkeys use punishment and coercion to de-escalate costly intergroup fightsMale vervet monkeys attack members of their own group to prevent them from escalating intergroup encounters into high-risk fights, or to de-escalate ongoing intergroup fights. In contrast, female monkeys use 'the carrot and the stick' to promote male participation in intergroup fights, anthropologists have shown.
1h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
11
Avoiding catastrophe: Yeast study reveals clues to maintaining genome sizeStudy reveals an unexpected role for a well-known protein machinery in maintaining the correct DNA content with implications for cancer and other diseases.
1h
New on MIT Technology Review
25
AI is helping wildlife biologists identify rare beasts on the Serengeti
1h
cognitive science
1
Overtaxed Working Memory Knocks the Brain out of Syncsubmitted by /u/NaiveSkeptic [link] [comments]
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Organic insect deterrent for agricultureTraditional insecticides are killers: they not only kill pests, they also endanger bees and other beneficial insects, as well as affecting biodiversity in soils, lakes, rivers and seas. A team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now developed an alternative: A biodegradable agent that keeps pests at bay without poisoning them.
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Bioengineers identify safer way to make rugby tacklesVideo analysis, 3-D motion analysis lab trials and model-based image-matching techniques show that tackling the lower trunk of the ball carrier's body — not the upper trunk or upper legs — is safer for head injury prevention.
1h
Big Think
6
Why Microsoft just installed a data center on the seafloor for Project NatickMicrosoft Project NatickMicrosoft is experimenting with underwater data centers that could cut cooling costs and provide faster internet connections to the billions of people who live near oceans. Read More
1h
Science | The Guardian
9
European Space Agency boss warns EU of rival agency risksESA director general argues for more collaboration as EU ramps up investment in own space agency The EU has clashed with the head of the independent European Space Agency (ESA) over the bloc’s plans to take greater control over the continent’s space programmes, in a move that could cut the UK out of key decisions. EU officials have rubbished as “unfounded” claims made by Jan Wörner, the ESA’s dir
1h
Feed: All Latest
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Sonos Beam Soundbar: Price, Details, Release DateSonos Beam AirPlay 2The latest smart speaker from Sonos plays music and works as a soundbar for your TV. It also lets you control your smart home with your voice.
1h
Quanta Magazine
52
Overtaxed Working Memory Knocks the Brain Out of SyncIn 1956, the renowned cognitive psychologist George Miller published one of the field’s most widely cited papers, “ The Magical Number Seven, Plus or Minus Two .” In it, he argued that although the brain can store a whole lifetime of knowledge in its trillions of connections, the number of items that humans can actively hold in their conscious awareness at once is limited, on average, to seven. T
1h
The Atlantic
400+
Gambling Channels Are the Latest Victims Of YouTube's Arbitrary Moderation ProcessDays before he was set to begin a month-long promotional tour for his YouTube channel, Brian Christopher learned that his account had been abruptly terminated. In the two years since Christopher has been running BrianChristopherSlots , he’s produced more than 1,100 vlogs of himself gambling, mostly on slot machines, and racked up 50 million views and 80,000 subscribers. But then, last week, his a
1h
The Atlantic
16
How to Copyedit The AtlanticThis article is edited from a story shared exclusively with members of The Masthead , the membership program from The Atlantic ( find out more ). Atlantic senior copy editor Karen Ostergren walks us through her copyediting routine, and shares why copyediting is essential to our journalism. There’s a moment in the recent film The Post when the reporters finish writing their first story about the P
1h
Science | The Guardian
10
Sanne de Wilde's best photograph: the island of the colour blind‘It’s the most colour-blind place on Earth. I had to take four flights to get there. I wanted to celebrate their unique way of seeing the world’ I shot this image of Deke, one of the smaller islands of the Pingelap atoll, in the Federated States of Micronesia , in 2015. I had travelled to the atoll to research achromatopsia, a rare genetic condition that causes complete colour blindness and hyper
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

International 'A' team debuts brain cancer atlasIt takes an 'A' team to make headway against glioblastoma, a highly aggressive type of brain cancer. Glioblastoma is the most common type of malignant brain tumor in adults. In addition to the caliber of the researchers involved, in this case 'A' also stands for atlas. A key member of the team, Jill S. Barnholtz-Sloan, PhD, and approximately 80 other internationally renowned neurologists, bioinfor
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Study explores options that optimize profit in broadband satellite constellationsSeveral large telecommunications companies have proposed plans to provide global broadband services by launching hundreds and even thousands of satellites into orbit. Although broadband for everyone sounds like a great idea, it also carries great financial risk, resulting in bankruptcy for some who've tried it. Recent research at the University of Illinois suggests a more cost-effective strategy u
1h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Twitter to be added to S&P 500 index, shares jump on newsSocial media platform Twitter will be added to the S&P 500 stock index before the start of trading Thursday, a move that will expand the number of individual investors who own the stock through index funds that track the large-company stock gauge.
1h
Scientific American Content: Global
4
A Wyoming Reservation Shows the New Face of DroughtA climate-driven warping of the water cycle is forcing a re-think of water management practices — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Tech behemoths Facebook, Google planning big Chicago office expansionsFacebook and Google are mapping big expansions in Chicago, where real estate searches by two of the nation's other technology giants have been the center of attention.
1h
BBC News – Science & Environment
36
Has US physics lab found a new particle?Results from the MiniBooNE physics experiment suggest a particle known as the sterile neutrino might have been found.
1h
Live Science
39
This Toxic Toad Could End Up Killing the Predators on MadagascarThe Asian common toad toxic threat to native species in Madagascar.
2h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
9
Female bats judge a singer by his songFemale lesser short-tailed bats can size up a potential mate just from his singing. A new study shows that the New Zealand bat species Mystacina tuberculata relies on singing as a primary method of courtship, and the complex signals given out by males allow females to assess the physiological suitability of a mate.
2h
New on MIT Technology Review
30
Drones are flying over whales and collecting their snot
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
It's not all rainbows for Chicago's $1 billion tech 'unicorns'The office space in the old Montgomery Ward catalog warehouse where cancer-fighting data startup Tempus set up shop almost three years ago couldn't contain the company's growth.
2h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New tools reveal prelude to chaosEngineers at Washington University in St. Louis have developed tools that mathematically describe the kinetics in a system right before it dissolves into randomness.
2h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Montmorency tart cherry juice lowered blood pressure and LDL cholesterol in older adultsMontmorency tart cherry juice helped lower blood pressure and LDL 'bad' cholesterol in older adults.
2h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Qualcomm aims to spark virtual reality market with its first standalone AR/VR chipVR HTC Vive D&B The VoidQualcomm is rolling out a dedicated chip targeting virtual reality/augmented reality headsets in hopes of driving the nascent market into the mainstream.
2h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Amazon's TV deal with Jordan Peele among the highest-profile to date for streaming serviceWhen it comes to enticing A-list production talent to the world of streaming television, Amazon Studios is showing that two can play this game.
2h
The Atlantic
1
The Atlantic to Examine Baltimore’s Health Disparities and Efforts to Advance Equity at Forum on June 13Washington, D.C. (June 6, 2018)– Across America, African Americans have a lower life expectancy than whites. In Baltimore, this gap can reach 20 years. Race and poverty drive persistent health inequities, and the impact on entire communities can be devastating. What is the cause of such severe disparities in Baltimore and other cities around the country, and how can they be alleviated? On Wednes
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The Atlantic
200+
The Democrats Barely Pull It Off in CaliforniaCalifornia’s unusual election system probably won’t determine which party controls the House of Representatives next year after all. Democrats on Tuesday night seemed poised to advance to the general election in every competitive House battleground in the state, easing fears that a glut of candidates would lock the party out of crucial pickup opportunities in its quest for the majority. Republica
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The Atlantic
16
Trump Is Choosing Eastern EuropeOver the past week, the recently appointed U.S. ambassador to Germany, Ric Grenell, has been in the news for all the wrong reasons. On June 3, Breitbart published an interview with Grenell, in which he said: “There are a lot of conservatives throughout Europe who have contacted me to say they are feeling there is a resurgence going on. I absolutely want to empower other conservatives throughout E
2h
BBC News – Science & Environment
200+
Spanish astronaut Pedro Duque joins government as science ministerHe will join a cabinet appointed by the new PM where at least half of the ministers will be women.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Mangos help promote gut healthEating mangos found to be more effective in relieving constipation and reducing intestinal inflammation than comparable amount of fiber.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Clear predictors of changing insulin requirements & A1C in youth with type 1 diabetes20-year longitudinal study conducted by researchers from Joslin Diabetes Center and Harvard Medical School identifies clear predictors of rising A1C levels in young persons, as well as ways to improve glycemic control in this population.
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Feed: All Latest
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Apple's Plans to Bring Artificial Intelligence to Your PhoneNew tools for developers make it easier to integrate machine learning into apps; it's like training wheels for AI.
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The Scientist RSS

After Relocation, an Endangered Species Stops Avoiding Predator ScentsResearchers find that conserving marsupials on a predator-free island dampens their avoidance behaviors, which could mean trouble for their reintroduction to mainland Australia.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
11
The heat is back on high: May smashes US temperature recordsRecord heat returned to the United States with a vengeance in May.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
7
Salt Lake's light rail trains are air quality sleuthsFor nearly 20 years, TRAX light rail trains have shuttled riders up and down the Salt Lake Valley, saving countless car trips and sparing Salt Lake's air tons upon tons of petroleum-powered pollutants.
2h
The Atlantic
87
Remembering Clarence Fountain, a Gospel LegendThe singers are dressed in sharp matching suits and dark sunglasses, facing an audience of several hundred. Standing at the center of the stage, lead singer Clarence Fountain holds a microphone with one hand and rests his other hand on his hip, as he begins to speak to the audience. “I didn’t come here looking for Jesus,” he says, while the other singers moan in harmony behind him. “I brought Him
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Inexpensive detector is like 'Velcro' for cancer cellsResearchers have developed a new type of sensor that acts like Velcro for prostate cancer cells, sticking them to a modified frosted glass slide, like those used in science classes, so that they can be identified from blood samples. The low-cost method, reported in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces, could help doctors better diagnose and monitor the disease.
2h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Sensor detects whiff of bad breathEver wish you could do a quick "breath check" before an important meeting or a big date? Now researchers, reporting in ACS' journal Analytical Chemistry, have developed a sensor that detects tiny amounts of hydrogen sulfide gas, the compound responsible for bad breath, in human exhalations.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
6
As solar wind blows, our heliosphere balloonsWhat happens when the solar wind suddenly starts to blow significantly harder? According to two recent studies, the boundaries of our entire solar system balloon outward—and an analysis of particles rebounding off of its edges will reveal its new shape.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
As solar wind blows, our heliosphere balloonsWhat happens when the solar wind suddenly starts to blow significantly harder? According to two recent studies, the boundaries of our entire solar system balloon outward — and an analysis of particles rebounding off of its edges will reveal its new shape.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Salt Lake's light rail trains are air quality sleuthsThe TRAX project is the only known transit-based mobile air quality network in North America. Some results are unsurprising, such as spikes of carbon dioxide and nitrogen dioxide, byproducts of gasoline combustion, at street intersections. But the sensors also found methane emissions patterns that didn't correlate to daytime working hours, suggesting possible fugitive methane leaks.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Camouflaged plants use the same tricks as animalsPlants use many of the same methods as animals to camouflage themselves, a new study shows.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
A better way to trace neuronal pathwaysResearchers have improved an important technology used to map neural circuits in the brain. The method, next-generation retrograde viral tracing, can be used in all cell types to relate the connectivity of specific types of neurons to the functions they perform.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

How the brain performs flexible computationsMIT neuroscientists have found that by analyzing neural activity using a mathematical concept known as a dynamical system, they can accurately model how the brain performs tasks that require flexible timing.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Link found between neurotransmitter imbalance, brain connectivity in those with autismResearchers from the University of Missouri School of Medicine and MU Thompson Center for Autism and Neurodevelopmental Disorders identified a link between a neurotransmitter imbalance and brain connectivity between regions of the brain that play a role in social communication and language. The study found two tests that could lead to more precise medical treatments.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Excess zinc in muscles contributes to wasting syndrome in cancerA new study from Columbia University suggests that an overload of zinc in muscle leads to a debilitating wasting syndrome in cancer patients.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Human drug addiction behaviors tied to specific impairments in 6 brain networksSystematic review of task-related neuroimaging studies found addicted individuals demonstrate increased activity in these networks during drug-related processing but decreases across all other functions.
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Popular Science
13
The weirdest things we learned this week: underwater horse videos, the call of the void, and an ill-fated, icy balloon tripScience Our editors scrounged up some truly bizarre facts. What’s the weirdest thing you learned this week? Well, whatever it is, we promise you’ll have an even weirder answer if you listen to PopSci’s newest podcast.
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Futurity.org
2
How breast cancer hijacks immune cells to weaken our defenseResearchers have discovered that tumor cells reprogram metabolic pathways to gain control over a type of immune cell that allows cancer growth. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells live in the tumor microenvironment and work to block cancer immunity. They also encourage a stem cell-like growth that’s linked to more aggressive cancer. Patients with a lot of these suppressor cells typically have worse
2h
New on MIT Technology Review
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Economies can’t ignore human needs if they want to benefit from automationMIT professor Daron Acemoglu: “We are not heading to an economy without human labor anytime soon.”
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Ingeniøren

TI: Virksomheders frygt for datalæk hæmmer innovationAngsten for, at data havner i hænderne på en konkurrent, er årsagen til, at mange produktionsvirksomheder holder dem tæt til kroppen. Det gør det svært for leverandører af digitaliseringsløsninger at optimere deres produkter, påpeger Teknologisk Institut.
3h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
13
Neighborhoods can help buffer impacts from childhood povertyIn one of the first studies to examine the effect of both socioeconomic status and neighborhoods on children's health, researchers found that living in higher opportunity neighborhoods may protect children from some of the negative health impacts associated with growing up poor.
3h
TED Talks Daily (SD video)
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How technology can fight extremism and online harassment | Yasmin GreenCan technology make people safer from threats like violent extremism, censorship and persecution? In this illuminating talk, technologist Yasmin Green details programs she's piloted at Jigsaw (a unit within Google's Alphabet Inc.) to counter radicalization and online harassment — including a project that gives commenters real-time feedback about how their words might land, which has already incre
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Viden

Hvor mange bliver egentlig dræbt af vulkaner?Vulkaner dræber langt færre mennesker end jordskælv. Her er 3 ting, du skal vide om vulkanudbrud.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

A common electronic language for magnetic resonanceThe standards used to re-transcribed the collected data in organic chemistry is however specific to each laboratory, making it difficult to export the information electronically. An international team headed by chemists from UNIGE has developed a new common electronic language around two main features: it translates the data of each molecule in exactly the same way and makes it simple to export it
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New nuclear medicine method shows promise for better detection of neuroendocrine tumorsResearchers have shown that a new nuclear medicine procedure could safely and more effectively detect cancerous gastrointestinal and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors than current methods. The study is featured in the June issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine.
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Sensor detects whiff of bad breathEver wish you could do a quick "breath check" before an important meeting or a big date? Now researchers, reporting in ACS' journal Analytical Chemistry, have developed a sensor that detects tiny amounts of hydrogen sulfide gas, the compound responsible for bad breath, in human exhalations.
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Inexpensive detector is like 'Velcro®' for cancer cellsResearchers have developed a new type of sensor that acts like Velcro® for prostate cancer cells, sticking them to a modified frosted glass slide, like those used in science classes, so that they can be identified from blood samples. The low-cost method, reported in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces, could help doctors better diagnose and monitor the disease.
3h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
30
Camouflaged plants use the same tricks as animalsPlants use many of the same methods as animals to camouflage themselves, a new study shows.
3h
Scientific American Content: Global
5
Cores from Coral Reefs Hold Secrets of the Seas' Past and FutureCoral skeletons have recorded changes in the ocean environment over thousands of years — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
3h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
18
Nutrient pollution makes ocean acidification worse for coral reefsA new study showed that local impacts of humans — nutrient pollution from activities on land — may accelerate the negative impacts of global ocean acidification on coral reefs.
3h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
15
Large-scale and sustainable 3D printing with the most ubiquitous natural materialResearchers have recently demonstrated the use of cellulose to sustainably manufacture/fabricate large 3D objects. Their approach diverges from the common association of cellulose with green plants and is inspired by the wall of the fungus-like oomycetes, which is reproduced introducing small amounts of chitin between cellulose fibers. The resulting fungal-like adhesive material(s) (FLAM) are stro
3h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Facebook deals with Chinese firm draw ire from US lawmakersFacebook Huawei ChineseFacebook drew fresh criticism from US lawmakers following revelations that it allowed Chinese smartphone makers, including one deemed a national security threat, access to user data.
3h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
8
NASA observes the formation of Tropical Storm AlettaNASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite saw the Eastern Pacific Ocean's first tropical storm coming together.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
100+
New Horizons wakes for historic Kuiper Belt flybyNASA's New Horizons spacecraft is back "awake" and being prepared for the farthest planetary encounter in history – a New Year's Day 2019 flyby of the Kuiper Belt object nicknamed Ultima Thule.
3h
Dagens Medicin

Lægeformanden glider udenomLægeforeningen er i en slags etisk dvaletilstand, og Andreas Rudkjøbing forholder sig ikke til min kritik – hans svar er toldfrie og ministeragtige. Jeg ønsker at debattere, om vi skal øge de etiske krav til os selv, og det vil være en fornøjelse, om foreningen for en gangs skyld ikke bare er reaktiv.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Facebook announces first original news shows, with partnersFacebook on Wednesday announced its first original news shows for the social network, joining other online platforms producing video to compete with television.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
8
Rising seas, raising questions in low-lying Boston districtIn this old city's booming Seaport District, General Electric is building its new world headquarters, Amazon is bringing in thousands of new workers, and Reebok's red delta symbol sits atop the new office it opened last year. Three businesses are testing self-driving cars, other dynamic companies are planting their flag, and restaurants and apartments have gone up virtually overnight.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
10
Inside the brains of killer beesAfricanized honeybees, commonly known as "killer bees," are much more aggressive than their European counterparts. Now researchers have examined neuropeptide changes that take place in Africanized honeybees' brains during aggressive behavior. The researchers, who report their results in the Journal of Proteome Research, also showed they could turn gentle bees into angry ones by injecting them with
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Killing bacteria by silencing genes may be alternative to antibioticsA new approach to killing C. difficile that silences key bacterial genes while sparing other bacteria may provide a new way to treat the most common hospital-acquired bacterial infection in the United States, according to researchers.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

What doctors wear really does matter, study findsHalf of patients surveyed in the clinics and hospitals of ten major medical centers said that what physicians wear is important to them — and more than one-third said that what a doctor wears influences their satisfaction with their care. The patients also picked their preferred attire for physicians in different settings and specialties.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
New link identified between inflammation and depression in type-1 diabetesDepression in type-1 diabetes patients is associated with higher levels of the inflammatory protein galectin-3, according to research published in Endocrine Connections. These findings suggest that galectin-3 levels may be useful for diagnosis of depression or may be a new target for treating depression associated with type-1 diabetes, which could lead to better patient care.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Inside the brains of killer beesAfricanized honeybees, commonly known as 'killer bees,' are much more aggressive than their European counterparts. Now researchers have examined neuropeptide changes that take place in Africanized honeybees' brains during aggressive behavior. The researchers, who report their results in the Journal of Proteome Research, also showed they could turn gentle bees into angry ones by injecting them with
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

NASA observes the formation of Tropical Storm AlettaNASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite saw the Eastern Pacific Ocean's first tropical storm coming together.
3h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
25
A typical communication pattern of people with Alzheimer's diseaseDementia, in any form, is a heartbreaking disease that can take away one's thinking and judgement abilities before they pass. To save face, people with dementia often pretend to know answers to questions, even if they really don't. This often hides the severity of the disease and exasperates the fears and frustrations of the people who care for them. The act of pretending to know answers to keep u
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
12
How pathogens affect bird migrationWhether long-distance animal migration facilitates or hampers pathogen transmission depends on how infections affect the routes and timing of migrating hosts.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
18
Psychedelic drug use associated with reduced partner violence in menResearchers have discovered that men who have used psychedelic drugs in the past have a lower likelihood of engaging in violence against their intimate partners.
3h
Inside Science
7
New 2018 World Cup Ball Passes Wind Tunnel TestsNew 2018 World Cup Ball Passes Wind Tunnel Tests Aerodynamic experts suggest that Adidas' Telstar 18 should fly true and be less controversial than balls from past tournaments. Telstar18.jpg Image credits: Adidas Sports Wednesday, June 6, 2018 – 10:30 Marcus Woo, Contributor (Inside Science) — Soccer fans around the world are gearing up for the 2018 FIFA World Cup, which is set to kick off in Ru
3h
Futurity.org
2
Swimming in schools gives fish an energy boostSwimming in schools give fish an energetic advantage, a new study shows. Scientists developed a highly detailed simulation of the complex interplay between swimming fish and their flow environment. Previous research had only studied fish schooling with very simplified models that didn’t account accurately for fluid dynamics, researchers say. Using the supercomputer “Piz Daint” at the Swiss Nation
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Live Science
18
Why Cosmonauts Pee on the Bus That Picks Them Up for LaunchesEvery time that space crews launch from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan, they literally follow in the footsteps of the first human in space – Yuri Gagarin.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
First tropical storm of east Pacific hurricane season forms off MexicoThe first named tropical storm of the east Pacific hurricane season formed Wednesday off the coast of Mexico, but posed no immediate threat to coastal communities, meteorologists said.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
14
NASA sees strong storms in Tropical Depression 05W as it strengthenedTropical Depression 05W briefly reached tropical storm status overnight on June 5 into June 6, and then weakened back to a depression at 5 a.m. EDT (0900 UTC). Once 05W reached tropical storm status it was named "Ewiniar." NASA's Aqua satellite captured infrared imagery that provided clues that the storm would strengthen.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
NASA sees strong storms in Tropical Depression 05W as it strengthenedTropical Depression 05W briefly reached tropical storm status overnight on June 5 into June 6, and then weakened back to a depression at 5 a.m. EDT (0900 UTC). Once 05W reached tropical storm status it was named 'Ewiniar.' NASA's Aqua satellite captured infrared imagery that provided clues that the storm would strengthen.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

As mystery deepens over the cause of Alzheimer's, a UB lab seeks new answersFor more than 20 years, much of the leading research on Alzheimer's has been guided by the 'amyloid hypothesis.' But with a series of failed clinical trials raising questions about this theory, some researchers are looking for deeper explanations into the causes of the disease and how it can be treated. University at Buffalo biologist Shermali Gunawardena is among these investigators.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Majority of Americans believe it is essential that the US remain a global leader in spaceRoughly seven in 10 Americans (72 percent) say it is essential for the US to continue to be a world leader in space exploration. Strong public support is widely shared across gender, generational, educational and political groups.
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Science : NPR
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In Thailand, 17 Pounds Of Plastic Kills Whale, Highlighting Ocean PollutionLast week, dozens of plastic bags were pulled from the stomach of a whale that researchers found washed ashore in Thailand. (Image credit: Thailand's Department of Marine and Coastal Resources/Social Media/via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS)
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
6
Majority of Americans believe it is essential that the US remain a global leader in spaceSixty years after the founding of NASA, most Americans say the U.S. should be at the forefront of global leadership in space exploration and believe that—even as private space companies emerge as increasingly important players—NASA's role is still vital for U.S. space exploration.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
9
Microsoft sinks data centre off Scottish archipelagoMicrosoft Project NatickUS tech giant Microsoft has submerged a data centre off the Orkney archipelago in northern Scotland in a project to save on the energy used to cool the servers on land, the firm said Wednesday.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
5
Scientists stunned by decline of birds during epic Southern African roadtripA two year project to repeat a famous bird survey by driving over 20, 000km in a 4×4 across Botswana has confirmed researchers' fears: many birds of prey are fast disappearing from one of Africa's last great wilderness areas.
3h
Ingeniøren
18
Politikere dropper Femern-høring med kritiske fagfolkFolketingets transportudvalg havde inviteret kritiske røster til høring om Femern-forbindelsen for at 'undgå myter' om beslutningsgrundlaget. Men nu har et flertal i udvalget fortrudt. I stedet inviterer transportministeren til en lukket gennemgang af projektet.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Study examines how pathogens affect bird migrationWhether long-distance animal migration facilitates or hampers pathogen transmission depends on how infections affect the routes and timing of migrating hosts. In a Journal of Zoology study, investigators have found that haemosporidians—blood parasites commonly infecting birds—likely impede migratory performance, as infected individuals lag behind those who are uninfected.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Disaster recovery requires rebuilding livelihoodsThe short-term losses people suffer when natural disasters strike can turn into long-term poverty if reconstruction policies don't consider how people are going to make a living.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Who should be on the $10 and $20 bills? How race, gender, and politics shape public opinionRace, gender, political affiliation, and the prejudices and biases associated with them (racism, sexism, and political ideology) seem to be at the forefront of citizen's minds when it comes to preferences for US currency—specifically, who should be on the $10 and $20 bills. The findings come from research published in the Journal of Applied Social Psychology.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Microplastics may heat marine turtle nests and produce more femalesHave you ever considered that small pieces of plastic less than 5 millimeters long, or smaller than a pencil eraser head, called microplastics, can affect large marine vertebrates like sea turtles?
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Female bats judge a singer by his songFemale lesser short-tailed bats can size up a potential mate just from his singing. A new study in Springer's journal Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology shows that the New Zealand bat species Mystacina tuberculata relies on singing as a primary method of courtship, and the complex signals given out by males allow females to assess the physiological suitability of a mate. The research was conducte
4h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
42
Seeing the light? Study illuminates how quantum magnets mimic lightWhat is light? It sounds like a simple question, but it is one that has occupied some of the best scientific minds for centuries.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Medical departments of Kazan University work on treatments for hereditary pathologiesNewest results were showcased at the International Myology School in Moscow on May 16th – 19th, 2018. KFU was represented by Junior Research Associate Mikhail Mavlikeev. In particular, he spoke about an expedition to the Republic of Dagestan, a multiethnic region in Southern Russia, conducted by a combined team of researchers from Kazan, Ryazan, Moscow, and Saint-Petersburg.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

World's most efficient production of succinate from carbon dioxideSuccinate is widely used as a raw ingredient for petrochemicals, and there is high demand for a way of producing succinate that is renewable and environmentally benign. A Japanese researcher has discovered that succinate production levels increase when cyanobacteria is grown above the ideal temperature for cell growth. He used insights into the metabolic pathway engineering to achieve the world's
4h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Scientists stunned by decline of birds during epic Southern African roadtripA two year project repeating a famous bird survey by driving over 20, 000km in a 4×4 across Botswana has confirmed researchers' fears: many birds of prey are fast disappearing from one of Africa's last great wilderness areas. Reported sightings of iconic species of eagle and vulture declined by as much as 80% compared with the previous survey, while some migrant species recorded last time have van
4h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Male vervet monkeys use punishment and coercion to de-escalate costly intergroup fightsMale vervet monkeys attack members of their own group to prevent them from escalating intergroup encounters into high-risk fights, or to de-escalate ongoing intergroup fights. In contrast, female monkeys use 'the carrot and the stick' to promote male participation in intergroup fights, anthropologists at the University of Zurich and University of Neuchatel have shown.
4h
Scientific American Content: Global
11
Solar Farms Produce Power–and FoodSome crops grow better under raised solar panels than they do in full sun — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Not letting the neighbours ruin the moodNew research into the reproductive behaviour of one of New Zealand's most mysterious and unusual insects – the cave weta – shows that the male weta's distinctively-elongated hind legs play a vital role in ensuring mating success.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
7
Why won't scientific evidence change the minds of Loch Ness monster true believers?You may have noticed a curious recent announcement: An international research team plans to use state-of-the-art DNA testing to establish once and for all whether the Loch Ness monster exists.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Sites want your (anonymized) social media dataSocial media sites' responses to the Facebook-Cambridge Analytica scandal and new European privacy regulations have given users much more control over who can access their data, and for what purposes. To me, as a social media user, these are positive developments: It's scary to think what these platforms could do with the troves of data available about me. But as a researcher, increased restrictio
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
The threats behind the plight of the puffinPuffins are facing a perilous future. Population numbers have fallen sharply, and there are even fears the sea bird could be heading towards extinction within the next 100 years.
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The Atlantic
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How Bad Is Facebook’s New China Problem?Another shoe dropped in the New York Times investigation of Facebook’s deals with phone makers across the world: A Chinese connection emerged, touching the data scandal to the politically electric topic of the United States’ biggest economic rival. Beginning in 2007 , Facebook cut deals with 60 phone manufacturers to put versions of the service onto their devices, and among those companies were f
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Restricting unwanted immune reactionsMünster researchers at the Cells-in-Motion Cluster of Excellence have decoded a mechanism found at the beginning of almost every inflammatory response. Their study provides a new approach to develop novel treatment options for many inflammatory disorders with many fewer side effects compared to current drugs.
4h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Who should be on the $10 and $20 bills? How race, gender, and politics shape public opinionRace, gender, political affiliation, and the prejudices and biases associated with them (racism, sexism, and political ideology) seem to be at the forefront of citizen's minds when it comes to preferences for US currency — specifically, who should be on the $10 and $20 bills.
4h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Double-layered porous nanotubes with spatially separated photoredox surfacesSolar energy conversion of water into H2 through photocatalysis is envisaged to be an attractive approach for developing clear energy. However, the separation efficiency of charge carriers is the key to improve the photocatalytic hydrogen production efficiency. A recent study proposed that the double-layered porous nanotubes with spatially separated photoredox surfaces were synthesized by self-tem
4h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
A new method for solving a series of global optimization problems developedTo create highly effective technical systems and technological processes, in addition to the use of new principles, new materials, new physical effects and other new solutions that determine the overall structure of the object being created, one has to choose the best combination of this object's parameters (geometric dimensions, electrical characteristics, etc.), since any changes in the paramete
4h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Study examines how pathogens affect bird migrationWhether long-distance animal migration facilitates or hampers pathogen transmission depends on how infections affect the routes and timing of migrating hosts.
4h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Female bats judge a singer by his songFemale lesser short-tailed bats can size up a potential mate just from his singing. A new study in Springer's journal Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology shows that the New Zealand bat species Mystacina tuberculata relies on singing as a primary method of courtship, and the complex signals given out by males allow females to assess the physiological suitability of a mate. The research was conducte
4h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Seeing the light? — Study illuminates how quantum magnets mimic lightA magnetic crystal that behaves like quantum light validates the theory.
4h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
7
Male vervet monkeys use punishment and coercion to de-escalate costly intergroup fightsMale vervet monkeys attack members of their own group to prevent them from escalating intergroup encounters into high-risk fights, or to de-escalate ongoing intergroup fights. In contrast, female monkeys use "the carrot and the stick" to promote male participation in intergroup fights, anthropologists at the University of Zurich and University of Neuchâtel have shown.
4h
Ingeniøren
2
Facebook: Virtual reality er på vej – men det er stadig eksperimenteltVirtual reality-teknologien har endnu ikke for alvor fået sit gennembrud, selv om det er forudset flere gange. Hos Facebook tror man dog stadig på konceptet.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
12
Can we drink rain? Researchers take a lookUntil fairly recently, it was illegal to harvest rainwater in Colorado. Now, as in a number of other Western states, it's seen as alternative water source in an increasingly dry landscape. But is rainwater safe?
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
A summer of learning, deep in Costa RicaGazing across the Convento River in southern Costa Rica, Taite Nazifi envisions a software solution for conservationists who examine the water rushing below. He snaps photos, observes wildlife and considers fields of data that might be useful to collect.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Three steps toward safer and sounder softwareHow confident are you that your software will perform the way it is meant to in the moment of truth? How sure are you that a system going down somewhere else in your industry won't take yours out, too, or vice versa?
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Feed: All Latest
61
Motorola Moto Z3 Play: Price, Specs, Release Date, ModsMotorola's modular dreams are alive and well with the latest Z series phone.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
9
For disappearing Bicknell's thrushes, statistical models are lifesaversBicknell's thrush has been identified as a globally vulnerable Nearctic-Neotropical migratory bird in need of serious conservation efforts. Males and females use different habitats in winter, with females preferring middle elevation forests that are more vulnerable to human disturbance than the higher, more remote forests used by males. A new study identifies key habitat for females in the remaini
4h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
16
For flickers, looks can be deceivingDespite the obvious visual differences between the Red-shafted Flicker of the west and the Yellow-shafted Flicker of the east, scientists have never before found genetic differences between them. A new study uses data from thousands of regions across the genome to distinguish these birds molecularly for the first time.
4h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
10
What would help or hinder patient participation in mitochondrial disease clinical trials?As clinical trials gear up with the aim of attaining the first FDA-approved treatments for mitochondrial disease, a new study reports for the first time what patients and families say would motivate them for or against participating in such research trials.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
10
Disaster recovery requires rebuilding livelihoodsThe short-term losses people suffer when natural disasters strike can turn into long-term poverty if reconstruction policies don't consider how people are going to make a living.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
9
Flexible solar cells: Will they someday power your devices?Researchers are looking at the challenges of mass producing and commercializing the now-experimental technology.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
10
Increased electrical activity in eye may relieve short-term dry eye painA boost of electrical activity in the eye's mucous membranes may lead to new treatments for the painful condition known as dry eye.
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Big Think
5
Is excess belly fat caused by your genes or your diet?Researchers have put to bed an important question: is our genetic makeup responsible for an overabundance of abdominal fat, or is our diet the most significant factor? Read More
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
52
Imaging renders decayed texts visible once moreIn the Harry Potter series, a tap of the wand and a whispered incantation transforms a blank roll of parchment into detailed map of Hogwarts castle.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
18
Artificial intelligence—a game changer for climate change and the environmentAs the planet continues to warm, climate change impacts are worsening. In 2016, there were 772 weather and disaster events, triple the number that occurred in 1980. Twenty percent of species currently face extinction, and that number could rise to 50 percent by 2100. And even if all countries keep their Paris climate pledges, by 2100, it's likely that average global temperatures will be 3˚C higher
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Software tool can show when a city's wastewater treatment will failUrban populations and mega-cities are on the rise and so is the amount of wastewater pouring into treatment facilities that cannot adequately handle the load.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

A typical communication pattern of people with Alzheimer's diseaseA research group from Kumamoto University, Japan has performed the first statistical analysis of "saving appearance responses/attitudes" (SARs) in people with dementia. They found SARs are especially common among those with Alzheimer's disease.
4h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

What would help or hinder patient participation in mitochondrial disease clinical trials?As clinical trials gear up with the aim of attaining the first FDA-approved treatments for mitochondrial disease, a new study reports for the first time what patients and families say would motivate them for or against participating in such research trials.
4h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Avoiding catastrophe: Yeast study reveals clues to maintaining genome sizeStudy reveals an unexpected role for a well-known protein machinery in maintaining the correct DNA content with implications for cancer and other diseases.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

For disappearing Bicknell's thrushes, statistical models are lifesaversBicknell's thrush has been identified as a globally vulnerable Nearctic-Neotropical migratory bird in need of serious conservation efforts. Males and females use different habitats in winter, with females preferring middle elevation forests that are more vulnerable to human disturbance than the higher, more remote forests used by males. A new study from The Condor: Ornithological Applications iden
4h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

For flickers, looks can be deceivingDespite the obvious visual differences between the Red-shafted Flicker of the west and the Yellow-shafted Flicker of the east, scientists have never before found genetic differences between them. A new study from The Auk: Ornithological Advances uses data from thousands of regions across the genome to distinguish these birds molecularly for the first time.
4h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Large-scale and sustainable 3D printing with the most ubiquitous natural materialSUTD researchers have recently demonstrated the use of cellulose to sustainably manufacture/fabricate large 3D objects. Their approach diverges from the common association of cellulose with green plants and is inspired by the wall of the fungus-like oomycetes, which is reproduced introducing small amounts of chitin between cellulose fibers. The resulting fungal-like adhesive material(s) (FLAM) are
4h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
14
Genetic study offers highest resolution yet of rat populations in the New WorldA team of researchers from the U.S., Canada and Brazil has done a genetic analysis of rats from four major cities in the New World. In their paper published in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the group describes their study and what they found.
4h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
World's most efficient production of succinate from carbon dioxideSuccinate is widely used as a raw ingredient for petrochemicals, and there is high demand for a way of producing succinate that is renewable and environmentally benign. A Japanese researcher has discovered that succinate production levels increase when cyanobacteria is grown above the ideal temperature for cell growth. He used insights into the metabolic pathway engineering to achieve the world's
4h
Dagens Medicin

Aalborg har fundet ledende overlæge til nyt dermatologisk specialeAalborg Universitetshospital har ansat Christian Vestergaard som ledende overlæge til et nyoprettet speciale i dermatologi.
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Dagens Medicin

»Jeg kan sagtens forestille mig læger, som er tiltrukket af det her«Jonathan Falgrens fem år som praksislæge i Sverige har efterladt et indtryk af et dansk system i høj kurs og en generel utilfredshed blandt de svenske praksislæger.
4h
New Scientist – News
49
Apple’s new app is designed to help you use their tech lessA new app called Screen Time will show iPhone and iPad users how many notifications they receive, how often they pick up their device and how much time they spend on different apps
4h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
66
Astronomers observe huge flares on a young brown dwarfUsing Kepler, astronomers have spotted two superflares on a very young brown dwarf known as CFHT-BD-Tau 4. The two superflares turn out to be the strongest flares observed on any brown dwarf so far. The finding is detailed in a paper published May 28 on the arXiv pre-print server.
4h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
56
Scientists study how wood is formed and how that process can help develop materials for the futureWhen plants moved from sea to land they faced a problem they hadn't previously encountered. How, when you are now surrounded by air, do you get water up to your leaves?
4h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
How a genetically modified soybean helped modernize an economyAs Brazil grew richer in the 2000s, its agricultural workers left their farms in droves and headed to work in the rapidly growing industrial sector.
4h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
14
Aromatic herbs lead to better parenting in starlingsFor European starlings, the presence of aromatic herbs in the nest leads to some improved parenting behaviors, according to a new study. Specifically, birds whose nests incorporate herbs along with dried grasses were more likely to attend their nests, exhibited better incubation behavior for their eggs, and became active earlier in the day.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
28
You talking to me? Scientists try to unravel the mystery of 'animal conversations'An international team of academics undertook a large-scale review of research into turn-taking behavior in animal communication, analyzing hundreds of animal studies.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
24
Study examines sickness absence from work among abstainers, low-risk drinkers and at-risk drinkersIn a recent study, people who reported not drinking any alcohol over several years were absent from work due to illness more often than low-risk drinkers.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
11
Do arthritis treatments provide mental health benefits?Drugs used to treat rheumatoid arthritis may impact mental health by improving pain and stiffness and by targeting inflammatory processes common to arthritis and depression; however, a recent review demonstrates that relying on rheumatoid arthritis therapies alone may not meaningfully improve patients' mental health.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
14
Simpler model gets to the point with proteinsResearchers introduce a new computational framework to predict the details of protein folding and other dynamic molecular processes.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
19
Optimal sleep linked to lower risks for dementia and early deathShort and long daily sleep duration were risk factors for dementia and premature death in a study of Japanese adults aged 60 years and older.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
10
Different outdoor professions carry different risks for skin cancerOne of the main risk factors for non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC), the most common cancer worldwide, is solar ultraviolet radiation.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
11
Urinary markers predict bone problems after hip replacementInvestigators have identified urinary markers that differentiate total hip replacement patients who eventually develop bone tissue destruction, or osteolysis, from patients who do not.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
12
Exposure to smoking before and after birth linked to hearing impairment in toddlersExposure to tobacco smoke prenatally and postnatally was associated with hearing impairment.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
9
Breeding better Brazilian riceRice production in Brazil is a multi-billion-dollar industry. It employs hundreds of thousands of people, directly and indirectly. Given the importance of rice farming in Brazil, researchers are working to develop improved rice varieties.
5h
The Atlantic
200+
A Defense of the SuburbsWhen Anthony Bourdain launched the new season of his food-and-travel series Parts Unknown , he began not with an exotic, far-off land, but with West Virginia. A native-born New Yorker, the state seemed as foreign as Timbuktu to Bourdain, which is why he decided to go see its people and explore their culture. There, he found people eating squirrel, prepared like chicken. He found people who were p
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Feed: All Latest
51
12 Killer Deals on Google Devices, Amazon Echo, and Headphones We LoveFour different Google devices are on sale this week, along with several more WIRED Recommends products!
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Latest Headlines | Science News
39
If real, dark fusion could help demystify this physics puzzleFusing dark matter particles might explain why galaxy cores have evenly distributed dark matter.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
3
Disaster recovery requires rebuilding livelihoodsThe short-term losses people suffer when natural disasters strike can turn into long-term poverty if reconstruction policies don't consider how people are going to make a living.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Neighborhoods can help buffer impacts from childhood povertyIn one of the first studies to examine the effect of both socioeconomic status and neighborhoods on children's health, researchers at San Francisco State University and the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) found that living in higher opportunity neighborhoods may protect children from some of the negative health impacts associated with growing up poor.
5h
Scientific American Content: Global
73
These Apps Don't Exist Yet–but They ShouldThe Waze model of crowdsourced info is only the beginning — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
Insects supply chitin as a raw material for the textile industryHarmful chemicals are often used in textile processing. That is why the Fraunhofer Institute for Interfacial Engineering and Biotechnology IGB is researching harmless biobased alternatives. The Institute is working on utilizing side streams from the animal feed manufacture for the production of chitosan. The biopolymer is supposed to be used as a sizing agent in the processing of yarns or for the
5h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Avoiding catastrophe: Yeast study reveals clues to maintaining genome sizeAs cells divide, they must accurately split their DNA between the two daughter cells or risk having an uneven number of chromosomes which can lead to developmental disorders and cancer. A new Donnelly Centre study uncovers how a key molecular machinery drives this process and gives clues to why some children develop aggressive kidney tumours.
5h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
For disappearing Bicknell's thrushes, statistical models are lifesaversBicknell's Thrush has been identified as a globally vulnerable Nearctic-Neotropical migratory bird in need of serious conservation efforts. This species travels each year between its breeding grounds in the Canadian maritime provinces and upper northeastern United States and its winter home in the Greater Antilles. Males and females use different habitats in winter, with females preferring middle
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
For flickers, looks can be deceivingThe North American woodpeckers known as "flickers" stand out for their distinctive wing and tail feathers of bright reds or yellows, and for their rampant interbreeding where these birds of different colors meet in the Great Plains. Despite the obvious visual differences between the Red-shafted Flicker of the west and the Yellow-shafted Flicker of the east, scientists have never before found genet
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
21
Researchers glimpse elusive stem cell in the early embryoStem cell researchers at Harvard Medical School and Boston Children's Hospital have, for the first time, profiled a highly elusive kind of stem cell in the early embryo—a cell so fleeting that it makes its entrance and exit within a 12-hour span.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
77
Collisions of dead stars spray heavy elements throughout small galaxiesCaltech scientists have found, for the first time, that merging pairs of neutron stars—the burnt-out cores of stars that have exploded—create the majority of heavy elements in small "dwarf" galaxies. Heavy elements, such as silver and gold, are key for planet formation and even life itself. By studying these dwarf galaxies, the researchers hope to learn more about the primary sources of heavy elem
5h
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
1
Episode 2: Dead Man Walking | Deadliest Catch: GreenhornLandon may have cost Wild Bill $50,000. Luke is a dead man walking, struggling to work through the pain. Now both greenhorns are put to the ultimate test — a good ol' fashioned gear race. Binge all episodes of Deadliest Catch: Greenhorn: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/deadliest-catch-greenhorn/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.
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Futurity.org
3
Too much pumping gets arsenic into drinking waterNew research suggests that, as intensive groundwater pumping makes the ground sink, it also allows arsenic to move into groundwater aquifers that supply drinking water for 1 million people. For decades, intensive groundwater pumping has caused ground beneath California’s San Joaquin Valley to sink, damaging infrastructure. In their new work, researchers found that satellite-derived measurements o
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Searching for turtles in a sea of grassSearching for reptiles and amphibians is often quite tedious. You have to carefully scan ahead of each step for movement before a snake gets away, or spend hours flipping over logs to find the particular salamander you are looking for.
5h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
9
Mountain gorilla numbers climb upwardsResults from a two-year survey in the transboundary Virunga Massif, one of the two remaining habitats of the mountain gorilla, show numbers of the critically endangered species are on the rise.
5h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
77
Machine learning model predicts phenomenon key to understanding material propertiesUsing machine learning, evolutionary algorithms and other advanced computational techniques, researchers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) have successfully modeled how atoms are arranged between the crystals that make up most materials, a development that could impact how future materials are designed and optimized.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
How to crowdsource your decision-making (or not)Whether you are choosing a restaurant or the destination for your next vacation, making decisions about matters of taste can be taxing.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
9
Ocean warming, 'junk-food' prey cause of massive seabird die-off, study findsIn the fall of 2014, West Coast residents witnessed a strange, unprecedented ecological event. Tens of thousands of small seabird carcasses washed ashore on beaches from California to British Columbia, in what would become one of the largest bird die-offs ever recorded.
5h
The Atlantic
51
What Should We Do About the International Space Station?The International Space Station was never meant to last forever. This was a distant concern in late 1998, when the United States, Canada, Russia, Japan, and European nations started launching hardware into space to assemble the largest human-made structure in orbit around Earth. But as the years went on—as the station’s operations expanded, as humans lived and ate and slept inside its cozy module
5h
BBC News – Science & Environment
10
European astronaut set to command ISS launches on SoyuzThe next European commander of the International Space Station has just blasted off into orbit.
5h
BBC News – Science & Environment
300+
Take a look inside the world's largest legal cannabis farmCanada is on the verge of legalising marijuana for recreational use. The BBC visited a huge cannabis farm in British Columbia, which the operators say is the world's largest.
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Dagens Medicin

Region vil hente praksislæger i SverigeI samarbejde med rekrutteringsfirmaet Konzenta forsøger Region Nordjylland i øjeblikket at rekruttere en svensk læge til regionsklinikken i Sindal. Ordlyden i jobopslaget får PLO til at betegne fremstødet som »endnu et opgør med familielægen«.
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Dagens Medicin

Regioner godkender overenskomstaftaleEfter et stort ja fra de offentligt ansatte har Regionernes Lønnings- og Takstnævn nu godkendt overenskomstaftalen for de næste tre år.
5h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
Former head of Cambridge Analytica to testifyThe former head of the defunct political consultant Cambridge Analytica is due to testify to British lawmakers investigating the use of Facebook data in election campaigns.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
China's Huawei says it hasn't collected Facebook user dataFacebook Huawei ChineseChinese mobile phone maker Huawei said Wednesday it has never collected or stored Facebook user data, after the social media giant acknowledged it shared such data with Huawei and other manufacturers.
5h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Ryanair recognises cabin crew unions for first timeRyanair has for the first time reached an agreement to recognise cabin crew staff who have union membership, but only in Italy, the Irish no-frills airline announced Wednesday.
5h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
9
New crew blasts off for ISSA relatively inexperienced crew of two astronauts and a cosmonaut blasted off Wednesday from the Baikonur cosmodrome in Kazakhstan for a five-month mission on the International Space Station.
5h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Simpler model gets to the point with proteinsComputational models have come a long way in their ability to simulate the most basic biological processes, such as how proteins fold. A new technique created by Rice University researchers should enable scientists to model larger molecules with greater accuracy than ever.
5h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
6
Hot weather lowers students' ability to learn, study findsAn expansive study tracking 10 million American students over 13 years confirms what children, parents and teachers already suspected: When classrooms grow uncomfortably warm, students struggle to learn.
5h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
45
Evidence of TB-like infection found in 245-million-year-old marine reptileA team of researchers from Poland and the U.S. has found possible evidence of tuberculosis in a 245-million-year-old marine reptile. In their paper published in the journal Royal Society Open Science, the group describes their study of the fossilized remains of a Proneusticosaurus silesiacus specimen and why they believe the creature had a TB-like disease.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
6
Pollution from Britain's cars and vans costs £6 billion per year in damaged healthA new Oxford University collaboration has shed light on the damaging health consequences of Britain's car addiction – revealing that it is likely costing our NHS and society in general more than £6 billion per year.
5h
Ingeniøren

Elektrisk testfly styrter ned i UngarnEt elektrisk fly styrtede i sidste uge ned i Ungarn. Både pilot og passager blev dræbt. Myndigheder kan endnu ikke sige noget om årsagen til styrtet.
5h
Scientific American Content: Global
14
The Science Behind 5 Classic Happiness ClichésMost inspirational quotes make us roll our eyes, but if you dig into them, they can offer true wisdom — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
5h
Scientific American Content: Global
14
Apollo, the Graphic Novel; Scientists on Acid and Other New Science BooksBook Recommendations from the Editors of Scientific American — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
5
Regional inequalities within the EU have declined over the past 35 yearsNew research from the University of Oxford and UFZ Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research in Germany shows the gap between Europe's haves and have-nots has been narrowing over the past 35 years.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
ICE Cubes space research service open for businessThe first European facility for commercial research on the International Space Station was installed today in Europe's space laboratory Columbus. The International Commercial Experiments service – ICE Cubes for short – offers fast, simple and affordable access for research and technology experiments in microgravity.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
6
Wind satellite shows offBefore ESA's Aeolus satellite is packed up and shipped to French Guiana for liftoff in August, media representatives had the chance to see this wind measuring Earth Explorer satellite standing proud in the cleanroom.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
5
Image: Sicily hotspotLaunched on 25 April 2018, Sentinel-3B has already delivered some impressive first images from its ocean and land colour instrument, from its altimeter and from the optical channels of its radiometer. With the radiometer's thermal-infrared channels now turned on, the satellite completes its set of firsts with an image that depicts thermal signatures over southern Italy, the Mediterranean Sea and S
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Species found to lose fear of predators after 13 generations of protective isolationA trio of researchers from the University of Melbourne and the University of Life Science, Sydney, has found an isolated mammal species that lost its fear of predators in just 13 generations. In their paper published in the journal Biology Letters, Chris Jolly, Jonathan Webb and Ben Phillips describe their study of protected northern quolls living in Australia and what they found.
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The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: Black-Eyed RageWhen defensive, guppies display a warning sign to their counterparts.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
Learning good habits is secret to seabird foraging successLong-lived seabird species, such as gannets, take several years to learn where the best feeding grounds are and how to recognise them, new research has revealed.
5h
Science-Based Medicine
3
Health Effect of Wind TurbinesWhat are the health effects of living close to wind turbines? The answer is, probably not much, but definitive data is elusive.
5h
Futurity.org
1
‘Shake-and-bake’ catalyst could be the next leap for fuel cellsSelf-assembling compounds may make better catalysts for hydrogen fuel cells than platinum, according to new research. Called cofacial cobalt porphyrins, these molecules—which are great at facilitating a chemical reaction that’s needed to produce power from hydrogen and oxygen—could be the next big advance in alternative energy. “To bring down the price of hydrogen vehicles and make them a realist
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Dagens Medicin

To gynækologiske studier vil ændre klinisk praksis i DanmarkResultaterne af to fase 3-studier kommer til at ændre måden patienter med æggestokkræft skal behandles i Danmark. Mod forventning viser det sig, at æggestokkræft-patienter med tilbagefald efter førstelinjebehandling har dårligere total overlevelse med sekundær cytoreduktiv kirurgi.
5h
The Atlantic
25
Dear Therapist: I Don’t Know How to Feel About My Girlfriend’s AbortionEditor’s Note: Every Wednesday, Lori Gottlieb answers questions from readers about their problems, big and small. Have a question? Email her at dear.therapist@theatlantic.com . Dear Therapist, About a year ago, my girlfriend got pregnant and we decided right away that we should get an abortion. I was only 19 and she was 24. We were both still studying and could see no way of working around the si
5h
The Atlantic
15
Letter: Electric Scooters Aren’t Selfies, They’re Selfie SticksUnfortunately, the Electric Scooters Are Fantastic “The war is over and I have lost,” Robinson Meyer confessed on TheAtlantic.com last week. “I love Big Scooter.” But can the trendy new mode of transport overcome its essential dorkiness? And what does the boom portend for cities? I enjoyed your recent article on the electric scooter phenomenon—I wanted to hate them, too, not least because they’ve
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Feed: All Latest
66
The Dawn of Mobile Convenience Stores—and (Maybe) Free Car RidesStartups like Cargo, which allow you to buy convenience-store items from ride-hailing drivers, point to a future where your commute doesn’t cost a cent—because you, friend, are the product.
6h
Popular Science
48
A nutritionist’s guide to eating junk foodHealth Eating healthy isn't about eliminating sugar—it's about having a plan. Not even the most optimistic of nutritionists thinks you’ll never touch a piece of cake again.
6h
Scientific American Content: Global
500+
New Higgs Boson Observations Reveal Clues on the Nature of MassFor the first time the scientists have observed the famous Higgs boson, responsible for imparting mass, interacting with the heaviest particle in the universe — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
82
Obese dogs could have similar 'personality' traits to overweight humans – new studyWe're all told we need to eat healthier and exercise more to combat obesity, but did you know that there's also an obesity epidemic among pets, at least in the West? Between 39% and 59% of pet dogs in Europe, Australia and the US are estimated to be overweight or obese. In fact, obesity is now considered the biggest threat to the the health and well-being of our pets.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
Exploring greener approaches to nitrogen fixationAbout half of the nitrogen in our bodies today comes from bacteria via the enzyme nitrogenase, which converts, or "fixes," unreactive nitrogen gas in the atmosphere into a form that plants can use for growth. The other half is produced artificially through an energy-intensive industrial process developed more than 100 years ago. This process, called Haber-Bosch (H-B) after the two chemists who dev
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Precise deuteration using heavy waterNUS chemists have developed a more effective method using heavy water splitting to swap hydrogen atoms on organic molecules with their heavier cousins (deuterium) for pharmaceutical applications.
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New Scientist – News
100+
Anti-acne cream clears up skin without any nasty side effectsA new anti-acne cream that blocks inflammation is more effective and has fewer side effects than existing lotions, a clinical trial has found
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New Scientist – News
2
AI construction worker plans the fastest way to put up buildingsBy considering hundreds of millions of potential schedules, an AI construction manager works out the best and fastest way for builders to put up a new building
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Pine invasion threatens South West native forestsUnintentional seeding from pine plantations poses a grave threat to Australian native forests, new research by Edith Cowan University (ECU) suggests.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
New tool enables large-scale analysis of single cellsNew research led by Holger Heyn at the Centro Nacional de Análisis Genómico of the Centre for Genomic Regulation (CNAG-CRG), presents a sophisticated computational framework to analyze single-cell gene expression levels, scalable to process millions of individual cells. The work, published in the current issue of the scientific journal Genome Research, reports the first tool capable of analyzing s
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
16
Artificial intelligence trained to analyze causationThe causes of real-world problems in economics and public health can be notoriously hard to determine. Often, multiple causes are suspected, but large datasets with time-sequenced data are not available. Previous models could not reliably analyze these challenges. Now, researchers have tested the first artificial intelligence model to identify and rank many causes in real-world problems without ti
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Immigrant and disadvantaged children benefit most from early childcareAttending universal childcare from age three significantly improves the school readiness of children from immigrant and disadvantaged family backgrounds, a new UCL study has found.
6h
Live Science
500+
Climate Change Killed the Aliens, and It Will Probably Kill Us Too, New Simulation SuggestsClimate change probably killed off any aliens that might have existed, one study claims.
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Scientific American Content: Global
17
U.S. Cities Need to Plan for an Influx of Internal Climate RefugeesMigrations have already started in the face of droughts and hurricanes, and the situation is likely to get worse — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
6h
New Scientist – News
6
4-year-olds care more about plants and animals than sick peopleWhen we’re young, we care less about people – so much so that 4-year-olds care less about teachers and police than they do about dogs, monkeys and rosebushes
6h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Increased electrical activity in eye may relieve short-term dry eye painA boost of electrical activity in the eye's mucous membranes may lead to new treatments for the painful condition known as dry eye. The study, published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology — Cell Physiology, was chosen as an APSselect article for June.
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Dagens Medicin

Voldsom brand på Holbæk Sygehus lukkede for patientindtagNatten til onsdag opstod der brand på Holbæk Sygehus. Det medførte, at sygehuset ikke har modtage nye patienter frem til onsdag morgen.
6h
Live Science
84
Artists Have Been Drawing Lightning Bolts Wrong for CenturiesIf you draw lightning bolts like crooked zigzags, then you're doing it wrong — but at least you're in good company. Artists have drawn lightning incorrectly for hundreds of years, a new study finds.
7h
Live Science
75
Here's How Much Caffeine You Need, and When, for Peak AlertnessCaffeine can perk you up, but exactly how much caffeine should you consume – and when should you take it – to achieve "peak" alertness?
7h
Latest Headlines | Science News
200+
A big analysis of environmental data strengthens the case for plant-based dietsA new study calculates the bonus for the planet of choosing more foods from plants.
7h
Feed: All Latest
89
Does It Matter If China Beats the US to Build a 5G Network?The rivalry to build the next-generation wireless network is partly a matter of national ego, but faster speeds and greater data capacity will give businesses real advantages.
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Feed: All Latest
100
An Encryption Upgrade Could Upend Online PaymentsWhile ditching TLS 1.0 encryption will benefit the payments ecosystem, it'll be rough going for those with older devices.
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Feed: All Latest
72
Crispr Fans Fight for Egalitarian Access to Gene EditingThe applications of gene editing tech will be shaped by the values of the societies that wield it.
7h
BBC News – Science & Environment
31
European Commission seeks to boost space spendingThe European Commission wants to expand its space activities, and will set up a new agency to support them.
7h
New Scientist – News
2
Europeans now burn more palm oil in their cars than they eatPalm oil consumption in the EU jumped by 7 per cent in 2017 because it is increasingly used as a biofuel – driving the destruction of orangutans’ habitat
7h
Dagens Medicin

PI3K-hæmmer forbedrer progressionsfri overlevelse hos brystkræft-patienterTaselisib forbedrer progressionsfri overlevelse hos kvinder med fremskreden østrogenreceptor-positiv brystkræft, viser nyt fase 3-studie. Den signifikante overlevelsesgevinst ser dog ud til at aftage over tid, hvorfor dansk ekspert ikke forventer, at behandlingen bliver indført i Danmark.
7h
Dagens Medicin

Ingen ‘breaking news’ om melanom, men spændende nyt i pipelinenStudierne på den orale melanom-session omhandlede primært opdateringer på allerede kendte data, og bekræftede således langtidseffekten af adjuverende immunterapi. Til gengæld kastede en række posters lys over nye stoffer, som potentielt kan optimere effekten og sikkerheden ved behandling af patienter med metastatisk melanom, vurderer dansk ekspert.
7h
Scientific American Content: Global
27
Private Smarts: Can Digital Assistants Work without Prying into Our Lives?Personalized AI requires personal data. Apple, Google and others say they can now grab more of it while keeping privacy and security intact — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
7h
Ingeniøren
49
Pesticidrester i hovedstadens drikkevand udløser landsdækkende kontrolMiljøstyrelsen vil have undersøgt vandboringer landet over for stoffet dimethylsulfamid, der netop er fundet i flere vandværker under Hovedstadens Forsyningsselskab.
7h
Ingeniøren
3
92 mio. slægtsforskningsbrugere får lækket kodeord og e-mailadresseSlægtsforskningsfirmaet My Heritage har fået lækket brugerdata på 92 mio. brugere. Sikkerhedsbristen blev først opdaget over syv måneder senere.
7h
Ingeniøren

Folkemødet lækker kontaktdata på journalister i strid med GDPRMed GDPR-reglerne skal man have mere kontrol med sine egne data. Men Folkemødet har lækket personlige kontaktdata uden samtykke.
7h
Viden
3
MINUT FOR MINUT: Sådan gik raketopsendelsen til ISSEkspedition 56-57 sendte tre nye astronauter til den internationale rumstation. Her kan du se hvordan opsendelsen med Soyuz-raketten gik.
7h
Dagens Medicin

Akupunktur og kognitiv terapi kan afhjælpe søvnløshed blandt kræftoverlevereOtte uger med akupunktur eller kognitiv adfærdsterapi mindsker alvorsgraden af søvnløshed blandt kræftoverlevere.
7h
Dagens Medicin

Methyleret gen afslører effekt af PARP-hæmmereEt bestemt methyleret gen kan forudsige, om patienter med fremskreden æggestokkræft har gavn af behandling med PARP-hæmmere, indikerer et nyt dansk studie.
7h
Ingeniøren
41
Norske chauffører efter FM-sluk: Forringet dækning giver farlige situationerManglende trafikmeldinger og dårligt signal er blevet hverdag på landevejene, siger brancheorganisation.
8h
Feed: All Latest
61
Solar Panels Power New Schools—and New Ways of LearningNationwide, K-12 schools are leading an oh-so-green zero-energy building boom.
8h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
7
Decoding the honeybee dance could lead to healthier hivesUnravelling one of the most elaborate forms of non-human communication – the honeybee's waggle dance – could help researchers better understand insect brains and make farming more environmentally friendly.
8h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Neutron tomography: Insights into the interior of teeth, root balls, batteries, and fuel cellsA team of researchers at Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB) and European Spallation Source (ESS) has now published a comprehensive overview of neutron-based imaging processes in the renowned journal Materials Today. The authors report on the latest developments in neutron tomography, illustrating the possible applications using examples of this non-destructive method. Neutron tomography has facilitate
8h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
10
More detailed data on thermal conditions of Arctic groundUnderstanding the thermal conditions of the ground in the Arctic is of utmost importance in order to assess the effects of climate change on the occurrence of permafrost, on the ecosystems and societies of Arctis, and the global climate system. Juha Aalto and Miska Luoto, researchers in natural geography at the University of Helsinki, participated in this study. The findings of the study have been
8h
Dagens Medicin

Kemo inden operation i bugspytkirtlen kan muligvis bedre overlevelseFørste randomiserede forsøg som viser, at indledende behandling med kemoradioterapi kan forbedre udfaldet for patienter med tidlige stadier af kræft i bugspytkirtlen, hvor patienterne er sat til at gennemgå en operation.
8h
Dagens Medicin

Måling af cirkulerende tumor-DNA bør foretages hyppigere end forventetDet er ikke tilstrækkeligt at tilrettelægge den adjuverende behandlingsstrategi for patienter med kolorektalkræft ud fra én postoperativ måling af cirkulerende tumor-DNA, viser studie. Billedet forandrer sig løbende, og der skal flere målinger til for at vurdere patienternes status.
8h
Dagens Medicin

Kombination af lægemidler kan forlænge livet for lungekræftpatienterCirka 4,5 ekstra måneders overlevelse af hente på kombination af Tecentriq, Avastin, carboplatin og paclitaxel.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
300+
Scientists reveal structure of amino acid transporter involved in cancerThe human glutamine transporter ASCT2 is upregulated in several forms of cancer. It is also the docking platform for a wide range of pathogenic retroviruses. A team of University of Groningen scientists have used cryo-electron microscopy to elucidate the structure of the protein, which may generate leads for drug development. The results were published in Nature Structural & Molecular Biology on 5
8h
BBC News – Science & Environment
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Shunning BritainBritish farmers say they are facing a shortage of workers to pick fruit and vegetables as recruitment companies say they can't find enough to fill vacancies.
8h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Density gradient ultracentrifugation for colloidal nanostructures separation and investigationDensity gradient ultracentrifugation (DGUC), as an effective method for the purification of nanomaterials, has attracted research. A recent review was reported by Science Bulletin in a paper titled "Density gradient ultracentrifugation for colloidal nanostructures separation and investigation," by Xiaoming Sun and Liang Luo et al from Beijing University of Chemical Technology. The authors systemat
8h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
A new indicator of human development at subnational levelThe Human Development Index, published each year by the United Nations Development Program (UNDP), is the world's most famous indicator of the level of development of societies. It shows for almost all countries in the world how they fare with regard to three key aspects of development: education, health and standard of living.
8h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
Religiosity plays a role in educational success of immigrant childrenIn a recently conducted study, Professor Sarah Carol (Institute of Sociology and Social Psychology, University of Cologne) and Benjamin Schulz (Berlin Social Science Center—WZB) have investigated the influence of different forms of religiosity on the educational success of Muslim and Christian children with an immigrant background. They found that the correlation between school achievement and rel
8h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Simpler model gets to the point with proteinsRice University researchers introduce a new computational framework to predict the details of protein folding and other dynamic molecular processes.
8h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Stroke survivors could gain the most from new blood pressure guidelinesMore than half of all strokes can be attributed to uncontrolled high blood pressure. If stroke survivors were treated so their blood pressures reach the new target of less than 130/80 mmHg, deaths might be cut 33 percent compared with previous guidelines with a higher target blood pressure.
8h
Science : NPR
26
News Brief: Primary Results, Facebook In China, '3-Parent Babies'We look at results after eight states had primary elections Tuesday. Also, Facebook gave data access to Chinese companies, and a look inside a controversial Ukrainian clinic making embryos.
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Science : NPR
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Clinic Claims Success In Making Babies With 3 Parents' DNAA clinic in Kiev, Ukraine, stirs controversy by making babies with DNA from three different people to help women who are infertile bear children. It's the only clinic known to be doing this right now. (Image credit: Rob Stein/NPR)
8h
Ingeniøren
5
Fiat skal levere 62.000 minibusser til Googles selvkørende projektGoogles selvkørende bil-virksomhed, Waymo, 100-dobler nu sin flåde af selvkørende biler fra Fiat-Chrysler. Samtidig annoncerer Fiat, at dieselbiler bliver udfaset til fordel for el- og hybridbiler.
9h
The Atlantic
89
Moving Animals to Safe Havens Can Unexpectedly Doom ThemDespite everything that had been done to save them, the quolls were still dying. And this time, it wasn’t for the expected reason. Quolls are small Australian mammals that superficially resemble ferrets, but are more closely related to kangaroos and koalas. Being hunters, they tackle all kinds of small prey. But if they attack cane toads—large invasive amphibians that were introduced to Australia
9h
Dagens Medicin

Hvordan agerer man som leder i (medie)stormvejr?Ledelserne i sundhedsvæsenet syntes at glemme, at de også – og især – er ledere for medarbejdere, der tilfældigt bliver hovedpersoner i meget voldsomme mediestorme. Med en anderledes ageren fra lokale ledelser kunne tre kendte mediestorme formentlig være afværget.
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Science | The Guardian
38
A watershed in fighting cancer – but a miracle cure is a long way off | Charles SwantonThe latest advance in immunotherapy offers great hope, but there is much to learn before it can be translated into treatment These are exciting times to be a cancer researcher. The news this week that a woman’s advanced breast cancer has apparently been eradicated by a therapy derived from her own immune system is a development many of us have waited a long time to hear. It’s personalised medicine
10h
Ingeniøren

Robotiværksættere vil kopiere fynsk guldopskrift med elektrisk vakuumgriberTre tidligere medarbejdere fra Universal Robots har udviklet en elektrisk vakuumgriber til UR’s robotarm. Nulserien er blevet revet væk, og nu vil de tre ingeniører erobre verdensmarkedet med hjælp fra en fjerde fynsk robotmand.
10h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
11
'Water is life': Ivory Coast city struggles with crippling drought"All that comes out of the tap right now is cockroaches," said Honorine Babalou, a 20-year-old textile worker.
10h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
6
Lonely furrow: Little pay dirt for organic farming in JapanYuya Shibakai sometimes feels he is ploughing a lonely furrow.
10h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
8
Mother Nature runs wild on China's emerald isleChina's rampant development has sent nature into full retreat, but in one village the countryside has crept back to reclaim lost ground.
10h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
Health sector gives blockchain glowing prognosisSecuring safe interchange of patient data, improving the conduct of clinical tests and medicine traceability, and lowering costs.
10h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
From beep to boom: Europe hears call of Chinese phonesChina's smartphone makers have long been confined to their enormous local market but this is fast changing, with a growing number of western European users opting for a relatively cheap but still sleek Chinese-made upgrade.
10h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
65
Japan 'drone-brella' promises hands-free sun coverIt's the hands-free experience you never knew you needed—a Japanese company has developed a drone-powered parasol it says can hover over users, protecting them from the sun.
10h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
61
Scans reveal newsprint, second painting under PicassoInfrared imaging technology has helped peel back the layers of a Pablo Picasso painting on display in Japan, and revealed a page from a 1902 newspaper and another composition below.
10h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Tesla shareholders reject bid to strip Musk of chairman roleTesla CEO Elon Musk has rebuffed a shareholder attempt to overhaul the electric car maker's board and strip him of his role as chairman, despite worries about the company's shaky finances and inability to meet its production goals for its first mass-market sedan.
10h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Airbnb culls Japan listings ahead of new rental lawRental platform Airbnb has suspended a large majority of its listings in Japan ahead of a new law that goes into effect next week regulating short-term rentals in the country.
11h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
7
Tesla reveals plans to build cars in ShanghaiTesla on Tuesday revealed to shareholders that it is working with officials in China to build electric cars and battery packs in Shanghai.
11h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
Facebook says Chinese phone makers got access to data (Update)Facebook Huawei ChineseFacebook on Tuesday confirmed that a Chinese phone maker deemed a national security threat by the US was among companies given access to data on users.
11h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
5
Study warns of alarming decline in Australian fishConservation experts warned Wednesday of alarming falls in Australian fish populations and called for more marine reserves and better management to halt the decline.
11h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Breeding better Brazilian riceOutside Asia, no other country produces as much rice as does Brazil. It is the ninth largest rice producer in the world. Average annual yields are close to 15 million tons.
11h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
35
Nutrient pollution makes ocean acidification worse for coral reefsA study published recently by a team of researchers, alumni and students from the University of Hawai'i at Manoa School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (SOEST) showed that local impacts of humans—nutrient pollution from activities on land—may accelerate the negative impacts of global ocean acidification on coral reefs.
11h
Dagens Medicin

Om igen, SDU og OUH, lad os diskutere sagens kerneGod forskning og studier af bivirkninger er vigtige. Men hvis Anton Pottegårds formidlingspraksis sætter trend, så vælter sundhedsvæsenet, og vi risikerer at sætte patientsikkerheden over styr.
11h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
6
Sticky situation: New process turns wood scraps into tapeWhether you're wrapping a gift or bandaging a wound, you rely on an adhesive to get the job done.
11h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
200+
Data discrepancies may affect understanding of the universeOne of the unsolved mysteries in modern science is why the expansion of the universe appears to be accelerating. Some scientists argue it is due to a theoretical dark energy that counteracts the pull of gravity, while others think Albert Einstein's long-accepted theory of gravity itself may need to be modified.
11h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
10
Flexible solar cells: Will they someday power your devices?Will you ever be able to charge your mobile device, car and even clothing with flexible solar cells? Researchers at Aalto University in Finland and Université de Montréal are studying whether the now-experimental technology could someday be mass-produced and commercialized, and some of the issues that have to be resolved, including the environmental impact.
11h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
14
Vermont start-up's small packets a big deal for energy industryIt's been a whirlwind few months for Packetized Energy, the energy sector start-up spun off from a large Department of Energy project in 2016 by three University of Vermont electrical engineering faculty, Paul Hines, Jeff Frolik and Mads Almassalkhi.
11h
Science | The Guardian
22
When a dinosaur fossil is gone it's gone foreverPalaeontologists and museum curators try to keep their objects safe, but sometimes there are forces outside of their control Periodically palaeontologists will announce a new candidate for the largest dinosaur to have ever walked the Earth with the finding of a new specimen or species. There are multiple credible candidates for this title on display in various museums though sadly each is inevita
12h
Science | The Guardian
6K
All eyes on Canada as first G7 nation prepares to make marijuana legalFrom crime to health to business, Canada’s decision to legalize marijuana is a grand progressive experiment that promises to answer a host of questions When Canopy Growth opened its first cannabis factory in an old chocolate plant near Ottawa four years ago, it did so predicting a bright future. Canada had already legalized medical marijuana, and Canopy predicted full legalization for recreationa
12h
Ingeniøren

Dårligt nyt til politi og sikkerhedsfolk: Slut med fri adgang til register over domæne-ejereSikkerhedsekspert slår alarm, mens politiet slår koldt vand i blodet. Danske domæner er fortsat undtaget de nye regler.
12h
Science | The Guardian
200+
Work stress raises risk of premature death in vulnerable men – studyMen with diabetes or heart disease under ‘job strain’ have 68% higher risk of early death A major study into the impact of work stress on health has revealed dramatic differences in the rates of premature death between different groups of men, and between men and women, depending on existing medical conditions. Doctors found that men with diabetes, heart disease, or who had previously suffered a
12h
Science | The Guardian
100+
Tailoring cancer treatment to genetic profile extends lives, study findsA long-term ‘precision medicine’ study found improved outcomes when doctors engage in genetic sequencing of patients’ tumors Cancer patients with diseases that are difficult to treat may live longer if doctors engage in genetic sequencing and then match treatment to their illness, a long-term “ precision medicine ” study has found. Continue reading…
13h
Science | The Guardian
37
Country diary: butterflies instinctively make chemistry sexyWyre Forest, Worcestershire: The male pearl-bordered fritillaries were laying pheromone trails low along the track The amber flicker materialised in air so saturated that it steamed through the trees, sauna hot. The orange light became two, spinning around each other only a metre above the ride, knotting and unknotting in the air. These were small pearl-bordered fritillary butterflies, Boloria se
13h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Flexible solar cells: Will they someday power your devices?Researchers in Finland and Montreal are looking at the challenges of mass producing and commercializing the now-experimental technology.
13h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Breeding better Brazilian riceRice production in Brazil is a multi-billion-dollar industry. It employs hundreds of thousands of people, directly and indirectly. Given the importance of rice farming in Brazil, researchers are working to develop improved rice varieties.
13h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Exposure to smoking before and after birth linked to hearing impairment in toddlersExposure to tobacco smoke prenatally and postnatally was associated with hearing impairment in a Paediatric and Perinatal Epidemiology study of young children in Japan.
13h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Urinary markers predict bone problems after hip replacementIn a study published in the Journal of Orthopaedic Research, investigators have identified urinary markers that differentiate total hip replacement patients who eventually develop bone tissue destruction, or osteolysis, from patients who do not.
13h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Different outdoor professions carry different risks for skin cancerOne of the main risk factors for non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC), the most common cancer worldwide, is solar ultraviolet radiation.
13h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Optimal sleep linked to lower risks for dementia and early deathShort and long daily sleep duration were risk factors for dementia and premature death in a study of Japanese adults aged 60 years and older.
13h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Combination drug therapy effectively treats male infertilityTwo drugs that are commonly used off-label in the treatment of male infertility are clomiphene citrate (CC) and anastrozole (AZ); however, data are lacking on the use of combination CC+AZ therapy.
13h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
'Lipofilling' technique found safe for reconstruction after breast cancer surgeryAutologous fat transfer, also known as 'lipofilling,' is a minimally invasive procedure in which the plastic surgeon uses the patient's own fat obtained by liposuction to perform breast reconstruction.
13h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Model examines pregnancy's effects on opioid addiction treatmentBuprenorphine (BUP) is approved for the treatment of opioid addiction.
13h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Do arthritis treatments provide mental health benefits?Drugs used to treat rheumatoid arthritis may impact mental health by improving pain and stiffness and by targeting inflammatory processes common to arthritis and depression; however, a recent review of published studies demonstrates that relying on rheumatoid arthritis therapies alone may not meaningfully improve patients' mental health.
13h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
3
Study examines sickness absence from work among abstainers, low-risk drinkers and at-risk drinkersIn a recent study, people who reported not drinking any alcohol over several years were absent from work due to illness more often than low-risk drinkers.
13h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Opioid use may affect treatment for alcohol dependenceNew research indicates that opioid misuse and the use of cannabis and other drugs may compromise the effectiveness of treatments for alcohol use disorder.
13h
NeuWrite West
18
Remembering a champion for justice in academia and emulating his approachIf you’ve checked out the previous posts in this series , you’re aware of just how prevalent and detrimental implicit bias can be for individuals, society, and scientific progress. How can we overcome these seemingly insurmountable problems? Though numerous individuals have taken countless approaches to combat bias, we believe that one particular approach stands out among them. Dr. Ben Barres, kn
14h
Live Science
16
Bladder: Facts, Function & DiseasesThe bladder is a round, bag-like organ that stores urine. It is typically the size of a large grapefruit but can stretch much larger as needed.
14h
Scientific American Content: Global
19
Saying "This May Hurt" May Make It WorseWarning a child that something, like a vaccine shot, will hurt can actually increase their perception of the pain. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
15h
Science : NPR
200+
Space Station For Sale: NASA Administrator Is In Talks With International CompaniesNASA's Jim Bridenstine says he is interested in private corporations taking over management of the International Space Station consortium. (Image credit: Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images)
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Science | The Guardian
1K
Broccoli coffee: scientists create new way to eat more greensCSIRO and agriculture group Hort Innovation turn ‘ugly’ bunches into a powder for drinks, soup and baked goods Those who don’t fancy eating broccoli can still reap its health benefits thanks to a newly developed powder version that be stirred into smoothies, baked goods and even coffee. Bunches of broccoli deemed too imperfect in appearance to be stocked in shops have been ground up and turned in
17h
Feed: All Latest
100+
Elon Musk Calms Down, and More From Tesla's Shareholder MeetingAt the automaker’s annual shareholder meeting, the CEO struck a conciliatory note while providing updates on Model 3 production, Autopilot, Tesla's Supercharger network, veganism, and more.
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Science : NPR
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Lava Claims 'Hundreds' More Homes On Hawaii's Big Island, Officials SayLava from Kilauea volcano has filled Kapoho Bay and inundated a section of coastline that was once covered with lush forest and dotted by homes. (Image credit: U.S. Geological Survey via AP)
17h
The Atlantic
3K
What Kate Spade Meant for WomenA trip to the mall wasn’t a trip if it didn’t include a stop at the Kate Spade store. Teenage me would insist that, after the requisite stops had been made, my mother and I do a quick walk-through— just a minute, mom, I promise —to assess the jewel-box store filled with bright-pink bags, orange-and-white striped coats, and golden-edged Bakelite-esque bangles. It didn’t matter that I never left wi
18h
Futurity.org
3
Robot submarine flaps its fins to swim without powerResearchers have developed a new propulsion concept for swimming robots. The robot exploits temperature fluctuations in the water for propulsion without the need for an engine, propellant, or power supply. As a proof-of-concept study, the researchers developed a 7.5-centimeter (a bit less thant three inches) mini-submarine equipped with paddles, which they fabricated entirely using a multi-materi
18h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
8
Nutrient pollution makes ocean acidification worse for coral reefsA study published recently by a team of researchers, alumni and students from the University of Hawai'i at Manoa School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (SOEST) showed that local impacts of humans — nutrient pollution from activities on land — may accelerate the negative impacts of global ocean acidification on coral reefs.
18h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Study finds aromatic herbs lead to better parenting in starlingsFor European starlings, the presence of aromatic herbs in the nest leads to some improved parenting behaviors, according to a new study. Specifically, birds whose nests incorporate herbs along with dried grasses were more likely to attend their nests, exhibited better incubation behavior for their eggs, and became active earlier in the day.
18h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
3
Major heart attacks are more deadly during colder monthsHeart attacks are more likely to kill you in the winter than in the summer, according to new research presented at the British Cardiovascular Society Conference in Manchester today.
18h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

You talking to me? Scientists try to unravel the mystery of 'animal conversations'An international team of academics undertook a large-scale review of research into turn-taking behavior in animal communication, analyzing hundreds of animal studies.
18h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Bridging the gap between human and animal communicationCooperative turn-taking has been suggested as an ancient mechanism of the language system bridging the existing gap between the articulate human species and our inarticulate primate cousins. A team of researchers now provides an overview of the state of the art and present a new comparative framework on turn-taking to unravel the evolutionary roots of language.
18h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
64
You talking to me? Scientists try to unravel the mystery of 'animal conversations'African elephants like to rumble, naked mole rats trade soft chirps, while fireflies alternate flashes in courtship dialogues.
18h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
70
Study finds aromatic herbs lead to better parenting in starlingsFor European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris), the presence of aromatic herbs in the nest leads to some improved parenting behaviors, according to a new study. Specifically, birds whose nests incorporate herbs along with dried grasses were more likely to attend their nests, exhibited better incubation behavior for their eggs, and became active earlier in the day.
18h
Futurity.org
3
Teens who use heroin probably use other drugs, tooHigh school seniors who use heroin commonly use multiple other drugs—and not just opioids, a new study shows. The findings, which appear in Drug and Alcohol Dependence , suggest that addressing heroin use among teens should also take into account the probable use of multiple drugs. Heroin use has risen in the United States in connection with the ongoing opioid epidemic. Research shows a strong li
19h
The Atlantic
400+
How Trump Celebrates America, but Not PhiladelphiaOn the day that the Philadelphia Eagles were supposed to visit the White House after having won the Super Bowl, a long-held tradition, President Donald Trump held a “Celebration of America” on the South Lawn. Instead of meeting Eagles players, the president praised his economy, mouthed some of “God Bless America,” and promoted standing for the national anthem. Standing under a hot sun over the So
19h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Rigorous study finds widely used treatment for infection fails young cancer patientsSt. Jude Children's Research Hospital found ethanol-lock therapy failed to prevent new or recurring infections in cancer patients with central venous catheters and was associated with increased complications.
19h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

The Lancet Diabetes and Endocrinology: Job strain linked to increased risk of premature death for men with cardiometabolic diseaseHaving a demanding job and little control over it is associated with an increased risk of premature death in men with coronary heart disease, stroke, or diabetes, according to an observational study tracking more than 100000 men and women with and without cardiometabolic disease from Finland, France, Sweden, and the UK for almost 14 years, published in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology journal.
19h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
39
Distracted people can be 'smell blind''Inattentional smell blindness,' or inattentional anosmia, has been proven to exist. Just as it has previously been found that people can miss visual cues when they are busily engaged in a task, the same is true of smells. However, with smells there is only a 20-minute window before people become habituated to the smell and the opportunity to notice it has passed.
19h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
11
Does living near wind turbines negatively impact human health?Wind turbines are a source of clean renewable energy, but some people who live nearby describe the shadow flicker, the audible sounds and the subaudible sound pressure levels as 'annoying.' They claim this nuisance negatively impacts their quality of life.
19h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
5
Detecting the birth and death of a phononPhysicists have developed a new technique to probe elementary quantum excitations of atomic vibrations inside a diamond crystal under ambient conditions. The technique uses ultra-short laser pulses and detectors sensitive to single photons.
19h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
6
Massive AI Twitter probe draws heat map of entrepreneurial personalityA new study using artificial intelligence has proved a Twitter-based personality estimate is as successful in predicting local differences in actual entrepreneurial activity as regional personality data collected by means of millions of standard personality tests.
19h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
12
More breast cancers found with combined digital screeningA combination of digital mammography and tomosynthesis detects 90 percent more breast cancers than digital mammography alone, according to a new study.
19h
Popular Science
76
You are disgusting in so many ways. Scientists just outlined six of them.Health Humans learned disgust to avoid disease, but it’s turned into a complicated feeling. A new study doubles down on the theory that humans evolved revulsion to avoid infectious disease, culminating in six different categories of human disgust.
19h
Feed: All Latest
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WWDC 2018: Apple's New AR Features Are Proof That Wearables Are ComingNo one onstage at WWDC yesterday used the phrase "smart glasses." They didn't have to.
19h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
24
Injuries and loss of life boost religious faith after disastersWeather-related disasters can make people more religious but it depends on the toll they inflict, suggests new research. If a disaster injures a significant number of people, it can strengthen religiosity among those who are already religious. But if a disaster inflicts mostly economic damage, the opposite effect applies.
19h
The Atlantic

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Chick-fil-EPA-Written by Elaine Godfrey ( @elainejgodfrey ) Today in 5 Lines President Trump held a “Celebration of America” event in lieu of the planned Philadelphia Eagles celebration. Less than 24 hours before their visit to the White House, Trump disinvited the Super Bowl champions for what he said was a disagreement on standing during the National Anthem. Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Sco
20h
The Atlantic

The Atlantic Daily: A Long, Slow SlideWhat We’re Following Manafort’s Misstep: Federal prosecutors in Robert Mueller’s investigation say that Paul Manafort, Donald Trump’s former campaign manager, who’s now awaiting trial for conspiracy and money-laundering charges, attempted to coach the testimony of one of his former associates. Legal experts say the alleged witness tampering is a puzzling move, as Manafort must have known that his
20h
Popular Science
100+
What you need to know about your browser's digital fingerprintsTechnology Facebook and others want to track you. Apple is blocking them. Your browser has a fingerprint. It’s not as obvious as the real ones on your fingertips, but it exists nonetheless.
20h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
13
A step closer to developing a DNA test for liver cancerResearchers have completed a phase II study comparing a set of DNA markers to alpha fetoprotein as a method to test for liver cancer.
20h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
23
Sticky situation: New process turns wood scraps into tapeA team of chemical engineers has developed a more sustainable way of making high-performance adhesives. Their novel new process takes a plant material called lignin — a substance paper manufacturers throw away — and turns them into tape. Their invention performs just as well as at least two commercially available products.
20h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
71
First artificial human prion createdResearchers have synthesized the first artificial human prion, a dramatic development in efforts to combat a devastating form of brain disease that has so far eluded treatment and a cure.
20h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
14
Mono-energetic neutrinos with enough energy to produce a muonScientists recently reexamined data from the MiniBooNE experiment at Fermilab taken between 2009 and 2011, and they found the first direct evidence of mono-energetic neutrinos, or neutrinos with definite energy, that are energetic enough to produce a muon.
20h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
100+
Dogs prefer to eat fat, and cats surprisingly tend toward carbsDogs gravitate toward high-fat food, but cats pounce on carbohydrates with even greater enthusiasm, according to research into the dietary habits of America's two most popular pets.
20h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
20
Invasive species of coral boasts amazing capacity for regenerationColonies of sun coral multiply rapidly, driving native corals out. Scientists investigate whether the rising of oceanic temperature, combined with increasing activity of the oil and gas industry, might be favoring the invasive species.
20h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
27
Study in Fiji finds that removing sea cucumbers spells trouble for shallow coastal watersThe sea cucumber's unimpressive appearance belies the outsized role these creatures play in converting decomposing organic matter into recyclable nutrients and keeping coastal ecosystems healthy and clean, and overfishing them can have negative impacts on coastal marine environments, according to a new study focusing on a species of sea cucumber called a sandfish.
20h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
18
Mandatory bundled-payment Medicare programs should stay, study suggestsHospitals that receive bundled payments for joint replacements either voluntarily or through Medicare's mandatory programs, vary by size and volume, but not in spending or quality, signaling a need for both programs, according to a new study. The results show that voluntary programs tend to engage larger non-profit hospitals, whereas some hospitals with lower volumes and fewer resources might only
20h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
24
Data discrepancies may affect understanding of the universeOne of the unsolved mysteries in modern science is why the expansion of the universe appears to be accelerating. As astrophysicists look for answers in the mountains of data gathered from astronomical observations, they are finding that inconsistencies in that data might ultimately lead to the truth.
20h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Sticky situation: New process turns wood scraps into tapeA team of chemical engineers at the University of Delaware has developed a more sustainable way of making high-performance adhesives. Their novel new process takes a plant material called lignin — a substance paper manufacturers throw away — and turns them into tape. Their invention performs just as well as at least two commercially available products.
20h
NYT > Science
100+
A Promising Cancer Treatment Made Patients Worse, Not BetterFor an unusual form of lymphoma, an immunotherapy drug made the disease more aggressive. A cautionary tale.
20h
The Atlantic
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Dietland Envisions a World of Female RevengeThe 2009 black comedy Jennifer’s Body plotted the demonically possessed succubus Jennifer (Megan Fox) and her hopelessly nerdy friend Anita, more often referred to as “Needy” (Amanda Seyfried), at opposite poles of womanhood. Where Needy cowered, Jennifer pounced. The movie, told from the perspective of the institutionalized Needy, recounts the bloody series of events spurred by a rock band attem
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Data discrepancies may affect understanding of the universeOne of the unsolved mysteries in modern science is why the expansion of the universe appears to be accelerating. As astrophysicists look for answers in the mountains of data gathered from astronomical observations, they are finding that inconsistencies in that data might ultimately lead to the truth.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Mayo Clinic researchers take a step closer to developing a DNA test for liver cancerA group of researchers from Mayo Clinic and Exact Sciences Corporation have completed a phase II study comparing a set of DNA markers to alpha fetoprotein as a method to test for liver cancer. The researchers presented their findings today at the 2018 Digestive Disease Week conference in Washington, D.C.
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New on MIT Technology Review
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Microsoft’s president says governments and Big Tech can get alongBrad Smith, who is also the company’s chief lawyer, even suggested that America’s antitrust laws could do with a broader interpretation.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Invasive species of coral boasts amazing capacity for regenerationDetected for the first time in Brazil on the coast of the Southeast region in the late 1980s, when oil and gas prospecting began in the Campos Basin offshore of Rio de Janeiro, sun corals of the genus Tubastraea are now spreading very swiftly throughout the rocky shores and cliffs of Brazilian islands and are considered to be biological invaders.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Study in Fiji finds that removing sea cucumbers spells trouble for shallow coastal watersThe lowly sea cucumber strikes observers as a simple sausage-like creature, one that is far less interesting than brightly colored reef fish or color-changing octopi that share its coastal habitat.
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The Scientist RSS
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Microbiome Differences Between Farmers and City-Dwellers Start EarlyCompared with their urban counterparts, babies and toddlers in rural Nigeria have gut microbiota that more closely resembles that of adults in their community.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Many US women don't realize they're seeking reproductive care at Catholic hospitalsMore than one-third of women who go to a Catholic hospital for reproductive care aren't aware they're seeking obstetrical and gynecological care at a facility that may have limited health care options due to its religious affiliation.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Mandatory bundled-payment Medicare programs should stay, Penn study suggestsHospitals that receive bundled payments for joint replacements either voluntarily or through Medicare's mandatory programs, vary by size and volume, but not in spending or quality, signaling a need for both programs, according to a new study. The results show that voluntary programs tend to engage larger non-profit hospitals, whereas some hospitals with lower volumes and fewer resources might only
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Study in Fiji finds that removing sea cucumbers spells trouble for shallow coastal watersThe sea cucumber's unimpressive appearance belies the outsized role these creatures play in converting decomposing organic matter into recyclable nutrients and keeping coastal ecosystems healthy and clean, and overfishing them can have negative impacts on coastal marine environments, according to a new study focusing on a species of sea cucumber called a sandfish in the journal PeerJ.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Surprising recovery of red spruce shows value of Clean Air ActSurprising new research shows that red spruce are making a comeback — and that a combination of reduced pollution mandated by the 1990 Amendments to the Clean Air Act and changing climate are behind the resurgence.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Invasive species of coral boasts amazing capacity for regenerationColonies of sun coral multiply rapidly, driving native corals out. Scientists in Brazil investigate whether the rising of oceanic temperature, combined with increasing activity of the oil and gas industry, might be favoring the invasive species.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Hawaii volcano lava destroys hundreds of homes overnightLava from Hawaii's Kilauea volcano destroyed hundreds more homes overnight, overtaking two oceanfront communities that were advised to evacuate last week, officials said Tuesday.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
5
Injuries and loss of life boost religious faith after disastersWeather-related disasters can make people more religious but it depends on the toll they inflict, suggests new UBC research. If a disaster injures a significant number of people, it can strengthen religiosity among those who are already religious. But if a disaster inflicts mostly economic damage, the opposite effect applies.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
14
Space pioneer George von Tiesenhausen dies at Alabama homeGeorg von Tiesenhausen, the last of the German rocket team that launched the U.S. space program, has died at his home in Alabama. He was 104.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Facebook music feature allows lip-sync of songsFacebook users will be able to lip-sync live to their favorite tunes as the social media behemoth on Tuesday unveiled its first personalized features as part of licensing deals with music labels.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Research shows dogs prefer to eat fat, and cats surprisingly tend toward carbsDogs gravitate toward high-fat food, but cats pounce on carbohydrates with even greater enthusiasm, according to research into the dietary habits of America's two most popular pets.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Fungi-produced pigment shows promise as semiconductor materialResearchers at Oregon State University are looking at a highly durable organic pigment, used by humans in artwork for hundreds of years, as a promising possibility as a semiconductor material.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Microbiome differences between urban and rural populations start soon after birthAn analysis comparing the intestinal microbiomes of both infants and adults living in rural and urban areas of Nigeria has revealed that not only are there many differences in adults living in subsistence environments versus urban ones but also that these variations begin at a very young age.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Blast from the past—First measurement of mono-energetic neutrinosBy analyzing data collected over eight years ago, scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory and Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory have made a potentially groundbreaking discovery.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Family blood mystery solvedBack in the 1970s, a Norwegian family was found to have abnormally high red blood cell counts. Thirty-five years later, researchers succeeded in solving the mystery, thanks to new analytical methods and the latest developments in genetic engineering — and a chance meeting with a Swiss scientist.
21h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Research shows dogs prefer to eat fat, and cats surprisingly tend toward carbsDogs gravitate toward high-fat food, but cats pounce on carbohydrates with even greater enthusiasm, according to research into the dietary habits of America's two most popular pets.
21h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
200+
Injuries and loss of life boost religious faith after disastersWeather-related disasters can make people more religious but it depends on the toll they inflict, suggests new UBC research. If a disaster injures a significant number of people, it can strengthen religiosity among those who are already religious. But if a disaster inflicts mostly economic damage, the opposite effect applies.
21h
Big Think
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Miss America will scrap swimsuit competition, no longer judge physical appearanceIn a #MeToo-inspired rebranding effort, Miss America is ditching its swimsuit competition to focus more on contestants’ personalities. Read More
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Feed: All Latest
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The Ghost of John Perry Barlow Lives in His Posthumous MemoirMother American Night will become the crucial document for understanding the trippy, contradictory life and work of the internet pioneer and Grateful Dead lyricist.
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Inside Science
9
Brief: For Physical Fitness, Should You Aim to Be The Hulk or The Flash?Brief: For Physical Fitness, Should You Aim to Be The Hulk or The Flash? Research suggests that developing strength or aerobic fitness can improve long-term health. But is another method even better? KidSuperhero.jpg Image credits: AboutLife/ Shutterstock Sports Tuesday, June 5, 2018 – 15:45 Chris Gorski, Editor (Inside Science) — Last week, sports and exercise scientists in Minneapolis discusse
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Viden
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Billeder: Enorme mængder plastik ender på lossepladser eller i naturenPlastik er temaet for Verdens Miljødag. Et af verdens største miljøudfordringer, mener FN.
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New on MIT Technology Review
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The White House promises to release government data to fuel the AI boomThe president’s most senior technology advisor claims the White House is quietly pursuing an aggressive AI plan.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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How Tau aggregates can contribute to cell death in Alzheimer's diseaseNew evidence suggests a mechanism by which progressive accumulation of Tau protein in brain cells may lead to Alzheimer's disease.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
26
Cancer: Microbubbles delivered via gas embolotherapy could cut off blood supply and deliver drugsEmbolization — the use of various techniques to cut off the blood vessels that feed tissue growth — has gained traction over the past decades to treat cancerous tumors, and one specific version is gas embolotherapy. During this process, the blood supply is cut off using acoustic droplet vaporization, which uses microscopic gas bubbles induced by exposure to ultrasonic waves. Researchers have dis
21h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
53
Earth could have supported continental crust, life earlier than thoughtThe early Earth might have been habitable much earlier than thought, according to new research.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Blast from the pastScientists recently reexamined data from the MiniBooNE experiment at Fermilab taken between 2009 and 2011, and they found the first direct evidence of mono-energetic neutrinos, or neutrinos with definite energy, that are energetic enough to produce a muon.
21h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

CWRU School of Medicine researchers create first artificial human prionCase Western Reserve University School of Medicine researchers have synthesized the first artificial human prion, a dramatic development in efforts to combat a devastating form of brain disease that has so far eluded treatment and a cure. The new findings are published in Nature Communications.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Distracted people can be 'smell blind' — according to new University of Sussex study'Inattentional smell blindness,' or inattentional anosmia, has been proven to exist in a study from the University of Sussex. Just as it has previously been found that people can miss visual cues when they are busily engaged in a task, the same is true of smells. However, with smells there is only a 20-minute window before people become habituated to the smell and the opportunity to notice it has
21h

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