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Nyheder2018juni08

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The Atlantic
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Remembering Anthony BourdainIf you are having thoughts of suicide, please know that you are not alone. If you are in danger of acting on suicidal thoughts, call 911. For support and resources, call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255 or text 741-741 for the Crisis Text Line. What made Anthony Bourdain distinct as a writer was what made him a great television personality: He unprettified reality and fo
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Ingeniøren
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Ingeniøren vinder Bording prisen for dækning af signalprogrammetSenere på måneden fortæller journalisterne om hele projektet.
4h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Scientists find ordered magnetic patterns in disordered magnetic materialA team of scientists working at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) has confirmed a special property known as "chirality—which potentially could be exploited to transmit and store data in a new way—in nanometers-thick samples of multilayer materials that have a disordered structure.
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Wanna Pull Water Out of Air? Grab Some Ions or a Weird SpongeThese techniques won’t quench humanity's thirst, but they’ve got serious potential to help augment water supplies in particularly dry places.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

In desert trials, next-generation water harvester delivers fresh water from airLast October, a University of California, Berkeley, team headed down to the Arizona desert, plopped their newest prototype water harvester into the backyard of a tract home and started sucking water out of the air without any power other than sunlight.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Move over, 'Laurel or Yanny': Study looks at why we hear talking as singing after many repetitionsThe great Laurel-or-Yanny debate of 2018 was so fun because it shined a light on the often-illusory nature of auditory perception. What you hear may not be the same as what somebody else hears. Or, perhaps what you hear could change over time. What surely was "Yanny" to some people at first sounded a lot more like "Laurel" upon their 27th listening.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Are birth mothers satisfied with decisions to place children for adoption?New research findings could change the adoption landscape for birth mothers struggling with the life-altering decision to place their children. How is a birth mother's level of satisfaction — that feeling that the right decision was made — affected by time?
14min
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
1
Electrons take one step forward without two steps backResearchers have, for the first time, successfully used electric dipoles to completely suppress electron transfer in one direction while accelerating in the other. The discovery could aid development of improved solar cells and other energy-conversion devices and hasten the design of new and superb energy and electronic materials.
14min
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Carbon dioxide reduces belly fatThe first randomized, controlled trial testing carbon dioxide gas injections (carboxytherapy) to reduce belly fat found the new technique eliminates fat around the stomach. However, the changes were modest and did not result in long-term fat reduction.
14min
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Scientists find ordered magnetic patterns in disordered magnetic materialA team of scientists has confirmed a special property known as 'chirality' — which potentially could be exploited to transmit and store data in a new way — in nanometers-thick samples of multilayer materials that have a disordered structure.
14min
NYT > Science
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You’d Need 63 Billion Years to Do What This Computer Can Do in a SecondFor the past five years, China has had the world’s speediest computer. But as of Friday, Summit, a machine built in the United States, is taking the lead.
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NYT > Science
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Homer A. Neal, Leader in Physics Who Explored Matter, Dies at 75Dr. Neal became a particle physicist when few African-Americans entered the field; he went on to lead two large University of Michigan research teams.
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Science | The Guardian
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UK's Inmarsat rejects takeover approach from US rival EchoStarSatellite company sees its price rise 13% and says US firm ‘significantly undervalues’ it Inmarsat, Britain’s leading satellite company , has rejected a bid approach from a US rival, in what could signal the start of a fresh foreign takeover saga. Responding to a 13.5% rise in its share price on Friday, Inmarsat admitted it had received an offer from Colorado-based EchoStar that it said “very sig
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The Atlantic
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More Americans Are Dying From SuicideIf you are having thoughts of suicide, please know that you are not alone. If you are in danger of acting on suicidal thoughts, call 911. For support and resources, call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255 or text 741-741 for the Crisis Text Line. Since 1999, the suicide rate in the U.S. has gone up across all racial and ethnic groups, in both men and women, in both cities
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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How stem cells moveScientists have shown that human embryonic stem cells move by traveling back and forth in a line, much like ants moving along their trails.
28min
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Carbon dioxide reduces belly fatThe first randomized, controlled trial testing carbon dioxide gas injections (carboxytherapy) to reduce belly fat found the new technique eliminates fat around the stomach. However, the changes were modest and did not result in long-term fat reduction.
35min
Popular Science
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Five rad and random ways to enjoy augmented and virtual realityGadgets The end-of-week dispatch from PopSci's commerce editor. Vol. 47. My job is to find cool stuff. Throughout the week I spend hours scouring the web for things that are ingenious or clever or ridiculously cheap.
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It’s Time for the Next Wave of Ocean Exploration and ProtectionOpinion: Reigniting exploration of the world's oceans is essential to protecting our natural resources and promoting scientific advancement.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Electrons take one step forward without two steps backResearchers at the University of California, Riverside, have, for the first time, successfully used electric dipoles to completely suppress electron transfer in one direction while accelerating in the other. The discovery could aid development of improved solar cells and other energy-conversion devices and hasten the design of new and superb energy and electronic materials.
56min
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
6
Electrons take one step forward without two steps backResearchers at the University of California, Riverside, have, for the first time, successfully used electric dipoles to completely suppress electron transfer in one direction while accelerating in the other. The discovery could aid development of improved solar cells and other energy-conversion devices and hasten the design of new and superb energy and electronic materials.
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New Scientist – News
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Trump v Kim: The mind games that led to the Korea summitThe road to the Singapore summit between Donald Trump and Kim Jong-un has been marked by nuclear bluffs. Let's hope the talks are for real, says Christopher Boehm
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cognitive science
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'Westworld' Science Advisor Talks Brains and AIsubmitted by /u/Lightfiend [link] [comments]
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The Atlantic
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The Trump-Macron Bromance Is Going SourFrench President Emmanuel Macron, like several other world leaders, decided early on that it was better to flatter President Trump and remain on his good side than to end up like Angela Merkel, the German chancellor, whose relationship with the U.S. president is uncomfortable even on the best of days. Macron and Trump hugged, smiled, shook hands, and gazed deeply into each other’s eyes. Trump eve
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Kia recalls over 500K vehicles; air bags may not inflateKia is recalling over a half-million vehicles in the U.S. because the air bags may not work in a crash.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Sky darkens for broadcasters afters Amazon online assaultAmazon's acquisition of live Premier League matches may signal the start of an online assault that could upend the dominance of established broadcasters Sky and BT Sport, according to analysts.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Verizon names former Ericsson chief as new CEOFormer Ericsson chief executive Hans Vestberg was named Friday as the new CEO of US telecom group Verizon, succeeding Lowell McAdam as of August 1.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Cyprus starts work on building 'Europe's biggest' casinoCyprus started work Friday on building what has been billed as the largest casino resort in Europe costing 550 million euros ($650 million) and creating thousands of jobs on the holiday island.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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French beekeepers accuse Bayer after glyphosate found in honeyA beekeeping cooperative in northern France has filed a legal complaint against German chemicals giant Bayer after traces of the controversial weedkiller glyphosate were detected in batches of honey, officials said Friday.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Crew from Germany, US, Russia board ISSTwo astronauts and a cosmonaut docked with the International Space Station on Friday and joined the current crew after blasting off two days earlier, Russia's space agency Roscosmos said.
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Science | The Guardian
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Ageism widespread in UK, study findsMillennials hold most negative attitudes, with 40% believing dementia is inevitable Ageism is rife in Britain, with millennials holding the most negative attitudes towards ageing, according to a study . A quarter of millennials believe it is normal for older people to be unhappy and depressed, while 40% believe there is no way to escape dementia as you get older, research from the Royal Society f
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Universities, research firm win $2.5B Los Alamos contractThe U.S. government has awarded a team of two universities and a research firm with offices around the world a $2.5 billion-a-year contract to manage Los Alamos National Laboratory.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Tropical Storm Ewiniar landfall in China seen by NASA's Aqua satelliteWhen NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the South China Sea on June 7 infrared imagery showed Tropical Storm Ewiniar's center made landfall in southeastern China.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Infrared NASA imagery shows Hurricane Aletta strengtheningWhen NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Aletta in the Eastern Pacific Ocean it had just become the first hurricane of the season. Infrared imagery showed that Aletta appeared more organized. The National Hurricane Center noted that Aletta could become a Category 4 hurricane later on June 8.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
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If you thought the most recent flu season was bad, you were rightThe recent U.S. flu season was classified as highly severe overall, the third time since 2003 that the seasonal outbreak has earned that designation.
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Scientific American Content: Global
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U.S. Still Lags Behind in Preparing for a Changing ArcticDespite a new icebreaker ship in the works, efforts still lag behind those of China and Russia — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Researcher creates 3-D printed multimaterial with programmed stiffnessA new method of microscale 3-D printing features in-situ resin mixing, delivery and exchange, and a robotic material cleansing system to allow switching between materials of different modulus, or flexibility, without cross contamination between properties.
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New Scientist – News
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Criminals can be identified from the microbes they leave behindWhen a person enters a house, they leave behind a unique set of microorganisms that could serve as a fingerprint – and it seems to be accurate enough to spot individual people
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The Atlantic
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Hotel Artemis Wastes Its Cult-Classic PotentialIt seems the hottest new trend in action movies is bureaucracy. The base desires of assassins, thieves, and gangsters are yesterday’s news, their gun-toting antics mere grist for the story mill. What audiences really care about is the infrastructure around those pulpy antiheroes. At least, that’s the lesson Hotel Artemis appears to have taken away from films like the hugely successful John Wick s
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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NASA's Aqua satellite sees formation of Tropical Storm MaliksiTropical Storm Maliksi formed in the Philippine Sea, off the northeastern coast of the Philippines as NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead.
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Feed: All Latest
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The US Again Has World’s Most Powerful SupercomputerA new computer at Oak Ridge National Lab can perform 200 quadrillion calculations per second, ending China's reign.
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Big Think
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Study: Reading daily and playing games may help prevent dementiaA study of 15,582 elderly Hong Kong community residents suggests a link between robust intellectual activity and avoiding the onset of dementia. Read More
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Infrared NASA imagery shows Hurricane Aletta strengtheningWhen NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Aletta in the Eastern Pacific Ocean it had just become the first hurricane of the season. Infrared imagery showed that Aletta appeared more organized. The National Hurricane Center noted that Aletta could become a Category 4 hurricane later on June 8.
2h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Tropical Storm Ewiniar landfall in China seen by NASA's Aqua satelliteWhen NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the South China Sea on June 7 infrared imagery showed Tropical Storm Ewiniar's center made landfall in southeastern China.
2h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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NASA's Aqua satellite sees formation of Tropical Storm MaliksiTropical Storm Maliksi formed in the Philippine Sea, off the northeastern coast of the Philippines as NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead.
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New on MIT Technology Review
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America’s new supercomputer beats China’s fastest machine to take the world’s most powerful title
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New on MIT Technology Review
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The world’s most powerful supercomputer is tailor made for the AI eraThe technology used to build America’s new Summit machine will also help us make the leap to exascale computing.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Study: Are birth mothers satisfied with decisions to place children for adoption?New research findings from Baylor University's Diana R. Garland School of Social Work could change the adoption landscape for birth mothers struggling with the life-altering decision to place their children. How is a birth mother's level of satisfaction — that feeling that the right decision was made — affected by time?
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Bees and the thought of naughtHoneybees can conceive and interpret zero. This has just been demonstrated by a scientist from the Research Centre on Animal Cognition (CNRS / Université Toulouse III–Paul Sabatier) and her Australian colleagues, proving for the first time ever that insects are capable of mathematical abstraction. As zero, designating nothingness, neutrality, or absence, is a relatively recent concept for humans,
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Science : NPR
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Don't Touch! A Scientist's Advice For Spotting Poison Ivy Before It Ruins Your SummerThe best way to treat poison ivy is to avoid touching it in the first place. But that's tricky, given the many faces the rash-inducing plant can have. (Image credit: Courtesy of John Jelesko)
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Big Think
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10 philosophers on if money can make you happyHow much money does it take to be happy? How much is too much? These philosophers have a lot to say about money and how it relates to the good life. Read More
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Big Think
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The incredible potential, and dark misuse, of cognitive diversity hiringTwo popular terms, 'neurodiversity' and 'cognitive diversity' could hardly be more different, even though they sound similar. Read More
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Futurity.org
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6 questions about the big risks of softball pitchingAlthough fast-pitch softball may be less risky than youth baseball, the potential for injury still exists. Youth baseball leagues often have fairly strict limits on how many innings pitchers can pitch, or how many pitches a player can throw. But for girls playing fast-pitch softball, such guidelines are rare. One reason is that softball pitchers throw underhand, a motion thought to stress the arm
2h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Scientists find ordered magnetic patterns in disordered magnetic materialA team of scientists working at Berkeley Lab has confirmed a special property known as 'chirality' — which potentially could be exploited to transmit and store data in a new way — in nanometers-thick samples of multilayer materials that have a disordered structure.
2h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

How stem cells moveScientists from Newcastle University have shown that human embryonic stem cells move by travelling back and forth in a line, much like ants moving along their trails.
2h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Food allergies connected to children with autism spectrum disorderA new study from the University of Iowa and published by the Journal of the American Medical Association finds that children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are more than twice as likely to suffer from a food allergy than children who do not have ASD.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Are antibiotics overused in treatment of outpatient acute respiratory infections?Antibiotics are most commonly prescribed for acute respiratory infections, although most of these infections are caused by viruses for which antibiotics aren't effective. A new study found that among almost 15,000 outpatients with acute respiratory infections during flu seasons, 41 percent of outpatients were prescribed antibiotics and 41 percent of them had diagnoses for which antibiotics weren't
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Association of food allergy, other allergies with autism spectrum disorderFood and other types of allergies are more likely to be reported in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) than in children without ASD but the underlying reasons for this association aren't clear.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

The burglary microbiome projectResearchers have demonstrated that microbial signatures, the unique microbial make-up of each individual, from the built environment can identify persons involved in crimes occurring in the home, such as burglaries. The research is presented at ASM Microbe, the annual meeting of the American Society for Microbiology, held from June 7-11 in Atlanta, Ga.
2h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

ARS scientists are working to ensure safe waterways in GeorgiaScientists with USDA's Agricultural Research Service (ARS) are developing ways to identify the sources of any potentially harmful bacteria found in the surface waters around Athens, Georgia. The research is presented at ASM Microbe, the annual meeting of the American Society for Microbiology, held from June 7-11 in Atlanta, Ga.
2h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Bone apetit: How bacteria eat bone to sustain invasive infectionResearchers from Vanderbilt University Medical Center have determined the metabolic pathway that Staphylococcus aureus use to survive in bones. Invasive S. aureus infections frequently occur in the bone and are notoriously resistant to antimicrobial therapy. The research is presented at ASM Microbe, the annual meeting of the American Society for Microbiology, held from June 7-11 in Atlanta, Ga.
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Live Science
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Why Does Artificial Intelligence Scare Us So Much?Not everyone is prepared to welcome robot overlords.
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New on MIT Technology Review
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This algorithm can tell which number sequences a human will find interestingThe result hints that machines could one day be trained to spot mathematical elegance and beauty.
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Popular Science
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Farmers may cultivate better gut microbes than nearby city dwellersHealth But ideal flora could vary based on where you live. Researchers just compared the gut microbiomes of people living in a rural community in Nigeria to those living in a nearby city.
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The Atlantic
27
Normalizing Trade Relations With China Was a MistakeIn 2000, Congress made the fateful decision to extend “permanent normal trade relations,” or PNTR, to China. As the economists Justin Pierce and Peter Schott have argued , the permanence of PNTR status made an enormous difference: Without PNTR, there was always a danger that China’s favorable access to the U.S. market would be revoked, which in turn deterred U.S. firms from increasing their relia
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Futurity.org
3
How to use stats to fight racial inequality, not support itUsing statistics to inform the public about racial disparities can backfire. Worse yet, it can cause some people to be more supportive of the policies that create those inequalities, according to new research. “One of the barriers of reducing inequality is how some people justify and rationalize it,” says Rebecca Hetey, a psychology researcher at Stanford University. “A lot of people doing social
3h
Scientific American Content: Global
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Ancient Teeth Unlock Plague SecretsThe findings suggest the pathogen’s ancestor is almost 1,000 years older than previously thought — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
3h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
The burglary microbiome projectResearchers have demonstrated that microbial signatures, the unique microbial make-up of each individual, from the built environment can identify persons involved in crimes occurring in the home, such as burglaries. The research is presented at ASM Microbe, the annual meeting of the American Society for Microbiology, held from June 7th to June 11th in Atlanta, Georgia.
3h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
How stem cells moveScientists from Newcastle University have shown that human embryonic stem cells move by travelling back and forth in a line, much like ants moving along their trails.
3h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
ARS scientists are working to ensure safe waterways in GeorgiaScientists with USDA's Agricultural Research Service (ARS) are developing ways to identify the sources of any potentially harmful bacteria found in the surface waters around Athens, Georgia. The research is presented at ASM Microbe, the annual meeting of the American Society for Microbiology, held from June 7th to June 11th in Atlanta, Georgia.
3h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Bone apetit: How bacteria eat bone to sustain invasive infectionResearchers from Vanderbilt University Medical Center have determined the metabolic pathway that Staphylococcus aureus use to survive in bones. Invasive S. aureus infections frequently occur in the bone and are notoriously resistant to antimicrobial therapy. The research is presented at ASM Microbe, the annual meeting of the American Society for Microbiology, held from June 7th to June 11th in Atl
3h
New Scientist – News
6
Sperm whales are tracking fishing boats and stealing their fishFishing boats in the Gulf of Alaska are being stalked by enormous sperm whales, which charge in and rip huge volumes of fish from the lines
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)
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The discoveries awaiting us in the ocean's twilight zone | Heidi M. SosikWhat will we find in the twilight zone: the vast, mysterious, virtually unexplored realm hundreds of meters below the ocean's surface? Heidi M. Sosik of Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution wants to find out. In this wonder-filled talk, she shares her plan to investigate these uncharted waters, which may hold a million new species and 90 percent of the world's fish biomass, using submersible techn
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Ingeniøren

Nasa-sonde vågner op til ny dåd i KuiperbæltetNew Horizons, der fløj forbi Pluto for tre år siden, har nu kursen rettet mod objektet Ultima Thule med en størrelse på ca. 30 km.
3h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
20
'Supersized alcopops' pose unique danger to youthCollege students seriously underestimate the effects of drinking a new class of beverages being marketed across the country, according to a new study. 'Supersized alcopops' — sweet, colorful and fizzy drinks that have been shown to appeal to youth — now contain almost as much alcohol as a six-pack of beer in a single can, and young drinkers don't know how much these drinks can affect them.
3h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
14
Secret to whale shark hotspotsA study has uncovered the secret to why endangered whale sharks gather on mass at just a handful of locations around the world.
3h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Virtual brain gives insights into memory deficits in depressionDuring a depressive episode the ability of the brain to form new brain cells is reduced. Scientists examined how this affects the memory with a computational model. It was previously known that people in an acute depressive episode were less likely to remember current events. The computational model however suggests that older memories were affected as well. How long the memory deficits reach back
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Nano-saturn: Supramolecular complex formationSaturn is the second largest planet in our solar system and has a characteristic ring. Researchers have now synthesized a molecular 'nano-Saturn'. It consists of a spherical C(60) fullerene as the planet and a flat macrocycle made of six anthracene units as the ring. The structure is confirmed by spectroscopic and X-ray analyses.
3h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
30
Researchers reverse cognitive impairments in mice with dementiaReversing memory deficits and impairments in spatial learning is a major goal in dementia research. A lack of knowledge about cellular pathways critical to the development of dementia has prevented significant clinical advance. Researchers are breaking through that barrier. They show, for the first time in an animal model, that a drug can reverse tau pathology — the second-most important lesion i
3h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
7
Cooling by laser beamA laser pulse that for a few picoseconds transforms a material into a high-temperature superconductor. Different experiments have unveiled this interesting phenomenon, with potential applicative implications. Research carried out by scientists a year ago had already provided several basic principles of the phenomenon.
3h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
12
Thorny life of new-born neuronsThe hippocampus is a critical region in the brain for learning and memory. For the first time, scientists have observed how stimulation causes the spines on its neuronal dendrites to enlarge.
3h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
11
Reducing opioids not associated with lower patient satisfaction scores, study findsA study of nearly 2,500 patients who used high doses of opioids for at least six months showed that reducing their opioid use did not lower their satisfaction with care.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
13
Lead-free, efficient perovskite for photovoltaic cellsA research team has proposed a perovskite material that serves as a potential active material for highly efficient lead-free thin-film photovoltaic devices. This material is expected to lay the foundation to overcome previously known limitations of perovskite including its stability and toxicity issues.
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

First public forecasts from ViEWS, a political Violence Early-Warning SystemThe challenges of preventing, mitigating, and adapting to largescale political violence are daunting, particularly when violence escalates where it is not expected. With funding from the European Research Council, ViEWS: a political Violence Early-Warning System at Uppsala University, is developing a system that is rigorous, data-based, and publicly available to researchers and the international c
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Consumers beware: High user ‘star ratings’ don’t mean a mobile medical app worksBy screening 250 user reviews and comments for a once popular — but proven inaccurate — mobile app claiming to change your iPhone into a blood pressure monitor, Johns Hopkins researchers have added to evidence that a high 'star rating' doesn't necessarily reflect medical accuracy or value.
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Researcher creates 3D printed multimaterial with programmed stiffnessThe technology could be useful in various applications, including aircraft wing structures, protective coatings, energy absorption, actuation, flexible armor, artificial muscles, and microrobotics.
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Research reveals secret to whale shark hotspotsA study has uncovered the secret to why endangered whale sharks gather on mass at just a handful of locations around the world.
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

'Supersized alcopops' pose unique danger to youthCollege students seriously underestimate the effects of drinking a new class of beverages being marketed across the country, according to a new George Mason University study. 'Supersized alcopops' — sweet, colorful and fizzy drinks that have been shown to appeal to youth — now contain almost as much alcohol as a six-pack of beer in a single can, and young drinkers don't know how much these drink
3h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
11
Secrets of fish population changes revealedPopulations of fish in the ocean are notoriously variable, waxing and waning in often unpredictable ways. Knowing what drives changes in fish population sizes is important for managing fisheries and conserving species. For the first time, scientists have linked the ecology of adult fish populations inhabiting coral reefs with the dispersal of baby fish between reefs, reporting the dynamics of a li
3h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Measuring metabolites in algae one cell at a timeA new microscopy system can visualize the production of metabolites in living cells. Fluorogenic aptamers that fluoresce when bound to metabolites were inserted into algae cells by femtosecond laser photoporation and observed by fluorescence microscopy. The new system is expected to contribute to the metabolic engineering of environmentally friendly biofuels, pharmaceutical and other products.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Nutritional quality of fish and squid reduced by warm water eventsThe nutritional quality of fish and squid deteriorates under warm water events, research reveals — with implications for the marine environment, marine predators and fisheries capturing food for human consumption.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Monkeys eat fats and carbs to keep warmCrave comfort foods in cooler months? You're in good company. Golden snub-nosed monkeys prefer to eat more fats and carbohydrates in winter to help generate heat, research suggests.
3h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
4
Malaria: Cooperating antibodies enhance immune responseScientists have studied how the human immune system combats malaria infections. In this study, the researchers discovered a previously unnoticed characteristic of antibodies against the malaria parasite: They can cooperate with each other, thus binding even stronger to the pathogens and improving the immune response. The results, now published in Science, are expected to help develop a more effect
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Soyuz capsule with 3 astronauts docks with space stationA Russian space capsule carrying three astronauts has docked with the International Space Station two days after it was launched from Kazakhstan.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Prague zoo says it's on its way to breeding rare lemursPrague's zoo says its attempt to breed critically endangered white-belted ruffed lemurs is on the right track.
3h
The Atlantic

Radio Atlantic: The North Korea SummitTwo of the world’s most volatile heads of state—Kim Jong Un and Donald Trump—have moved in the span of a year from trading insults to trading fawning letters. Now, they're days away from the first meeting between a sitting U.S. president and a North Korean leader. Between Kim's nuclear ambitions and Trump's political pressures, the stakes of this exchange couldn’t be higher. Are we headed toward
3h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Law and society rely upon a 'Republic of Belief'In developed and less developed countries alike, many worry about why laws are so often ignored. But there's a converse question that is even more puzzling: Why are laws obeyed at all?
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Antioxidants developed by MSU scientists slow down senescence in plantsA team from the Faculty of Biology, MSU tested on plants mitochondria-targeted antioxidants developed in the university lab under the guidance of Academician Vladimir Skulachev. The tests showed slowdown of senescence processes and inhibition of cell death. The study was published in the Mitochondrion journal.
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Thorny life of new-born neuronsThe hippocampus is a critical region in the brain for learning and memory. For the first time, scientists have observed how stimulation causes the spines on its neuronal dendrites to enlarge.
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Cooling by laser beamA laser pulse that for a few picoseconds transforms a material into a high-temperature superconductor. Different experiments have unveiled this interesting phenomenon, with potential applicative implications. Research carried out by SISSA scientists a year ago had already provided several basic principles of the phenomenon. A new study published on "Physical Review Letters" now clarifies other imp
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Water users associations approve remote control watering systemsResearchers at the University of Cordoba assess the success or failure of installing remote control systems and data measuring in water users associations.
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Temple researchers reverse cognitive impairments in mice with dementiaReversing memory deficits and impairments in spatial learning is a major goal in dementia research. A lack of knowledge about cellular pathways critical to the development of dementia has prevented significant clinical advance. Researchers at Temple's Lewis Katz School of Medicine are breaking through that barrier. They show, for the first time in an animal model, that a drug can reverse tau patho
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Coral tricks for adapting to ocean acidificationA molecular process that signals distress could also help corals adapt to climate change.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Visual worlds in mirror and glassResearchers have uncovered a material perception mechanism with which humans discriminate between reflective and transparent materials (mirror and glass). The research team discovered that the brain adeptly utilizes motion of complex reflective and transparent images that appear on object surfaces when distinguishing between mirror and glass.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Ukrainian villages still suffering legacy of Chernobyl more than 30 years onMilk in parts of Ukraine has radioactivity levels up to five times over the country's official safe limit, new research shows.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
11
Scientists go deep to quantify perovskite propertiesScientists have discovered properties in naturally occurring solution-processed quantum wells that are likely to impact the growing field of low-cost perovskite based optoelectronics. They created a general scaling law that researchers can use to determine how to tune the electronic properties of 2D perovskite-based materials for devices.
3h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
13
Populations of widely spread tree species respond differently to climate changeA new study shows that not all populations of a single, widely spread tree species respond the same to climate change, something scientists will need to consider when making climate change projections.
3h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
8
Ex-smokers might be better off with high rather than low nicotine e-cigsVapers using low rather than high nicotine e-cigarettes may be using their devices more intensely, potentially increasing the risk of exposure to toxins in the vapour, according to new research.
3h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
8
Children from older mothers more likely to have heart risksNew research demonstrates that adult offspring born to older mothers are more susceptible to heart risks in later life. These results could be crucial in developing preventative treatments for children born to older women.
3h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
13
Unnecessarily difficult: Physical activity resources for adults are loaded with jargonWeb page articles and other written materials designed to encourage physical activity are often too difficult to be easily read and understood by most US adults, limiting their effectiveness.
3h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
7
Is there an end to the periodic table? Professor explores its limitsAs the 150th anniversary of the formulation of the Periodic Table of Chemical Elements looms, a professor probes the table's limits. In 2016, four new elements were added to it: nihonium, moscovium, tennessine, and oganesson. It took a decade and worldwide effort to confirm these last four elements. And now scientists wonder: how far can this table go?
3h
Ingeniøren

Branchedirektør: Decentralisering vil vende op og ned på energisektorenElektrificering medfører større elforbrug ude i distributionsnettet, hvor der samtidig er lokal produktion og giver mere kompleks styring af distributionsnettet, advarer den europæiske branchedirektør for elselskaber.
3h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
Study: Populations of widely spread tree species respond differently to climate changeA new Portland State University study shows that not all populations of a single, widely spread tree species respond the same to climate change, something scientists will need to consider when making climate change projections.
3h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Nutritional quality of fish and squid reduced by warm water eventsResearch led by the University of Sydney shows that under warm water events the nutritional balance of fish and squid changes and is of lower quality, while under cold water events it is of higher quality.
3h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
Monkeys eat fats and carbs to keep warmUniversity of Sydney researchers have found monkeys living in the wild in cold snowy habitats adjust their nutrient intake to match the elevated costs of thermoregulation.
3h
Science | The Guardian
11
When is an exception not an exception? | Oliver BurkemanIf ‘just this once’ happens every month, there’s a name for it: a monthly expense One of the more infuriating challenges of personal money management goes as follows. Suppose your dishwasher breaks down. It makes sense to replace it with a good one, instead of something cheap that will need replacing again next year, so you buy a high‑end model, congratulating yourself on your wisdom. The followi
3h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
Predicting the outcome of the arms race between man and bacteriaThrough computer simulations, scientists can predict if bacteria can be stopped with popular antibacterial therapies or not – a breakthrough which will help select and develop effective treatments for bacterial infections.
3h
The Atlantic
1K
Trump's Surprise Idea to Add Moscow to the G7President Trump said Friday Russia should be readmitted to the Group of Seven industrialized nations, which the country was suspended from after its invasion and annexation of Ukraine’s Crimean peninsula in 2014. He made the remarks as he prepared to head to Canada for the annual G7 summit, and they add to a list of positions that put the U.S. in opposition to many of its allies ahead of what wil
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The Atlantic
78
Watching Israeli TV’s Fauda as a PalestinianIt’s the third week of Ramadan, a month of fasting, charity, and prayer for the world’s 1.8 billion Muslims. In the Arab world, it’s also a month for an influx of new TV specials, which families gather to watch after breaking their fasts. Since I’ve spent most of my Ramadans outside the Arab world—often without access to the region’s popular TV channels—I’ve never been able to enjoy these shows t
3h
The Atlantic
61
The Modestly Diverting Gender Swap of Ocean’s 8“You are not doing this for me. You are not doing this for you. Somewhere out there is an 8-year-old girl dreaming of becoming a criminal. Do this for her.” Thus does the master thief Debbie Ocean exhort her female partners in crime on the eve of their big jewelry heist in the director Gary Ross’s Ocean’s 8 . It’s a cunning bit of narrative transposition. Because Debbie—played by Sandra Bullock—i
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Dana Foundation

#WSF18: Why Music Makes Us ShiverI have some friends who have tried to describe the overwhelming emotion they feel when listening to a certain piece of music, so much so that it sometimes brings them to tears. While I could empathize with the sensation, my reaction to the same piece was often completely different. Personal experience and context for which the piece is playing are just two variables that can affect the way we int
3h
Feed: All Latest
63
The Many Shades of Bad PhysicsThere are different categories of incorrect physics—and each deserves its own strategy.
3h
Feed: All Latest
40
Inside the Arctic Circle, Golden Hour Has Nothing on Golden DayWhen photographer Reuben Wu visited the Svalbard Satellite Station in Norway, the sun never strayed far from the horizon.
3h
Futurity.org
3
Lung drug may also cut damage after heart attackAfter a heart attack, a type of immune cell tries to heal the injured organ, but instead triggers inflammation that leads to even more damage, research finds. In addition, an already approved drug effectively tamps down such inflammation in mice, protecting the heart from the progressive damage that often occurs after a heart attack. Led by senior author Douglas L. Mann, director of the cardiovas
3h
Science | The Guardian
59
Mindfulness by itself won’t cure loneliness – ending austerity is key | Moya SarnerThe government has a minister to fight this modern-day epidemic, but still decimates services for those at risk Are we living through an epidemic of loneliness? Well, it depends who you ask. One Red Cross study found that more than 9 million people in the UK – almost a fifth of the adult population – are often or always lonely , and in January Tracey Crouch was appointed the so-called “minister fo
3h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
5
Image: Cabo VerdeFor World Oceans Day, the Copernicus Sentinel-3A satellite takes us over the Atlantic Ocean and the Republic of Cabo Verde.
4h
BBC News – Science & Environment
100+
Plastic and cotton found in UK's wild musselsScientists warn material including strands of underwear could be found in the seafood.
4h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Increased safety in diagnosing cardiac infarction with more sensitive analytical methodFive percent more cardiac infarctions detected and 11 percent fewer patients suffering a relapse. That is the result of a study of more than 80,000 patients in which two cardiac damage markers (conventional troponin and the newer, high-sensitive troponin T) were compared with each other.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New way to predict caries progressionA team of researchers form Russia discovered that an increase in the concentration of several substances in oral fluid can serve as the indication of caries development. Using this data they found a way to prevent the disease in its early stages. The study was supported by a grant from the Russian Science Foundation (RSF). The results of the study were published in the EPMA Journal.
4h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Nano-saturnSaturn is the second largest planet in our solar system and has a characteristic ring. Japanese researchers have now synthesized a molecular 'nano-Saturn'. As the scientists report in the journal Angewandte Chemie, it consists of a spherical C(60) fullerene as the planet and a flat macrocycle made of six anthracene units as the ring. The structure is confirmed by spectroscopic and X-ray analyses.
4h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New method helps make orthotopic brain-tumor imaging clearer and fasterA research team led by Prof. ZHENG Hairong from the Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology (SIAT) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, in collaboration with Prof. LIU Bin from the University of Singapore, reported the first NIR-II fluorescent molecule with aggregation-induced-emission (AIE) characteristics for dual fluorescence and photoacoustic imaging.
4h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Virtual brain gives insights into memory deficits in depressionDuring a depressive episode the ability of the brain to form new brain cells is reduced. Scientists of the Ruhr-Universität Bochum examined how this affects the memory with a computational model. It was previously known that people in an acute depressive episode were less likely to remember current events. The computational model however suggests that older memories were affected as well. How long
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Live Science
30
How Drug Addiction Hijacks the BrainIt's not just one, or two, but six different brain networks are thrown into shambles by drug addiction
4h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
38
Oldest bubonic plague genome decodedAn international team has analyzed two 3,800-year-old Y. pestis genomes that suggest a Bronze Age origin for bubonic plague. The study shows that this strain is the oldest sequenced to date that contains the virulence factors considered characteristic of the bubonic plague and is ancestral to the strain that caused the Black Death.
4h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
12
Gene editing just got easierResearchers have made CRISPR technology more accessible and standardized by simplifying its complex implementation in a way that offers a broad platform for off-the shelf genome engineering.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
7
Bikeshare could increase light rail transit ridershipCoupling bikeshare with public transit could be an important component when trying to increase light rail transit (LRT) ridership, according to a new study.
4h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
15
Caloric intake and muscle mass at high altitudeNew research looks at why a group of young, healthy adults residing at high altitude lost muscle mass while severely underfed and consuming the same high-protein diet that preserved muscle during weight loss at sea level.
4h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
14
A nanotech sensor that turns molecular fingerprints into bar codesA new system can detect and analyze molecules without the need for an infrared spectrometer. The system uses nanostructured metapixels to detect and then translate molecules' unique signatures into bar codes. The technology can be integrated into a compact sensor chip. It opens the door to large-scale image-based detection of materials using machine-learning technology.
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Futurity.org
1
Volcanoes hint early Mars was cold and icyMars Curiosity NASAIn its early history, Mars was probably cold and icy—not warm and wet, a new study shows. “It’s difficult to create a warm ancient Mars because the sun was a lot fainter then. The whole solar system was cooler.” The planet is littered with valley networks, deltas, and lake deposits, meaning it must have had freely flowing water at some point, probably around 4 billion years ago. But climate model
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Ingeniøren

Nyt initiativ: Danske virksomheder skal blive bedre til 3D-printNational platform, finansieret af Industriens Fond, skal gøre 3D-print og additive manufacturing til hverdagskost.
4h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
5
Financial costs implicated in farmers' risk takingFarmers are risking personal safety due to financial pressures according to new research from the University of Aberdeen.
4h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
Research reveals secret to whale shark hotspotsA study has uncovered the secret to why endangered whale sharks gather on mass at just a handful of locations around the world.
4h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
6
Sea robots show Arctic climate changeUnderwater robots have uncovered new evidence about life in the Arctic and, for the first time, revealed the moment the region's marine ecosystem springs into life after the dark winter season.
4h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Recycling quartz from mining wasteAn EPFL engineer has discovered a way to extract value from mining waste by recycling the quartz it contains to make composite surfaces for kitchen and bathroom countertops. Brazil-based Vale, the world's largest producer of iron ore, will try out his idea.
4h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
61
Scientists go deep to quantify perovskite propertiesScientists led by Rice University and Los Alamos National Laboratory have discovered electronic properties in quantum-scale devices that are likely to impact the growing field of low-cost perovskite based optoelectronics.
4h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

How to reduce rail chaos using mathsThe British train timetables changed on May 20. Since then, there has been chaos across the railway network. The railway operators Northern and Govia Thameslink Railway (GTR) have been particularly affected by the changes which have led to hundreds of trains being cancelled and passengers experiencing significant delays.
4h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Visual worlds in mirror and glassThe Visual Perception and Cognition Laboratory research team at the Toyohashi University of Technology has uncovered a material perception mechanism with which humans discriminate between reflective and transparent materials (mirror and glass). The research team discovered that the brain adeptly utilizes motion of complex reflective and transparent images that appear on object surfaces when distin
4h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Study: Populations of widely spread tree species respond differently to climate changeA new Portland State University study shows that not all populations of a single, widely spread tree species respond the same to climate change, something scientists will need to consider when making climate change projections.
4h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Secrets of fish population changes revealedPopulations of fish in the ocean are notoriously variable, waxing and waning in often unpredictable ways. Knowing what drives changes in fish population sizes is important for managing fisheries and conserving species.For the first time, scientists have linked the ecology of adult fish populations inhabiting coral reefs with the dispersal of baby fish between reefs, reporting the dynamics of a liv
4h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Lead-free, efficient perovskite for photovoltaic cellsA KAIST research team has proposed a perovskite material, Cs2Au2I6 that serves as a potential active material for highly efficient lead-free thin-film photovoltaic devices. This material is expected to lay the foundation to overcome previously known limitations of perovskite including its stability and toxicity issues.
4h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Monkeys eat fats and carbs to keep warmCrave comfort foods in cooler months? You're in good company. Golden snub-nosed monkeys prefer to eat more fats and carbohydrates in winter to help generate heat, research suggests.
4h
Science | The Guardian
47
The week in wildlife – in picturesForaging wood ducks, an adder taking a dip and a fearless baby rabbit are among this week’s pick on images from the natural world Continue reading…
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Popular Science
64
How to keep your car from getting butt-burningly hot this summerDIY Plus, cool it off quickly when you're ready to hit the road. As soon as you open the door of your parked car, an oppressive cloud of heat envelops you. Here’s how to keep your vehicle from getting so hot and cool it off as quickly…
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Futurity.org
1
How a crowd turns bad news into contagious panicNews stories about terrorism, disease outbreaks, natural disasters, and other potential threats become increasingly negative and inaccurate when they pass from person to person, according to a new study. “Society is an amplifier for risk.” The study finds that even drawing the public’s attention to unbiased, neutral facts does not mitigate this contagion of panic. This is the first research to in
4h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
31
Researchers find evidence suggesting spin liquids in ferromagnets may be similar to dipole liquids in ferroelectricsA team of researchers with members from several institutions in the U.S. and Russia has found evidence that suggests spin liquids in ferromagnets may be similar to dipole liquids in ferroelectrics. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes their study of molecular crystals and what they found. Ben Powell with the University of Queensland offers a Perspective piece on the
4h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

'Jurassic park' made a dinosaur-sized leap forward in computer-generated animation on screen, 25 years agoWith 25 years of hindsight, Jurassic Park marks a pivotal point in the history of visual effects in film. It came 11 years after 1982's Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan debuted computer-generated imagery for a visual effect with a particle system developed by George Lucas's Industrial Light and Magic to animate a demonstration of a life-creating technology called Genesis. And Tron, also in 1982, in
4h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
10
Detection of invisible archaeological elementsTwo researchers from Universidad Politécnica de Madrid (UPM) in collaboration with a researcher from Czech University of Life Sciences Prague (CULS) have developed a methodology to detect archaeological elements invisible to the naked eye.
4h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
How high streets and shopping malls face a 'domino effect' from major store closuresTraditional retail is in the centre of a storm – and British department store chain House of Fraser is the latest to succumb to the tempest. The company plans to close 31 of its 59 shops – including its flagship store in Oxford Street, London – by the beginning of 2019. The closures come as part of a company voluntary arrangement, which is an insolvency deal designed to keep the chain running whil
4h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
12
'Monstrous' new Russian saber-tooth fossils clarify early evolution of mammal lineageFossils representing two new species of saber-toothed prehistoric predators have been described. These new species improve the scientists' understanding of an important interval in the early evolution of mammals — a time, between mass extinctions, when the roles of certain carnivores changed drastically.
4h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
8
Unexpected new dynamics for large DNA molecules in liquid suspensionPolymer physicists are today reporting the unexpected and previously unknown behavior of a charged macromolecule such as DNA embedded in a charged hydrogel, where it displays what they call a 'topologically frustrated' inability to move or diffuse in the gel, a phenomenon they describe in the current Nature Communications.
4h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
14
Consumer food choices can help reduce greenhouse emissions contributing to climate changeChanges in diet have been proposed as a way to reduce carbon emissions from the food system. A new study provides the latest and most comprehensive estimate of greenhouse gas emissions generated by US consumer food purchases, and assesses how those choices could affect diet and climate change.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
15
Hurricanes are slowing down, and that's bad newsSome hurricanes are moving more slowly, spending increased time over land and leading to catastrophic local rainfall and flooding, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
11
Are you really into me?Those who feel greater certainty that a prospective romantic partner reciprocates their interest will put more effort into seeing that person again, while rating the possible date as more sexually attractive than they would if they were less certain about the prospective date's romantic intentions.
4h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
12
Scientists discover schizophrenia gene roles in brain developmentA USC research team identified 150 proteins affecting cell activity and brain development that contribute to mental disorders, including schizophrenia, bipolar condition and depression.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
15
Minerology on Mars points to a cold and icy ancient climateMars Curiosity NASAThe climate throughout Mars' early history has long been debated — was the Red Planet warm and wet, or cold and icy? New research published in Icarus provides evidence for the latter.
4h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
15
Improved ape genome assemblies provide new insights into human evolutionHigher-quality assemblies of great ape genomes have now been generated without guidance of the human reference genome. They provide a clearer view of genetic differences that arose as humans diverged from other primates. The newest investigation offers the most comprehensive catalog of genetic variants that were gained or lost in different ape lineages. The influence of these variants was explored
4h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
13
First tetrapods of Africa lived within the Devonian Antarctic CircleThe first African fossils of Devonian tetrapods (four-legged vertebrates) show these pioneers of land living within the Antarctic circle, 360 million years ago.
4h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

3-D catalysts for improved hydrazine-free propellantsHydrazine, one of the most widely used liquid propellants for space propulsion systems, is also extremely toxic. EU researchers have developed 3-D catalysts for igniting alternative propellants.
4h
Live Science
42
Archaeologists Dig Up Mass Grave of Soldiers Crushed by Napoleon's TroopsJust under the topsoil of the farm fields in this small town northeast of Vienna, there are traces of one of the biggest battles of the Napoleonic Wars.
4h
Live Science
8
Photos: Archaeologists Excavate Battlefield from Napoleonic WarsAhead of highway construction, archaeologists in Austria are busy excavating a huge battlefield from the Napoleonic Wars.
4h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Scientists go deep to quantify perovskite propertiesScientists led by Rice University and Los Alamos National Laboratory have discovered properties in naturally occurring solution-processed quantum wells that are likely to impact the growing field of low-cost perovskite based optoelectronics. They created a general scaling law that researchers can use to determine how to tune the electronic properties of 2D perovskite-based materials for devices.
4h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Reducing opioids not associated with lower patient satisfaction scoresA Kaiser Permanente study of nearly 2,500 patients who used high doses of opioids for at least six months showed that reducing their opioid use did not lower their satisfaction with care. The study, 'Satisfaction With Care After Reducing Opioids for Chronic Pain,' was published today in The American Journal of Managed Care.
4h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Nutritional quality of fish and squid reduced by warm water eventsThe nutritional quality of fish and squid deteriorates under warm water events, research reveals — with implications for the marine environment, marine predators and fisheries capturing food for human consumption.
4h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
10
Guatemala has lived in the shadow of volcanoes for centuriesWhen the Fuego volcano near Antigua, Guatemala erupted on June 3, it wasn't immediately apparent to the people living on its slopes quite how dangerous this event would be. The explosive nature, speed and direction of the eruption were all unexpected. Entire villages were destroyed, and houses covered in thick ash. The death toll stands at at least 99, hundreds of people are missing, and further v
4h
Ingeniøren

Kom med Ingeniørens journalister bag om signalprojektetAktindsigter, milliardudgifter og evige forsinkelser. Sådan ser signalprogrammet ud, og sådan kom det frem.
4h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Preventing a plane crash—research helps pilots train for aerodynamic stallsOn a winter night in February 2009, Colgan Air Flight 3407 crashed just outside of Buffalo, N.Y., killing all 49 passengers and crew aboard and one person on the ground. An investigation by the National Transportation Safety Board determined that the turbo-prop aircraft experienced many factors contributing to the crash, including an aerodynamic stall from which the aircraft couldn't recover.
4h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
5
The nuclear industry is making a big bet on small power plantsUntil now, generating nuclear power has required massive facilities surrounded by acres of buildings, electrical infrastructure, roads, parking lots and more. The nuclear industry is trying to change that picture – by going small.
4h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
8
Geobiologist Roger Summons on finding organic matter on MarsMars Curiosity NASANASA's Curiosity rover has found evidence of complex organic matter preserved in the topmost layers of the Martian surface, scientists report today in the journal Science.
4h
Live Science
48
Honeybees Know a Lot About NothingWhat is the number "zero"? Bees know.
4h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
12
Study identifies cellular 'death code'Dying cells generally have two options: go quietly, or go out with a bang.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
Netflix and Facebook helping to reduce youth crimeYouth crime in New South Wales has declined significantly in last two decades in part due to young people spending more time at home on the Internet and less time 'hanging out' on the street, according to new research from The Australian National University (ANU).
4h
BBC News – Science & Environment
400+
Plastic and other waste found in British musselsScientists say more work is needed to understand the health effects of consuming the seafood.
4h
Feed: All Latest
54
How to Watch the 2018 FIFA World CupStreaming services, match schedules, and more for the 2018 FIFA World Cup.
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Feed: All Latest
20
Airbus Rattles the Beluga XL in the Name of SafetyBefore it can make its maiden flight this summer, the enormous, glorious cargo plane must survive the static ground vibration test.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
85
Magnetic fields could hold the key to star formationAstronomers have discovered new magnetic fields in space, which could shed light on how stars are formed and uncover the mysteries behind one of the most famous celestial images.
4h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Engineered proteins could improve biomanufacturing production of medicines, fuelsPurdue University researchers have developed a series of engineered proteins that could improve biomanufacturing processes for the production of biofuels, pharmaceuticals and commodity chemicals.
4h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Honeybees prioritize well-fed larvae for emergency queen-rearingNew research shows that honeybees prioritize the nutritional status of larvae when selecting for a new emergency queen.
4h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
Honeybees prioritize well-fed larvae for emergency queen-rearing, study findsNew research shows that honeybees prioritize the nutritional status of larvae when selecting for a new emergency queen.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
30
Supramolecular complex formation—anthracene macrocycle and C60 fullereneSaturn is the second largest planet in our solar system and has a characteristic ring. Japanese researchers have now synthesized a molecular "nano-Saturn." As the scientists report in the journal Angewandte Chemie, it consists of a spherical C60 fullerene as the planet and a flat macrocycle made of six anthracene units as the ring. The structure is confirmed by spectroscopic and X-ray analyses.
5h
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
3
Episode 4: Scary Moment on the Summer Bay | Deadliest Catch: GreenhornDrawing the assignment of throwing the hook, Landon's hand meets "The Block," a hydrolic-powered pulley designed for hauling in 800-lb crab pots. But will he confess his injury to Captain Wild Bill? Binge all episodes of Deadliest Catch: Greenhorn: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/deadliest-catch-greenhorn/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://ww
5h
Scientific American Content: Global
35
The Arctic's Message to G7: Commit on ClimateInternational decision-makers must look to the environmental elephant in the room: our rapidly melting Arctic sea ice — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
5h
Big Think
6
How to stay healthy in middle ageThe first step is recognizing that physical, mental, and emotional health are interconnected. Read More
5h
BBC News – Science & Environment
17
Hunting for life's chemistry on MarsNasa says organic matter suggests there might have been life on the planet.
5h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
26
Should the police be allowed to use genetic information in public databases to track down criminals?A trio of concerned citizens from the University of Baltimore and Baylor College of Medicine has published a Policy Forum piece in the journal Science surrounding the issue of law enforcement using genetic information in public databases to pursue criminals. In their paper, Natalie Ram, Christi Guerrini and Amy McGuire highlight the issues involved and offer some suggestions regarding how the issu
5h
Ingeniøren

DTU shopper ny supercomputerTil november går næste udgave af Danmarks bio-supercomputer i luften.
5h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

How to use paint strippers with hazardous chemicals safelyAs retailers move to stop selling paint strippers that contain two potentially hazardous chemicals, a Purdue University chemist has some words of caution for those who continue to use this type of product.
5h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Foxconn unit becomes most valuable China-listed tech companyA unit of electronics manufacturing giant Foxconn soared by the maximum allowable 44 percent in its stock debut in Shanghai on Friday to become the most valuable tech company listed in mainland China.
5h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Malaysia seizes over 600 protected animalsMore than 600 protected animals, including geckos, snakes and tarantulas, have been seized in a series of raids in Malaysia, officials said Friday.
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Scientific American Content: Global
13
Poll: Climate Change, Global Leadership Should Be Top Priorities for U.S. Space ProgramA majority of Americans in a new national survey expressed support for a vision of space exploration largely at odds with the federal government’s present plans — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
5h
Dagens Medicin

Almen praksis skal dele ud af journaloplysningerRegeringen vil med nyt system sikre, at sundhedspersoner kan få umiddelbar adgang til centrale oplysninger fra de praktiserende lægers journaler. »Journalen er ikke lægens ejerskab,« siger sundhedsminister Ellen Trane Nørby (V).
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Dagens Medicin

Steno Diabetes Center Aarhus ansætter ny enhedschefFra 1. august er Annelli Sandbæk ny enhedschef ved Steno Diabetes Center Aarhus med ansvar for et sammenhængende patientforløb.
5h
Futurity.org
3
4 ‘doubt-raisers’ sap recommendation letters for womenLetters of recommendation for women are more likely to contain words or phrases that raise doubts about job or education qualifications than are letters written for men, a new paper shows. Researchers define “doubt-raisers” as phrases or statements that question an applicant’s aptness for a job. The language falls into four categories: Negativity (directly saying something bad) Faint praise (indi
5h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Fluorescence microscopy gets the BAMM treatmentA novel technique developed by researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Nanoscale BioPhotonics (CNBP) will help shine new light on biological questions by improving the quality and quantity of information that can be extracted in fluorescence microscopy.
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
3
Close encounters of the fishy kindGlobal Fishing Watch releases the first-ever 'live' global view of likely transshipping at sea — a practice that can mask illegal fishing activity, and imagery of night-time fishing and its location, exposing vessels often hiddenfrom other monitoring systems.
5h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Lead-free, efficient perovskite for photovoltaic cellsA KAIST research team has proposed a perovskite material, Cs2Au2I6 that serves as a potential active material for highly efficient lead-free thin-film photovoltaic devices. This material is expected to lay the foundation to overcome previously known limitations of perovskite including its stability and toxicity issues.
5h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
88
'Monstrous' new Russian saber-tooth fossils clarify early evolution of mammal lineageFossils representing two new species of saber-toothed prehistoric predators have been described by researchers from the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences (Raleigh, USA) and the Vyatka Paleontological Museum (Kirov, Russia). These new species improve the scientists' understanding of an important interval in the early evolution of mammals—a time, between mass extinctions, when the roles of c
5h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
'Uber' drug delivery for cancer patientsCancer remains one of the major causes of death in Australia and around the world, despite improved treatments and rates of survival.
5h
Ingeniøren

Vandbranchen efter ’tilfældigt’ pesticidfund: Miljøstyrelsen bør tage tetenMiljøstyrelsen erkender, at den nok burde have haft pesticidet DMS på kontrollisten.
5h
The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: Older and WiserAs the years go by, seabirds such as gannets get better at foraging.
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The Atlantic
47
Drone Cops Take Flight in Los AngelesThe machine hovered above us, at the edge of a cloud of yellow smoke billowing into the sky from a mock hazardous-waste spill. A member of the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Bomb Squad stood next to me, watching the scene from a protected space behind a concrete wall. If you don’t know what’s in the smoke, his colleague had explained to me earlier, then you don’t necessarily want to approach with a
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Coloured embroidery threads on demand save time, money and the environmentSwedish company Coloreel announces partnership with Ricoh, the Japanese technology giant, to revolutionise the textile industry. The partnership will launch an EU-supported innovation which increases design options, improves production efficiency and minimises environmental impact.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

How birds fly in flocksMany fish species swim in schools and birds fly in flocks. Such collective behaviour must arise from the interactions between the animals. How it works was largely unclear. Now, two Wageningen-researchers provide important insight into the mechanism behind this behaviour. Marcel Workamp and colleagues developed a model system in which they show experimentally that swarming behaviour is mainly gove
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Monitoring the dynamics of thousands of protein complexes simultaneously within intact cellsProtein-protein interactions are at the heart of all cellular functions and biological processes. These interactions are carefully regulated in space and time to meet the cell's requirements and are often disrupted in disease states.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Rover detects ancient organic material on Mars – and it could be trace of past lifeMars Curiosity NASAIt was to a great fanfare of publicity that researchers announced they had found evidence for past life on Mars in 1996. What they claimed they had discovered was a fossilised micro-organism in a Martian meteorite, which they argued was evidence that there has once been life on the Red Planet. Sadly, most scientists dismissed this claim in the decade that followed – finding other explanations for
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Neutron stars cast light on quark matterQuark matter – an extremely dense phase of matter made up of subatomic particles called quarks – may exist at the heart of neutron stars. It can also be created for brief moments in particle colliders on Earth, such as CERN's Large Hadron Collider. But the collective behaviour of quark matter isn't easy to pin down. In a colloquium this week at CERN, Aleksi Kurkela from CERN's Theory department an
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Light-interacting nanostructures produce a remarkable frequency doubling effectBy combining two very different light-interacting nanostructures, A*STAR researchers have demonstrated a surprisingly strong enhancement of a frequency doubling effect.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Direct nanoscale patterning of LED surfaces brings new possibilities for the control of lightNanoscale patterns designed to bend, deflect and split light can now be fabricated directly on light-emitting diode (LED) surfaces using an innovative etching method developed by A*STAR researchers. The new fabrication scheme creates new possibilities for the facile control of light output.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Porous silica protects nickel catalystBy wrapping nickel nanoparticles in a protective shield of porous silica, A*STAR researchers have developed a highly active and robust catalyst that could help to produce methane from biomass.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Genes marked with colorful barcodes give precise, instantaneous snapshots of single cellsA breakthrough new technique enables scientists to image 10,421 genes at once within individual cells.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
62
The cartography of the nucleusNestled deep in each of your cells is what seems like a magic trick: Six feet of DNA is packaged into a tiny space 50 times smaller than the width of a human hair. Like a long, thin string of genetic spaghetti, this DNA blueprint for your whole body is folded, twisted, and compacted to fit into the nucleus of each cell.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Metal-organic frameworks: a breath of fresh air for gas masksOn 7 April this year, a suspected chemical attack on the Syrian town of Douma was reported to have killed at least 40 people and injured up to 500, including women and children. Syria had made its chemical weapons capability known to the world six years earlier, with a public declaration of its intention to use them against any foreign assault. Under Saddam Hussein, Iraq waged chemical warfare aga
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Father's Day Gifts: 18 Awesome Gift Ideas for the Dad in Your LifeIf you have an awesome father figure, show your appreciation with one of these hand-picked Father’s Day gifts.
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Larry Page's Flying Car Project Suddenly Seems Rather RealThe Google founder's Kitty Hawk has shown a new version of its Flyer vehicle, boasting a sleek design and solid specs.
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What Brought 'Sense8' Back—and What Killed It in the First PlaceWeird, risky sci-fi has an uphill battle, and it's going to take a very long time until that changes.
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Scientific American Content: Global
89
Welcome to Scientific American's New Climate Science ColumnIt’s about this beautiful, messy, funny, tragic planet and the terrible, wonderful humans who live here — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Popular Science
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Sorry, keto fans, you're probably not in ketosisHealth Then again, you shouldn’t be anyway. The diet gets billed as a miraculously enjoyable diet—eat all the fat you want, just cut out the carbs. But the ketogenic diet (also called keto) was never supposed to…
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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TV categories shape how black youths view black womenBlack teens who watch more black-oriented television programs have stronger beliefs in the "strong black woman"—the idea that black women should be emotionally strong, independent and self-sacrificing, according to a new University of Michigan study.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
A brief history of agricultureThe Garden of Eden has long since gone. Somewhere in Mesopotamia in the 8th millennium B.C. a cultural and technical revolution took place that presumably formed the context for the biblical fall of mankind and still today brings sweat to our brow. In a settlement between the Euphrates and Tigris rivers, somebody came up with the idea of cultivating collected seeds so that they could produce a gra
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
Giant kelp switches diet when key nutrient becomes scarceOne of the fastest-growing organisms on Earth, giant kelp can grow 2 feet a day and reach almost 150 feet in length—in one growing season.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Professor tracks medieval winds of (climate) changeThe Middle Ages – spanning the 5th to 13th centuries – witnessed the rise of the Catholic Church, the spread of Islam and social and political transformation that laid the foundation for the Renaissance and modern Western civilization.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
When local newspapers close, government runs unchecked, costs increaseIt's no secret the U.S. newspaper industry is in decline. Nationwide, circulation is down by some 40 percent in the last two decades, and this year alone, multiple prominent newsrooms, including those at the Denver Post and Sacramento Bee, have been further gutted by layoffs.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Revisioned smart phone apps give grape growers more choicesGrape growers have more tools to manage grape quality through the delivery of an improved powdery mildew assessment application, PMapp, and a new application, Grape Assess, available for Android and Apple devices.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

New molecules to reduce cost, environmental impact of mining precious metalsResearchers at the University of Notre Dame have invented a new class of molecules that can be used to simplify the process used for capturing precious metals including gold, platinum and palladium.
6h
Live Science
55
This Wily Wolverine Threw Scientists for a LoopWe were not expecting a familiar face as we cracked open the wooden box trap we'd carefully set in the remote north slope of Alaska. But there he was: a wolverine staring back at us, his face covered with the shredded remains of frozen caribou.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Parker Solar Probe will transport more than 1 million names to the sunWhen the Parker Solar Probe lifts off from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida this summer on its historic journey to the sun, it will carry with it the names of more than a million people.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
Researchers gain insight into chromosome evolution in fliesNC State University researchers have shed new light on the evolution of fly chromosomes by identifying a gene indispensable for male survival in a devastating livestock pest species. What they found could have important implications for genetic pest control.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
58
Decoding RNA-protein interactionsThanks to continued advances in genetic sequencing, scientists have identified virtually every A, T, C, and G nucleotide in our genetic code. But to fully understand how the human genome encodes us, we need to go one step further, mapping the function of each base. That is the goal of the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) project, funded by the National Human Genome Research Institute and laun
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Dagens Medicin

Sundhedsminister: Flere patienter skal udredes til tidenSundhedsministeren langer ud efter Hovedstaden og Sjælland for ikke at overholde udredningsretten for børne- og ungepsykiatrien. Hovedstaden siger selv, at kurven er knækket.
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Live Science
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Do Coffee Drinkers Really Fall into 3 Groups?A new report divides coffee lovers into three groups depending on how their bodies respond to caffeine, but does science really support this conclusion?
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
Novel molecular designs unlock therapeutic potential of nicotine receptorsSeven million people die each year from smoking related diseases, according to the World Health Organisation, with the annual death toll expected to rise to eight million by 2030.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
Image: ESTEC's new Galileo Payload LaboratoryESA microwave engineers took apart an entire Galileo satellite to reassemble its navigation payload on a laboratory test bench to run it as though it were in orbit – available to investigate the lifetime performance of its component parts, recreate satellite anomalies, and test candidate technologies for Galileo's future evolution.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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'Monstrous' new Russian saber-tooth fossils clarify early evolution of mammal lineageFossils representing two new species of saber-toothed prehistoric predators have been described by researchers from the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences (Raleigh, USA) and the Vyatka Paleontological Museum (Kirov, Russia). These new species improve the scientists' understanding of an important interval in the early evolution of mammals — a time, between mass extinctions, when the roles o
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New Scientist – News
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Watch real football matches in miniature played on your deskAugmented reality headsets, like Hololens, can recreate a football match on any flat surface. The viewer sees tiny 3D versions of real-life players running around on a virtual pitch
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cognitive science
2
Research Finds Tipping Point for Large-scale Social Change: When 25% of people in a group adopt a new social norm, it creates a tipping point where the entire group follows suit. This shows the direct causal effect of the size of a committed minority on its capacity to create social change.submitted by /u/thedabarry [link] [comments]
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The Atlantic
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Mr. Rogers Had a Simple Set of Rules for Talking to ChildrenFor the millions of adults who grew up watching him on public television, Fred Rogers represents the most important human values: respect, compassion, kindness, integrity, humility. On Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood , the show that he created 50 years ago and starred in, he was the epitome of simple, natural ease. But as I write in my forthcoming book, The Good Neighbor: The Life and Work of Fred Ro
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The Atlantic
65
China Is Genetically Engineering Monkeys With Brain DisordersG uoping Feng applied to college the first year that Chinese universities reopened after the Cultural Revolution. It was 1977, and more than a decade’s worth of students—5.7 million—sat for the entrance exams. Feng was the only one in his high school to get in. He was assigned—by chance, essentially—to medical school. Like most of his contemporaries with scientific ambitions, he soon set his sigh
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How Science Helps the Warriors Sleep Their Way to SuccessNot like that.
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Meet Germán Garmendia, the Aggressively Normal YouTube Superstar Who Wants It AllOn the internet, Latin American phenom Germán Germandia is almost as big as Bieber. Now he’s setting his sites on Hollywood. One thing he doesn’t want: help from traditional media.
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New Chips From AMD, Intel, and Qualcomm Make PCs Exciting AgainAll-day battery. Universal connectivity. A 32-core monster CPU. PCs are about to transform, and it's about time.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
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This theory suggests few workers were needed to cap Easter Island statuesA small workforce may have put huge stones on the heads of Easter Island statues.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Study develops a model enhancing particle beam efficiencyThe use of particle accelerators is not confined to basic research in high-energy physics. Large-scale accelerators and gigantic instruments such as the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) are used for this purpose, but relatively small accelerators are used in medicine (diagnostic imaging, cancer treatment), industry (food sterilization, cargo scanning, electronic engineering), and various types of inves
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Physicists develop self-propelled droplets that can act as programmable micro-carriersIn the life sciences, researchers are working to inject drugs and other molecules using tiny transport vehicles. Researchers at the Saarland University and the University of Barcelona have shown in a model system that small emulsion droplets can be used as smart carriers. They have developed a method for producing self-propelled liquid droplets capable of providing spatially and temporally control
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Researchers discover a system with three Earth-sized planetsThe Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC) and the University of Oviedo present today the discovery of two new planetary systems, one of them hosting three planets the same size as the Earth.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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How solar prominences vibrateAn international team led by researchers from the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC) and the Universidad de La Laguna (ULL) has cataloged around 200 oscillations of the solar prominences during the first half of 2014. Its development has been possible thanks to the GONG network of telescopes, of which one of them is located in the Teide Observatory.
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Scientific American Content: Global
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Searching for Wolverines in a Vast Northern WildernessA survey to study this elusive, threatened mammal stretched over 7 winters and 70,000 kilometers — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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cognitive science
1
Web Searches Reveal (in Aggregate) What We're Really Thinking: Google as a window into our private thoughtssubmitted by /u/thedabarry [link] [comments]
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Dagens Medicin

Beich vs. PottegårdUgens ophedede slagsmål mellem forskeren Anton Pottegård og DSAM-formand Anders Beich har rejst flere diskussioner: Hvornår er forskningsresultater store nok til at forsvare offentliggørelse i massemedier? Og hvordan håndterer forskerne det stærke politiske pres om at præstere og skabe værdi for borgerne?
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Dagens Medicin

At skyde kolibrier med missilsystemerEn harmløs lille dims på halsen udløste den helt store og dyre rundtur i sundhedsvæsenet, inklusive indlæggelse og operation. Hvad er det, der er sket i væsenet? Overbehandler vi af frygt for at lave fejl og blive hængt ud?
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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The Clarke exobelt, a method to search for possible extraterrestrial civilizationsA new study published in the Astrophysical Journal by Hector Socas-Navarro, a researcher at the IAC, examines the possibility of detecting hypothetical artificial satellites orbiting around other worlds.
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Scientific American Content: Global
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The 25% Revolution–How Big Does a Minority Have to Be to Reshape Society?A committed few can influence the many and sweep away social conventions, new research shows — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
8
Dark inflation opens up a gravitational window on the first moments after the Big BangDark matter and dark energy may have driven inflation, the exponential expansion of the universe moments after the Big Bang. A new cosmological model proposed by physicists at the University of Warsaw, which accounts for dark inflation, is the first to outline a precise chronology of the main events during the early history of our universe. The model makes a spectacular prediction—that it should b
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Ingeniøren
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Podcast: Den nye VM-bold flyver kortereDen nye persondataforordning giver dig ret til at sælge data om dine vaner og indkøbsmønstre. Telstar 18 hedder årets VM-fodbold, der flyver 10 procent kortere end forgængeren.
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Viden
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Træt og aggressiv: Sådan påvirker varmen digEr du varmestresset? Høje temperaturer skaber ubehag, koncentrationsbesvær og tunghed.
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Science | The Guardian
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The psychological effects of inequality – Science Weekly podcastWealth inequality has skyrocketed in the UK, as has anxiety, stress and mental illness. Could the two be linked? Richard Lea investigates Subscribe and review on Acast , Apple Podcasts , Soundcloud , Audioboom and Mixcloud . Join the discussion on Facebook and Twitter We’re all familiar with the phrase money can’t buy happiness. For many years, researchers have pondered why that is. If you can af
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The Guardian's Science Weekly

The psychological effects of inequality – Science Weekly podcastWealth inequality has skyrocketed in the UK, as has anxiety, stress and mental illness. Could the two be linked? Richard Lea investigates
7h
The Atlantic
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How Birth Certificates Are Being Weaponized Against Trans PeopleWhen Walter A. Plecker died in August 1947, his “death was considered a gift by many,” writes historian Arica L. Coleman in her searing history, That the Blood Stay Pure: African Americans, Native Americans, and the Predicament of Race and Identity in Virginia . “It marked the end of one of the most virulent, bureaucratic, and racist regimes in the history of [Virginia] and the nation.” Six decad
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
7
Researchers discover clusters of galaxies in the early universeWith observations made with the Herschel Space Observatory, with the APEX antenna and with the ALMA interferometer it has been possible to observe the formation of a cluster of galaxies in deep space, when the universe was only a tenth as old as it is now. Ivan Oteo, a former student of the University of La Laguna and of the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias led the international team that made
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
20 years keeping an eye on R AquariiAn international team of researchers, including scientists from the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, has published a detailed study of the evolution of the nebula surrounding the symbiotic star R Aquarii. The study involved observations from telescopes at the Roque de los Muchachos Observatory, La Palma, and Chile taken over the course of more than two decades.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Invasive marbled crayfish found in Narva power plant cooling canalThe dangerous invasive marbled crayfish has developed a significant population in Estonia in the cooling canal of the Narva power plant. The danger of the species is that males are not required for reproduction; all crayfish are female and capable of reproducing every few months.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Rescuing historic climate data in the East Asian regionAn international team from the U.K., China, Japan and the U.S. has addressed the challenges of recovering, collating, digitizing and working with long-term instrumental weather observations in in the East Asian Region. Historic instrumental weather observations are critical in extending the knowledge of past weather and climate and for comparison with paleo-proxy data. The potential of such data i
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
Cleaning the seabed: Divers halt the carnage of 'ghost' netsThere are ghosts in the ocean. Silent killers carried by the currents, wrapping themselves around reefs and claiming the lives of millions of marine creatures great and small, from sponges and tiny crustaceans to dolphins, sharks and whales.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Airbus deal with Canada's Bombardier set for take-offAviation giants Airbus and Canada's Bombardier on Friday said they have finalised a partnership deal on the C Series airliner programme, the latest move in a long-running battle for the skies against US behemoth Boeing.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
59
Oldest bubonic plague genome decodedAn international team of researchers led by the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History has analyzed two 3,800-year-old Y. pestis genomes that suggest a Bronze Age origin for bubonic plague. The strain identified by the researchers was recovered from individuals in a double burial in the Samara region of Russia, who both had the same strain of the bacterium at death. The study, publi
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
29
Unexpected new dynamics for large DNA molecules in liquid suspensionPolymer physicists at the University of Massachusetts Amherst are today reporting the unexpected and previously unknown behavior of a charged macromolecule such as DNA embedded in a charged hydrogel, where it displays what they call a "topologically frustrated" inability to move or diffuse in the gel, a phenomenon they describe in the current Nature Communications.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
72
Gene editing just got easierAn international team of researchers has made CRISPR technology more accessible and standardized by simplifying its complex implementation. The simpler, faster CRISPR, which is presented in the journal Nature Communications, offers a broad platform for off-the shelf genome engineering that may lower the barrier of entry for this powerful technology.
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Ingeniøren
12
Routere i Danmark også ramt af ond VPNFilter malwareDen danske cybermyndighed anbefaler nu alle, der har en router, som ikke er fra en internetudbyder, at undersøge for VPNFilter.
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Ingeniøren
1
Facebook delte 14 millioner brugeres private opslag med alleFacebook har ved en fejl ændret omkring 14 mio. brugeres privatlivsindstillinger. Dermed blev opslag, som brugerne troede var private, i stedet slået op som offentlige.
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Ingeniøren

Højhus ligner en iPod og måler sundhedenTeknologiarkitekt har designet et byggeri i Dubai med spejle, som overvåger beboernes sundhed.
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Ingeniøren
1
GDPR udfordrer internetgiganternes datamonopolDatamæglere som danske Cima Technologies vil veksle dine data til kolde kontanter ved at agere mellemled over for interesserede selskaber.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
Embattled Air India seeks 'urgent' loanAir India has announced it is seeking an urgent multi-million-dollar loan to maintain day-to-day operations, highlighting the wretched financial predicament of the country's debt-stricken national carrier.
8h

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