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Nyheder2018juni07

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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Is there an end to the periodic table? MSU professor explores its limitsAs the 150th anniversary of the formulation of the Periodic Table of Chemical Elements looms, a Michigan State University professor probes the table's limits in a recent Nature Physics Perspective.
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The Atlantic
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Senate Investigators May Have Found a Missing Piece in the Russia ProbeAn ex-congressman has attracted scrutiny from the Senate Judiciary Committee, as it continues to investigate whether President Donald Trump’s campaign conspired with Moscow to sway the 2016 presidential election. Curt Weldon, a Republican and former Pennsylvania congressman, lost his re-election campaign more than a decade ago following an FBI probe into his ties to two Russian companies . He has
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Ingeniøren
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Leder: Plast skal ikke forbydes – det skal genanvendes
4h

LATEST

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Gene editing just got easierAn international team of researchers has made CRISPR technology more accessible and standardized by simplifying its complex implementation in a way that offers a broad platform for off-the shelf genome engineering.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Unexpected new dynamics for large DNA molecules in liquid suspensionPolymer physicists at the University of Massachusetts Amherst are today reporting the unexpected and previously unknown behavior of a charged macromolecule such as DNA embedded in a charged hydrogel, where it displays what they call a 'topologically frustrated' inability to move or diffuse in the gel, a phenomenon they describe in the current Nature Communications.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Oldest bubonic plague genome decodedAn international team of researchers led by the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History has analyzed two 3,800-year-old Y. pestis genomes that suggest a Bronze Age origin for bubonic plague. The study, published in the journal Nature Communications, shows that this strain is the oldest sequenced to date that contains the virulence factors considered characteristic of the bubonic plag
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Ingeniøren

Hofor opdagede pesticidfund takket være fund i MiddelfartForlydender om fund af stoffet dimethylsulfamid, DMS, på vandværker hos Trefor Vand bredte sig som ringe i vandet.
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Nyheder – Forskning – Videnskab

Afskedigelser på Bohr Institutet skyldes flere års underskudEn række stillinger nedlægges nu på Niels Bohr Institutet. Det sker den 11. juni. Op…
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Swiss to place bets on gambling law in high stakes referendumSwiss voters will decide on Sunday whether to back a new gambling law designed to prevent addiction and allow some online betting, or reject what opponents say amounts to internet censorship.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Tempers fray, fists fly in India's daily battle for waterWhen the water truck finally chugged into the Delhi slum, there was a stampede. It is a scene repeated daily across India as temperatures rise and the vital resource gets ever scarcer.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Mediterranean could become a 'sea of plastic': WWFThe Mediterranean could become a "sea of plastic", the WWF warned on Friday in a report calling for measures to clean up one of the world's worst affected bodies of water.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Report: ZTE chairman promises no more violations, apologizesZTE US China TrumpChinese tech giant ZTE Corp.'s chairman promised no further compliance violations and apologized to customers in a letter Friday for disruptions caused by its violation of U.S. export controls, a newspaper reported.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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China's Ant Financial raises $14bn to become biggest fintech firmChinese digital payments giant Ant Financial said Friday it had raised $14 billion in its latest financing round, making it the world's largest fintech company ahead of an expected mammoth IPO.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Scientists: No way to know when Hawaii eruption will endLava from the Kilauea volcano that flowed into Kapoho Bay has created nearly a mile of new land and officials with the U.S. Geological Survey said Thursday the flow is still very active and there's no way to know when the eruption will end or if more lava-spewing vents will open.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Facebook exec Sheryl Sandberg to address MIT graduatesFacebook Chief Operating Officer Sheryl Sandberg is set to deliver the commencement address at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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UK telecoms group BT says chief executive to step downBT, the British telecoms and television broadcasting company, said Friday that its chief executive Gavin Patterson would depart his role later this year, following shareholder unrest over the group's outlook.
2h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Ukrainian villages still suffering legacy of Chernobyl more than 30 years onMilk in parts of Ukraine has radioactivity levels up to five times over the country's official safe limit, new research shows.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Minerology on Mars points to a cold and icy ancient climateThe climate throughout Mars' early history has long been debated—was the Red Planet warm and wet, or cold and icy? New research published in Icarus provides evidence for the latter.
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Dagens Medicin

Elektromagnetisk behandling af depression har svært ved at trænge ind på hospitalerPrivate klinikker bruger elektromagnetisk hjelm til behandling af resistent deprimerede, men de offentlige hospitaler er stadigt skeptiske. Professor mener ikke, at behandlingen er testet nok.
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Viden
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Faktatjek: Er folk med briller klogere end andre?Flere medier har i denne uge konkluderet, at folk med briller er klogest. Men et dybere kig i forskningen viser, at det ikke er helt så enkelt.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Ukrainian villages still suffering legacy of Chernobyl more than 30 years onMilk in parts of Ukraine has radioactivity levels up to five times over the country's official safe limit, new research shows.
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Ingeniøren
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Med nye regler kan du sælge eller donere dine personlige dataEU’s nye regler for data­beskyttelse åbner mulighed for, at vi kan flytte rundt på vores persondata eller sælge dem til højestbydende. De første firmaer står på spring.
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Live Science
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Cantaloupes: Health Benefits & Nutrition FactsCantaloupes are packed with vitamins A and C, and since they have high water content, they are low in calories.
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Live Science
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Mosquitoes: Biology, Repellents & Bite ReliefHere's how to engineer a mosquito-free environment, and what to do if these annoying insects do bite.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Children from older mothers more likely to have heart risksNew research published in The Journal of Physiology demonstrates that adult offspring born to older mothers are more susceptible to heart risks in later life. These results could be crucial in developing preventative treatments for children born to older women.
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NeuWrite San Diego

We Shall not Repeat the Evil: The Destructive Power of the Atomic BombA Memorial to Peace Every August 5th at 8:15 A.M., a resonant bell loudly rings throughout Peace Memorial Park to mark the anniversary of the Hiroshima atomic bombing. As the bell rings, thousands of plaintive guests sit and reflect upon the proof of mankind’s inhumanity, and for a minute a siren booms across the healing […]
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Science | The Guardian
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Mars discovery: how did the organic matter end up there? – videoNasa’s Curiosity rover has found complex organic matter buried and preserved in ancient sediments that formed a vast lake bed on Mars more than 3bn years ago. Nasa expert Jennifer Eigenbrode explains how that matter might have ended up there and what the source could be: biological processes in the lake itself, meteorites or a natural rock-forming process. But, as Eigenbrode explains, there is no
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Ingeniøren

Bagsiden: Advarsel: Pas på med tunnelekstrudering …Ugens real news
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Ingeniøren

Bagsiden: Ugens glade nyhed
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Ingeniøren

Bagsiden: Herlevs forringede postombringningUgens kassereduktion
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Ingeniøren

Bagsiden: Ugens byttehandel
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Futurity.org
4
‘Brain password’ uses Leo DiCaprio to unlock your phoneResearchers are working on a “brain password” system that could let you unlock your phone with your brainwaves—or your reaction to a photo of Leonardo DiCaprio. “Like a password, it’s easy to reset; and like a biometric, it’s easy to use.” To overcome password fatigue, many smartphones include facial recognition, fingerprint scans, and other biometric systems. The trouble with these easy-to-use t
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Ex-smokers might be better off with high rather than low nicotine e-cigsVapers using low rather than high nicotine e-cigarettes may be using their devices more intensely, potentially increasing the risk of exposure to toxins in the vapour, according to new research funded by Cancer Research UK and published in Addiction today.
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Futurity.org
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Guppy guys grow bigger brains when predators are nearMale guppies exposed to predators in the wild or in captivity have heavier brains than those living in relatively predator-free conditions, according to new research. Behavioral ecologists sampled guppies from two rivers in northern Trinidad. In each river, guppies live both above a waterfall, a location that only guppies and a few other small species of fish have managed to colonize, and below t
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Futurity.org
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Just how gross are airplane cabins really?The bacterial communities accompanying airline passengers at 30,000 feet have a lot in common with the bacterial communities surrounding people in their homes and offices, according to a new study. “Airline passengers should not be frightened by sensational stories about germs on a plane…” Using advanced sequencing technology, researchers studied the bacteria found on three components of an airli
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Latest Headlines | Science News
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Suicide rates have shot up in almost every U.S. stateSuicide rates increased sharply in nearly all 50 states from 1999 to 2016, according to a new government report.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Cockpit protection (halo) to boost racing driver safety may affect steering accuracyThe cockpit protection system fitted to racing cars, known as halo, may affect the driver's head position and motion, possibly compromising steering accuracy, suggest the results of a simulation test, using a similar structure, and published in the journal BMJ Case Reports.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Synthetic cannabis ('spice', 'k2') use may boost stroke risk in young usersSynthetic cannabis, also popularly known as 'spice' or 'k2,' may boost the risk of a stroke in young users, warn US doctors writing in the journal BMJ Case Reports.
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Futurity.org
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Brain ‘ripples’ lock in mental maps while bodies restNew research using machine learning techniques shows that it’s possible to harvest minimal data from animal brains during periods of rest to shed light on how the brain forms and retains memories. The researchers’ work employs hidden Markov models commonly used in machine learning to study sequential patterns. Their strategy analyzes waves of firing neurons that race in an instant across the hipp
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cognitive science
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Active HIV in large white blood cells may drive cognitive impairment in infected micesubmitted by /u/davyeminy [link] [comments]
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The Atlantic
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The Atlantic Daily: Overlooked PlacesWhat We’re Following Executive Power: President Trump isn’t alone among modern chief executives in seeking to expand his presidential power. Yet, as David Graham writes, his particular tactics stand out: He’s pushed his limits not to respond to economic or national-security crises, as past leaders have done, but to protect himself. The president’s supporters, including his adviser Rudy Giuliani,
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Big Think
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10 smartest books you can read this summerRecent books that are sure to add to your intelligence. Read More
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Futurity.org
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For heroin users, addiction is swiftOne-third of people who use heroin become addicted within one to 12 months, a new study shows. It’s estimated that 300 to 520 people start using heroin each day in the United States alone. The findings indicate that prior estimates of 20 to 25 percent have been too low, researchers say. “Looking at drug use just one year later makes it less likely for subjects to die or be imprisoned…” “Earlier s
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Live Science
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Could the Next Flu Pandemic Come from Dogs?Scientists are concerned that dogs could be the source of the next flu pandemic.
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Science : NPR
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Man Kills Snake; Snake Tries To Kill Him BackTrying to save his wife from a diamondback rattler, Jeremy Sutcliffe decapitated the snake with a shovel. But when he went to pick up the head, it bit him — delivering a near deadly dose of venom. (Image credit: LM Otero/AP)
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Popular Science
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In a shocking turn of events, lightning strikes on Jupiter look a lot like our ownSpace The lightning struck more than twice. You’d be hard pressed to find an environment in the solar system more at odds with Earth than Jupiter.
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NYT > Science
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Texas Man’s Near-Fatal Lesson: A Decapitated Snake Can Still BiteA man survived after a rattlesnake’s severed head sank its fangs into his hand. “There’s not a lot of education out there about what you’re supposed to do with a snake,” his wife said.
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NYT > Science
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What to Do When a Loved One Is Severely DepressedThere are no easy answers for helping someone struggling with depression, especially if you’ve already tried and tried. Here are some tips from experts.
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The Atlantic
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The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Donald-May-Care-Written by Elaine Godfrey ( @elainejgodfrey ) Today in 5 Lines During a joint news conference with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, President Trump said he doesn’t have to “prepare very much” for the upcoming meeting with North Korea’s Kim Jong Un. Politico reported earlier Thursday that National-Security Adviser John Bolton has not yet convened a meeting to discuss the June 12 summit. Trump’
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Live Science
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Decapitated Snake Head Bites Man. But How?Shortly after a man killed a rattlesnake in his backyard, the rattlesnake's severed head bit and injected venom into the man, seriously injuring him.
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Live Science
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Watch a Tied-Up Alligator Knock a Man Out With Its Hard, Reptilian SkullEverybody has a plan until they get head-butted by an alligator.
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Feed: All Latest
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The Deal to Save ZTE Won't Resolve US-China TensionsThe "cold trade war" between the US and China continues, with probes into Google and Facebook in the US and Micron in China.
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New on MIT Technology Review
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ZTE may have been saved, but its plight could strengthen China’s tech ambitionsZTE US China Trump
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Bikeshare could increase light rail transit ridershipCoupling bikeshare with public transit could be an important component when trying to increase light rail transit (LRT) ridership, according to a new study out of the University of Waterloo.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Systemic racism needs more examination related to health, says UofL researcherAlthough the discipline of public health has recently recognized racism as a social determinant of health, little research examines the issue related to systems and structures.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Mars rover finds ancient organic compounds that match meteoritic samplesNASA's Curiosity Rover discovered 'tough' organic molecules on Mars, increasing the chances that a record of potential life could have been preserved despite harsh conditions that can easily break down organics. Carnegie's Andrew Steele was a key member of the research team, whose work on this project built off his discovery six years ago of indigenous organic carbon in Martian meteorites. The org
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NeuWrite West

A tribute to Ben BarresIt was the day of my defense, and as I prepared to give the biggest talk of my life thus far, I looked out into the audience, and saw Ben Barres walk into the room. Normally, this would have been a totally unremarkable event. Ben was one of the members on my committee. Except these circumstances were not normal. Ben was diagnosed with terminal cancer just over a year earlier. At that point, I tol
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Popular Science
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Navigating Amazon's increasingly complicated collection of Alexa-enabled devicesGadgets The Fire TV Cube is just the latest in Amazon's huge collection of Alexa-enabled gadgets. Trying to figure out what each of Amazon's Alexa-powered entertainment devices you should buy? Here's some clarity.
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New on MIT Technology Review
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The US government is seriously underestimating how much Americans rely on gig workUndercounting people who rely on “alternative work arrangements” risks marginalizing a key part of the American economy.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Minerology on Mars points to a cold and icy ancient climateThe climate throughout Mars' early history has long been debated — was the Red Planet warm and wet, or cold and icy? New research published in Icarus provides evidence for the latter.
12h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Sustained use of opioids before spine surgery increases risk of continued use after surgeryPatients who take prescription opioids for a longer period before spinal surgery are more likely to continue using opioids several months after surgery, reports a study in the June 6, 2018, issue of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio in partnership with Wolters Kluwer.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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International agreement that human-relevant research is needed to enhance drug discoveryProceedings of a multistakeholder workshop co-organized by The Humane Society of the United States, Humane Society International and the National Institutes of Health under the auspices of the global BioMed21 Collaboration is published in Drug Discovery Today, presenting a comprehensive overview of existing efforts to prioritize human-based biology for health research and proposing key recommendat
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Is there an end to the periodic table? MSU professor explores its limitsAs the 150th anniversary of the formulation of the Periodic Table of Chemical Elements looms, a Michigan State University professor probes the table's limits in a recent Nature Physics Perspective. In 2016, four new elements were added to it: nihonium, moscovium, tennessine, and oganesson. It took a decade and worldwide effort to confirm these last four elements. And now scientists wonder: how far
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

In kidney disease patients, illicit drug use linked with disease progression and deathAmong individuals with chronic kidney disease, hard illicit drug use was associated with higher risks of kidney disease progression and early death. Tobacco smoking was associated with a higher risk of early death. Alcohol drinking was associated with a lower risk of early death.
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Science : NPR
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NASA's Curiosity Rover Finds Chemical Building Blocks For Life On MarsMars NASA CuriosityScientists can't say whether there is, or ever was, life on the Red Planet. But two Martian rock samples contained organic molecules — which contain carbon, the chemical element central to life. (Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS)
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The Scientist RSS

Blood Test Predicts Pregnancy Due DateA small study based on circulating RNA in the blood of moms-to-be describes a technique that could be used to help predict who's most at risk of preterm labor.
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The Scientist RSS

Researchers React to Microsofts Acquisition of GitHubComputational biologists are optimistic that the purchase of the world's largest hub for open-source computer code will not affect the way they use GitHub for science.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
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Bees join an exclusive crew of animals that get the concept of zeroHoneybees can pass a test of ranking ‘nothing’ as less than one.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

UMSOM researchers find that silent carriers of malaria are unlikely to develop the diseaseIn regions where malaria illness is widespread, it is common to find many individuals who are infected with malaria parasites (Plasmodium falciparum), but without symptoms. New research conducted by the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) shows that treating these silent malaria cases could help stop the spread of malaria to others.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Unnecessarily difficult: Physical activity resources for adults are loaded with jargonWeb page articles and other written materials designed to encourage physical activity are often too difficult to be easily read and understood by most US adults, limiting their effectiveness.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

USC scientists discover schizophrenia gene roles in brain developmentA USC research team identifies a universe of molecules responsible for cell activity and brain development that contribute to mental disorders, including schizophrenia. bipolar condition and depression.
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The Atlantic
2
‘An Opportunity for the Taliban’It's been rare, over the past 17 years of conflict in Afghanistan, to see any particularly bold movements toward peace. So Ashraf Ghani's announcement Thursday that he would observe a weeklong ceasefire with the Taliban was a dramatic departure from the pattern, even if only for a week. And the gesture follows up the Afghan leader’s unconditional offer of talks with the Taliban in February. In ne
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Facebook admits privacy settings 'bug' affecting 14 million usersFacebook acknowledged Thursday a software glitch that changed the settings of some 14 million users, potentially making some posts public even if they were intended to be private.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Are you really into me?Those who feel greater certainty that a prospective romantic partner reciprocates their interest will put more effort into seeing that person again, while rating the possible date as more sexually attractive than they would if they were less certain about the prospective date's romantic intentions.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Amazon unveils nearly hands-free streaming TV deviceAlexa for couch potatoes is coming: Amazon's new streaming TV device will let users shout out when they want to turn on the TV, flip channels or search for sitcoms—all without pushing any buttons.
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Feed: All Latest
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Facebook Bug Made Up to 14 Million Users' Posts Public For DaysIn late May, millions of Facebook users had new posts set to public by default.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Hurricanes are slowing down, and that's bad newsSome hurricanes are moving more slowly, spending increased time over land and leading to catastrophic local rainfall and flooding, according to a new study published Wednesday (June 6) in the journal Nature.
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New Scientist – News
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Mars has complex organic material that may be from ancient lifeThe Curiosity rover has found methane in Mars’s atmosphere and complex organic molecules preserved for 3.5 billion years. Both could have come from life
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Inside Science
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The Science and Controversy Behind Horse Racing’s Most Popular Race Day DrugThe Science and Controversy Behind Horse Racing’s Most Popular Race Day Drug Trainers have used Lasix for decades to reduce bleeding and improve performance in North American racehorses. Horserace.jpg Race at Belmont Park on September 29, 2012 Image credits: Cheryl Ann Quigley/ Shutterstock Sports Thursday, June 7, 2018 – 15:30 Kimberly Hickok, Contributor (Inside Science) — This Saturday, a 3-y
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Live Science
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The Cell-Killing 'Executioner Protein' Has a Helper. Scientists Think They've Identified It.The protein responsible for a complex type of cell suicide has an accomplice.
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New on MIT Technology Review
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Don’t be AI-vil: Google says its algorithms will do no harmGoogle has created a set of principles for its artificial-intelligence researchers to live by—and they prohibit weapons technology.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Sleuthing leads to new findings about peculiar ocean fishThe fish buyer noticed something different about the large, colorful disc-shaped opah waiting to be sold at the auction house in Honolulu. Among the differences: one fish had a bigger eye than the other.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Google rules out using artificial intelligence for weapons (Update)Google announced Thursday it would not use artificial intelligence for weapons or to "cause or directly facilitate injury to people," as it unveiled a set of principles for the technologies.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Scientists predict average dead zone, but 3x long-term goalFederal scientists are predicting an average dead zone this summer in the Gulf of Mexico. But they note that this would still be three times greater than the long-term goal for reducing the size of the largely human-caused area where there's too little oxygen to support marine life.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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US household wealth tops $100 trillion for first timeUS household wealth topped the $100 trillion mark for the first time ever in the first quarter of 2018, the US Federal Reserve said on Thursday.
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The Scientist RSS

Nobel-Winning Biochemist Paul Boyer DiesThe UCLA researcher was lauded for figuring out how ATP synthase works.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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New laser makes silicon 'sing'Scientists have created a new type of silicon laser that uses sounds waves to amplify light.
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Big Think
4
Brutality is common in video games, but not sexual violence. Why?In computer games, sexual violence and pedophilia are not as pervasive as warfare and murder. Why is that? What makes gamers drawn to some forms of violence, but not to others? Read More
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Popular Science
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Why scientific evidence won't change the minds of Loch Ness monster true believersScience To handle potential discomforting thoughts, people rationalize their thoughts and actions. An international research team plans to use state-of-the-art DNA testing to establish once and for all whether the Loch Ness monster exists. Regardless of the results,…
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Big Think
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Google publishes A.I. code of ethics after Pentagon project debacleGoogle recently announced that it would end its participation in Project Maven after its current contract expires. It will also publish a set of ethical guidelines for future use of artificial intelligence, but is this too little too late to save the tech firm from the public’s eroding trust? Read More
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New on MIT Technology Review
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Researchers have released the largest self-driving-car data set yet
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NYT > Science
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Life on Mars? Rover’s Latest Discovery Puts It ‘On the Table’Mars NASA CuriosityThe identification of organic molecules in rocks on the red planet does not necessarily point to life there, past or present, but does indicate that some of the building blocks were present.
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NYT > Science
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Blood Test Might Predict Pregnancy Due Date and Preterm BirthThe test is far from ready for use, but research is promising. If it works in bigger studies, it could help prevent deaths of babies born prematurely.
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Big Think
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New ‘opt-out’ law makes every Icelander an organ donor by defaultIceland just passed a law that changes its organ donor program from ‘opt-in’ to ‘opt-out’, a move that effectively turns every citizen into a donor unless otherwise specified. Read More
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Cattle may spread leptospirosis in Africa, study suggestsThe bacterial infection leptospirosis is increasingly recognized as an important cause of fever in Africa. Now, researchers have analyzed the major risk factors for contracting leptospirosis and discovered that rice and cattle farming are associated with acute infection.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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New computational tool predicts progression of metabolic syndrome in miceScientists have developed a new computational model that accurately predicts the gradual, long-term progression of metabolic syndrome in mice.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Cattle, sheep and goats may transmit leptospirosis to humans in TanzaniaLeptospirosis, which affects more than one million people worldwide each year, is known to be transmitted to humans from a wide range of animals. Now, researchers have discovered that more than 7 percent of the cattle and 1 percent of sheep and goats in local slaughterhouses in northern Tanzania are infected with Leptospira bacteria.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Active HIV in large white blood cells may drive cognitive impairment in infected miceMacrophages, large white blood cells that engulf and destroy potential pathogens, harbor active viral reserves that appear to play a key role in impaired learning and memory in mice infected with a rodent version of HIV.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Bees understand the concept of zeroScientists have discovered honeybees can understand the concept of zero, putting them in an elite club of clever animals that can grasp the abstract mathematical notion of nothing.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Threat of malaria left its mark on the immune system in people with African ancestryResearchers have identified a genetic difference between people with African and European ancestry that affects how the immune system triggers inflammation. They suspect these differences are rooted in how the immune system evolved and the evolutionary pressure exerted by malaria on ancestors who lived in Africa.
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Viden

NASA-robot finder tegn på liv i søbund på MarsRobotten Curiosity har fundet klare spor efter organiske molekyler på Mars, der måske stammer fra levende organismer.
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Viden

Er det for sent at redde Jorden?Det kræver politisk handling, hvis klimaforandringerne skal bremses, vurderer forsker. Men du kan også selv gøre noget.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Feds: Tesla accelerated, didn't brake ahead of fatal crashA Tesla SUV using the company's semi-autonomous Autopilot driving system accelerated just before crashing into a California freeway barrier, killing its driver, federal investigators have determined.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Consumer food choices can help reduce greenhouse emissions contributing to climate changeChanges in diet have been proposed as a way to reduce carbon emissions from the food system. But there has been little research on the affordability and feasibility of low-carbon food choices in the U.S. and how these choices could affect diet and climate change.
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Big Think
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NASA's Curiosity rover has found organic matter on MarsMars NASA CuriosityNASA has found organic matter preserved in 3-billion-year-old mudstones at Gale crater on Mars. Is it just a matter of time before life is discovered on the red planet? Read More
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The Atlantic
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A New Glimpse Into the Martian PastSeveral billion years ago, when it was a young planet, Mars was different. Liquid water pooled in deep craters carved out of the landscape by violent collisions with space rocks. Rivers snaked through the jagged terrain. The planet was wrapped in a warm, thick atmosphere, and mountaintops pierced a sky not unlike our own. Today, Mars is a cold, barren desert world, with a wispy atmosphere and no
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The Atlantic
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A CRISPR Pioneer on Gene Editing: 'We Shouldn't Screw It Up'The first thing many people notice about Feng Zhang—nearly every article written about him acknowledges it—is his relative youth. At just 36, with glasses and a round face that make him look even younger, the biologist has already made two discoveries tipped to win Nobel Prizes. The big one, the one that shot Zhang to scientific celebrity, is CRISPR : a gene-editing tool that could allow precise
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Feed: All Latest
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Google Sets Limits on Its Use of AI, but Allows Defense WorkIn response to employee unrest over a Pentagon contract, Google CEO Sundar Pichai offered rules for the company's use of artificial intelligence.
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Science current issue
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Still not ready for Ebola
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Science current issue

News at a glance
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Science current issue
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She studied Mexico City. Can she lead it, too?
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Science current issue

China takes new steps to lure science talent from abroad
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Science current issue
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NASA Curiosity rover hits organic pay dirt on Mars
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Science current issue

No bias found in NIH reviews
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Science current issue
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Dig seeks site of first English settlement in the New World
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Science current issue

Middleweight black holes found at last
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Science current issue
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Beavers, rebooted
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Science current issue
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Summer reading, science style
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Science current issue
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Organic molecules on MarsMars NASA Curiosity
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Science current issue
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Honey bees zero in on the empty set
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Science current issue

Targeting microbial pathogens
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Science current issue

What precipitation is extreme?
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Science current issue
1
The expanding materials multiverse
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Science current issue
38
Exploring early human embryo development
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Science current issue

Stanley Falkow (1934-2018)
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Science current issue
77
Genealogy databases and the future of criminal investigation
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Science current issue
2
Greenland sled dogs at risk of extinction
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Science current issue

The misunderstood sixth mass extinction
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Science current issue

Injustices of foreign investment in coal
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Science current issue

Out of Antarctica
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Science current issue

Measuring martian organics and methane
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Science current issue

Making silicon shine bright
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Science current issue

Tipping points in social convention
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Science current issue

Toward more predictable birthdays
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Science current issue

Sterility in rice via toxin and antidote
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Science current issue

Economic rationale for fishing the high seas
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Science current issue

DNA-bound ubiquitin coordinates repair
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Science current issue

A spotlight on great ape genomes
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Science current issue

Finding a role for PNECs in asthma
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Science current issue

A missing link in cholesterol absorption
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Science current issue

Quantum dipoles go liquid
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Science current issue

Antenna switches partners in the shade
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Science current issue

Metasurfaces for molecular detection
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Science current issue

Predicting changes in "extreme" precipitation
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Science current issue

Defense cargo shuttles in vesicles
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Science current issue

Understanding zero
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Science current issue

Zika leaves a lasting impact on the brain
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Science current issue

Modeling embryogenesis
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Science current issue

Taking residence to defend
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Science current issue

The San Andreas creeps along the decade
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Science current issue

The long and short of RNA export
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Science current issue

An algal transformation in Lake Baikal
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Science current issue

Tissue-specific DNA demethylation after birth
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Science current issue

Not just a LARK
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Genomic crowdsourcing with privacy
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Science current issue

Hurting the most vulnerable
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Science current issue
8
A LIMA1 variant promotes low plasma LDL cholesterol and decreases intestinal cholesterol absorptionA high concentration of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Although LDL-C levels vary among humans and are heritable, the genetic factors affecting LDL-C are not fully characterized. We identified a rare frameshift variant in the LIMA1 (also known as EPLIN or SREBP3 ) gene from a Chinese family of Kazakh ethnicity with inherited low LDL-
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Science current issue
14
Background levels of methane in Mars atmosphere show strong seasonal variationsVariable levels of methane in the martian atmosphere have eluded explanation partly because the measurements are not repeatable in time or location. We report in situ measurements at Gale crater made over a 5-year period by the Tunable Laser Spectrometer on the Curiosity rover. The background levels of methane have a mean value 0.41 ± 0.16 parts per billion by volume (ppbv) (95% confidence interv
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Science current issue
300+
Organic matter preserved in 3-billion-year-old mudstones at Gale crater, MarsMars NASA CuriosityEstablishing the presence and state of organic matter, including its possible biosignatures, in martian materials has been an elusive quest, despite limited reports of the existence of organic matter on Mars. We report the in situ detection of organic matter preserved in lacustrine mudstones at the base of the ~3.5-billion-year-old Murray formation at Pahrump Hills, Gale crater, by the Sample Ana
14h
Science current issue

Evidence for a quantum dipole liquid state in an organic quasi-two-dimensional materialMott insulators are commonly pictured with electrons localized on lattice sites, with their low-energy degrees of freedom involving spins only. Here, we observe emergent charge degrees of freedom in a molecule-based Mott insulator -(BEDT-TTF) 2 Hg(SCN) 2 Br, resulting in a quantum dipole liquid state. Electrons localized on molecular dimer lattice sites form electric dipoles that do not order at
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Science current issue

Imaging-based molecular barcoding with pixelated dielectric metasurfacesMetasurfaces provide opportunities for wavefront control, flat optics, and subwavelength light focusing. We developed an imaging-based nanophotonic method for detecting mid-infrared molecular fingerprints and implemented it for the chemical identification and compositional analysis of surface-bound analytes. Our technique features a two-dimensional pixelated dielectric metasurface with a range of
14h
Science current issue
1
Structure of the maize photosystem I supercomplex with light-harvesting complexes I and IIPlants regulate photosynthetic light harvesting to maintain balanced energy flux into photosystems I and II (PSI and PSII). Under light conditions favoring PSII excitation, the PSII antenna, light-harvesting complex II (LHCII), is phosphorylated and forms a supercomplex with PSI core and the PSI antenna, light-harvesting complex I (LHCI). Both LHCI and LHCII then transfer excitation energy to the
14h
Science current issue

A silicon Brillouin laserBrillouin laser oscillators offer powerful and flexible dynamics as the basis for mode-locked lasers, microwave oscillators, and optical gyroscopes in a variety of optical systems. However, Brillouin interactions are markedly weak in conventional silicon photonic waveguides, stifling progress toward silicon-based Brillouin lasers. The recent advent of hybrid photonic-phononic waveguides has revea
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Science current issue

Experimental evidence for tipping points in social conventionTheoretical models of critical mass have shown how minority groups can initiate social change dynamics in the emergence of new social conventions. Here, we study an artificial system of social conventions in which human subjects interact to establish a new coordination equilibrium. The findings provide direct empirical demonstration of the existence of a tipping point in the dynamics of changing
14h
Science current issue
21
A tetrapod fauna from within the Devonian Antarctic CircleUntil now, all known fossils of tetrapods (limbed vertebrates with digits) and near-tetrapods (such as Elpistostege , Tiktaalik , and Panderichthys ) from the Devonian period have come from localities in tropical to subtropical paleolatitudes. Most are from Laurussia, a continent incorporating Europe, Greenland, and North America, with only one body fossil and one footprint locality from Australi
14h
Science current issue
200+
Numerical ordering of zero in honey beesSome vertebrates demonstrate complex numerosity concepts—including addition, sequential ordering of numbers, or even the concept of zero—but whether an insect can develop an understanding for such concepts remains unknown. We trained individual honey bees to the numerical concepts of "greater than" or "less than" using stimuli containing one to six elemental features. Bees could subsequently extr
14h
Science current issue
3
Plants send small RNAs in extracellular vesicles to fungal pathogen to silence virulence genesSome pathogens and pests deliver small RNAs (sRNAs) into host cells to suppress host immunity. Conversely, hosts also transfer sRNAs into pathogens and pests to inhibit their virulence. Although sRNA trafficking has been observed in a wide variety of interactions, how sRNAs are transferred, especially from hosts to pathogens and pests, is still unknown. Here, we show that host Arabidopsis cells s
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Science current issue

A selfish genetic element confers non-Mendelian inheritance in riceSelfish genetic elements are pervasive in eukaryote genomes, but their role remains controversial. We show that qHMS7 , a major quantitative genetic locus for hybrid male sterility between wild rice ( Oryza meridionalis ) and Asian cultivated rice ( O. sativa ), contains two tightly linked genes [ Open Reading Frame 2 ( ORF2 ) and ORF3 ]. ORF2 encodes a toxic genetic element that aborts pollen in
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Science current issue
44
Noninvasive blood tests for fetal development predict gestational age and preterm deliveryNoninvasive blood tests that provide information about fetal development and gestational age could potentially improve prenatal care. Ultrasound, the current gold standard, is not always affordable in low-resource settings and does not predict spontaneous preterm birth, a leading cause of infant death. In a pilot study of 31 healthy pregnant women, we found that measurement of nine cell-free RNA
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Science current issue

New Products
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Science current issue

Sponsored Collection | 90 Years of Scientific Advances at the Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, CAS
14h
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The power of persistence
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Science current issue
42
High-resolution comparative analysis of great ape genomesGenetic studies of human evolution require high-quality contiguous ape genome assemblies that are not guided by the human reference. We coupled long-read sequence assembly and full-length complementary DNA sequencing with a multiplatform scaffolding approach to produce ab initio chimpanzee and orangutan genome assemblies. By comparing these with two long-read de novo human genome assemblies and a
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Science current issue

Pulmonary neuroendocrine cells amplify allergic asthma responsesPulmonary neuroendocrine cells (PNECs) are rare airway epithelial cells whose function is poorly understood. Here we show that Ascl1 -mutant mice that have no PNECs exhibit severely blunted mucosal type 2 response in models of allergic asthma. PNECs reside in close proximity to group 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s) near airway branch points. PNECs act through calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP
14h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
4
Consumer food choices can help reduce greenhouse emissions contributing to climate changeChanges in diet have been proposed as a way to reduce carbon emissions from the food system. A new study provides the latest and most comprehensive estimate of greenhouse gas emissions generated by US consumer food purchases, and assesses how those choices could affect diet and climate change.
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The Scientist RSS

Bees Appear Able to Comprehend the Concept of ZeroThe insects correctly ordered an absence of black dots as 'less than' a group of black dots.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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NASA finds ancient organic material, mysterious methane on MarsMars NASA CuriosityNASA's Curiosity rover has found new evidence preserved in rocks on Mars that suggests the planet could have supported ancient life, as well as new evidence in the Martian atmosphere that relates to the search for current life on the Red Planet.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
42
Tipping point for large-scale social changeA new study finds that when 25 percent of people in a group adopt a new social norm, it creates a tipping point where the entire group follows suit. This shows the direct causal effect of the size of a committed minority on its capacity to create social change.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
27
Blood test for pregnant women can predict premature birthA new blood test for pregnant women detects with 75-80 percent accuracy whether their pregnancies will end in premature birth. The technique can also be used to estimate a fetus's gestational age — or the mother's due date — as reliably as and less expensively than ultrasound.
14h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Amazon to livestream Premier League in online shakeupAmazon has secured the rights to show English Premier League football matches in a pioneering move for the online sector in the bidding war for sports events.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
8
Ukraine puts out forest fire around ChernobylA forest fire that had raged for three days in the restricted zone around Chernobyl, scene of the world's worst nuclear accident in 1986, was put out Thursday and no increase in radiation in the air was detected, authorities said.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
12
Heat-trapping carbon dioxide levels in air hit another highThe amount of heat-trapping carbon dioxide in the air peaked again this year at record levels, scientists reported Thursday.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
6
Auction of Brazil's pre-salt oil fields earns $807 millionBrazil raked in 3.15 billion reais ($807 million) Friday in the first auction of deep sea, pre-salt oil fields since a crippling strike led to the resignation of state oil company Petrobras's CEO.
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Popular Science
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Is there life on Mars? TBD. But scientists found ancient organic matter in the Red Planet’s rocks.Mars NASA CuriositySpace Sorry, no aliens—yet. Scientists have been looking for organic material on Mars for decades.
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NYT > Science
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Defying Prevention Efforts, Suicide Rates Are Climbing Across the NationSince 1999, suicide rates have risen in almost every state and by 25 percent nationwide. Health officials are scrambling for solutions.
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NYT > Science
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The Chemical Industry Scores a Big Win at the E.P.A.The agency has decided that it will not look at air, water or ground contaminants when it determines the health and safety risks of potentially toxic chemicals.
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NYT > Science
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Do Bees Know Nothing?Researchers say bees understand the concept of nothing, or zero. But do we understand what that means?
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NYT > Science
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Paul D. Boyer, 99, Dies; Nobel Winner Decoded Enzyme That Powers LifeHe shared the 1997 prize in chemistry for his work on understanding how organisms get energy from their environments and process it to stay alive.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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NASA finds ancient organic material, mysterious methane on MarsMars NASA CuriosityNASA's Curiosity rover has found new evidence preserved in rocks on Mars that suggests the planet could have supported ancient life, as well as new evidence in the Martian atmosphere that relates to the search for current life on the Red Planet. While not necessarily evidence of life itself, these findings are a good sign for future missions exploring the planet's surface and subsurface.
14h
Live Science
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Suicide Rates Increase in Nearly All StatesIn a concerning trend, deaths from suicide have increased in nearly every U.S. state in recent years.
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New on MIT Technology Review
40
“Stablecoins” are trending, but they may ignore basic economicsPegging cryptocurrencies to “real” money could stabilize them—or ruin them entirely.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
Letters of recommendation for women more likely to raise doubtsLetters of recommendation written for women are more likely to contain words or phrases that raise doubts about job or education qualifications than letters written for men, according to new research from Rice University and the University of Houston.
15h
BBC News – Science & Environment
200+
Curiosity rover sees seasonal Mars methane swingMars NASA CuriosityMethane on the Red Planet waxes and wanes with the seasons – another clue in the search for life.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
15
Sleep problems in Parkinson's disease: Can we fix them?Researchers have uncovered why people with a hereditary form of Parkinson's disease suffer from sleep disturbances. The molecular mechanisms uncovered in fruit flies and human stem cells also point to candidate targets for the development of new treatments.
15h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
9
Structural protein found essential to X chromosome inactivationA research team has identified the essential role of a structural protein in the silencing of the inactive X chromosome, a process that prevents both copies of the same gene from being expressed in female mammals, which carry two copies of the X chromosome.
15h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
500+
Widespread uranium contamination found in India's groundwaterA new Duke University-led study has found widespread uranium contamination in groundwater from aquifers in 16 Indian states.
15h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Italy fines Ryanair for mass flight cancellationsItaly's competition authority (AGCM) on Thursday hit Ryanair with a 1.85 million euro ($2.19 million) fine for mass flight cancellations late last year and failing to adequately inform affected passengers of their rights.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Football training in school greatly improves girls' fitness and healthSchoolgirls can achieve lower blood pressure, stronger muscles, better balance and improved jumping performance if their school puts football training on the timetable — including girls who have never played football before. This is the finding of a study of the FIFA 11 for Health in Europe exercise concept in Faroese schoolchildren carried out by football researchers at the University of Souther
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Novel transmitter protects wireless devices from hackersMIT researchers have developed a novel transmitter that frequency hops each individual 1 or 0 bit of a data packet, every microsecond, which is fast enough to thwart even the quickest hackers.
15h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Blood test may identify pregnant women at risk of premature birthResearchers have found biomarkers in maternal blood that accurately identified pregnant women who would go on to deliver babies up to two months prematurely, an important finding as there is currently no test on the market to reliably assess which pregnancies will end with a premature birth. 15 million babies are born prematurely each year worldwide.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

A nanotech sensor that turns molecular fingerprints into bar codesA new system developed at EPFL can detect and analyze molecules without the need for an infrared spectrometer. The system uses nanostructured metapixels to detect and then translate molecules' unique signatures into bar codes. The technology can be integrated into a compact sensor chip. It opens the door to large-scale image-based detection of materials using machine-learning technology. The resea
15h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Active HIV in large white blood cells may drive cognitive impairment in infected miceAn experimental model of HIV infection in mice, developed by Mount Sinai researchers, has shown that HIV causes learning and memory dysfunction, a cognitive disease that is now observed in about half of HIV infected people that worsens with age, and is currently incurable.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Thyroid dysfunction may lead to diabetes during pregnancyWomen with thyroid dysfunction in the first half of pregnancy face an increased risk for gestational diabetes, a form of diabetes that is typically diagnosed during the second trimester, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.
15h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Mars exhumes methane on a seasonal cycle, Curiosity reveals; rover also detects ancient organic matterData from the Curiosity rover, part of two separate studies, furthers scientists' understanding of methane on Mars — suggesting some of it may be trapped in water-based crystals — and identifies additional carbon-bearing molecules, central to understanding processes and conditions on the planet.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Research finds tipping point for large-scale social changeA study in Science finds that when 25 percent of people in a group adopt a new social norm, it creates a tipping point where the entire group follows suit. This shows the direct causal effect of the size of a committed minority on its capacity to create social change.
15h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Honey bees can zero in on the advanced concept of zeroThe honey bee has joined the ranks of dolphins, parrots, primates and preschool children, in demonstrating the ability to distinguish zero on the numerical spectrum.
15h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

At what size does a minority group become influential?When a viewpoint is held by a minority, what size does that minority need to reach to hit a tipping point, where their view becomes widely accepted in the rest of the population?
15h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Blood test for pregnant women can predict premature birth, Stanford-led study reportsA new blood test for pregnant women detects with 75-80 percent accuracy whether their pregnancies will end in premature birth. The technique can also be used to estimate a fetus's gestational age — or the mother's due date — as reliably as and less expensively than ultrasound.
15h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Shifting the thinking on tetrapod evolution: Ancient four-limbed animals lived near the polesIt has long been presumed that the ancestors of all vertebrates — the amphibious, aquatic tetrapods that first colonized the land — evolved in warm tropical environments.
15h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Malaria: Cooperating antibodies enhance immune responseScientists from the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) in Heidelberg, Germany, and from The Hospital for Sick Children (SickKids) in Toronto, Canada, have studied how the human immune system combats malaria infections. In this study, the researchers discovered a previously unnoticed characteristic of antibodies against the malaria parasite: They can cooperate with each other, thus binding even s
15h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
First tetrapods of Africa lived within the Devonian Antarctic CircleThe first African fossils of Devonian tetrapods (four-legged vertebrates) show these pioneers of land living within the Antarctic circle, 360 million years ago.
15h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Honeybees zero in on nothingThe number zero is the complex, abstract backbone of modern mathematics and technological advancements and now it's clear that bees are officially in the "zero club" – that elite group of clever creatures that can understand the concept.
15h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New laser makes silicon 'sing'Yale scientists have created a new type of silicon laser that uses sounds waves to amplify light. A study about the discovery appears June 8 in the online edition of the journal Science.
15h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Improved ape genome assemblies provide new insights into human evolutionHigher-quality assemblies of great ape genomes have now been generated without guidance of the human reference genome. They provide a clearer view of genetic differences that arose as humans diverged from other primates. The newest investigation offers the most comprehensive catalog of genetic variants that were gained or lost in different ape lineages. The influence of these variants was explored
15h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Threat of malaria left its mark on the immune system in people with African ancestryIn a new study published June 7, 2018, in PLOS Genetics, Christine Ambrosone of Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center and colleagues identified a genetic difference between people with African and European ancestry that affects how the immune system triggers inflammation. They suspect these differences are rooted in how the immune system evolved and the evolutionary pressure exerted by malaria
15h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Active HIV in large white blood cells may drive cognitive impairment in infected miceMacrophages, large white blood cells that engulf and destroy potential pathogens, harbor active viral reserves that appear to play a key role in impaired learning and memory in mice infected with a rodent version of HIV. Chao-Jiang Gu of Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, and colleagues present these new findings in PLOS Pathogens.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New computational tool predicts progression of metabolic syndrome in miceScientists have developed a new computational model that accurately predicts the gradual, long-term progression of metabolic syndrome in mice. The model, created by Yvonne Rozendaal of Eindhoven University of Technology in the Netherlands and colleagues, is presented in PLOS Computational Biology.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Cattle may spread leptospirosis in Africa, study suggestsThe bacterial infection leptospirosis is increasingly recognized as an important cause of fever in Africa. Now, researchers reporting in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases have analyzed the major risk factors for contracting leptospirosis and discovered that rice and cattle farming are associated with acute infection.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Cattle, sheep and goats may transmit leptospirosis to humans in TanzaniaLeptospirosis, which affects more than one million people worldwide each year, is known to be transmitted to humans from a wide range of animals. Now, researchers reporting in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases have discovered that more than 7 percent of the cattle and 1 percent of sheep and goats in local slaughterhouses in northern Tanzania are infected with Leptospira bacteria.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

FASEB Journal: Caloric intake and muscle mass at high altitudeNew research in The FASEB Journal explored why a group of young, healthy adults residing at high altitude lost muscle mass while severely underfed and consuming the same high-protein diet that preserved muscle during weight loss at sea level.
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Science : NPR
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Math Bee: Honeybees Seem To Understand The Notion Of ZeroResearch shows that bees possess a mathematical ability once thought to exist only in dolphins, primates, birds and humans who are beyond the preschool years. (Image credit: Don Farrall/Getty Images)
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Ingeniøren
2
En minoritet på 25 procent kan gennemtvinge sin viljeUgens forskning i minoriteter og bier bestemmer den magiske størrelse, en minoritet skal have for at ændre en gruppes holdning eller norm, og opdager en overraskende egenskab ved biers talfornemmelse.
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Scientific American Content: Global
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Blood Test Could Predict Premature Birth Risk, Due DateA teaspoon of a pregnant woman’s blood would be required for this experimental tool — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
20
Waves move across the human brain to support memoryEngineers have discovered a new fundamental feature of brain oscillations: they actually move rhythmically across the brain, reflecting patterns of neuronal activity that propagate across the cortex. The researchers also found that the traveling waves moved more reliably when subjects performed well while performing a working memory task, indicating traveling waves are important for memory and cog
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
48
Tonsil and adenoid removal associated with respiratory, allergic and infectious diseaseRemoving tonsils and adenoids in childhood increases the long-term risk of respiratory, allergic and infectious diseases, according to researchers who have examined — for the first time — the long-term effects of the operations.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
18
Widespread uranium contamination found in India's groundwaterA new study has found widespread uranium contamination in groundwater aquifers — a chief source for drinking water and irrigation — in 16 Indian states. The primary source of the contamination is natural, but human factors such as groundwater-table depletion and nitrate pollution may exacerbate the problem. Studies have linked exposure to uranium in drinking water to chronic kidney disease.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
15
Jurassic diet: Why our knowledge of what ancient pterosaurs ate might be wrongResearch reveals knowledge of prehistoric diets is often based on outdated ideas and could be inaccurate.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
11
In building the brain, cell pedigree mattersResearch in mice shows that a protein made by the stem cells that give rise to neurons, but not by neurons themselves, is key to brain cells' ability to migrate during development and assume their proper positions This primordial protein acts by clinging onto thousands of sites in the genome, affecting the activity of multiple genes that regulate brain development. The findings could yield valuabl
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Science | The Guardian
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Nasa Mars rover finds organic matter in ancient lake bedCuriosity digs up carbon compounds that could be food for life in sediments that formed 3bn years ago Nasa’s veteran Curiosity rover has found complex organic matter buried and preserved in ancient sediments that formed a vast lake bed on Mars more than 3bn years ago. The discovery is the most compelling evidence yet that long before the planet became the parched world it is today, Martian lakes
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Science | The Guardian
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Premature birth risk could be measured by blood test – studyFindings offer hope of accurate predictions on age of foetus and early birth through test that picks up free-floating RNA in the mother’s blood Whether a pregnant woman is at risk of premature delivery could eventually be predicted by a blood test, according to new research. The study found that both the age of a developing foetus, and whether a woman was at risk of giving birth early, could be w
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The Atlantic
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Will Probiotics Ever Live Up to the Hype?“Altering someone’s microbiome is as complicated as changing a rainforest or a coral reef,” The Atlantic ’s Ed Yong told an audience at the National Institutes of Health on Tuesday. “It’s not easy.” In conversation with Francis Collins, the director of the NIH, Yong discussed the future of microbial medicine. He argued that doctors should focus on an “ecological type of thinking” instead of the m
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The Atlantic
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The Tipping Point When Minority Views Take OverIn the 1970s, the business professor Rosabeth Kanter published an influential account of an American company that had recently recruited women to its sales team. The quality of those women’s working lives, Kanter noted astutely, depended on their representation. When they made up just 15 percent of the workforce, they faced stereotyping, harassment, isolation, disproportionate performance pressur
15h
Live Science
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See How Brain Worms Turn Ants into the Walking DeadCan you wrap your mind around the idea of an ant brain with a worm in it?
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Live Science
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There May Be Life on Mars, But This NASA Report Doesn't Prove ItNASA did find two more scraps of evidence about the kind of life that might exist on Mars. Here's what the new research really shows.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
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Curiosity finds that Mars’ methane changes with the seasonsThe Curiosity rover found seasonally changing methane in Mars’ atmosphere and more signs of organic molecules in an ancient lake bed.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
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Why using genetic genealogy to solve crimes could pose problemsRules governing how police can use DNA searches in genealogy databases aren’t clear, raising civil rights and privacy concerns.
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Scientific American Content: Global
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Curiosity Rover Uncovers Long-Sought Organic Materials on Martian SurfaceAfter decades of searching, scientists are at last closing in on the sources of carbon-rich material in the Red Planet’s air and soil — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
53
Improved ape genome assemblies provide new insights into human evolutionNew, higher-quality assemblies of great ape genomes have now been generated without the guidance of the human reference genome. The effort to reduce "humanizing" discovery bias in great ape genomes provides a clearer view of the genetic differences that arose as humans diverged from other primates.
15h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
92
New laser makes silicon 'sing'Yale scientists have created a new type of silicon laser that uses sounds waves to amplify light. A study about the discovery appears June 8 in the online edition of the journal Science.
15h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1K
Scientists discover bees understand the concept of zeroScientists have discovered honeybees can understand the concept of zero, putting them in an elite club of clever animals that can grasp the abstract mathematical notion of nothing.
15h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
200+
Research finds tipping point for large-scale social changeWhen organizations turn a blind eye to sexual harassment in the workplace, how many people need to take a stand before the behavior is no longer seen as normal?
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
58
A nanotech sensor that turns molecular fingerprints into bar codesInfrared spectroscopy is the benchmark method for detecting and analyzing organic compounds. But it requires complicated procedures and large, expensive instruments, making device miniaturization challenging and hindering its use for some industrial and medical applications and for data collection out in the field, such as for measuring pollutant concentrations. Furthermore, it is fundamentally li
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
100+
First tetrapods of Africa lived within the Devonian Antarctic CircleThe first African fossils of Devonian tetrapods (four-legged vertebrates) show these pioneers of land living within the Antarctic circle, 360 million years ago.
15h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
14
Teen pregnancy and birth rates at an all time low in Minn.Pregnancy and birth rates continue to decline for 15-19-year-olds in Minnesota, with rates decreasing the most among youth from communities of color. Researchers attribute the decline to a combination of delayed sexual activity and an increase in use of highly effective contraceptive methods among teens.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
9
Letters of recommendation for women more likely to raise doubtsLetters of recommendation written for women are more likely to contain words or phrases that raise doubts about job or education qualifications than letters written for men, according to new research.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
13
Using mathematical approaches to optimally manage public debtLarge government debt negatively impacts long-term economic growth and the debt-to-gross domestic product (GDP) ratio is an important indicator of a country's financial leverage. Financial mathematicians propose a mathematical model that helps optimize and control the debt-to-GDP ratio.
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New Scientist – News
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The LHC has found the Higgs works perfectly – which is a problemThe Higgs boson has been seen acting just as the standard model of physics predicts – which leaves us without clues to dark matter and other mysteries
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Feed: All Latest
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The Comcast-Disney Battle Isn't Just Business—It's a Grand Human DramaRubert Murdoch and Brian Roberts aren't just trying to increase their empires; they're two men seeking the ultimate control
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Popular Science
95
China teases its new stealth bomberEastern Arsenal Big News Xian Aircraft Corporation's 60 year anniversary video teases about China's future strategic stealth bomber.
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Popular Science
36
Father’s Day gifts for dads you adore, tolerate, and everything in betweenGadgets No gimmicks. Just great presents. Dads are half of the reason you’re here, so celebrate your existence by celebrating theirs. You’ll never be able to give them something better than life, but you can…
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Dana Foundation

#WSF18: Our Microbiome and the BrainOn Saturday at the World Science Festival , microbiologists David Relman, Jo Handelsman, Rob Knight, and Martin Blaser convened for a discussion on how the microbiome relates to our health . Our microbiome, the collective bacteria, viruses, fungi and other microorganisms that live in the digestive tract, allows us to digest food properly and fight off disease. Research suggests that an unhappy mi
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Teen pregnancy and birth rates at an all time low in Minn., UMN Medical School report showsPregnancy and birth rates continue to decline for 15-19-year-olds in Minnesota, with rates decreasing the most among youth from communities of color. The 2018 Minnesota Adolescent Sexual Health Report from the University of Minnesota Medical School's Healthy Youth Development – Prevention Research Center (HYD – PRC) attributes the decline to a combination of delayed sexual activity and an increase
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BBC News – Science & Environment
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Oldest 'footprints' found in ChinaThe oldest known "footprints" left by an animal have been uncovered in China.
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New Scientist – News
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Nipah: the unknown virus that could be the next pandemic threatA virus most people have never heard of has killed 17 people in India, and disease experts are getting concerned
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Live Science
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Scorching-Hot Lava Evaporates Entire Lake in HawaiiFiery lava from Hawaii's ongoing volcanic eruption has completely evaporated the water from Green Lake, the Big Island's largest freshwater lake, according to the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).
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Live Science
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More Americans Are Being Evacuated from China Following Mysterious 'Sonic Attacks'At least two more Americans have been evacuated from China to be treated for mysterious headaches brought on by bizarre noises.
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Inside Science
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Capturing Carbon Dioxide From the Air Is Cheaper Than Originally ThoughtCapturing Carbon Dioxide From the Air Is Cheaper Than Originally Thought Canadian company shows that hydrocarbon fuel made from captured CO2 could compete with fossil fuels. FuelFromAir.jpg Image credits: Carbon Engineering Technology Thursday, June 7, 2018 – 11:45 Tracy Staedter, Contributor (Inside Science) — For decades, researchers have discussed possible methods for capturing excess carbon
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Viden

For mange øl? Virtual reality skal lære unge at styre deres brandertForskere udvikler nu et virtual reality-spil, der skal ruste unge til at modstå gruppepres til fester.
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The Atlantic
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Pose and the Uncapturable Brilliance of the BallroomIt was one of the first great gay outrages-slash-inside-jokes of 2018: “I’m so into voguing right now.” So announced the former Disney Channel actress Vanessa Hudgens on a January episode of RuPaul’s Drag Race All Stars after watching one of the contestants karate-chop the air and then execute a backwards fall off a platform. So into voguing right now ? It was like Hudgens had been invited to the
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Mom's voice may help babies sleep better in the NICUWhen they were played recordings of their mothers reading children's books, babies in the NICU slept better and woke up less often, according to a new abstract presented at this week's annual meeting for Sleep Medicine hosted by the Associated Professional Sleep Societies.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Letters of recommendation for women more likely to raise doubtsLetters of recommendation written for women are more likely to contain words or phrases that raise doubts about job or education qualifications than letters written for men, according to new research from Rice University.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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NASA sees Ewiniar slide back into South China Sea and strengthenTropical Cyclone Ewiniar made landfall on mainland China and as the center of circulation has moved back into the South China Sea and reorganized, NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP provided a look at the storm.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Widespread uranium contamination found in India's groundwaterA Duke-led study has found widespread uranium contamination in groundwater aquifers — a chief source for drinking water and irrigation — in 16 Indian states. The primary source of the contamination is natural, but human factors such as groundwater-table depletion and nitrate pollution may exacerbate the problem. Studies have linked exposure to uranium in drinking water to chronic kidney disease.
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Scientific American Content: Global
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Surprise! Jupiter's Lightning Looks a Lot Like Earth'sData from NASA’s Juno spacecraft reveals thunderbolts around the giant planet’s stormy poles — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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NASA sees Ewiniar slide back into South China Sea and strengthenTropical Cyclone Ewiniar made landfall on mainland China and as the center of circulation has moved back into the South China Sea and reorganized, NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP provided a look at the storm.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Scientists ID source of damaging inflammation after heart attackScientists have zeroed in on a culprit that spurs damaging inflammation in the heart following a heart attack. The guilty party is a type of immune cell that tries to heal the injured heart but instead triggers inflammation that leads to even more damage. The researchers also have found that an already approved drug effectively tamps down such inflammation in mice, protecting the heart from the pr
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Machine learning helps detect lymphedema among breast cancer survivorsMachine learning using real-time symptom reports can accurately detect lymphedema, a distressing side effect of breast cancer treatment that is more easily treated when identified early, finds a new study.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Flu virus is protected by mucus when airborne, regardless of humidityMucus and other airway secretions that are expelled when a person with the flu coughs or exhales appear to protect the virus when it becomes airborne, regardless of humidity levels, a creative experiment discovered. The results refute long-standing studies that indicated the influenza virus degrades and is inactivated sooner as the humidity increases.
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Science | The Guardian
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Plans for Clifford's Tower visitor centre scrapped after outcryEnglish Heritage concedes proposal for 13th-century mound in York was ‘too much’ Plans to build a visitor centre sited in the mound of York’s 13th-century Clifford’s Tower have been abandoned after huge opposition. Residents and archaeologists expressed alarm when it emerged that English Heritage was planning to insert a gift centre into the base of the famous mound, which was raised by William t
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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NASA peers into the rainfall of Eastern Pacific' Tropical Storm AlettaTropical Storm Aletta is spinning more than 440 miles off the southwestern coast of Mexico and using satellite data, NASA peered into the storm to uncover where the heaviest rain was falling.
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The Atlantic
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The Man Who Would Be King“I could stand in the middle of 5th Avenue and shoot somebody and I wouldn’t lose voters,” Donald Trump boasted during the campaign. According to his attorney and adviser Rudy Giuliani, if he tried it today, he could get away with murder. “I said, you know very theoretically, the answer is the president can’t be prosecuted for anything,” Giuliani told CNN , defending an earlier assertion to HuffP
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Viden

Her er jeres råd: Sådan bekæmper vi overforbrug af plastikLæs mere end 20 gode råd fra dr.dks brugere til, hvordan du kan genanvende eller reducere dit forbrug af plastik.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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NASA peers into the rainfall of Eastern Pacific' Tropical Storm AlettaTropical Storm Aletta is spinning more than 440 miles off the southwestern coast of Mexico and using satellite data, NASA peered into the storm to uncover where the heaviest rain was falling.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
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In a conservation catch-22, efforts to save quolls might endanger themAfter 13 generations isolated from predators, the endangered northern quoll lost its fear of them.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Researchers find evolutionary 'tipping point' linked to climate changeResearchers studying the impact of extreme climate conditions on biodiversity found a "tipping point" at which species, under pressure from dwindling food supplies due to climate change, must either evolve to take advantage of different food supplies or face extinction.
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Big Think
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Study: Muslim Americans living in prejudiced towns more likely to seek out ISISNew research reveals empirical data on how anti-Muslim sentiment could be nudging some Muslim Americans toward extremism. Read More
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Gulf of Mexico 'dead zone' forecasted to exceed the size of ConnecticutScientists have predicted the dead zone, or area with little to no oxygen in the northern Gulf of Mexico, will become larger than the state of Connecticut by the end of July, according to a new report. While there are more than 500 dead zones around the world, the northern Gulf of Mexico dead zone is the second largest human-caused coastal hypoxic area in the world.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Tiny paragliding beetle that lived with dinosaurs discovered in amber, named 'Jason'Featherwing beetles are smaller than the period at the end of this sentence. They get their name from the feathery fringe on their wings that enables them to catch the air and float like dandelion seeds. And, it turns out, they go way back — scientists discovered a 99-million-year-old featherwing beetle preserved in amber, and they named it "Jason."
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Maps made of nerve cellsMice move through the virtual world of a video game and provide insight into the mechanisms of memory formation.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Study develops a model enhancing particle beam efficiencyInspired by tokamaks, researchers create via computer simulation an alternative for better control, in accelerators, of the particles' chaotic trajectories.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Customized resistance exercise a factor for success with fibromyalgiaFibromyalgia and resistance exercise have often been considered an impossible combination. But with proper support and individually adjusted exercises, female patients achieved considerable health improvements, according to new research.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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How to suck carbon dioxide from the sky for fuels and moreSomeday, the gasoline you buy might come from carbon dioxide pulled out of the sky rather than from oil pumped out of the ground. By removing emitted carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and turning it into fresh fuels, engineers have demonstrated a scalable and cost-effective way to make deep cuts in the carbon footprint of transportation with minimal disruption to existing vehicles.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Providers preferences may be helpful in reducing inappropriate antibiotic prescriptionsPhysicians are open to receiving information on their antibiotic prescribing patterns, but have specific preference for receiving that information, according to new results. Anticipating physicians' preferences for feedback on antimicrobial use (AU) could help optimize impact of antibiotic stewardship programs and improve the use of antibiotics.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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In a hole in a tunicate there lived a hobbit: New shrimp species named after Bilbo BagginsA new species of shrimp was named after Tolkien's Bilbo Baggins thanks to its small size and hairy feet. The new species, Odontonia bagginsi, was described, figured and named together with another new species: Odontonia plurellicola. Both shrimps live symbiotically inside tunicates collected around Ternate and Tidore, Indonesia. In the present study anatomical and genetic characters were used to p
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
Operations resume at underground US nuclear waste repositoryRoutine operations have resumed at the U.S. government's only underground nuclear waste repository following an evacuation in May that was prompted by the discovery of a misaligned drum of waste.
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The Atlantic
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What Happens in the Gulf Doesn’t Stay in the GulfThe Gulf crisis that began last year appears to be living by reverse Las Vegas rules: What happens in the Gulf doesn’t stay in (or even have much impact on) the Gulf. Last June, a Saudi-led coalition cut off relations with and imposed a blockade on Qatar, invoking various and shifting rationales—Qatar was, allegedly, supporting terrorist groups, interfering in Saudi internal affairs, and displayi
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
Boston, other cities, to work to curb renewable energy costsBoston Mayor Martin Walsh is hoping to work with other cities to drive down the cost of renewable energy by asking developers for price estimates to meet their collective energy demand.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Scientists, animal activists: Don't cull Romanian brown bearScientists and animal rights groups have urged the Romanian government to rethink its plans to allow the hunting of brown bears.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Germany's Bayer completes purchase of MonsantoGerman pharmaceutical company Bayer AG says it has completed its purchase of U.S. seed and weed-killer maker Monsanto Co.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Honda, GM to develop electric vehicle batteries togetherHonda Motor Co. of Japan and U.S. automaker General Motors Co. agreed Thursday to work together in developing batteries for electric vehicles, mainly for the North American market.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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BuzzFeed to shut French websiteUS news website BuzzFeed is to shut down its French version after four years online, staff told AFP on Thursday.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
15
Not read a book lately? Blame Netflix, says studyAre you all caught up on your favourite Netflix show, but that novel on your nightstand is gathering dust?
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Gulf of Mexico 'dead zone' forecasted to exceed the size of ConnecticutScientists have predicted the dead zone, or area with little to no oxygen in the northern Gulf of Mexico, will become larger than the state of Connecticut by the end of July, according to a new report. While there are more than 500 dead zones around the world, the northern Gulf of Mexico dead zone is the second largest human-caused coastal hypoxic area in the world.
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Quanta Magazine
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Why Earth’s Cracked Crust May Be Essential for LifeFrom a distance, it’s not obvious that Earth is full of life. You have to get pretty close to see the biggest forests, and closer still to see the work of humans, let alone microbes. But even from space, the planet itself seems alive. Its landmass is broken apart into seven continents, which are separated by vast waters. Below those oceans, in the unseen depths of our planet, things are even live
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Google faces EU anti-trust fines over Android: sourcesThe EU's powerful anti-trust authority is set to decide in the coming weeks that Google unfairly punishes rivals of its Android mobile phone operating system and faces billions of euros in fines, sources said on Thursday.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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New BlackBerry phone aims to revive faded brandThere's a new BlackBerry smartphone, the latest effort to revive the once-dominant brand.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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At Guatemala volcano, weather and danger halt searchGuatemala's national disaster agency on Thursday suspended search and rescue efforts at the zone devastated by the eruption of the Volcano of Fire, saying climatic conditions and still-hot volcanic material makes it dangerous for the rescuers.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
5
Theater club at NASA center gives scientists creative outletSusan Breon wears two hats: scientist and musician.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Rare lynx found in Spain after being released in PortugalSpanish environmental authorities say they have captured a rare lynx in Catalonia, three years after it was released in Portugal. Litio, a four-year-old Iberian lynx, had been spotted on the outskirts of Barcelona on May 29.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Coral study reveals surprising twistA new study puts a surprising twist—one might even say a double spiral—into our understanding of how coral reefs react to ocean warming and acidification. It also offers the possibility of an early warning system for the warmth-induced bleaching events that are increasingly harming coral reefs worldwide.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Tiny paragliding beetle that lived with dinosaurs discovered in amber, named 'Jason'Featherwing beetles are smaller than the period at the end of this sentence. They get their name from the feathery fringe on their wings that enables them to catch the air and float like dandelion seeds. And, it turns out, they go way back— scientists discovered a 99-million-year-old featherwing beetle preserved in amber, and they named it "Jason."
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Popular Science
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There's an outbreak of canine flu. What do we do?Animals A bark, cough, or even petting your dog could spread infection. Is your dog coughing? Sneezing? Nose a little wetter than normal? Experiencing a lag in wag? Yes, just like you, your dog can get the flu.
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Scientific American Content: Global
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FEMA Approves Buyout Funds for Houston Homes Flooded by HarveyHomes will be bought in areas where it does not make sense to build flood control structures — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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New Scientist – News
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Seals only sleep with half their brain when they’re out at seaNorthern fur seals mostly sleep with half their brain while they’re at sea, but sleep with all their brain while on land – unlike any other animal studied
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The Economist: The world this week
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KAL’s cartoon
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The Economist: The world this week
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Business this week
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The Economist: The world this week
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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In male dolphin alliances, 'everybody knows your name'It's not uncommon in dolphin society for males to form long-lasting alliances with other males, sometimes for decades. Now, after studying bottlenose dolphins in Shark Bay, Australia, for more than 30 years, researchers find that these males retain individual vocal labels rather than sharing a common call with their cooperative partners.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
11
Study of sleeping fur seals provides insight into the function of REM sleepAll land mammals and birds have two types of sleep: rapid eye movement (REM) and non-REM (also called slow-wave sleep). Earlier evidence had suggested that REM sleep is essential for physical and mental well-being and learning, but the underlying function of REM sleep has been a mystery. New insight into the function of REM sleep, based on studies of an unlikely animal: the fur seal.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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The disc of the Milky Way is bigger than we thoughtA team of researchers suggests that if we could travel at the speed of light it would take us 200,000 years to cross the disc of our Galaxy.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Evolution of nebula surrounding symbiotic star R AquariiScientists have published a detailed study of the evolution of the nebula surrounding the symbiotic star R Aquarii. The study employed observations from telescopes at the Roque de los Muchachos Observatory, La Palma, and Chile taken over the course of more than two decades.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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One of the most massive neutron stars ever discoveredUsing a pioneering method, researchers have found a neutron star of about 2.3 Solar masses — one of the most massive ever detected.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Breaking through a tumor's defensesResearchers have shown that some tumors use not one but two levels of protection against the immune system. Knocking out one level boosted the protective effects of the second and vice versa. The research demonstrates that a two-pronged approach targeting both cell types simultaneously may offer a promising route for the development of new cancer immunotherapies.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
11
How solar prominences vibrateResearchers have cataloged around 200 oscillations of the solar prominences during the first half of 2014. Its development has been possible thanks to the GONG network of telescopes, of which one of them is located in the Teide Observatory.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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New model sheds light on key physics of magnetic islands that halt fusion reactionsMagnetic islands, bubble-like structures that form in fusion plasmas, can grow and disrupt the plasmas and damage the doughnut-shaped tokamak facilities that house fusion reactions. Recent research has used large-scale computer simulations to produce a new model that could be key to understanding how the islands interact with the surrounding plasma as they grow and lead to disruptions.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Algal partner responds to climate-change stresses more strongly than coral hostA new study puts a surprising twist into our understanding of how coral reefs react to ocean warming and acidification and may offer an early warning system for warmth-induced coral bleaching events.
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Feed: All Latest
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Can You Spot the Hidden Images in These Psychedelic Landscapes?Terri Loewenthal uses self-made reflective optics to compose scenes that look like double exposures but are actually single shots.
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Feed: All Latest
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YouTube's Slow-Mo Guys Break Down Their Quick ThinkingIn a new Tech Support video, Daniel Gruchy and Gavin Free detail the method to their mania.
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The Atlantic
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The Close-to-Home Horror of HereditaryWhat more indefatigable enemy is there than the family tree, the idea that one’s worst nightmares have been inherited and are doomed to recur from generation to generation? Ari Aster’s debut film, Hereditary, is an impressive, wrenching piece of horror that draws all its power from that notion—that we’re cursed, as it were, to be our parents’ children. Aster has crafted a story with one foot in t
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The Atlantic
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A Portrait of America: Watching Robert F. Kennedy's Funeral Train Pass ByFollowing the assassination of Robert F. Kennedy in Los Angeles on June 5, 1968, his body was taken to New York City for a funeral mass in Saint Patrick’s Cathedral. After the completion of the mass, Kennedy’s coffin was transported by a private funeral train from New York to Washington, D.C., to be buried in Arlington National Cemetery on June 8. It was a Saturday, and mourners came out by the h
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Gulf of Mexico 'dead zone' forecasted to exceed the size of ConnecticutScientists have predicted the dead zone, or area with little to no oxygen in the northern Gulf of Mexico, will become larger than the state of Connecticut by the end of July. The dead zone will cover about 6,620 square miles of the bottom of the continental shelf off Louisiana and Texas. While there are more than 500 dead zones around the world, the northern Gulf of Mexico dead zone is the second
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The Atlantic
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Donald Trump’s Mysterious Sense of IronyAlanis Morissette is getting another look. The singer who’s associated with sex acts in a theat-urr and vengeance against Dave Coulier is also a political visionary, at least according to the jukebox musical Jagged Little Pill that’s now running at Harvard’s American Repertory Theater. Diablo Cody’s script uses Morissette’s raging rock to touch upon Women’s March–like protesting, gender fluidity,
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Multiple alkali metals in unique exoplanetScientists have observed a rare gaseous planet, with partly clear skies, and strong signatures of alkali metals in its atmosphere.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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System with three Earth-sized planets discoveredToday marks the discovery of two new planetary systems, one of them hosting three planets with the same size of the Earth.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Physicists developed self-propelled droplets that can act as programmable micro-carriersIn the life sciences, researchers are working to inject drugs or other molecules into a human body using tiny 'transport vehicles.' Researchers have shown in a model system that small emulsion droplets can be used as smart carriers. They have developed a method for producing self-propelled liquid droplets capable of providing spatially and temporally controlled delivery of a 'molecular load'.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Normal eye dominance is not necessary for restoring visual acuity in amblyopiaResearch published today may lead to changes in how amblyopia is treated, particularly in adults. The research shows that eye dominance and visual acuity are controlled by different areas of the brain, and that one can be corrected without correcting the other.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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High vitamin D levels linked to lower cholesterol in childrenThere is a link between higher serum vitamin D levels and lower plasma cholesterol levels in primary school children, new research shows.
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New Scientist – News
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Why Richard Branson’s promises about space tourism are emptyThe billionaire businessman says he'll ride into space within months, paving the way to routine suborbital passenger trips. Don't get too excited, says Paul Marks
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NYT > Science
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Matter: Hot Heads: Why Mammals Need R.E.M. SleepSleeping fur seals toggle between two brain patterns: one while at sea, the other on land. Researchers suggest that R.E.M. sleep serves to warm the brain.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Study develops a model enhancing particle beam efficiencyInspired by tokamaks, Brazilians researchers create via computer simulation an alternative for better control, in accelerators, of the particles' chaotic trajectories.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Maps made of nerve cellsMice move through the virtual world of a video game and provide insight into the mechanisms of memory formation.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Tiny paragliding beetle that lived with dinosaurs discovered in amber, named 'Jason'Scientists discovered a new species of beetle preserved in amber. The tiny beetle, which lived alongside dinosaurs, had fringe on its wings that let it float on the air like a dandelion seed, and its scientific name is 'Jason.'
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Study shows PR best practices are only second bestCharles Marsh has studied economic experiments, evolutionary biology and philosophy to examine how indirect reciprocity, or cooperation without expectation of payment, is actually a better approach to public relations than the dominant competition-based approach.
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The Atlantic
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‘We Choose to Go to the Moon’ Again—But When?The bumper stickers have made an appearance at many congressional hearings in the last several years.“2033: We can do this,” they say, affirming the year by which some hope humans will set foot on Mars. Lawmakers wave them in front of the scientists, space executives, astronauts in the room, the people they hope can make it happen. But before NASA sends humans to Mars, it’s going to send them bac
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Scientists ID source of damaging inflammation after heart attackScientists have zeroed in on a culprit that spurs damaging inflammation in the heart following a heart attack. The guilty party is a type of immune cell that tries to heal the injured heart but instead triggers inflammation that leads to even more damage. The researchers, from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, also have found that an already approved drug effectively tamps dow
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

In building the brain, cell pedigree mattersResearch in mice shows that a protein made by the stem cells that give rise to neurons, but not by neurons themselves, is key to brain cells' ability to migrate during development and assume their proper positionsThis primordial protein acts by clinging onto thousands of sites in the genome, affecting the activity of multiple genes that regulate brain development.The findings could yield valuable
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Normal eye dominance is not necessary for restoring visual acuity in amblyopiaResearch published today, led by Aaron W. McGee, Ph.D., assistant professor in the UofL Department of Anatomical Sciences and Neurobiology, may lead to changes in how amblyopia is treated, particularly in adults. The research shows that eye dominance and visual acuity are controlled by different areas of the brain, and that one can be corrected without correcting the other.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Individual 'names' reveal complex relationships in male bottlenose dolphinsMale bottlenose dolphins retain their individual 'names' well into adulthood. Similar to humans, this plays a central role in forming and maintaining complex social relationships, recent findings carried out by researchers at the universities of Zurich and Western Australia suggest. Dolphins form long-lasting alliances in which they give each other mutual support.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Structural protein found essential to X chromosome inactivationA Massachusetts General Hospital research team has identified the essential role of a structural protein in the silencing of the inactive X chromosome, a process that prevents both copies of the same gene from being expressed in female mammals, which carry two copies of the X chromosome.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Tonsil and adenoid removal associated with respiratory, allergic and infectious diseaseRemoving tonsils and adenoids in childhood increases the long-term risk of respiratory, allergic and infectious diseases, according to researchers who have examined — for the first time — the long-term effects of the operations.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Sleep problems in Parkinson's disease: Can we fix them?A team of researchers at VIB and KU Leuven has uncovered why people with a hereditary form of Parkinson's disease suffer from sleep disturbances. The molecular mechanisms uncovered in fruit flies and human stem cells also point to candidate targets for the development of new treatments.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Decrease in eye injuries to childrenEye injuries that sent children to emergency departments in the United States decreased from 2006 to 2014, and most eye injuries posed low risk for vision loss.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Are there long-term health risks after having tonsils or adenoids removed in childhood?Removing tonsils and adenoids in children in Denmark was associated with increased long-term risk of respiratory, infectious and allergic diseases.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Does cancer increase risk of diabetes?Developing cancer was associated with increased risk for later diabetes in a nationally representative sample of the Korean general population.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Waves move across the human brain to support memoryColumbia Engineers have discovered a new fundamental feature of brain oscillations: they actually move rhythmically across the brain, reflecting patterns of neuronal activity that propagate across the cortex. The researchers also found that the traveling waves moved more reliably when subjects performed well while performing a working memory task, indicating traveling waves are important for memor
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Stanford-led study identifies cellular 'death code'Cellular 'death code' discoveredBrief story summary: Stanford scientists and their collaborators have discovered a molecule that initiates the final, crucial step in a type of cell death.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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How to suck carbon dioxide from the sky for fuels and moreSomeday, the gasoline you buy might come from carbon dioxide pulled out of the sky rather than from oil pumped out of the ground. By removing emitted carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and turning it into fresh fuels, engineers at a Canadian firm have demonstrated a scalable and cost-effective way to make deep cuts in the carbon footprint of transportation with minimal disruption to existing vehic
18h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Study of sleeping fur seals provides insight into the function of REM sleepAll land mammals and birds have two types of sleep: rapid eye movement (REM) and non-REM (also called slow-wave sleep). Earlier evidence had suggested that REM sleep is essential for physical and mental well-being and learning, but the underlying function of REM sleep has been a mystery. Now researchers reporting in Current Biology on June 7 have new insight into the function of REM sleep, based o
18h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

In male dolphin alliances, 'everybody knows your name'It's not uncommon in dolphin society for males to form long-lasting alliances with other males, sometimes for decades. Now, after studying bottlenose dolphins in Shark Bay, Australia, for more than 30 years, researchers reporting in Current Biology on June 7 find that these males retain individual vocal labels rather than sharing a common call with their cooperative partners.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Video: Why seashells are tougher than chalkSeashells are made mostly of calcium carbonate, also known as chalk, a mineral soft and crumbly enough to use for sidewalk doodles.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
100
In a hole in a tunicate there lived a hobbit: New shrimp species named after Bilbo BagginsTwo new species of tiny symbiotic shrimps are described, illustrated and named by biology student at Leiden University Werner de Gier as part of his bachelor's research project, supervised by Dr. Charles H. J. M. Fransen, shrimp researcher of Naturalis Biodiversity Center (Leiden, the Netherlands).
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
New model sheds light on key physics of magnetic islands that halt fusion reactionsMagnetic islands, bubble-like structures that form in fusion plasmas, can grow and disrupt the plasmas and damage the doughnut-shaped tokamak facilities that house fusion reactions. Recent research at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) has used large-scale computer simulations to produce a new model that could be key to understanding how the islands in
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
Drone forensics gets a boost with new data on NIST websiteAerial drones might someday deliver online purchases to your home. But in some prisons, drone delivery is already a thing. Drones have been spotted flying drugs, cell phones and other contraband over prison walls , and in several cases, drug traffickers have used drones to ferry narcotics across the border.
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Ingeniøren
1
Udskældt robotdukke tilkaldt som inspiration for danske erhvervsspidserSophia viser danske erhvervsledere udviklingen indenfor computere og kunstig intelligens. Kritikerne kalder hende for et marketingsstunt.
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BBC News – Science & Environment
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Key 'step forward' in cutting cost of removing CO2 from airA Canadian firm says new technology has dramatically cut the cost of removing carbon from the air.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
12
The Clarke exobelt, a method to search for possible extraterrestrial civilizationsA new study examines the possibility of detecting hypothetical artificial satellites orbiting around other worlds.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
11
Discovery of clusters of galaxies in the early universeUntil now astronomers thought that these phenomena occurred 3,000 million years after the Big Bang, but this new result shows that they were already happening when the Universe was 1,500 million years old.
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The Atlantic
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Climate Change Can Be Stopped by Turning Air Into GasolineA team of scientists from Harvard University and the company Carbon Engineering announced on Thursday that they have found a method to cheaply and directly pull carbon-dioxide pollution out of the atmosphere. If their technique is successfully implemented at scale, it could transform how humanity thinks about the problem of climate change. It could give people a decisive new tool in the race agai
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New on MIT Technology Review
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Maybe we can afford to suck CO2 out of the sky after allA new analysis shows that air capture could cost less than $100 a ton.
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Big Think
33
Want to know where the next Ebola outbreak will strike? Follow the batsA global Ebola pandemic could cause tens of millions of deaths. To prevent this, researchers at Lehigh University have created a predictive model based on the migratory patterns of bats. Read More
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
4
Physicists developed self-propelled droplets that can act as programmable micro-carriersIn the life sciences, researchers are working to inject drugs or other molecules into a human body using tiny 'transport vehicles.' Researchers at the Saarland University and the University of Barcelona have shown in a model system that small emulsion droplets can be used as smart carriers. They have developed a method for producing self-propelled liquid droplets capable of providing spatially and
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Who should be on the $10 and $20 bills? How race, gender, & politics shape public opinionRace, gender, political affiliation, and the prejudices and biases associated with them (racism, sexism, and political ideology) seem to be at the forefront of citizen's minds when it comes to preferences for US currency — specifically, who should be on the $10 and $20 bills.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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In a hole in a tunicate there lived a hobbit: New shrimp species named after Bilbo BagginsA new species of shrimp was named after Tolkien's Bilbo Baggins thanks to its small size and hairy feet. The new species, Odontonia bagginsi, was described, figured and named together with another new species: Odontonia plurellicola. Both shrimps live symbiotically inside tunicates collected around Ternate and Tidore, Indonesia. In the present study, published in the open access journal ZooKeys, a
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)
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Inside the fight against Russia's fake news empire | Olga YurkovaWhen facts are false, decisions are wrong, says editor and TED Fellow Olga Yurkova. To stop the spread of fake news, she and a group of journalists launched StopFake.org, which exposes biased or inaccurate reporting in order to rebuild the trust we've lost in our journalists, leaders and institutions. Learn more about the fight against misinformation as well as two critical ways we can ensure we'r
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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How to suck carbon dioxide from the sky for fuels and moreSomeday, the gasoline you buy might trace its heritage to carbon dioxide pulled straight out of the sky rather than from oil pumped out of the ground. By removing emitted carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and turning it into fresh fuels, engineers at a Canadian firm have demonstrated a scalable and cost-effective way to make deep cuts in the carbon footprint of transportation with minimal disrupt
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Study identifies cellular 'death code'Dying cells generally have two options: go quietly, or go out with a bang.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
31
Structural protein found essential to X chromosome inactivationA Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) research team has identified the essential role of a structural protein in the silencing of the inactive X chromosome, a process that prevents both copies of the same gene from being expressed in female mammals, which carry two copies of the X chromosome. In their report published online in the journal Cell, the investigators describe finding that the SMCHD1
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
46
Study of sleeping fur seals provides insight into the function of REM sleepAll land mammals and birds have two types of sleep: rapid eye movement (REM) and non-REM (also called slow-wave sleep). Earlier evidence had suggested that REM sleep—associated with dreaming—is essential for physical and mental well-being and learning, and that a lack of it could even be deadly. But the underlying function of REM sleep has been a mystery since its discovery in 1953. Now researcher
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
37
In male dolphin alliances, 'everybody knows your name'It's not uncommon in dolphin society for males to form long-lasting alliances with other males, sometimes for decades. Now, after studying bottlenose dolphins in Shark Bay, Australia, for more than 30 years, researchers reporting in Current Biology on June 7 find that these males retain individual vocal labels rather than sharing a common call with their cooperative partners.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
19
Scientists use 4D scanning to predict behavior of volcanoesScientists are using the latest in 4D technology to predict the behavior of lava flows and its implications for volcanic eruptions. The results explain why some lava flows can cover kilometers in just a few hours, whilst others travel more slowly during an eruption, highlighting the hazard posed by fast-moving flows which often pose the most danger to civilian populations close to volcanoes.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
9
Researchers change clinical practice for infants with diabetesInfants with diabetes can drop insulin syringes. This will be new clinical practice after a recent study. Researchers have been leading the work, which causes children worldwide to replace insulin syringes with tablets.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
8
Does nanoconfinement affect the interaction between two materials placed in contact?Does nanoconfinement affect the interaction between two materials placed in contact? A research team shows that it is possible to estimate how nanoconfinement affects the number of contacts formed by two materials placed in intimate contact and, hence, the interfacial interactions.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
38
Essential oils to fight bacterial infectionsScientists have discovered a technique to apply natural plant extracts such as Tea Tree Oil as a coating for medical devices, a process which could prevent millions of infections every year.
18h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
14
Sharing spaces: Your brain considers other people's personal space as your ownPeripersonal space (PPS) is the area immediately around your body used when interacting with people and objects. Recently, researchers have shown that some neurons in the primate brain respond to an infringement of another individual's PPS as if their own space was being encroached upon. Now, a Japanese researcher studying human behavior has shown that people respond to someone else's PPS as quick
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
16
Dark inflation opens up a gravitational window onto the first moments after the Big BangDark matter and dark energy may have driven inflation, the exponential expansion of the Universe moments after the Big Bang. A new cosmological model proposed by physicists, which takes dark inflation into account, is the first to outline a precise chronology of the main events during the early history of our Universe. The model makes a spectacular prediction: that it should be possible to detect
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
27
Negative vs. positive social media experiences and depressive symptomsNegative experiences on social media carry more weight than positive interactions when it comes to the likelihood of young adults reporting depressive symptoms, according to a new analysis. The finding may be useful for designing interventions and clinical recommendations to reduce the risk of depression.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
26
Deadly behavior-modifying weapon identified in insect-world chemical arms raceNew research joins the dots between zombie ants, an insect-world arms race and the search for new antibiotics. Scientists probing one of the mysteries of the insect world identified a powerful chemical weapon used in the arms race between fungus-farming leafcutter ants and the parasites that plague them. It is hoped that the findings will help scientists search for new antibiotics from this unique
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Dagens Medicin

Seksårsfristen er det forkerte værktøj til det rigtige formålVi har nu i nogle år haft 4-5-6-årsfrister, som ikke har løst problemerne med mangel på speciallæger. Man behøver kun at kigge ud over landet for at konstatere, at dette værktøj har spillet fallit. Lad os derfor tænke nyt.
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Futurity.org
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4 reasons ‘fake news’ tricks us and what we can doMounting evidence that social media-friendly “fake news” may have shaped the outcome of the 2016 election has strengthened the conviction of some that US politics are uniquely and newly broken. “That’s the cool thing about science. When you’re watching the news and freaking out, one thing you can do is go back to your lab…” But if that’s true, where exactly did we go wrong? And is there any hope
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Futurity.org
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Case study: Supplement caused scary false positiveA new case report documents how a patient’s use of a common biotin supplement, also known as vitamin B7, caused her to have clinically misleading test results, which led to numerous consultations and unnecessary radiographic and laboratory testing. The patient in the case report took a 5,000 mcg dose of biotin daily. Biotin supplements in that dosage are commonly available over-the-counter, witho
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The Atlantic
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The Price of ‘Machismo Populism’ in the PhilippinesThe kiss drew outrage and disgust, but not surprise. At a gathering of Filipino migrant workers in South Korea, Rodrigo Duterte, the president of the Philippines, unexpectedly kissed Bea Kim, a Filipino migrant worker, on the lips. Kim, who is married to a Korean national, later gave an interview to a state-run television network in which she said the kiss was meant only to entertain and titillat
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The Atlantic
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The Trump Administration Is Driving Away Immigrant EntrepreneursIn late May, the Department of Homeland Security announced its plans to rescind the International Entrepreneur Rule, an Obama-era provision that allowed foreign-born entrepreneurs to stay in the United States for up to five years to expand their businesses, granted they could prove their companies’ potential for rapid business growth and job creation. The announcement came as no surprise, given t
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
35
Australian lizard scares away predators with ultra-violet tongueWhen attacked, bluetongue skinks open their mouth suddenly and as wide as possible to reveal their conspicuously coloured tongues. This surprise action serves as their last line of defence to save themselves from becoming prey says Martin Whiting, of Macquarie University in Australia, who conceived the study just published in Springer's journal Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology. The research rev
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New model sheds light on key physics of magnetic islands that halt fusion reactionsMagnetic islands, bubble-like structures that form in fusion plasmas, can grow and disrupt the plasmas and damage the doughnut-shaped tokamak facilities that house fusion reactions. Recent research at the US Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory has used large-scale computer simulations to produce a new model that could be key to understanding how the islands interact with the
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Researchers discover a system with three Earth-sized planetsThe Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC) and the University of Oviedo present today the discovery of two new planetary systems, one of them hosting three planets with the same size of the Earth.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Immunoscore: A test to improve the care and treatment of colon cancerWith Immunoscore, a test devised by a team of researchers from Inserm and Université Paris Descartes and doctors from the Paris AP-HP hospitals, disease progression in patients with colon cancer can now be defined more accurately. According to an international study conducted in more than 2,500 patients, Immunoscore has proved effective in predicting which patients are at high risk of tumor recurr
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

How solar prominences vibrateAn international team led by researchers from the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC) and the Universidad de La Laguna (ULL) has cataloged around 200 oscillations of the solar prominences during the first half of 2014. Its development has been possible thanks to the GONG network of telescopes, of which one of them is located in the Teide Observatory.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Understanding how drug reduces confusion in older patients after surgery may lead to better careA drug that reduces delirium in postoperative patients may work by preventing the overactivity of certain receptors in brain cells, according to a new study published in the Online First edition of Anesthesiology, the peer-reviewed medical journal of the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA). The researchers say the findings could lead to more widespread use of the drug, dexmedetomidine, and
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Genomic study reveals surprising twistA new study puts a surprising twist into our understanding of how coral reefs react to ocean warming and acidification and may offer an early warning system for warmth-induced coral bleaching events.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Breaking through a tumor's defensesIn research published today, Babraham Institute researchers have shown that some tumors use not one but two levels of protection against the immune system. Knocking out one level boosted the protective effects of the second and vice versa. The research demonstrates that a two-pronged approach targeting both cell types simultaneously may offer a promising route for the development of new cancer imm
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Science | The Guardian
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Reading Abbey reopens to public – but there's no sign of Henry IRuined medieval church believed to be a royal burial place has been made safe for visitors again Reading has got its abbey back, almost 10 years after the gates to the ruined medieval church were locked when large stones began to fall from the walls with ominously increasing frequency. However, the remains of Henry I, who founded the abbey in 1121 and is believed to be buried there, have yet agai
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Science : NPR
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He Started Vaping As A Teen And Now Says Habit Is 'Impossible To Let Go'Public health officials worry vaping is an emerging disaster that could reverse years of decline in smoking by young people. What's the latest evidence that e-cigarettes are a gateway to tobacco? (Image credit: John Daley / CPR News)
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cognitive science
1
Cognitive Biases in Apartment Huntingsubmitted by /u/waitingforgoodoh [link] [comments]
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
26
Aircraft microbiome much like that of homes and offices, study findsWhat does flying in a commercial airliner have in common with working at the office or relaxing at home?
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
Essential oils to fight bacterial infectionsJames Cook University scientists have discovered a technique to apply natural plant extracts such as Tea Tree Oil as a coating for medical devices, a process which could prevent millions of infections every year.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Pheromone power—Bringing 'SexyPlant' back to defy crop pestsThe project will use a biological method for manufacturing pheromones, which provide a safe and sustainable alternative to harmful pesticides, reducing the environmental impact of agriculture.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
6
Using mathematical approaches to optimally manage public debtWhile most countries around the world rely on debt to finance their government and economy, keeping this debt under control is a financial imperative. Large government debt negatively impacts long-term economic growth. Increase in a nation's debt results in lower private investment, which leads to diminishing growth and wages in the long term. A high amount of debt can be detrimental even in the a
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
28
Australian lizard scares away predators with ultra-violet tongueResearchers investigate how the blue-tongued skink uses a full-tongue display to deter attacking predators.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
21
Bad news becomes hysteria in crowds, new research showsNews stories about terrorism, disease outbreaks, natural disasters, and other potential threats become increasingly negative, inaccurate and hysterical when passed from person to person, according to new research.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
18
Astronomers find a galaxy unchanged since the early universeResearchers confirm the first detection of a relic galaxy with the Hubble Space Telescope.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
16
Aircraft microbiome much like that of homes and offices, study findsWhat does flying in a commercial airliner have in common with working at the office or relaxing at home? According to a new study, the answer is the microbiome — the community of bacteria found in homes, offices and aircraft cabins.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
34
A laser that can smell like a houndResearchers have created a laser that can 'smell' different gases within a sample. Applications for the new device lie not just in environmental monitoring and detecting industrial contamination, but may eventually be used to diagnose disease by 'smelling' the breath.
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The Atlantic
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Raising a Daughter, and Fearing How the Law Will Treat HerWhen I gave birth to my daughter Eleanor six weeks before the 2016 presidential election, my wife Liz and I were smitten. Five pounds, four ounces of perfection slept in my arms as we watched the first debate between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump from the hospital bed in Connecticut just a couple hours after delivery. Besides the standard health-insurance and birth-certificate forms that come
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New Scientist – News
23
Sour tastes may make you more adventurous and take bigger risksA gambling experiment has found that the taste of umami seems to make us more conservative in our choices, while sour flavours may promote risk-taking
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Researchers discover multiple alkali metals in unique exoplanetScientists from the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC) and the University of Cambridge have observed with the Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC) a rare gaseous planet, with partly clear skies, and strong signatures of alkali metals in its atmosphere.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
The Hubble Space Telescope discovers the most distant star ever observedAn international team, including researchers from the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC) and the University of La Laguna (ULL), participated in the discovery of a star at a distance of nine billion lightyears from Earth.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Researchers from the UPC and the IAC discover one of the most massive neutron starsUsing a pioneering method, researchers from the Astronomy and Astrophysics Group of the Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya (UPC) and the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC) have found a neutron star of about 2.3 Solar masses — one of the most massive ever detected. The study was published on May 23 in The Astrophysical Journal and opens a new path of knowledge in many fields of astrophys
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
The disc of the Milky Way is bigger than we thoughtA team of researchers at the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC) and at the National Astronomical Observatories of Beijing (NAOC) have published a paper which suggests that if we could travel at the speed of light it would take us 200,000 years to cross the disc of our galaxy.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Providers preferences may be helpful in reducing inappropriate antibiotic prescriptionsPhysicians are open to receiving information on their antibiotic prescribing patterns, but have specific preference for receiving that information, according to results from a study published today in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. Anticipating physicians' preferences for feedback on antimicrobial use (AU) could help op
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

20 years keeping an eye on R AquariiAn international team of researchers, including scientists from the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, has published a detailed study of the evolution of the nebula surrounding the symbiotic star R Aquarii. The study employed observations from telescopes at the Roque de los Muchachos Observatory, La Palma, and Chile taken over the course of more than two decades.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Researchers at the IAC participate in the discovery of clusters of galaxies in the early universeUntil now astronomers thought that these phenomena occurred 3,000 million years after the Big Bang, but this new result shows that they were already happening when the universe was 1,500 million years old.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Does nanoconfinement affect the interaction between two materials placed in contact?Does nanoconfinement affect the interaction between two materials placedin contact?A research team from the ULB shows that it is possible to estimate how nanoconfinement affects the number of contacts formed by two materials placed in intimate contact and, hence, the interfacial interactions.
19h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Dark inflation opens up a gravitational window onto the first moments after the Big BangDark matter and dark energy may have driven inflation, the exponential expansion of the Universe moments after the Big Bang. A new cosmological model proposed by physicists at the University of Warsaw, which takes dark inflation into account, is the first to outline a precise chronology of the main events during the early history of our universe. The model makes a spectacular prediction: that it s
19h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

The Clarke exobelt, a method to search for possible extraterrestrial civilizationsA new study published in the Astrophysical Journal by Hector Socas-Navarro, a researcher at the IAC, examines the possibility of detecting hypothetical artificial satellites orbiting around other worlds.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Jurassic diet: Why our knowledge of what ancient pterosaurs ate might be wrongResearch reveals knowledge of prehistoric diets is often based on outdated ideas and could be inaccurate.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
France seeks to send 'signal' with mobile phone ban in schoolsFrench lawmakers began debating Thursday a ban on mobile phones in public schools, one of President Emmanuel Macron's campaign pledges which critics say will do little to counter classroom disruptions or limit cyberbullying.
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Ingeniøren

IoT-iværksætter: »Jeg tror ikke, vores kunder ved, hvad IoT er«På et stadig ­umodent marked har den fynske iværksætter Sensohive fundet en niche som IoT-leverandør til ­betonindustrien. Men når virksomheden er ude hos kunderne, er det ikke Internet of Things, de taler om.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
10
Study shows football teams who sing their national anthem with passion are more likely to winFootball games are enormously unpredictable, which may explain why spectators are often willing to embrace superstition to try to predict the winner. During the 2010 football world cup, many of us actually put our trust in an octopus to tell us the outcome of each match. But, with the 2018 world cup about to kick off, are there more reliable ways of working out who will be crowned champions?
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New on MIT Technology Review
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Facebook is fighting fake news with … more news
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The Atlantic
28
Will Uber and Lyft Become Different Things?For most people, an Uber is a Lyft and a Lyft is an Uber. Uber’s roots are in the black-car business, while Lyft’s predecessor, Zimride, was a carpooling app. Yet over the last six years, as the two ride-hailing companies have been in direct competition around the nation, Uber and Lyft have essentially served as exact substitutes. Drivers seem to find them interchangeable, too, often suctioning t
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Feed: All Latest
53
Lyft Redesigns Its App—and Strategy—for the Age of SharingBelieving sharing is key to its longterm success, the Uber rival is doing everything it can to get more people into fewer cars.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
51
At-home telomere testing is not a reliable marker of aging, researcher saysTelomere testing for consumers offers a poor measure of “biological age,” says Johns Hopkins oncologist Mary Armanios.
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Scientific American Content: Global
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Hurricanes Slow Their Roll around the WorldStorms' slowdown means more rain, and potentially more damage, for populated areas — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Futurity.org
2
Model organs let surgeon rehearse ‘impossible’ surgeryBuilding an exact replica of an organ, such as a kidney with tumors, allows surgeons to practice complex procedures long before the patient goes under the knife. Anthony Camnetar remembers the first time he heard that he had von Hippel-Lindau syndrome, a rare genetic disorder. He was 12 years old and his mother, who had just picked him up from school, broke the news through tears realizing the he
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Scientists are using DNA to study ocean life and reveal the hidden diversity of zooplanktonMarine zooplankton are tiny animals, roughly the size of insects you might see on a summer day, that drift with ocean currents. Many of them are lovely, but except for scientists who study them, few people are aware that they are among the most numerous – and important – animals on Earth.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Researchers change clinical practice for infants with diabetesInfants with diabetes can drop insulin syringes. This will be new clinical practice after a recent study, now published in Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology. Researchers from Bergen and Exeter have been leading the work, which causes children worldwide to replace insulin syringes with tablets.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
8
Australian lizard scares away predators with ultra-violet tongueResearchers investigate how the blue-tongued skink uses a full-tongue display to deter attacking predators.
19h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Astronomers find a galaxy unchanged since the early universeResearchers at the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC) confirm the first detection of a relic galaxy with the Hubble Space Telescope.
19h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Bad news becomes hysteria in crowds, new research showsNews stories about terrorism, disease outbreaks, natural disasters, and other potential threats become increasingly negative, inaccurate and hysterical when passed from person to person, according to new research by the University of Warwick.
19h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Scientists use 4D scanning to predict behavior of volcanoesScientists are using the latest in 4D technology to predict the behavior of lava flows and its implications for volcanic eruptions. The results explain why some lava flows can cover kilometers in just a few hours, whilst others travel more slowly during an eruption, highlighting the hazard posed by fast-moving flows which often pose the most danger to civilian populations close to volcanoes.
19h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Rescuing historic climate data in the East Asian regionAn international team from the UK, China, Japan and the US tackles the challenges of recovering, collating, digitizing and working with long-term instrumental weather observations in in the East Asian Region.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Sharing spaces: Your brain considers other people's personal space as your ownPeripersonal space (PPS) is the area immediately around your body used when interacting with people and objects. Recently, researchers have shown that some neurons in the primate brain respond to an infringement of another individual's PPS as if their own space was being encroached upon. Now, a Japanese researcher studying human behavior has shown that people respond to someone else's PPS as quick
19h
Big Think
200+
Are atheists more religious than Christians?A new Pew study suggests that American atheists are actually "more religious" than Western European Christians. Read More
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
US, China reach $1.4 bn sanctions deal over ZTE: Commerce DeptZTE US China TrumpWashington and Beijing have reached a deal to ease sanctions that brought Chinese smartphone maker ZTE to the brink of collapse, the US Commerce Department announced Thursday.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
Bend it like Einstein: Science and the World CupFootball fans won't be alone when they sit glued to their TV sets for the 2018 World Cup.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
Refund ordered for Austrian car buyer over DieselgateA Vienna court has ordered a car dealer to reimburse a customer who bought a Volkswagen car because it was fitted with software designed to cheat emissions tests, the buyer's lawyers said Thursday.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
Airbnb says forced to cancel bookings under new Japan lawRental site Airbnb said Thursday it had been forced by Japanese authorities to cancel thousands of reservations ahead of a new law regulating short-term rentals, apologising for the "extraordinary disruption."
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Futurity.org
1
Will ACA dropouts unravel the insurance market?People who take advantage of the Affordable Care Act when they need health care and then drop out when that need is no longer a factor could threaten the insurance market, a new working paper warns. “If you have too many people who drop out after a few months of coverage, you might end up in a situation where insurers don’t want to offer any insurance at all in the market,” says Petra Persson, an
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
6
Youtube partly liable for copyright breaches: Austrian courtAn Austrian court has ruled that video-sharing platform YouTube can be held partly liable for copyright breaches in videos uploaded by its users, in a ruling that may have far-reaching implications.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
5
Image: Tunguska devastationFallen trees at Tunguska, Imperial Russia, seen in 1929, 15 km from epicentre of aerial blast site, caused by explosion of a meteor in 1908 (Photo N. A. Setrukov, 1928).
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
What it takes to discover small rocks in spaceOnce every month, on average, somewhere on Earth a fireball appears out of nowhere and for mere seconds, casts a blinding flash across the sky before it blows up in a thunderous explosion. It happened last Saturday over southern Africa, where a small space rock disintegrated in the night sky and – possibly – scattered debris on the ground, awaiting discovery by meteorite hunters.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
61
Did plate tectonics set the stage for life on Earth?A new study suggests that rapid cooling within the Earth's mantle through plate tectonics played a major role in the development of the first life forms, which in turn led to the oxygenation of the Earth's atmosphere. The study was published in the March 2018 issue of Earth and Planetary Science Letters.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
61
Forgotten corner of Europe brought back to life thanks to artificial intelligenceA lost world in a former empire in Europe has been brought to life thanks to University of Bristol researchers who used artificial intelligence (AI) techniques to analyse 47,000 multilingual pages from newspapers dating back to 1873.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
6
Bad news becomes hysteria in crowds, new research showsNews stories about terrorism, disease outbreaks, natural disasters, and other potential threats become increasingly negative, inaccurate and hysterical when passed from person to person, according to new research by the University of Warwick.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
9
Dominant practice of public relations, competition, is not best, study findsWithin public relations, the standard practice of looking out for No. 1 and viewing relationships as sources of conflict and competition is defended by best-selling textbooks and a generation of research. A growing body of scientific evidence, however, supports a different vision of PR, a University of Kansas researcher has found. Discoveries in evolutionary biology and economics show that helping
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
5
New report highlights how drones can be used for good of societyA new report demonstrating how drones can come to the rescue in natural disasters, help starving people in conflict and provide emergency medicine has been published today (7 June 2018) by one of the UK's leading robotics experts.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
51
Jurassic diet: Why our knowledge of what ancient pterosaurs ate might be wrongWhenever we think about extinct animals we often imagine them eating their favourite meals, whether it be plants, other animals or a combination of both.
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Live Science
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Antarctica's Largest Iceberg Is About to Die … Near the EquatorAntarctica's iceberg B-15 will finally melt in the South Atlantic Ocean. Farewell, friend. It's been a crazy, 18-year ride.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
High vitamin D levels linked to lower cholesterol in childrenThere is a link between higher serum vitamin D levels and lower plasma cholesterol levels in primary school children, new research from the University of Eastern Finland shows.
19h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Cost and scale of field trials for bovine TB vaccine may make them unfeasibleField trials for a vaccination to protect cattle against bovine tuberculosis (bovine TB) would need to involve 500 herds — potentially as many as 75,000-100,000 cattle — to demonstrate cost effectiveness for farmers, concludes a study published today in the journal eLife.
19h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Aircraft microbiome much like that of homes and offices, study findsWhat does flying in a commercial airliner have in common with working at the office or relaxing at home? According to a new study, the answer is the microbiome — the community of bacteria found in homes, offices and aircraft cabins.
19h
Ingeniøren

Kronik: Ny lovgivning fordrer en kritisk sans over for digitalisering
19h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
5
Improved water treatment systems needed to remove contaminants in waterThe methods commonly used for water purification are not necessarily effective enough to combat chemical contaminants transported into household waters. Chlorination and UV disinfection work well on pathogenic microbes but are not as effective in removing chemical substances. These are among the findings of a research project funded by the Academy of Finland studying the health effects of microbia
19h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Does nanoconfinement affect the interaction between two materials placed in contact?A research team from the Université libre de Bruxelles shows that it is possible to estimate how nanoconfinement affects the number of contacts formed by two materials placed in intimate contact and, hence, the interfacial interactions.
19h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
14
How far away was that lightning?You probably do it. It might be ingrained from when you were a kid, and now it's almost automatic. You see the flash of lightning – and you immediately start counting the seconds till it thunders.
19h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
20
A human fossil species in western Europe could be close to a million years oldFirst direct dating of an early human tooth confirms the antiquity of Homo antecessor, western Europe's oldest known human fossil species.
19h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Killing sharks, wolves and other top predators won't solve conflictsIn French Polynesia, fishing is an integral part of everyday life. The people living here fish on the flats and along the reef using nets, hooks and line, harpoons, spearguns and traditional artisanal traps.
19h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
8
Scientists use 4-D scanning to predict behaviour of volcanoesScientists are using the latest in 4-D technology to predict the behaviour of lava flows and its implications for volcanic eruptions.
19h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
91
Scientists solve lunar mystery with aid of missing moon tapesAfter eight years spent recovering lost moon data from the Apollo missions, scientists report in a new study they've solved a decades-old mystery of why the moon's subsurface warmed slightly during the 1970s.
19h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
Are there enough chemicals on icy worlds to support life?For decades, scientists have believed that there could be life beneath the icy surface of Jupiter's moon Europa. Since that time, multiple lines of evidence have emerged that suggest that it is not alone. Indeed, within the Solar System, there are many "ocean worlds" that could potentially host life, including Ceres, Ganymede, Enceladus, Titan, Dione, Triton, and maybe even Pluto.
19h
Popular Science
29
Get your phone's AI assistant to actually assist youDIY It does much more than answering trivia questions. Your smartphone comes with an artificial-intelligence personal assistant. Most people only call on it to answer trivia questions—but this AI can do so much more.
19h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Australian fished populations drop by a third over ten years, study findsLarge fish species are rapidly declining around Australia, according to the first continental diver census of shallow reef fish. Contrary to years of sustainability reports, our study indicates that excessive fishing pressure is contributing to decline of many Australian fish species.
20h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
61
When inertial frames of reference collideIn an inertial frame of reference, a body with zero net force acting on it does not accelerate. When scientists speak of inertial frames of reference, they're invoking a coordinate system with no external influences, and which describes space and time homogeneously and with uniformity in all directions. This was Galileo's clever conceptual solution to the problem of describing inertial systems mat
20h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Biologists discover gene responsible for unique appearance of butterflies' dorsal wingsButterflies often display strikingly different colour or patterns on the dorsal (top) and ventral (bottom) sides of their wings. A study by researchers from the National University of Singapore (NUS) has revealed that the gene apterous A is responsible for the appearance of the dorsal wings of butterflies.
20h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
13
Half of hepatitis C patients with private insurance denied life-saving drugsThe number of insurance denials for life-saving hepatitis C drugs among patients with both private and public insurers remains high across the United States. Private insurers had the highest denial rates, with 52.4 percent of patients denied coverage, while Medicaid denied 34.5 percent of patients and Medicare denied 14.7 percent.
20h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
15
Children can learn ways to significantly reduce salt usageConsuming excessive salt during childhood is associated with cardiovascular health risk factors, yet the effectiveness of education- and behavior-based strategies to lower salt usage among children has not been fully researched.
20h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
14
How much is wildlife tourism affecting the animals it targets?A new study reveals that white shark activity increases dramatically when the animals are interacting with cage-diving operators.
20h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
11
Larger sample sizes needed to increase reproducibility in neuroscience studiesSmall sample sizes in studies using functional MRI to investigate brain connectivity and function are common in neuroscience, despite years of warnings that such studies likely lack sufficient statistical power. A new analysis reveals that task-based fMRI experiments involving typical sample sizes of about 30 participants are only modestly replicable. This means that independent efforts to repeat
20h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
21
Men may contribute to infertility through newly discovered part of spermThe research identifies a new structure in human sperm that functions in the zygote and may provide new avenues for addressing male infertility and insights into early embryo developmental defects.
20h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
5
Camouflaged plants use the same tricks as animalsPlants use many of the same methods as animals to camouflage themselves, a new study shows.
20h
Dagens Medicin

Nyt center vil udvikle alternativ til dyr immunterapi til børn med kræftHerlev og Gentofte Hospital opretter sammen med Rigshospitalet et nyt Dansk Center for Pædiatrisk Cancer, som skal udvikle en ny immunterapi til børn med leukæmi, der kan være alternativ til lægemidlet Kymriah fra Novartis.
20h
Dagens Medicin

Danske og tyske forskere vil sammen finde kur mod diabetesEt dansk og tysk samarbejde skal forske i stamcellebaseret terapi som behandling til patienterne med svære former for type 1-diabetes.
20h
Dagens Medicin

Region Hovedstaden indhenter nogle af de manglende millionerHospitalerne i Region Hovedstaden stod til at miste 430 mio. kr. i finansiering. Det tal er nu skåret ned til 54 mio. kr.
20h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Essential oils to fight bacterial infectionsJames Cook University scientists in Australia have discovered a technique to apply natural plant extracts such as Tea Tree Oil as a coating for medical devices, a process which could prevent millions of infections every year.
20h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

FEFU scientists have created a new type of optical ceramic materialThe new material is needful to develop instruments for the high-precise measuring of distances, terrestrial and space optical communications, pollution monitoring, implementation of new modes of laser processing, information recording and storage.
20h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Using mathematical approaches to optimally manage public debtLarge government debt negatively impacts long-term economic growth and the debt-to-gross domestic product (GDP) ratio is an important indicator of a country's financial leverage. In a paper publishing next week in the SIAM Journal on Control and Optimization, financial mathematician Giorgio Ferrari proposes a mathematical model that helps optimize and control the debt-to-GDP ratio.
20h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
A laser that smells like a houndUniversity of Adelaide researchers have created a laser that can 'smell' different gases within a sample. Applications for the new device lie not just in environmental monitoring and detecting industrial contamination, but may eventually be used to diagnose disease by 'smelling' the breath.
20h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Fighting back against the Australian blowflyOpening the mail may not seem the most thrilling of tasks for a geneticist, but for a period of five months at the start of this year, our team was excited every time an Express Post envelope arrived at our Melbourne lab.
20h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
Nature's traffic engineers have come up with many simple but effective solutionsAs more and more people move to cities, the experience of being stuck in impenetrable gridlock becomes an increasingly common part of the human experience. But managing traffic isn't just a human problem. From the tunnels built by termites to the enormous underground networks built by fungi, life forms have evolved incredible ways of solving the challenge of moving large numbers of individuals and
20h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
500+
More mystery objects detected near Milky Way's supermassive black holeAstronomers have discovered several bizarre objects at the Galactic Center that are concealing their true identity behind a smoke screen of dust; they look like gas clouds, but behave like stars.
20h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
How over-production of meat is maintainedMeat consumption is high in Sweden, but production nevertheless outstrips demand. In a new doctoral thesis in sociology, Jonas Bååth has studied how Swedish meat producers are handling the problems that arise when supply of their products exceeds demand. Why do so many of them continue to produce meat, sometimes even at a financial loss?
20h
The Atlantic
500+
A Decision Too Important for Rick PerryA generation ago, the House of Representatives debated a matter of huge civilizational consequence: whether building a neutron bomb would help deter conflict with the U.S.S.R. or make an apocalyptic catastrophe more likely by lowering the threshold for nuclear war. A republic demands that the people’s representatives decide such matters. As a young House leadership page in the late 1970s, Jonatha
20h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
100+
Dolphins deliberately killed for use as bait in global fisheriesAhead of World Oceans Day, new research exposes the practice of killing of aquatic mammals, including some listed as endangered, for the express purpose of securing bait for global fisheries. The practice is widespread globally, but most common in Latin America and Asia. The study reveals there is little information on the impact of this harvesting on targeted mammal populations and urges increase
20h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
13
Hidden magnetism appears under hidden symmetrySometimes a good theory just needs to right materials to make it work. That's the case with recent findings by UT's physicists and their colleagues, who designed a two-dimensional magnetic system that points to the possibility of devices with increased security and efficiency, using only a small amount of energy. By exploiting a hidden symmetry in the material, their results support a theory first
20h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
When do invasive species pose a threat?Is it possible to predict whether newly-arriving alien species, such as fishes from the Black Sea, will establish in Western Europe and displace native species? Researchers of Wageningen University & Research and Radboud University Nijmegen present a novel method, based on functional traits, such as mouth shape, to predict which alien fish species pose a threat to native fish. Their work is publis
20h
Feed: All Latest
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Amazon Fire TV Cube: Details, Price, Release DateAlexa knows: it's hip to be square.
20h
Feed: All Latest
300+
Britannica Insights Is a Chrome Extension to Fix False Google ResultsEncyclopedia Britannica released a Chrome extension designed to fix Google's sometimes inaccurate "featured snippets."
20h
Feed: All Latest
60
Can This State Finally Put a Price on Carbon?After a decade of failed carbon taxes, Washington state is pushing to pass the country's first "carbon fee." Will this time be different?
20h
Scientific American Content: Global
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Web Searches Reveal (in Aggregate) What We're Really ThinkingGoogle as a window into our private thoughts — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
20h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
How germs thrive on school desksLooking at the microbial communities that grow on students' desks, a team of Yale researchers found that the bacteria and fungi overwhelmingly came from the children sitting at the desks. They also found that, even after a desk cleaning, the microbes were back in full force within a few days.
20h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Post-emergent herbicide timing key in corn productionWeed control in corn is important to profitability, but producers need to be aware of herbicide application timing, said Dr. Jourdan Bell, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service agronomist in Amarillo.
20h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
100+
No evidence that Europe's bog bodies were gayDanish bogs have preserved some unique archaeological finds: Grauballe Man and Tollund Man, to name a few.
20h
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
3
Episode 3: Jellyfish to the FACE! | Deadliest Catch: GreenhornThe worst storm of the season hits like a bomb. At the rail in whipping seas, Landon makes a painful mistake that puts his career in jeopardy. Luke takes a stinging jellyfish to the eye. Binge all episodes of Deadliest Catch: Greenhorn: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/deadliest-catch-greenhorn/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.c
20h
Science | The Guardian
77
Tiny shrimp could influence global climate changes | John AbrahamResearchers find the daily migrations of brine shrimp is strong enough to mix ocean waters When we think of global warming and climate change, most of us ignore the impacts that animals have on the environment. Climate affects animals, but is the reverse true? Can animals affect the climate? I don’t know how to answer that question definitively, but I was fortunate enough to read a very recent pa
20h
New Scientist – News
35
Surveillance drones can now spot violent attacks as they happenA drone surveillance system can spot violence in a crowd, including stabbing and strangling, but some worry the consequences have not been thought through
20h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
7
Copycat sea slugs vary in toxicity and tasteUniversity of Queensland-led research found sea slugs that mimic the colours of other slugs to scare off predators do not have the same chemical defences as the species they are copying.
20h
The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: New Kids on the BlockResearchers discover that a layer of human breast tissue is not one but two distinct cell types.
20h
Dagens Medicin

Kommunerne får 1,7 mia. kr. til at løfte serviceområdetEt løft på 1,7 mia. kr. til et kommunal løft på serviceområdet er en af konklusionerne i økonomiaftalen for 2019 mellem Kommunernes Landsforening og regeringen.
20h
Futurity.org
2
‘Hashing’ gives more accurate estimate of Syrian war deadResearchers are using statistics and data science tools to accurately and efficiently estimate the number of identified victims killed in the Syrian civil war. In a new paper , which will appear in the Annals of Applied Statistics , scientists report on a four-year effort to combine a data-indexing method called “hashing with statistical estimation.” The new method produces real-time estimates of
20h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
13
Study suggests three periods of global warming slowdown since 1891 due to natural temporary causesA team of researchers from the U.K., Sweden and Australia has found that three periods of global warming slowdown since 1891 were likely due to natural causes rather than disruptions to the factors causing global warming. In their paper published on the open access site Science Advances, the group describes their study of global mean surface temperatures (GST) since the late 19th century and what
20h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Retrofitting roofs in Pennsylvania's Rust BeltThe dramatic deindustrialization of much of Pennsylvania during the 1980s and 1990s left many areas of the state in serious need of revitalization. Once vibrant and bustling communities have been left in disarray. Deteriorating streets, abandoned factories and buildings and empty storefronts are found in cities like New Kensington, Pennsylvania, a town located 18 miles northeast of Pittsburgh.
20h
Ingeniøren
100+
Justitsministeriet: Hov, vi har alligevel 678 GB Tibet-mailsAnsatte i politiet har flyttet mails over i et personligt .pst-arkiv, fordi størrelsen på deres mailbokse var begrænset til 50 megabyte. Derfor blev mails fra politiets øverste ledelse ikke udleveret til Tibetkommissionen. Nu er de dog dukket op.
20h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
9
Warm water creeps into otherwise-calm Central PacificAfter a mild La Niña late last year, temperatures, convection and rainfall rates in the equatorial Pacific Ocean returned to normal by early April of this year. An April 9 image of sea level height from the U.S./European Jason-3 satellite mission showed most of the ocean at neutral heights. But by the beginning of May, high sea levels began to build up in the Central Pacific. In the tropics, high
20h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
5
Searching the sea, and bacterial battles, for new antibioticsAlexander Fleming's discovery of penicillin—the world's first natural antibiotic—is famously told as a story of serendipity: a petri dish growing bacteria was contaminated by mold, which secreted a substance to keep bacteria at bay. The lesson learned was that science can take advantage of chance encounters to change the world.
20h
Dana Foundation

#WSF18: What Causes Extremism in the Brain?Why did the World Science Festival organize a talk about the roots of extremism as part of this year’s celebration? Moderator Maria Konnikova explained that, under the current US administration, it is very hard to escape political discussion. With extreme views on both sides, the question of whether we are becoming a more extreme society is something on everyone’s mind. Where does extremism come
21h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
6
Study of Google search histories reveals relationship between anti-Muslim and pro-ISIS sentiment in U.S.A trio of researchers from Duke University and the University of California has found that Google search data can offer insights into the relationship between anti-Muslim and pro-ISIS sentiment in the U.S. In their paper published on the open access site Science Advances, Christopher Bail, Friedolin Merhout and Peng Ding discuss their study and what they found.
21h
Scientific American Content: Global
53
How Global Warming Is Shrinking Earth's AnimalsA rise in global temperatures may be making all kinds of creatures smaller—a trend with worrisome implications — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
21h
Live Science
400+
A Face from the Bible May Appear in This Tiny SculptureArchaeologists aren't sure which biblical king is being depicted in this miniature sculpture found in ancient Israel.
21h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Yep, driving home does take longer than driving to work in L.A., research showsYour evening commute in Los Angeles is probably a lot longer than your morning drive, even though it's essentially the same trip in reverse. Now research from USC bears that out.
21h
Dagens Medicin

Lokalt samarbejde kan fremme forebyggelse af diabetesBørnefamilier kan komme til at leve sundere, når flere aktører i lokalsamfundet bliver aktiveret, og det kan forebygge diabetesrelaterede sygdomme. Det er budskabet, efter diabetescenter har gennemført projekt på Bornholm.
21h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
200+
Men may contribute to infertility through newly discovered part of spermThe research identifies a new structure in human sperm that functions in the zygote and may provide new avenues for addressing male infertility and insights into early embryo developmental defects.
21h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
100+
Trees at nighttime trigger formation of charged particlesUnderstanding how climate has changed over the last centuries and will evolve in the future requires a detailed knowledge of all the climate system components, including an accurate evaluation of the effect of human activity on those.
21h
Futurity.org
2
Plastic bits in barnacles threaten food chainMarine creatures can easily ingest plastic nanoparticles—tiny bits of plastic less than 1 micrometer in size—and they can accumulate over time, research shows. The plastic bits could potentially threaten food safety and pose health risks. Ocean plastic pollution is a huge and growing global problem, researchers say. Estimates say the oceans may already contain over 150 million tons of plastic, an
21h
Feed: All Latest
60
'Vampyr' Review: A Game Whose Messiness Doesn't Weaken Its BiteThe game manages to mechanize something that role-playing games have broadly bungled: ulterior motives.
21h
Feed: All Latest
100+
Alternatives to Cobalt, the Blood Diamond of BatteriesCan scientists find a way to power our phones, robots, and electric cars without cobalt?
21h
Popular Science
100+
There's a HIIT for weight lifting, too. And it works really well.Health You may already know it by another name. Everyone wants to work out less and see more gains, right?. Sweat for 20 minutes instead of an hour and get in shape faster? Come on. What could be better than that?
21h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
19
Chandra scouts nearest star system for possible hazardsIn humanity's search for life outside our Solar System, one of the best places scientists have considered is Alpha Centauri, a system containing the three nearest stars beyond our Sun.
21h
Scientific American Content: Global
200+
Evidence Builds for a New Kind of Neutrino“Sterile neutrinos” that ignore all other particles might be showing up in experiments—and could even help solve the mystery of dark matter — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
21h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
14
Large cli­mate un­cer­tainty even with a 1.5-de­gree tem­per­a­ture in­creaseThe Paris climate agreement includes the aim of limiting average global warming to 1.5°C. There has previously been little research on how climate might look across the world and over time with this level of temperature increase. Climate scientists have now shown that even this lower level of warming could lead to very different consequences on a regional level.
21h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
8
NASA revises Juno's Jupiter missionNASA has approved an update to Juno's science operations until July 2021. This provides for an additional 41 months in orbit around Jupiter and will enable Juno to achieve its primary science objectives.Juno is in 53-day orbits rather than 14-day orbits as initially planned because of a concern about valves on the spacecraft's fuel system. This longer orbit means that it will take more time to col
21h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
Expedition measures solar motions seen during last summer's total solar eclipse"During the August 21, 2017, solar eclipse, our dozens of telescopes and electronic cameras collected data during the rare two minutes at which we could see and study the sun's outer atmosphere, the corona," reported solar-astronomer Jay Pasachoff to the American Astronomical Society, meeting in Denver during June 4-7. Pasachoff, Field Memorial Professor of Astronomy at Williams College, discussed
21h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
A laser that tracks like a houndUniversity of Adelaide researchers have created a laser that can "smell" different gases within a sample.
21h
Dagens Medicin

Nyt middel mod skizofreni på vej mod godkendelseEMA anbefaler godkendelse af lægemidlet Rxulti, som er udviklet af Lundbeck og Otsuka i fællesskab.
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Dagens Medicin

Konservative får nu sundhedsordførerMette Abildgaard kan igen kalde sig konservatives sundhedsordfører.
21h
The Atlantic
100+
People Are Changing the Way They Use Social MediaConnection is the watchword. That’s what Facebook is about, if you haven’t heard. “My top priority has always been our social mission of connecting people,” CEO Mark Zuckerberg said in testimony before Congress in April, after tens of millions of Facebook users learned that their private data had been compromised and shared with the political consulting firm Cambridge Analytica. What Facebook is
21h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Fungicide impairs silk production, according to studyOne of the problems caused by the intensive use of pesticides is their effect on organisms other than those they are designed to combat—the most notorious example of which is the global mortality of honeybees.
21h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Newly discovered regulation process explains plant developmentVascular tissue in plants distributes water and nutrients, thereby ensuring constant growth. Each new cell needs to develop into its respective cell type in the vascular tissue. A team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now discovered how these cells know which cell type they should develop into.
21h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Biodegradable crop protection products without risks or side effectsTraditional insecticides not only kill pests, they also endanger bees and other beneficial insects, as well as affect biodiversity in soils, lakes, rivers and seas. A team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now developed an alternative—a biodegradable agent that keeps pests at bay without poisoning them.
21h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
92
Keeping plants nourished—the workings of a photosynthesis backup systemPhotosynthesis is how plants 'make their food' and feed the rest of the planet. The key ingredient in that recipe is carbon. So, the process captures energy from the sun, which is then used to tear away carbon from atmospheric CO2.
21h
Ingeniøren
43
Rejsekort-kunder: Her er 11 forbedringer til kortetForbrugerrådet Tænk har på baggrund af brugerundersøgelser og henvendelser udarbejdet 11 forslag til forbedring af rejsekortet.
21h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
A common electronic language for magnetic resonanceScientists working in the field of organic chemistry create and study new molecules using magnetic resonance. The standards used to re-transcribe the collected data is, however, specific to each laboratory or publication, making it difficult to export the information electronically and thus to be used by the scientific community. An international team headed by chemists from the University of Gene
21h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Terror: The power of narrationLiterary texts have the potential to penetrate war and terror by overcoming divisive narratives, according to comparatist Dr. Dana Bönisch. In her thesis at the University of Bonn, she examined newer, largely unknown novels on 9/11 and the so-called "War on Terror." She worked on literary examples that counteract a simplistic narrative of "Good versus Evil." For her analyses, she also made extensi
21h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Double-layered porous nanotubes with spatially separated photoredox surfacesSolar energy conversion of water into H2 through photocatalysis is considered a promising approach for H2 production. However, the separation efficiency of charge carriers is the key to improving the efficiency of photocatalytic hydrogen production. A recent study reveals that the double-layered porous nanotubes with spatially separated photoredox surfaces were synthesized by a self-template strat
21h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
5
A new method for solving a series of global optimization problems developedTo create highly effective technical systems and technological processes, in addition to the use of new principles, new materials, new physical effects and other solutions that determine the overall structure of the object being created, researchers have to choose the best combination of the object's parameters (geometric dimensions, electrical characteristics, etc.), since any changes in the para
21h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
10
Large-scale and sustainable 3-D printing with the most ubiquitous natural materialCellulose is one of the most abundant and broadly distributed organic compounds and industrial by-products on Earth. Yet, despite decades of extensive research, the bottom-up use of cellulose to fabricate 3-D objects is still plagued with problems that restrict its practical applications: derivatives with vast polluting effects, used in combination with plastics, lack of scalability and high produ
21h
Viden
9
Eksamenstiden er over os: Derfor får du sommerfugle i mavenDit ubevidste nervesystem er i sving, når du har følelsen af flyvende insekter i maven.
21h
Viden

Nu skal du rejse i passagerfly uden vinduerI fremtiden er der ingen vinduer i mange passagerfly. De er digitale skærme. Flyselskab har netop sendt sit første af slagsen i luften.
22h
The Atlantic
300+
The Strangest Thing About Trump’s Approach to Presidential PowerDonald Trump’s take on executive power is peculiar, but not merely because he’s reaching for more of it. Expanding presidential prerogatives is practically part of the job description in the modern era. So when Trump’s all-caps flirtation with a self-pardon this week launched a new round of concerns about the president’s use of executive power, many of those concerns were, in part, misdirected. T
22h
Feed: All Latest
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Yuba Electric Boda Boda Review: An E-Bike for ParentsIt's as easy and convenient to ride the electric Yuba Boda Boda as it is to drive a car.
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Feed: All Latest
100+
We Need to Talk About Robots Trying to Pass as HumansRobots that mimic humans are getting so entrancing, it’s easy to forget how ethically problematic they could be one day if we’re not careful.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
93
50 years ago, NASA astronauts prepared to return to spaceApollo 7 crewmembers underwent their first major tests 50 years ago. Today, U.S. astronauts struggle to get into space.
22h
Scientific American Content: Global
32
Testing Philosophy through ExperimentsNew technologies could shed light on old philosophical questions, such as the nature of the mind and whether moral values reflect universal truth — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
22h
Scientific American Content: Global
500+
A Shot against Cancer Slated for Testing in Massive Dog StudyThe canine clinical trial will vaccinate 800 healthy pets — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
22h
Nyheder – Forskning – Videnskab

Opråb til ledelseskommunikation sæt fokus på ambitionerNy analyse af Lektor Jacob Alsted fra Institut for Statskundskab peger på, at ambitioner kan have…
23h
BBC News – Science & Environment
36
European Commission hopes for big science funding upliftThe European Commission sets out how it wants to spend €100bn (£87bn) on science in the next EU budget.
23h
Popular Science
2K
Why don’t we put power lines underground?Technology The move could defend the grid against hurricanes. But it brings its own problems—and price tag. “Put power lines underground!” is a common hurricane season rallying cry. So why don’t we do it?
23h
Ingeniøren

UR-grundlægger klar med robot-konkurrentEfter fire års udvikling er danske Kassow Robots klar til at præsentere deres første samarbejdende robotter.
23h
Ingeniøren
2
To ministerier blæser på Rigsrevisionens it-anbefalinger mod ransomwareSundhedsdatastyrelsen og Udenrigsministeriet vil ikke forhindre medarbejderne i at bruge private e-mailløsninger på arbejdspladsen. Heller ikke selv om det indgår i værnet mod ransomware og er anbefalet af Rigsrevisionen.
23h
The Atlantic
1K
Reporting Foreign Meddling in Elections Shouldn’t Be OptionalOver the past year, I’ve spent hours listening to witnesses talk about the events of the 2016 campaign. The House Intelligence Committee, on which I sit, has been investigating Russian interference in the election. Multiple members of Donald Trump’s campaign, businesses, and family, I’ve learned, were contacted by individuals linked to the Russian government—but none of them, so far as we know, r
23h
Dagens Medicin

Viborg får ny ledende overlæge til Operation og IntensivCarsten Søndergaard Poulsen er ny ledende overlæge på Operation og Intensiv på Regionshospitalet Viborg. Han tiltræder stillingen 1. september.
23h
Ingeniøren
1
Spørg Scientariet: Hvordan sikrer man historiske onlineartikler mod pilfingre?En læser vil gerne vide, hvordan man sikrer sig, at uvedkommende ikke justerer i artikler og nyheder, som ligger tilgængelige online. Det svarer Rigsarkivet og en professor fra NBI på.
23h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Study: Larger sample sizes needed to increase reproducibility in neuroscience studiesSmall sample sizes in studies using functional MRI to investigate brain connectivity and function are common in neuroscience, despite years of warnings that such studies likely lack sufficient statistical power. A new analysis reveals that task-based fMRI experiments involving typical sample sizes of about 30 participants are only modestly replicable. This means that independent efforts to repeat
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Deadly behavior-modifying weapon identified in insect-world chemical arms raceNew research from the University of East Anglia joins the dots between zombie ants, an insect-world arms race and the search for new antibiotics. Scientists probing one of the mysteries of the insect world identified a powerful chemical weapon used in the arms race between fungus-farming leafcutter ants and the parasites that plague them. It is hoped that the findings will help scientists search f
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Dolphins deliberately killed for use as bait in global fisheriesAhead of World Oceans Day, new research exposes the practice of killing of aquatic mammals, including some listed as endangered, for the express purpose of securing bait for global fisheries. The practice is widespread globally, but most common in Latin America and Asia. The study reveals there is little information on the impact of this harvesting on targeted mammal populations and urges increase
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Ingeniøren

»Offentlige data er ofte ubrugelige«Vi ser flere og flere forsøg med business analytics og machine learning i kommunerne, men det går generelt langsomt pga. ubrugelige offentlige data, skriver divisionsdirektør hos EG Citizen Solutions Johnny Iversen.
1d
The Atlantic
500+
Has the Western World Started Shunning America?When leaders of the Group of Seven industrialized nations meet Friday in Charlevoix, Quebec, alongside the usual awkward group photographs, forced smiles, and lifeless communiques, expect to find something usually missing from such gatherings: candor. A preview was on offer last Saturday as G7 finance ministers met in Whistler, British Columbia, and in a highly unusual move, specifically cited th
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
37
Dolphins deliberately killed for use as bait in global fisheriesImportant new research released ahead of World Oceans Day exposes the widespread practice of killing aquatic mammals such as dolphins, sea lions, seals and otters for use as bait in global fisheries. Published in open-access journal Frontiers in Marine Science, the study shines a new light into what researchers say is an issue that has so far received little attention within the scientific and con
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
100+
Deadly behavior-modifying weapon identified in insect-world chemical arms raceScientists probing one of the mysteries of the insect world have identified a powerful chemical weapon used in the arms race between fungus-farming leafcutter ants and the parasites that plague them.
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Ingeniøren
40
Danske vandværker indfører vandingsforbudFlere vandværker har svært ved at følge med, når vi i sommervarmen drikker, bader og vander løs for at holde os selv og haven på toppen. Derfor beder de nu danskerne fokusere mindre på plænen, så der er nok vand til os alle.
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Ingeniøren
100+
Energinet: Sjælland vil mangle el fra 2030Energinet går nu igang med at forberede et udbud af såkaldt midlertidige strategiske reserver til det østdanske elsystem fra 2025. Det skyldes, at Sjælland vil mangle 425 MW kraftværkskapacitet fra 2030.
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Viden
88
Ny dom: Brugere kan blive straffet for Facebooks overtrædelserDom fra EU-domstolen lægger ansvar over på firmaer, organisationer og politikere, hvis de benytter Facebook-sider.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Uber decries ride-hailing price cap passed in HonoluluHonolulu leaders approved a measure Wednesday to limit prices that ride-hailing services like Uber and Lyft can charge during peak demand, a cap that the companies say would be the first restriction of its kind in the United States.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
Bayer-Monsanto merger creates agrichemical juggernautGerman chemicals and pharmaceuticals giant Bayer will seal a $63-billion merger with US-based Monsanto Thursday, creating an agrichemical juggernaut with lofty ambitions to feed the world but feared by environmentalists.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
Shareholders reject bid to link Google diversity to exec payShareholders of Google parent Alphabet Inc. have rejected several proposals aimed at linking executive pay to diversity goals, being more open about lobbying, narrowing the gender-pay gap, and weakening the grip founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin have on company voting stock.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
7
Hawaii volcano gives experts clues to boost scienceHawaii's Kilauea volcano may be disrupting life in paradise with its bursts of ash and bright-orange lava, but it also has scientists wide-eyed, eager to advance what's known about volcanoes.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
30
Volcano creates new land after lava fills Hawaii ocean bayA neighborhood called Vacationland on Hawaii's Big Island had disappeared as lava poured into two oceanfront subdivisions, smothering hundreds of homes and filling an ocean bay, turning it into new land that now juts into the sea.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
94
Scientists propose changing the rules of history to avoid environmental collapseFor the first time in our planet's 4.5 billion-year history a single species, humans, is increasingly dictating its future, according to a new book by UCL scientists.
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Ingeniøren

Elsektorens data-protektionisme koster dyre dobbeltinvesteringerBranchekilder kritiserer Energinets DataHub for at være forældet og have for ringe brugerflader. Det resulterer i dyre dobbeltinvesteringer
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
500+
Juno solves 39-year old mystery of Jupiter lightningEver since NASA's Voyager 1 spacecraft flew past Jupiter in March, 1979, scientists have wondered about the origin of Jupiter's lightning. That encounter confirmed the existence of Jovian lightning, which had been theorized for centuries. But when the venerable explorer hurtled by, the data showed that the lightning-associated radio signals didn't match the details of the radio signals produced by
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Dagens Medicin

Biosimilær trastuzumab anbefales til tre grupper af brystkræftpatienterMedicinrådet vurderer, at biosimilær trastuzumab kan tages i brug til både nydiagnosticerede patienter, patienter med tilbagefald og til brystkræftpatienter, der allerede er i behandling med originalmidlet
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Ingeniøren

CPR ramt af kodefejl: 22.000 danskere kunne ikke låne pengeDet var en fejl hos it-leverandøren DXC (det tidligere CSC), der i sidste uge sendte forkerte kreditadvarsler om 22.000 danskere til blandt andet kreditvurderingsfirmaer. Det oplyser CPR-kontoret til Version2.
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Science | The Guardian
500+
‘Sexy plants’ on track to replace harmful pesticides to protect cropsResearchers are genetically engineering plants to produce the sex pheromones of insects, which then frustrate the pests’ attempts to mate “Sexy plants” are on the way to replacing many harmful pesticides, scientists say, by producing the sex pheromones of insects which then frustrate pests’ attempts to mate. Scientists have already genetically engineered a plant to produce the sex pheromones of m
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Insurance denials for new hepatitis C drugs remain high nationwide, study suggestsHighly effective drugs that can cure chronic hepatitis C infection in approximately 95 percent of patients first became available in the US in 2014. But both public and private insurers continue to deny coverage for these costly drugs at high rates nationwide, despite efforts to remove treatment restrictions, according to a new study published in Open Forum Infectious Diseases.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
82
Half of hepatitis C patients with private insurance denied life-saving drugsThe number of insurance denials for life-saving hepatitis C drugs among patients with both private and public insurers remains high across the United States. Private insurers had the highest denial rates, with 52.4 percent of patients denied coverage, while Medicaid denied 34.5 percent of patients and Medicare denied 14.7 percent.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Flu virus is protected by mucus when airborne, regardless of humidityMucus and other airway secretions that are expelled when a person with the flu coughs or exhales appear to protect the virus when it becomes airborne, regardless of humidity levels, a creative experiment conducted by the University of Pittsburgh and Virginia Tech discovered. The results refute long-standing studies that indicated the influenza virus degrades and is inactivated sooner as the humidi
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Science-Based Medicine
21
Chiropractic Pediatrics: “delayed referral, misdiagnosis, adverse events and ineffective treatments”A study finds "delayed referral, misdiagnosis, adverse events and ineffective treatments" in chiropractic management of pediatric orthopedic conditions. States should act to prevent this harm to children.
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Ingeniøren

Elsektorens data-protektionisme koster dyre dobbeltinvesteringerNår alle holder på data, risikerer vi at ende med at måle det samme to eller tre gange. Det er samfundsøkonomisk urentabelt. Flere branchekilder kritiserer Energinets DataHub for at være forældet og have have for ringe brugerflader.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Machine learning helps detect lymphedema among breast cancer survivorsMachine learning using real-time symptom reports can accurately detect lymphedema, a distressing side effect of breast cancer treatment that is more easily treated when identified early, finds a new study led by NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing and published in the journal mHealth.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
5
How much is wildlife tourism affecting the animals it targets?A new study in Conservation Physiology, published by Oxford University Press, reveals that white shark activity increases dramatically when the animals are interacting with cage-diving operators.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Negative vs. positive social media experiences and depressive symptomsNegative experiences on social media carry more weight than positive interactions when it comes to the likelihood of young adults reporting depressive symptoms, according to a new University of Pittsburgh analysis. The finding may be useful for designing interventions and clinical recommendations to reduce the risk of depression.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Children can learn ways to significantly reduce salt usageConsuming excessive salt during childhood is associated with cardiovascular health risk factors, yet the effectiveness of education- and behavior-based strategies to lower salt usage among children has not been fully researched. A new study published in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior found that a web-based salt education program improved salt-related knowledge, self-efficacy, and
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Mobile health technology can potentially transform how patients manage heart disease riskMobile health technology has the potential to transform the way we prevent and manage heart disease, but there are unanswered questions about how to optimize this technology and maintain engagement with patients, according to a review of randomized clinical trials published in the Canadian Journal of Cardiology.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Prolonged stress can impact quality of sperm, according to Ben-Gurion U. researchers'Mental stress is known to have an adverse effect on fertility, but there is little research on the impact of stress on sperm quality,' says Dr. Eliahu Levitas, a member of the Ben-Gurion University Faculty of Health Sciences and director of the IVF Unit at Soroka. 'This study shows that prolonged stress can have an effect on sperm quality.'
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
45
How much is wildlife tourism affecting the animals it targets?A new study in Conservation Physiology, published by Oxford University Press, reveals that white shark activity increases dramatically when the animals are interacting with cage-diving operators.
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ArXiv Query

The Erdos conjecture for primitive setsA subset of the integers larger than 1 is $primitive$ if no member divides another. Erdos proved in 1935 that the sum of $1/(alog a)$ for $a$ running over a primitive set $A$ is universally bounded over all choices for $A$. In 1988 he asked if this universal bound is attained for the set of prime numbers. In this paper we make some progress on several fronts, and show a connection to certain prim
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Live Science
12
David Cassidy Has Dementia: Here's What That MeansActor and singer David Cassidy recently revealed he has dementia, but what exactly does this term mean?
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Live Science
16
Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: Symptoms and TreatmentCarpal tunnel syndrome is a nerve-related condition that causes pain and numbness in the wrists and hands.
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Ingeniøren
45
Novo Nordisk Fonden klar med gigantiske donationer: 5 milliarder til forskning hvert årNovo Nordisk Fonden firedobler sine udbetalinger til dansk forskning de kommende år, og teknik og naturvidenskab får nu også del i pengene.
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The Scientist RSS

MyHeritage Account Data Compromised in Cybersecurity IncidentA security researcher found the email addresses and encrypted passwords of more than 92 million users of the genealogy site on a private server outside the company.
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The Scientist RSS

Dogs in Southern China Host Several Strains of FluThey may be a prospective source for an influenza pandemic, researchers warn.
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New Scientist – News
400+
Kidney cancer spreads by pretending to be white blood cellsMany people with cancer die from secondary tumours, and now we know how some cancer cells are able to spread around the body and move into other organs
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The Atlantic
3K
America’s Whittling Away of Consumer ProtectionsMick Mulvaney has been clear, so very clear , about his vision for the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. As acting director of the bureau, Mulvaney has already articulated his intention to slow down regulation of the financial industry. On Wednesday, he made good on that promise, in dramatic fashion—effectively ousting all 25 members of one of the bureau’s advisory boards. The dismantled grou
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Feed: All Latest
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Elections Don’t Work at All. You Can Blame the MathSan Francisco still doesn’t have a new mayor. But that’s democracy for you.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
64
Education linked to higher risk of short-sightednessSpending more years in full time education is associated with a greater risk of developing short-sightedness (myopia).
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
10
Drug combination offers more effective care for patients suffering miscarriageA combination of the drugs mifepristone and misoprostol can help bring closure to some women and their families suffering from miscarriage, and reduces the need for surgical intervention to complete the painful miscarriage process. Results of a new clinical trial show that while the standard drug regimen using misoprostol on its own frequently fails to complete the miscarriage, a combination of mi
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
9
Most clinical trial participants find benefits of sharing personal data outweigh risksMost participants in clinical trials believe the benefits of broadly sharing person-level data outweigh the risks, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
24
Preterm newborns sleep better in NICU while hearing their mother's voiceHearing a recording of their mother's voice may help neonates maintain sleep while in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), according to preliminary data from a new study.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Immunization with beneficial bacteria makes brain more stress resilientRats immunized weekly for three weeks with beneficial bacteria showed increased levels of anti-inflammatory proteins in the brain, more resilience to the physical effects of stress, and less anxiety-like behavior. If replicated in humans, researchers say the findings could lead to novel microbiome-based immunizations for mood disorders like anxiety and PTSD.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
17
Human drug addiction behaviors tied to specific impairments in 6 brain networksSystematic review of task-related neuroimaging studies found addicted individuals demonstrate increased activity in these networks during drug-related processing but decreases across all other functions.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
19
Clear predictors of changing insulin requirements & A1C in youth with type 1 diabetes20-year longitudinal study identifies clear predictors of rising A1C levels in young persons, as well as ways to improve glycemic control in this population.
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BBC News – Science & Environment
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A manifesto to save Planet Earth (and ourselves)Scientists Simon Lewis and Mark Maslin believe humans are not on an inevitable course to self-destruction.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
25
Tumultuous galaxy mergers better at switching on black holesA new study finds that violent crashes may be more effective at activating black holes than more peaceful mergers.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
19
New combination treatment against relapsed head and neck cancerThe five-year survival rate for locally-advanced head and neck cancer is only 46 percent, even with treatments including surgery, radiation, chemotherapy and/or genetically targeted treatments such as cetuximab. Often, the problem is that while treatments initially work, cancer evolves to resist treatment.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
30
Lab-grown neurons improve breathing in mice after spinal cord injuryIn a pre-clinical study, researchers show that V2a interneurons could one day help paralyzed patients breathe without a ventilator.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
16
Impact of fishing gear entanglement deduced from whale hormone levelsNew validation study analyzing hormone profile shows the duration and negative effects of fishing gear entanglement on the North Atlantic right whale — one of the most endangered whale species. Providing information on foraging success, migration behavior and body functioning, this technique can be used to study other baleen species to understand the impact of fishing activity on threatened whale
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
18
Targeting strategy may open door to better cancer drug deliveryBioengineers may be able to use the unique mechanical properties of diseased cells, such as metastatic cancer cells, to help improve delivery of drug treatments to the targeted cells, according to a scientists.
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BBC News – Science & Environment
1K
Meet the nuns helping save a sacred species from extinctionThe axolotl – a salamander unique to Mexico – has almost been wiped out by pollution and over-fishing.
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Futurity.org
1
Energy-efficient homes rent and sell for morePeople are willing to pay a premium for energy-efficient homes, according to new research. Georgia Warren-Myers, a property lecturer at the University of Melbourne and Franz Fuerst of the University of Cambridge analyzed tens of thousands of property transactions over five years, from 2011-2016, in Australia’s Capital Territory, where mandatory disclosure has been in place since the late 1990s. “
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Older breast cancer patients in England less likely to surviveOlder women diagnosed with breast cancer in England are less likely to survive their disease than those in Belgium, Poland, Ireland and the Netherlands according to research published today in the British Journal of Cancer.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
New report suggests three main groups of caffeine sensitivityCoffee drinkers fall into one of three major groups based on their caffeine sensitivity, according to physician and author Dr J.W. Langer, in a new report authored for the Institute for Scientific Information on Coffee.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
31
Desert bighorn sheep are crossing Interstate 40 in CaliforniaDesert bighorn sheep are able to climb steep, rocky terrain with speed and agility. New research shows that they can cross a four-lane highway.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
92
Human encouragement might influence how dogs solve problemsHuman encouragement might influence how dogs solve problems.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
10
How the quality of red sea urchin roe — uni — influences fishermen's behaviorSea urchin roe is an acquired taste. Served as sushi, uni — the Japanese word for this delicacy — is actually the reproductive organ of the sea urchin. One of the most highly valued coastal fisheries in California is the red sea urchin (Mesocentrotus franciscanus), found in the Pacific Ocean from Alaska to Baja California. Red sea urchins are sold to processors who determine the price of each un
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
38
Emergency physicians debunk 'dry drowning' myths, highlight drowning risk in older swimmersParents have been reading — and sharing — alarming reports of children who died or nearly died due to "dry drowning" over the past year. However, the use of that incorrect, nonmedical term has contributed to confusion about the true dangers of drowning in children and led to serious and fatal conditions being ignored after a "dry drowning" diagnosis was made.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
11
Want narcissists to donate to your cause? Make it about themWhen narcissistic individuals are able to imagine themselves in a victim's situation, they are more likely to donate to charity, according to new research.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
15
Fungicide impairs silk production, according to studyBy testing an agrochemical designed to increase resistance on the mulberry plants used to feed silkworms, a research verified a rise in caterpillars' mortality and reduction in the size of cocoons. Intensive use of pesticides in monoculture systems may be the cause of silkworm crop losses in Brazil.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
13
Poor sleep linked to lower cognitive functioning in people with diabetes and prediabetesA study reports that people with diabetes and prediabetes who have lower sleep efficiency — a measure of how much time in bed is actually spent sleeping — have poorer cognitive function than those with better sleep efficiency.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
58
Antibody blocks inflammation, protects mice from hardened arteries and liver diseaseResearchers have discovered that they can block inflammation in mice with a naturally occurring antibody that binds oxidized phospholipids (OxPL), molecules on cell surfaces that get modified by inflammation. Even while on a high-fat diet, the antibody protected the mice from arterial plaque formation, hardening of the arteries and liver disease, and prolonged their lives. The study uncovers new p
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Futurity.org
68
Program that lets little ones pick exercises improves motor skillsIn a new study, a movement curriculum that let preschoolers choose what exercise they do increased physical activity and motor skills competence. Many children—mainly girls—simply aren’t taught or don’t learn how to throw, run, jump, or dribble a ball, researchers say. To change this, Leah Robinson, associate professor at the School of Kinesiology at the University of Michigan, and her colleagues
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Futurity.org
30
Patients really care about what doctors wear to workIf they want their patients to view them favorably, doctors may want to think more about what they wear to work, according to new research. In fact, what medical doctors wear may matter more than most doctors—or even patients—might think, say the researchers behind the new paper in BMJ Open . Based on their findings, they call for more hospitals, health systems, and practice groups to look at the
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Scientific American Content: Global
31
Ancient Clan War Explains Genetic Diversity DropSome 5,000 to 7,000 years ago, the diversity of Y chromosomes plummeted. A new analysis suggests clan warfare may have been the cause. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Futurity.org
3
How to get the most self-centered people to give to charityWhen narcissistic individuals can imagine themselves in a victim’s situation, they are more likely to donate to charity, according to a new study. The study, forthcoming in Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin , found that appeals explicitly asking donors to put themselves in the recipient’s circumstance were more effective at provoking concern and donations from narcissists than appeals th
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
35
How do you weigh a galaxy? Especially the one you're in?Pinning down the mass of a galaxy may seem like an esoteric undertaking, but scientists think it holds the key to unraveling the nature of the elusive, yet-to-be-seen dark matter, and the fabric of our cosmos. A new technique promises more reliable estimates of the masses of galaxies.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
20
Social media images of culture can predict economic trends in citiesA vibrant arts, music and science culture — as measured by images posted to social media site Flickr — successfully predicted the economic rise of certain neighborhoods in London and New York City. The model could even anticipate gentrification by five years. With more than half of the world's population living in cities, such information could help policymakers ensure human wellbeing in dense u
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
15
How the brain performs flexible computationsNeuroscientists have found that by analyzing neural activity using a mathematical concept known as a dynamical system, they can accurately model how the brain performs tasks that require flexible timing.
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Futurity.org
11
These risk-predicting tools may add to the US prison populationRisk assessment tools may contribute to expanding the number of people caught up in the criminal justice system, rather than reducing those numbers, according to new research. The use of risk assessment tools has increased considerably within criminal justice institutions in recent decades, and these tools have been viewed by many as a way to stop or even reverse the United States’ heavy reliance
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
11
Education linked to higher risk of short-sightednessSpending more years in full time education is associated with a greater risk of developing short-sightedness (myopia), finds a study published by The BMJ today.
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NYT > Science
100+
Space Station Could Be Split to Aid Privatization, New NASA Chief SaysJim Bridenstine, the agency’s new administrator, said he is considering various ways to allow private companies to assume operation of the space station.
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The Atlantic
4
The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Kommuted-Written by Elaine Godfrey ( @elainejgodfrey ) Today in 5 Lines President Trump commuted the sentence of Alice Marie Johnson, a 63-year-old woman serving a life sentence for drug possession and money laundering. Kim Kardashian, who visited the White House last week to advocate for Johnson, thanked Trump and senior adviser Jared Kushner, among others, on Twitter. Trump blasted recent media coverag
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The Atlantic
13
The Atlantic Daily: Indispensable Alter EgoWhat We’re Following Aides and Abettors: Millan Hupp, a top aide at the Environmental Protection Agency, has resigned after testifying in Congress about personal tasks she performed for Administrator Scott Pruitt—the latest in a string of scandals that led Hupp to quit, EPA officials say. And people close to Paul Manafort have recognized his longtime aide Konstantin Kilimnik as the person referre
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
No agreement yet between US, China on ZTE: Trump aideZTE US China TrumpThe United States and China have not yet reached a deal on Chinese telecoms giant ZTE that would lift crippling sanctions against the company, top US economic advisor Larry Kudlow said Wednesday.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Bonjour, Alexa: Amazon digital assistant heads to FranceAmazon on Wednesday announced that its digital assistant Alexa is heading for France in Echo voice-commanded speakers as of next week.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
200+
Flying car startup backed by Google founder offers test flightsA flying car project backed by Google co-founder Larry Page was closer to take-off on Wednesday, with a model for test flights by aspiring buyers.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
29
Perinexus in the human heart identified: Implications for patients with atrial fibrillationA collaborative research team is on a quest to collapse a tiny pocket between cardiac cells that can cause big problems. Called the perinexus, the structure spans only tenths of a millimeter — all the space it needs to disrupt a person's heartbeat. The researchers were the first to identify the perinexus in humans.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
22
Transparent, conductive films promising for developing flexible screensBecause silver is less brittle and more chemically resistant than materials currently used to make these electrodes, the new films could offer a high-performance and long-lasting option for use with flexible screens and electronics. The silver-based films could also enable flexible solar cells for installation on windows, roofs and even personal devices.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
British cyber expert accused of lying to FBI about malwareA British cybersecurity researcher credited with stopping a worldwide computer virus last year faces new charges, including lying to the FBI, in an updated indictment Wednesday accusing him of developing malware to steal banking information.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
7
Desert bighorn sheep are crossing Interstate 40 in CaliforniaDesert bighorn sheep are able to climb steep, rocky terrain with speed and agility. New research shows that they can cross a four-lane highway.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
9
Human encouragement might influence how dogs solve problemsHuman encouragement might influence how dogs solve problems, according to a new Oregon State University study.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
18
It's about time: Immediate rewards boost workplace motivationStruggling to finish that report for your boss? One way to increase your interest in a task is to add immediate rewards, rather than wait until the end to reward yourself, according to new Cornell research.
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The Atlantic
2K
Long Live Samantha JonesLast year, a clip of Sex and the City star Kim Cattrall sitting across from Piers Morgan went viral. In the most heavily circulated snippet of the interview, the 61-year-old actress tells Morgan about the intra-cast turmoil that influenced her choice to not reprise her role in the SATC franchise: We’ve never been friends. We’ve been colleagues, and in some ways it’s a very healthy place to be, be
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Researchers assess how the quality of red sea urchin roe—uni—influences fishermen's behaviorSea urchin roe is an acquired taste. Served as sushi, uni—the Japanese word for this delicacy—is actually the reproductive organ of the sea urchin.
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Live Science
300+
Blood Cells Can Transform into Brain Cells, New Study ShowsBy transforming blood cells into nerve cells, can we learn about the brain?
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
100+
Social media images of culture can predict economic trends in citiesThe rise and prosperity of a city neighborhood is not predicated on economic capital alone—the presence of a vibrant arts, music and science culture is equally important. So says a groundbreaking study published in Frontiers in Physics, in which researchers used social media images of cultural events in London and New York City to create a model that can predict neighborhoods where residents enjoy
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
100+
Targeting strategy may open door to better cancer drug deliveryBioengineers may be able to use the unique mechanical properties of diseased cells, such as metastatic cancer cells, to help improve delivery of drug treatments to the targeted cells, according to a team of researchers at Penn State.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
End-to-end blood testing device shows capacity to draw sample and provide diagnostic resultsResearchers from the Biomedical Engineering Department at Rutgers University have developed an end-to-end blood testing device that integrates robotic phlebotomy with downstream sample processing. This platform device performs blood draws and provides diagnostic results in a fully automated fashion at the point-of-care. By reducing turnaround times, the device has the potential to expedite hospita
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Impact of fishing gear entanglement deduced from whale hormone levelsA novel hormone analysis provides a viable way of measuring the duration and effects of fishing gear entanglement on endangered North Atlantic right whales. This forensic technique for analyzing stress responses can also provide information on fasting periods and physical stress in whales. Published in open-access journal Frontiers in Marine Science, the technique can be used to study other baleen
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
300+
How do you weigh a galaxy? Especially the one you're in?A new technique for estimating the mass of galaxies promises more reliable results, especially when applied to large datasets generated by current and future surveys, according to a research team led by Ekta Patel at the University of Arizona. Published in the Astrophysical Journal, the study is the first to combine the observed full three-dimensional motions of several of the Milky Way's satellit
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Transparent, conductive films promising for developing flexible screensResearchers have demonstrated large-scale fabrication of a new type of transparent conductive electrode film based on nanopatterned silver. Smartphone touch screens and flat panel televisions use transparent electrodes to detect touch and to quickly switch the color of each pixel. Because silver is less brittle and more chemically resistant than materials currently used to make these electrodes, t
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Airlines and passengers save billions through crew planningAirlines avoid up to 80 percent of crew-related delays through advance planning, according to the authors of a Dartmouth College study on the commercial airline industry. The research explains the complex reality of crew scheduling and provides an inside look at the techniques used by airlines to absorb system delays.
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11
Collaborative team first to identify the perinexus in the human heartA collaborative research team is on a quest to collapse a tiny pocket between cardiac cells that can cause big problems. Called the perinexus, the structure spans only tenths of a millimeter — all the space it needs to disrupt a person's heartbeat. The researchers were the first to identify the perinexus in humans. They published their results this month in Frontiers in Physiology.
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1
How do you weigh a galaxy? Especially the one you're in?A new technique promises more reliable estimates of the masses of galaxies, according to a paper published in the Astrophysical Journal. The study is the first to combine full 3-D motions of several of the Milky Way's satellite galaxies with computer simulations to constrain the mass of the Milky Way.
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Tumultuous galaxy mergers better at switching on black holesA new study by researchers at the University of Colorado Boulder finds that violent crashes may be more effective at activating black holes than more peaceful mergers.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Drug combination offers more effective care for patients suffering miscarriageA combination of the drugs mifepristone and misoprostol can help bring closure to some women and their families suffering from miscarriage, and reduces the need for surgical intervention to complete the painful miscarriage process. Results of a new clinical trial show that while the standard drug regimen using misoprostol on its own frequently fails to complete the miscarriage, a combination of mi
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Most clinical trial participants find benefits of sharing personal data outweigh risksMost participants in clinical trials believe the benefits of broadly sharing person-level data outweigh the risks, according to a new study by Stanford University researchers.
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New Scientist – News
57
Party drugs are here to stay, but they don’t have to be killersCrack downs on psychedelic substances are failing to protect people from harm. Drug tests at festivals and nightclubs to check they are legit could be a better way
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New Scientist – News
71
Lightning reveals where Jupiter stores its ‘missing’ waterDecades ago a space probe found less water on Jupiter than expected, and now astronomers have tracked some of that water down by mapping lightning storms
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Live Science
62
How Do You Die from Hepatitis A?A woman in Australia died after eating frozen pomegranate seeds that were linked to an outbreak of hepatitis A. But how do you die from the viral illness?
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Human encouragement might influence how dogs solve problemsHuman encouragement might influence how dogs solve problems.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Desert bighorn sheep are crossing Interstate 40 in CaliforniaDesert bighorn sheep are able to climb steep, rocky terrain with speed and agility. New research shows that they can cross a four-lane highway.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Preterm newborns sleep better in NICU while hearing their mother's voiceHearing a recording of their mother's voice may help neonates maintain sleep while in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), according to preliminary data from a new study.
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Colorado study suggests new combination treatment against relapsed head and neck cancer'EphB4-ephrin-B2 inhibitors are currently in clinical trials in other disease settings, and our work shows that it might be successful in combination with EGFR inhibition in advanced head and neck cancers as well,' says Sana Karam, M.D., Ph.D.
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Transparent, conductive films promising for developing flexible screensBecause silver is less brittle and more chemically resistant than materials currently used to make these electrodes, the new films could offer a high-performance and long-lasting option for use with flexible screens and electronics. The silver-based films could also enable flexible solar cells for installation on windows, roofs and even personal devices.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Social media images of culture can predict economic trends in citiesA vibrant arts, music and science culture — as measured by images posted to social media site Flickr — successfully predicted the economic rise of certain neighborhoods in London and New York City. The model could even anticipate gentrification by five years. With more than half of the world's population living in cities, such information could help policymakers ensure human wellbeing in dense u
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New research identifies how blind cavefish lose their eyesBlind cavefish (Astyanax mexicanus) lose critical eye tissues within a few days after their eyes begin to develop. According to a new study, this loss of eye tissues happens through epigenetic silencing of eye-related genes. The researchers identified roles for more than two dozen genes that are shared by humans–most of which have been implicated in various human eye disorders.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
91
Tumultuous galaxy mergers better at switching on black holesA new study by researchers at the University of Colorado Boulder finds that violent crashes may be more effective at activating black holes than more peaceful mergers.
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cognitive science
1
Drones taught to spot violent behavior in crowds using AIsubmitted by /u/trot-trot [link] [comments]
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The Atlantic
200+
It’s the Right Wing’s Italy NowPARIS—In his first trip after becoming pope in 2013, Francis visited Lampedusa, the tiny Italian island off Sicily that had become the first point of arrival in Europe for hundreds of thousands of migrants, and called for a “reawakening of consciences” to their plight. In his first trip since he was named Italy’s new interior minister, Matteo Salvini, the leader of the right-wing League party, we
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New on MIT Technology Review
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Microsoft‘s throwing its servers in the sea to keep them cool
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Is a stress shot on the horizon?Rats immunized weekly for three weeks with beneficial bacteria showed increased levels of anti-inflammatory proteins in the brain, more resilience to the physical effects of stress, and less anxiety-like behavior. If replicated in humans, researchers say the findings could lead to novel microbiome-based immunizations for mood disorders like anxiety and PTSD.
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1
Targeting strategy may open door to better cancer drug deliveryBioengineers may be able to use the unique mechanical properties of diseased cells, such as metastatic cancer cells, to help improve delivery of drug treatments to the targeted cells, according to a team of researchers at Penn State.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Impact of fishing gear entanglement deduced from whale hormone levelsNew validation study analyzing hormone profile shows the duration and negative effects of fishing gear entanglement on the North Atlantic right whale — one of the most endangered whale species. Providing information on foraging success, migration behavior and body functioning, this technique can be used to study other baleen species to understand the impact of fishing activity on threatened whale
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Live Science
500+
World's Oldest Footprints Discovered on Ancient SeafloorNeil Armstrong left the first footprint on the moon, on July 20, 1969. But what about Earth — when did animals first leave footprints here?
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The Scientist RSS

Mouse Pups Infected With Zika Show Symptoms Into AdulthoodThe results suggest the virus could severely alter brain development in infants infected after birth, but blocking a signaling protein early on might ease certain symptoms.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Poor sleep linked to lower cognitive functioning in people with diabetes and prediabetesA study published in the journal Acta Diabetologica reports that people with diabetes and prediabetes who have lower sleep efficiency — a measure of how much time in bed is actually spent sleeping — have poorer cognitive function than those with better sleep efficiency.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Fungicide impairs silk production, according to studyBy testing an agrochemical designed to increase resistance on the mulberry plants used to feed silkworms, a research verified a rise in caterpillars' mortality and reduction in the size of cocoons. Intensive use of pesticides in monoculture systems may be the cause of silkworm crop losses in Brazil.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Black, Hispanic people may be more likely to have a second hemorrhagic stroke than whitesBlack and Hispanic people may be more likely to have another intracerebral hemorrhage, or a stroke caused by bleeding in the brain, than white people, according to a study published in the June 6, 2018, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Lab-grown neurons improve breathing in rodents after spinal cord injuryIn a pre-clinical study, researchers show that V2a interneurons could one day help paralyzed patients breathe without a ventilator.
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Big Think
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U.S. Army develops algorithm for getting ‘optimal alertness’ from caffeineCaffeine is consumed by some 90% of Americans every day, but not everyone is getting the most of its stimulating effects. Read More
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
46
Patenting marine genetic resources: Who owns ocean biodiversity?Marine organisms have evolved to thrive in various ocean environments, resulting in unique adaptations that make them the object of commercial interest. Researchers have identified 862 marine species, with a total of 12,998 genetic sequences associated with a patent. They found that a single transnational corporation (BASF, the world's largest chemical manufacturer) has registered 47 percent of th
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
9
Scientists reveal structure of amino acid transporter involved in cancerThe human glutamine transporter ASCT2 is upregulated in several forms of cancer. It is also the docking platform for a wide range of pathogenic retroviruses. Scientists have used cryo-electron microscopy to elucidate the structure of the protein, which may generate leads for drug development.
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Popular Science
23
Melting bergy bits are more serious than they sound, but this scientist found a way to study themEnvironment Climate change isn't just about massive ice sheets. Ice is melting, and fast. Luckily, there are scientists on the case—and they’re approaching their studies with plenty of creativity.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

California's other goldSea urchin roe is an acquired taste. Served as sushi, uni — the Japanese word for this delicacy — is actually the reproductive organ of the sea urchin. One of the most highly valued coastal fisheries in California is the red sea urchin (Mesocentrotus franciscanus), found in the Pacific Ocean from Alaska to Baja California. Red sea urchins are sold to processors who determine the price of each un
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Want narcissists to donate to your cause? Make it about themWhen narcissistic individuals are able to imagine themselves in a victim's situation, they are more likely to donate to charity, according to new research from the University at Buffalo School of Management.
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The Atlantic
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Can Democrats Press Their Home-Court Advantage?Over the past quarter century, the unmistakable trend in American elections is toward greater alignment between the way states vote for president and the delegations they send to Congress. After Democrats’ strong night in Tuesday’s primaries, the November midterms increasingly look like a test of which party can better defend its natural home-court advantage. The night’s biggest headline was that
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The Atlantic
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The Unraveling of NicaraguaNicaragua is showing all the symptoms of a failed state. At the center of the storm is the corrupt minority government of Daniel Ortega, the former revolutionary leader who now acts more like a cartel boss than a president. Over the past seven weeks, Ortega’s police and paramilitaries have killed more than 120 people, mostly students and other young protesters who are demanding the president’s ou
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The Atlantic
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Photo Updates From Kilauea: Dozens More Homes DestroyedOver the past week, the lava erupting from Hawaii’s Kilauea volcano fissures advanced through two small residential subdivisions along Kapoho Bay, reaching the Pacific Ocean, and wiping out nearly a hundred homes. Geologists at the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory say that lava is consistently fountaining from Fissure 8, reaching heights up to 180 feet, feeding the flow. Reuters quoted civil defense
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New on MIT Technology Review
200+
Small nuclear reactors—now with 20 percent more power!
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Feed: All Latest
200+
Former Cambridge Analytica CEO Alexander Nix Testifies Before ParliamentAlexander Nix testified before Parliament, but provided more bluster than answers.
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Inside Science
21
An Inconvenient SpoofAn Inconvenient Spoof Environmental scientists are so fed up with being ignored they are using satire. robotbees_final1.jpg Image credits: Abigail Malate, Staff Illustrator Rights information: Copyright American Institute of Physics ( reprinting information ) Earth Wednesday, June 6, 2018 – 14:30 Nala Rogers, Staff Writer (Inside Science) — No more coddling Mother Nature. Instead, we should let
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
10
A deeper understanding of AFib could lower riskMore than 2.5 million Americans are living with Atrial Fibrillation (AFib). AFib is an irregular heartbeat that can lead to blood clots, stroke, heart failure and other heart-related complications.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
15
End-to-end blood testing device shows capacity to draw sample and provide diagnostic resultsResearchers have developed an end-to-end blood testing device that integrates robotic phlebotomy with downstream sample processing. This platform device performs blood draws and provides diagnostic results in a fully automated fashion and has the potential to expedite hospital work-flow, allowing practitioners to devote more time to treating patients.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
31
Teenage girls are more impacted by sleepiness than teen boys arePreliminary results of a recent study show that teen girls reported a higher degree of interference of daytime sleepiness on multiple aspects of their school and personal activities than boys.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
25
Scientists see inner workings of enzyme telomerase, which plays key roles in aging, cancerCancer, diseases related to aging and other illnesses are closely tied to an important enzyme called telomerase. Scientists report the deepest scientific understanding ever of this once-mysterious enzyme, whose core they can now see in near atomic resolution.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
22
It's about time: Immediate rewards boost workplace motivationNew research shows that immediate rewards increase enjoyment and interest in tasks more compared to rewards at the end of a task.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
16
Airlines and passengers save billions through crew planningResearch explains the complex reality of airline crew scheduling and provides an inside look at the techniques used by carriers to avoid delays.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
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There are benefits to prenatal yoga, but lingering questions remainPrenatal yoga offers benefits to pregnant women, but a bigger and more rigorous body of research is needed.
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The Atlantic
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Mitch Daniels Urges Graduates to Resist TribalismFor several years, former Indiana Governor Mitch Daniels, a conservative who now leads Purdue University, has imparted the same caution to graduating students. He tells them that while he hopes they never think of themselves in this way, they are now aristocrats who owe their membership in a privileged elite not to family name, wealth, or ties to a ruling party, but to their unusual cognitive ski
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5
Emergency physicians debunk 'dry drowning' myths, highlight drowning risk in older swimmersParents have been reading — and sharing — alarming reports of children who died or nearly died due to 'dry drowning' over the past year. However, the use of that incorrect, nonmedical term has contributed to confusion about the true dangers of drowning in children and led to serious and fatal conditions being ignored after a 'dry drowning' diagnosis was made, according to a special report in the
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Antibody blocks inflammation, protects mice from hardened arteries and liver diseaseResearchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine discovered that they can block inflammation in mice with a naturally occurring antibody that binds oxidized phospholipids (OxPL), molecules on cell surfaces that get modified by inflammation. Even while on a high-fat diet, the antibody protected the mice from arterial plaque formation, hardening of the arteries and liver disease,
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Feed: All Latest
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Star Wars and the Battle of the Ever-More-Toxic Fan CultureThe Force is weak with the trolls who harassed 'The Last Jedi' actress Kelly Marie Tran on Instagram.
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Big Think
79
Will Starbucks' racial sensitivity training work?Starbucks is only the latest example of a very old systemic problem. Are these trainings effective? Read More
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
18
New data-mining technique offers most-vivid picture of Martian mineralogyMars NASA CuriosityA team of scientists have revealed the mineralogy of Mars at an unprecedented scale, which will help them understand the planet's geologic history and habitability. Understanding the mineralogy of another planet, such as Mars, allows scientists to backtrack and understand the forces that shaped their formation in that location.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
13
What does the future hold for the children of the Zika virus outbreak in Brazil?A new study uses a mouse model to investigate the potential long-term effects of early-life infection by Zika virus, and indicates that blocking TNF-alpha may be an effective strategy to stop seizures in newborns exposed to Zika congenitally.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
8
Sex and social experience affect ultrasonic vocalizations in miceMale mice produce more vocalizations after being with other mice than after being alone, according to a new study.
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Science | The Guardian
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Rapid rise in anti-HIV PrEP pills linked to drop in condom usePrEP availability may play a part in men’s complacency about the chances of becoming infected, study suggests A rapid rise in the takeup of pills to prevent HIV infection in some parts of Australia has been accompanied by a steep drop in the numbers of men using condoms during sex with other men whether or not they are on the protective drugs, a major study has shown. Pre-exposure prophylaxis, or
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The Atlantic
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Pruitt Aide Resigns Amid ScandalsA top aide to Scott Pruitt, Millan Hupp, resigned from the Environmental Protection Agency, according to a source briefed on the matter and correspondence reviewed by The Atlantic . Her last day will be Friday. Hupp, who worked as the director of scheduling and advance, has been entangled in many of the scandals dogging EPA Administrator Pruitt. In March, she was one of two aides who received hef
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
13
Majority of Americans believe it is essential that the US remain a global leader in spaceRoughly seven in 10 Americans (72 percent) say it is essential for the US to continue to be a world leader in space exploration. Strong public support is widely shared across gender, generational, educational and political groups.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
13
A better way to trace neuronal pathwaysResearchers have improved an important technology used to map neural circuits in the brain. The method, next-generation retrograde viral tracing, can be used in all cell types to relate the connectivity of specific types of neurons to the functions they perform.
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Popular Science
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The genes of many marine creatures are patented—and one company owns half of themScience Regulation is lagging behind industry. From the tiniest microbe to the biggest whale, the ocean is teeming with life. For corporations and researchers, that biodiversity is a veritable gold mine of genetic…
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Big Think
61
Why John Stuart Mill was a capitalistWe often support ideas without knowing quite why. John Stuart Mill reminds us why capitalism can be great for us and why we should be wary of state power. Read More
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The Atlantic
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Kate Spade’s Unforgettable DesignsFor many women now in their 30s and 40s—including this one—Kate Spade’s boxy, retro-minimalist “Sam” purse was their first grown-up handbag. It was also, ever since its launch in 1993, a well-known gateway drug to the increasingly costly “It” bags that started dominating the industry in that decade. And Spade herself—the bespectacled, brunette Catholic school girl from Missouri who married her co
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1
Early indicators of bone loss after hip replacement discoveredAresearch team at Rush University Medical Center has identified a pair of biomarkers that indicate which patients are likely to develop osteolysis. Biomarkers are detectable molecules in body fluid or tissue that are a sign of a health condition. The findings are published today in the Journal of Orthopaedic Research.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Teenage girls are more impacted by sleepiness than teen boys arePreliminary results of a recent study show that teen girls reported a higher degree of interference of daytime sleepiness on multiple aspects of their school and personal activities than boys.
1d
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

End-to-end blood testing device shows capacity to draw sample and provide diagnostic resultsRecent research published in a paper by the Biomedical Engineering Department of Rutgers University have developed an end-to-end blood testing device that integrates robotic phlebotomy with downstream sample processing. This platform device performs blood draws and provides diagnostic results in a fully automated fashion and has the potential to expedite hospital work-flow, allowing practitioners
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NYT > Science
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Hurricanes Are Lingering Longer. That Makes Them More Dangerous.A new study shows that storms are staying in one place longer, much like Hurricane Harvey did last year.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
14
Stem-cell niche for 10 billion colon cells a dayResearchers have discovered the identity of the stem-cell niche of the colon. The niche comprises special cells that activate the stem cells of the adjacent intestinal epithelium and are responsible for its continuous renewal. Without the activation signal, the epithelium perishes. If it's constantly activated, early stages of cancer develop. The discovery helps to improve our understanding of int
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
18
Bioengineers identify safer way to make rugby tacklesVideo analysis, 3-D motion analysis lab trials and model-based image-matching techniques show that tackling the lower trunk of the ball carrier's body — not the upper trunk or upper legs — is safer for reduction of head injuries.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
19
Organic insect deterrent for agricultureTraditional insecticides are killers: they not only kill pests, they also endanger bees and other beneficial insects, as well as affecting biodiversity in soils, lakes, rivers and seas. A team has now developed an alternative: A biodegradable agent that keeps pests at bay without poisoning them.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
23
Newly discovered regulation process explains plant developmentVascular tissue in plants distributes water and nutrients, thereby ensuring constant growth. Each newly developed cell needs to develop into its respective cell type in the vascular tissue. Botanists have now discovered how these cells know which cell type they should develop into.
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)
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Let's turn the high seas into the world's largest nature reserve | Enric SalaWhat if we could save the fishing industry and protect the ocean at the same time? Marine ecologist Enric Sala shares his bold plan to safeguard the high seas — some of the last wild places on earth, which fall outside the jurisdiction of any single country — by creating a giant marine reserve that covers two-thirds of the world's ocean. By protecting the high seas, Sala believes we will restore
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Latest Headlines | Science News
400+
A new 3-D printer builds temporary electronics on your skinA new 3-D printer that tracks and compensates for your slightest twitch can precisely print simple electronic devices onto your skin.
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The Scientist RSS
1
Blue Rush: One Company Leads the Race to Own Marine Genetic SequencesAlmost half of all patents relating to the genes of marine organisms belong to one large international corporation, BASF, a new study reveals.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

It's about time: Immediate rewards boost workplace motivationNew research from Kaitlin Woolley shows that immediate rewards increase enjoyment and interest in tasks more compared to rewards at the end of a task.
1d
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Scientists see inner workings of enzyme telomerase, which plays key roles in aging, cancerCancer, diseases related to aging and other illnesses are closely tied to an important enzyme called telomerase. UCLA scientists report in the journal Cell the deepest scientific understanding ever of this once-mysterious enzyme, whose core they can now see in near atomic resolution.
1d
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

A deeper understanding of AFib could lower riskMore than 2.5 million Americans are living with Atrial Fibrillation (AFib). AFib is an irregular heartbeat that can lead to blood clots, stroke, heart failure and other heart-related complications.
1d
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New data-mining technique offers most-vivid picture of Martian mineralogyA team of scientists have revealed the mineralogy of Mars at an unprecedented scale, which will help them understand the planet's geologic history and habitability. Understanding the mineralogy of another planet, such as Mars, allows scientists to backtrack and understand the forces that shaped their formation in that location.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
18
Patenting marine genetic resources: Who owns ocean biodiversity?Marine organisms have evolved to thrive in various ocean environments, resulting in unique adaptations that make them the object of commercial interest. Researchers from the Stockholm Resilience Centre and University of British Columbia have identified 862 marine species, with a total of 12,998 genetic sequences associated with a patent. They found that a single transnational corporation (BASF, th
1d
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

When did animals leave their first footprint on Earth?Scientists from China and the United States reported discovering fossil footprints for animal appendages in the Ediacaran Period (about 635-541 million years ago) in China. This is considered the earliest animal fossil footprint record.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Internet search data shows link between anti-Muslim and pro-ISIS searches in the USIn ethnically alike communities where poverty levels run high, anti-Muslim internet searches are strongly associated with pro-ISIS searches, according to a new analysis. This pattern, say the authors, suggests that counterterrorism policies targeting Muslims may do the opposite of what they intend, making these communities even more vulnerable to radicalization.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Zika's negative effects, as seen in human newborns, persist in adults, mouse study showsScientists have discovered that Zika virus infection in infant mice results in seizures and long-term deficits in brain structure and behavior that persist into adulthood.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Study on economics of fishing on the high seasUsing satellite tracking, a team of researchers exposes the economic unprofitability of fishing the high seas and the industry's dependence on government subsidies.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
21
What does the future hold for the children of the Zika virus outbreak in Brazil?A new study published in Science Translational Medicine uses a mouse model to investigate the potential long-term effects of early-life infection by Zika virus, and indicates that blocking TNF- may be an effective strategy to stop seizures in newborns exposed to Zika congenitally.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Sex and social experience affect ultrasonic vocalizations in miceMale mice produce more vocalizations after being with other mice than after being alone, according to a study published June 6, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Kali Burke from University at Buffalo, SUNY, US, and colleagues.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Late Pleistocene human mandibles from the Niah Caves may hint at ancient dietsThree human mandibles may provide new insight into the diet of Late Pleistocene hunter-gatherers in Borneo, according to a study published June 6, 2018, in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Darren Curnoe from the University of New South Wales, Australia, and colleagues.
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Scientific American Content: Global
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Jurassic World: Can We Really Resurrect a Dinosaur?The Jurassic Park franchise has sparked an interest in dinosaur DNA, but the movies are just fiction — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Big Think
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One big reason why McDonald’s is adding self-serve kiosks in a hurryNo, these kiosks at McDonald's are not because of the Fight For $15. Read More
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