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Nyheder2018juni09

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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
300+
Sculpted head of mystery biblical king found in IsraelAn enigmatic sculpture of a king's head dating back nearly 3,000 years has set off a modern-day mystery caper as scholars try to figure out whose face it depicts.
11h
NYT > Science
3K
In the Trump Administration, Science Is Unwelcome. So Is Advice.As the president prepares for nuclear talks, he lacks a close adviser with nuclear expertise. It’s one example of a marginalization of science in shaping federal policy.
2h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Remarkable skill of ancient Peru's cranial surgeonsA neurorehabilitation expert who helps modern patients recover from brain surgery, chronicles the remarkable skill of ancient Peru's cranial surgeons.
19h

LATEST

The Atlantic
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How Lebanon Transformed Anthony BourdainIf you are having thoughts of suicide, please know that you are not alone. If you are in danger of acting on suicidal thoughts, call 911. For support and resources, call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255 or text 741-741 for the Crisis Text Line. Growing up in Beirut during Lebanon’s 15–year civil war, I wished for someone like Anthony Bourdain to tell the story of my coun
6min
Scientific American Content: Global
400+
Do Our Questions Create the World?Quantum theorist John Wheeler’s “it from bit” hypothesis anticipated ongoing speculation that consciousness is fundamental to reality — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
18min
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Blue bins overflow with Amazon and Walmart boxes. But we're actually recycling lessWalk down the street on garbage day in many towns, and evidence of our love affair with online shopping is plain to see. Recycling bins overflow with boxes from Amazon, eBay, Walmart and others.
36min
Viden

Ekspert: Grønlands indlandsis tager på, imens vi svederGrønland smelter knapt så meget i år takket være masser af sne og kulde, vurderer ekspert.
1h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Startup product could detect concussions, win contestJessie Garcia's fortitude is a subject of occasional, exasperated observation by her Grandma Hortensia.
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Childhood obesity: Insights on risk factors and preventionThe factors that contribute to overweight and obesity are complex, but one pattern is clear: having obesity during childhood increases the likelihood of having obesity as an adult. The Nutrition 2018 meeting will feature new research on factors that may contribute to childhood obesity, as well as factors that can help kids maintain a healthy weight.
1h
Scientific American Content: Global
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6 Ways to Bring a Little STEM to Your SummerWhether inside or outdoors, looking up or digging down, the summer is full of textbook-free ways to enjoy some science — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
2h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Facebook, Starbucks, Ernst & Young are among top U.S. companies for professional developmentWhen joining a company, young employees try to refine their skills and grow as professionals. According to Comparably, a compensation, culture and career monitoring website, Facebook, Starbucks and Ernst & Young are among the best at helping workers achieve this goal, as they rank within the top 25 for professional development.
2h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Commuting in the age of sea rise. Miami Beach app could tell you how to avoid floodingCoastal flooding is the most visible symptom of climate change in South Florida. Outside of hurricanes, its more annoyance than instrument of property damage—at least for now—but it can make getting around the "ground zero" of global warming a pain.
2h
Science : NPR
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Want Your Child To Eat (Almost) Everything? There Is A WayGiving kids a diet varied in flavors and textures from the get-go can help them be more open to trying new foods. The problem is America's food landscape makes that ideal hard to live up to. (Image credit: Fabio Consoli for NPR)
2h
Science | The Guardian
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The asteroid rush sending 21st-century prospectors into spaceA race is on to mine billions of dollars in resources from the solar system’s asteroids, fuelling our future among the stars In an industrial park in San Jose, California, Grant Bonin is holding what looks like the end of a metal water bottle. It is the casing, he jokes, of his company’s “flying steam kettle”: a propulsion system for small spacecraft that uses super-hot water vapour, heated to 1,0
2h
Science | The Guardian
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Frank Tallis: ‘I often feel when I write fiction that I am just doing psychology in a different way’The psychotherapist and fiction writer on the importance of sci-fi and Freud, and the connection between love and madness Frank Tallis is a novelist, nonfiction writer and clinical psychologist. He has held lecturing posts in clinical psychology at the Institute of Psychiatry and neuroscience at King’s College London. He has written horror fiction, a series of detective novels featuring the fictio
2h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Writers Guild of America West signs deal with AppleThe Writers Guild of America West said Thursday it had signed an agreement with Apple Inc., underscoring the union's long-standing goal to expand its foray into digital media.
2h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Bifidobacteria supplement colonizes gut of breastfed infantsSupplementing breastfed infants with activated Bifidobacterium infantis (B. infantis) bacteria had a positive impact on babies' gut microbes for up to a year, according to a recent study by researchers at UC Davis and Evolve BioSystems Inc. The work will be presented June 9 at the annual meeting of the American Society for Nutrition in Boston.
2h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

The latest science on breastfeedingGuidelines recommend breastfeeding as the best source of nutrition for most babies. The Nutrition 2018 meeting will feature new research findings on the nature of breast milk and how breastfeeding may affect the health of both moms and babies.
2h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Loneliness is bad for the heartLoneliness is bad for the heart and a strong predictor of premature death, according to a new study. The study found that feeling lonely was a stronger predictor of poor outcomes than living alone, in both men and women.
3h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Kitchen towels could contribute to the growth of potential pathogens that cause food poisoningResearchers have shown that factors such as family size, type of diet, multi-usage of towels, among other factors, impact the growth of pathogens on kitchen towels, potentially causing food poisoning.
3h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
15
Colistin-resistant multidrug-resistant bacteria pervasive in rural Vietnam townA new study has found that the majority of residents in a rural village of Vietnam harbored multi-drug-resistant (MDR), colistin-resistant E. coli bacteria. Colistin is typically used as a last-resort treatment when there are no other therapy options available.
3h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Antibiotic-resistant bacteria found in the US presents a triple threatResearchers describe the first strain of carbapenem-resistant, hypermucoviscous Klebsiella pneumoniae exhibiting colistin heteroresistance and enhanced virulence isolated from a patient in the United States.
3h
The Atlantic
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The New York City Subway Is Beyond RepairThe New York City subway is a miracle, especially at 3 a.m. on a Friday night. But the system is also falling apart, and it’s going to cost billions to keep the old trains running: $19 billion, at least according to one estimate from city planners . The time has come to give up on the 19th-century idea of public transportation, and leap for the autonomous future. Right now, fully autonomous cars
3h
Viden

Faktatjek: Er klimaforandringer grunden til, at Danmark sveder?Både og, svarer to eksperter. Klimaforandringerne har nemlig været med til at gøre varmen endnu varmere.
3h
The Atlantic
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Climate Change Is Going to Make Scott Pruitt Need So Much MoisturizerThe head of the Environmental Protection Agency faced renewed scrutiny this week—with the latest allegations of unethical behavior veering, at times, into the utterly absurd. For example, Scott Pruitt reportedly attempted to use his position to secure a Chick-Fil-A franchise for his wife ; dispatched an aide look into purchasing a mattress from Trump International Hotel; and had security agents d
4h
Viden

Sikkerhedsekspert: 40.000 danskeres hackede data har høj værdi for kriminelleHackerangreb viser, at Kommunernes Landsforening har pinligt lidt styr på it-sikkerheden.
4h
The Atlantic
97
The Warriors' All but Inevitable VictoryThe Golden State Warriors beat the Cleveland Cavaliers Friday evening, 108–85, bringing a mercifully quick, four-games-to-none end to the 2018 NBA Finals. The Warriors had the finest collection of talent in basketball: two players, in Stephen Curry and Kevin Durant, who have combined to win three MVP awards; the reigning defensive player of the year, in Draymond Green, who doubles as the team’s b
4h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Weekly injections of PRO 140 in combination with optimized ART shows HIV-1 viral suppressionResults from a pivotal trial of PRO 140, a new HIV therapy, show that PRO 140 is an effective, long-acting therapeutic in combination with antiretroviral treatment (ART) for previously treated HIV-1 infected patients. This is an ongoing randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. The research is presented at ASM Microbe, the annual meeting of the American Society for Microbiology, held fro
4h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Antibiotic-resistant bacteria found in the US presents a triple threatResearchers from the Emory Antibiotic Resistance Center describe the first strain of carbapenem-resistant, hypermucoviscous Klebsiella pneumoniae exhibiting colistin heteroresistance and enhanced virulence isolated from a patient in the United States. The research is presented at ASM Microbe, the annual meeting of the American Society for Microbiology, held from June 7-11, in Atlanta, Ga.
4h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Kitchen towels could contribute to the growth of potential pathogens that cause food poisoningResearchers from the University of Mauritius have shown that factors such as family size, type of diet, multi-usage of towels, among other factors, impact the growth of pathogens on kitchen towels, potentially causing food poisoning. The research is presented at ASM Microbe, the annual meeting of the American Society for Microbiology, held from June 7-11, 2018 in Atlanta, Ga.
4h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Colistin-resistant multidrug-resistant bacteria pervasive in rural Vietnam townA new study has found that the majority of residents in a rural village of Vietnam harbored multi-drug-resistant (MDR), colistin-resistant E. coli bacteria. Colistin is typically used as a last-resort treatment when there are no other therapy options available. The research is presented at ASM Microbe, the annual meeting of the American Society for Microbiology, held from June 7-11 in Atlanta, Ga.
4h
The Atlantic
200+
What Europe Can Teach America About Russian DisinformationIn 2014, United States officials encountered a new form of Kremlin disinformation in Ukraine. As “little green men” streamed into the country’s south, blatant falsehoods over anything from the history of World War II to weapon-system deployments spread across the internet and the airwaves. Propagandists disguised as professors, activists, and journalists sowed confusion about what was actually ha
5h
Feed: All Latest
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Space Photos of the Week: Jupiter's Lightning Is StrikingThe strikes are a lot like on Earth, but they tend to linger toward the poles.
6h
Scientific American Content: Global
13
China May Compete for Limited Opportunities to Test Ebola VaccineOnly one experimental shot, made by Merck, has been approved for use amid the current outbreak — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
6h
Ingeniøren
5
Open source-software gør overbevisende filmmagi mulig på danske budgetterOpen source-programmer og et værktøj skabt til udvikling af computerspil lader danske filmmagere skabe overbevisende magiske verdener for små penge.
6h
Live Science
32
Why Are Suicide Rates Rising?Rates of death by suicide have increased in the United States.
7h
Feed: All Latest
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'Solo: A Star Wars Story' Should Have Been Two MoviesA second film could've explored where Han Solo got his cynical, jaded attitude.
7h
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
3
Episode 5: Broken Trust | Deadliest Catch: GreenhornLuke digs deep to finish the season strong; Landon confesses his injury to Wild Bill, jeopardizing the respect he has earned all season long. Binge all episodes of Deadliest Catch: Greenhorn: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/deadliest-catch-greenhorn/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DeadliestCatch https://www.facebook.com/Di
7h
Scientific American Content: Global
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How Fake Nutrition News Hurts Us AllLearning to think critically about nutrition claims can help make us better consumers of information in general — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
7h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Loneliness is bad for the heartLoneliness is bad for the heart and a strong predictor of premature death, according to a study presented today at EuroHeartCare 2018, the European Society of Cardiology's annual nursing congress. The study found that feeling lonely was a stronger predictor of poor outcomes than living alone, in both men and women.
7h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Healthy lifestyle smartphone app slows artery agingUsing a healthy lifestyle smartphone application helps to slow artery ageing, according to results from the EVIDENT II trial presented today at EuroHeartCare 2018, the European Society of Cardiology's annual nursing congress.
7h
Feed: All Latest
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How NATO Defends Against the CyberattacksOpinion: The NATO Secretary General explains how the alliance manages the dark side of the web.
8h
Feed: All Latest
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4 Weekend Tech Deals for Father’s Day GiftsGet a head start on your Father’s Day shopping.
8h
Big Think
5
Jessica Abel – Practical Magic – Think Again – a Big Think Podcast #151While figuring out how to steer her own creative ship, Jessica Abel has learned powerful, practical lessons about how to help others do the same. Read More
8h
New on MIT Technology Review
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The Best of the Physics arXiv (week ending June 9, 2018)This week’s most thought-provoking papers from the Physics arXiv.
8h
Scientific American Content: Global
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Does Killing Sharks, Wolves and Other Top Predators Solve Our Conflicts with Them?In spite of their ecological, economic and cultural significance, predators are among the most heavily persecuted animals, due to conflict with humans and their assets — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
8h
The Atlantic
5
The Family Weekly: Speaking “Freddish” With Mr. RogersThis Week in Family Fred Rogers made life in Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood look calm and simple—but it turns out the children’s TV icon was taking great pains behind the scenes to make sure the language he used in talking to kids was just right. Maxwell King describes , in a piece adapted from his upcoming book, The Good Neighbor: The Life and Work of Fred Rogers, how Rogers would revise scripts to
8h
BBC News – Science & Environment
300+
Climate change: Pope urges action on clean energyFrancis tells oil executives the world must convert to clean fuel in an unprecedented conference.
8h
The Atlantic
300+
When Will People Get Better at Talking About Suicide?If you are having thoughts of suicide, please know that you are not alone. If you are in danger of acting on suicidal thoughts, call 911. For support and resources, call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255 or text 741-741 for the Crisis Text Line. Suicide is on the rise in the United States, but people still don’t know quite how to talk about it. According to data released
9h
The Atlantic
62
What Tracy K. Smith Sees in America“Our country is like a really old house,” the historian and journalist Isabel Wilkerson said in an interview barely a week after the 2016 election. “Old houses need a lot of work. And the work is never done … Whatever you’re ignoring will be there to be reckoned with until you reckon with it. And I think that that’s what we’re called upon to do where we are right now.” Tracy K. Smith, in her cu
9h
Feed: All Latest
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With Cortex, Land Rover Takes Self-Driving Cars Off-RoadingLand Rover always delivers capability and convenience, and that means teaching its cars to drive themselves where the roads don't go.
9h
Feed: All Latest
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When Overtaxed Working Memory Knocks Your Brain Out of SyncResearchers find that when working memory gets overburdened, dialog between three brain regions breaks down. The discovery provides new support for a broader theory about how the brain operates.
9h
Feed: All Latest
63
At Festival of the Impossible, Artists Augment Reality to Tell Fresh StoriesGetting trippy with storytelling at Festival of the Impossible, an AR and VR showcase currently showing in San Francisco.
9h
NYT > Science
200+
atmosphere: The Rich Are Planning to Leave This Wretched PlanetHere comes private space travel — with cocktails, retro-futuristic Philippe Starck designs and Wi-Fi. Just $55 million a trip!
9h
Ingeniøren

Indisk biotek-iværksætter i opråb til Danmark: Lad os forløse jeres gode ideerIndien bobler af aktivitet inden for biotek, og det kunne danske virksomheder og startups nyde godt af, mener den succesrige indiske iværksætter Shrikumar Suryanarayan.
9h
cognitive science
1
Eight-month-old infants are much more likely to reach towards distant toys when an adult is present than when they are by themselves. This suggests that infants understand when they need another person’s help to accomplish a task and act accordingly.submitted by /u/randomusefulbits [link] [comments]
10h
NYT > Science
84
Trilobites: This Device Helps Fish Make It Out of the Twilight Zone AliveA portable decompression chamber helps scientists protect fish from injury when they are brought to the ocean’s surface.
11h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
11
Report: Downed power lines sparked deadly California firesPower lines owned by San Francisco-based Pacific Gas & Electric Co. are to blame for a dozen wildfires in Northern California's wine country last fall, including two that killed 15 people combined, the state's Department of Forestry and Fire Protection said Friday.
11h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
8
Facebook shared user data with select companiesFacebook shared personal information culled from its users' profiles with other companies after the date when executives have said the social network prevented third-party developers from gaining access to the data, the company confirmed Friday.
11h
Viden

3 gode råd: Sådan fortæller du dit barn om klimaetLæs eksperternes tre forslag til, hvordan du giver dit barn den bedste klimaopdragelse.
11h
Ingeniøren
5
Google Translate anno 1957: Elektronhjernen oversætter til russiskForsøg med moderne elektroniske cifferregnemaskiner på M.I.T. giver begrundet håb om maskinoversættelse af tekster fra et sprog til et andet.
11h
Nyheder – Forskning – Videnskab

Kig ned DJØF´ere – det er vejen til bedre samarbejde i den offentlige sektorDe fagprofessionelle i den offentlige sektor har øvet sig i at tale DJØF´ernes sprog….
14h
NYT > Science
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Trump’s New Plan to Dismantle Obamacare Comes With Political RisksThe Justice Department’s challenge of the constitutionality of major parts of the law imperils popular protections for people with pre-existing medical conditions.
18h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
29
New insight into why Pierce's disease is so deadly to grapevinesScientists are gaining a better understanding of Pierce's disease and how it affects grapevines. The disease, which annually costs California more than $100 million, comes from a bacterium called Xylella fastidiosa.
19h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
33
New system recovers fresh water from power plantsA system devised by engineers recovers fresh water from power plants. It could provide a low-cost source of drinking water for parched cities around the world, while also cutting plant operating costs.
19h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
71
In desert trials, next-generation water harvester delivers fresh water from airScientists who last year built a prototype harvester to extract water from the air using only the power of the sun have scaled up the device to see how much water they can capture in arid conditions in Arizona. Using a kilogram of MOF, they were able to capture about 7 ounces of water from low-humidity air each 24-hour day/night cycle. A new and cheaper MOF could double that.
19h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
21
Face transplantation: An established option to improve quality of life in patients with severe facial traumaThirteen years after the first successful face transplant, US trauma surgeons should be aware of the current role of facial transplantation for patients with severe facial disfigurement — including evidence that the final appearance and functioning are superior to that provided by conventional reconstructive surgery.
19h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
17
New hope from the 'seven year switch' in Type 1 diabetesA team found evidence that the amount of insulin produced declines by almost 50 percent each year for seven years. At that point, the insulin levels stabilize.
19h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
15
Silicon provides means to control quantum bits for faster algorithmsQuantum bits are now easier to manipulate for devices in quantum computing, thanks to enhanced spin-orbit interaction in silicon.
19h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
17
Ten thousand bursting genesScientists can now image the activity of 10,421 genes at once within individual cells, using a new technique.
19h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
13
The cartography of the nucleusA new technique creates maps of the folded structures of DNA, RNA, and proteins within the cellular nucleus, revealing elegant 'hubs' of organization.
19h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
92
Dogs can detect agricultural diseases earlyLaurel wilt disease has had a devastating effect on the avocado industry in South Florida in past harvest seasons. Early detection can be instrumental in deterring a widespread infection. The use of scent-discriminating dogs has shown to offer the avocado industry legitimate signs of hope in their fight against the spread of the disease throughout their groves.
19h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
10
A new way to measure energy in microscopic machinesResearchers have devised and demonstrated a new way to measure free energy. By using microscopy to track and analyze the fluctuating motion or configuration of single molecules or other small objects, the new method can be applied to a greater variety of microscopic and nanoscopic systems than previous techniques.
19h
NYT > Science
1K
How Suicide Quietly Morphed Into a Public Health CrisisThe deaths of Kate Spade and Anthony Bourdain are emblematic of a persistent and growing threat in the United States.
20h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
4
New hope from the 'seven year switch' in Type 1 diabetesA team at the University of Exeter Medical School found evidence that the amount of insulin produced declines by almost 50 percent each year for seven years. At that point, the insulin levels stabilize.
20h
Science | The Guardian
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Move over Elon: global energy prize goes to Australia's solar guruUNSW professor Martin Green, who revolutionised photovoltaics, says sun’s power is ‘the best option out there’ The “father of PV” – University of New South Wales professor Martin Green – has become the first Australian to win the global energy prize from a shortlist that included Tesla’s Elon Musk. UNSW said Green had been selected from 44 contenders from 14 countries by a committee of leading sc
21h
Popular Science
300+
Honeybees are surprisingly great at mathAnimals Bees know something about nothing Zero is an extremely hard concept to understand. Several species of non-human primates and birds, like the rhesus monkey and the African grey parrot, can all identify…
21h
Feed: All Latest
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Gadget Lab Podcast: Apple's WWDC Was About Using iPhone Less, and Also MoreIf you went into Apple's annual developers conference thinking it would be about performance, stability, and Animoji—and not new MacBook Pros—you were totally right.
22h
The Atlantic
13
The Atlantic Daily: Crowd a RoomWhat We’re Following Rough Relations : On his way to the G7 Summit, President Trump said the forum “should let Russia come back in.” Russia has been suspended from the group since 2014, and Trump’s call for its reinstatement may add to the divisions between the U.S. and its fellow G7 members. Trump’s tariffs on steel and aluminum imports from Europe and Canada are a key point of conflict, reporte
22h
The Atlantic
8
The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Nobody Leaves Russia Out of the Summit-Written by Elaine Godfrey ( @elainejgodfrey ) Today in 5 Lines As President Trump prepared to leave for the annual G7 summit in Canada, he said that Russia should be readmitted to the group. Russia was suspended from the group, then known as the G8, after its invasion and annexation of Ukraine’s Crimea region in 2014. Special Counsel Robert Mueller filed obstruction-of-justice charges against fo
22h
BBC News – Science & Environment
39
Nobel laureate joins another exclusive clubDr Richard Henderson is made a Companion of Honour in the Queen’s Birthday Honours.
22h
Popular Science
500+
China is converting old Soviet tanks into autonomous vehiclesEastern Arsenal A New Life for the ZTZ-59 China's finding new uses for Cold War tanks, by turning them into robots for dangerous tasks like target practice.
22h
The Atlantic
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The French President Has Described America Like a Rogue StateSince his election last May, French President Emmanuel Macron has tried to, and maybe believed he could, bend Donald Trump’s convictions. Macron sought to turn the U.S. president away from nationalism, protectionism, and climate-change skepticism and toward his own vision of a world in which strong, sovereign nations collaborate to find multilateral solutions to transnational problems. At first h
22h
Feed: All Latest
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Without Anthony Bourdain, Food Instagram Culture Wouldn't ExistFor better or worse.
22h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
71
A new way to measure energy in microscopic machinesWhat drives cells to live and engines to move? It all comes down to a quantity that scientists call "free energy," essentially the energy that can be extracted from any system to perform useful work. Without this available energy, a living organism would eventually die and a machine would lie idle.
23h
Big Think
7
10 most inspiring college commencement speechesFrom Oprah to Jim Carrey to Barack Obama to Neil Gaiman, here are some of the most incredible commencement speeches of all time. Read More
23h
Big Think
100+
Study: Honeybees one of few animals able to understand the concept of ‘zero’Scientists in Australia have demonstrated that honeybees can be trained to understand the concept of zero, something which took humans millennia to develop. Read More
23h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

A new way to measure energy in microscopic machinesIn work at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the University of Maryland in College Park, researchers have devised and demonstrated a new way to measure free energy. By using microscopy to track and analyze the fluctuating motion or configuration of single molecules or other small objects, the new method can be applied to a greater variety of microscopic and nanoscopic s
23h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Why seashells are tougher than chalk (video)Seashells are made mostly of calcium carbonate, also known as chalk, a mineral soft and crumbly enough to use for sidewalk doodles. Yet seashells are tough and resilient. In this video, Reactions explains why seashells are so different, and why you can't use them to draw on your driveway.
23h
Latest Headlines | Science News
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Kids with food allergies are twice as likely to have autismChildren with food allergies are more likely to have autism than kids without, a study finds. But that doesn’t mean a child will develop the disorder.
23h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
89
ORNL launches Summit Supercomputer—America's new top supercomputer for scienceSummit US IBM ORNLThe U.S. Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory today unveiled Summit as the world's most powerful and smartest scientific supercomputer.
23h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
300+
Silicon provides means to control quantum bits for faster algorithmsQuantum bits are now easier to manipulate for devices in quantum computing, thanks to enhanced spin-orbit interaction in silicon.
23h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
200+
Holes in the headEven with a highly skilled neurosurgeon, the most effective anesthesia, and all the other advances of modern medicine, most of us would cringe at the thought of undergoing cranial surgery today.
23h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Face transplantation — An established option to improve quality of life in patients with severe facial traumaThirteen years after the first successful face transplant, US trauma surgeons should be aware of the current role of facial transplantation for patients with severe facial disfigurement — including evidence that the final appearance and functioning are superior to that provided by conventional reconstructive surgery. That's the message of a special update on 'Face Transplantation Today' in the Ju
23h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
7
Dogs can detect agricultural diseases earlyA study out of Florida International University evaluates the use of scent-discriminating canines for the detection of laurel wilt-affected wood from avocado trees. Julian Mendel, Kenneth G. Furton, and DeEtta Mills have ferreted out a possible solution to a serious issue in one corner of the horticultural industry, and then ascertained the extent to which this solution is effective.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
20
New insight into why Pierce's disease is so deadly to grapevinesScientists are gaining a better understanding of Pierce's disease and how it affects grapevines. The disease, which annually costs California more than $100 million, comes from a bacterium called Xylella fastidiosa. While the bacterium has been present in the state for more than 100 years, Pierce's disease became a more serious threat to agriculture with the arrival of the glassy-winged sharpshoot
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
7
Facebook out to lure eSports fans with online portalFacebook on Friday unveiled a portal devoted to streaming video game play and commentary as it ramped up its challenge to Amazon-owned Twitch and Google's YouTube for eSports fans.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
6
Dogs can detect agricultural diseases earlyLaurel wilt disease has had a devastating effect on the avocado industry in South Florida in past harvest seasons. Early detection can be instrumental in deterring a widespread infection. The use of scent-discriminating dogs has shown to offer the avocado industry legitimate signs of hope in their fight against the spread of the disease throughout their groves.
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Big Think
6
The faster you walk, the better for long term health – especially as you ageA new study has found that those who report faster walking have lower risk of premature death. Read More
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Big Think
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Wireless system can power devices inside the bodyNew technology could enable remote control of drug delivery, sensing, and other medical applications. Read More
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New Scientist – News
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We can tweak immune cells to be much better at wiping out HIVStudying the immune cells of people who can keep HIV under control in their bodies has yielded new insights that might enable all people with HIV to do the same
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NYT > Science
300+
Why Guatemala’s Volcano Has Been More Deadly Than Hawaii’sNot all volcanoes are created equal: Some types pose a far greater hazard to life than others.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Holes in the headUM neurorehabilitation expert Dr. David S. Kushner, who helps modern patients recover from brain surgery, chronicles the remarkable skill of ancient Peru's cranial surgeons.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Science of racism examined in new set of research articlesPsychological scientists describe research on the enduring and often hidden presence of racism at both the interpersonal and societal levels in the June issue of Current Directions in Psychological Science.
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Popular Science
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How far away was that lightning? Here's how to figure it out.Science Light speed is almost instantaneous, while sound is much slower. You probably do it. It might be ingrained from when you were a kid, and now it’s almost automatic. You see the flash of lightning—and you immediately start counting the…
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The Scientist RSS

EPA to Limit Assessments of Toxic Chemical RisksReducing the evaluation to only direct contact, rather than including environmental exposures, could leave damaging substances on the market, critics say.
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Big Think
200+
CDC: U.S. suicide rate has increased by 25% in the last 20 yearsThe CDC has published very worrisome statistics about this upward trend in our culture. Read More
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cognitive science
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Web Searches Reveal (in Aggregate) What We're Really Thinkingsubmitted by /u/symonsymone [link] [comments]
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New insight into why Pierce's disease is so deadly to grapevinesScientists are gaining a better understanding of Pierce's disease and how it affects grapevines. The disease, which annually costs California more than $100 million, comes from a bacterium called Xylella fastidiosa. In a new study, published in Frontiers in Plant Science, researchers at the University of California, Davis, have identified a set of molecular markers that influence the onset of Pier
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Big Think
8
AI meets neuroscience, and it’s goodbye resumes, hello gamesTo improve hiring efficiency and success, companies are starting to leverage neuroscience gaming and AI to identify and attract the best people. Read More
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Big Think
300+
A look at the life and work of Anthony Bourdain, who died at 61The widely beloved chef, writer and TV host Anthony Bourdain was found dead Friday morning at age 61. Here's a brief look at the work and life that made him an international culinary star. Read More
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Live Science
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Corpse of Mysterious Sea Creature Washes Ashore in NamibiaThis 20-foot-long sea creature washed up on the shores of Africa.
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The Atlantic
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The Federal Government Abandons the Most Popular Part of the ACAPresident Trump’s administration hasn’t lacked for innovative ways to disrupt the Affordable Care Act. Now it’s found another. Facing a federal lawsuit from Texas and several other red states who want the entire law overturned, the Justice Department announced late Thursday that it won’t defend a core ACA provision in court: the guarantee of coverage for preexisting conditions. In a legal filing
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NYT > Science
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Can One Suicide Lead to Others?Suicides can occur in clusters, researchers have found, and high-profile examples may lead to similar acts among those who are already contemplating killing themselves.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
5
The cartography of the nucleusA new technique creates maps of the folded structures of DNA, RNA, and proteins within the cellular nucleus, revealing elegant 'hubs' of organization.
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The Atlantic
91
Photos of the Week: Distorted Queen, Toad King, GladiatorThe Corpus Christi festival in Spain, search and rescue operations in Guatemala, ocular exercises in China, the Life Ball in Austria, Trooping the Colour in England, “The Empire Strips Back” in Los Angeles, a Pride parade in Brazil, a rock festival in Germany, a dino-riding traffic cop in Thailand, and much more.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Ten thousand bursting genesScientists can now image the activity of 10,421 genes at once within individual cells, using a new technique developed at Caltech.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
3
Silicon provides means to control quantum bits for faster algorithmsQuantum bits are now easier to manipulate for devices in quantum computing, thanks to enhanced spin-orbit interaction in silicon.
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Feed: All Latest
300+
WannaCry Hero Marcus Hutchins' New Legal Woes Spell Trouble for White Hat HackersBy expanding the case against Marcus Hutchins, the Department of Justice has signaled a troubling interpretation of cybersecurity law.
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Feed: All Latest
400+
'Ocean's 8' Is Good, but It's Time for New Women's Stories, Not Just Gender-SwapsFemale-fronted movies could be better if they weren't focused on roles made for men.
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Live Science
14
Would You Stay at 'Hotel Influenza'?A stay at this hotel comes with a catch: You might get the flu.
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The Scientist RSS
1
Public T-Cell Receptors From Resistant People Fend Off HIVThe receptors, found in so-called elite controllers who don't need medications to keep the virus in check, suggest a new path toward immunotherapy.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

A 'super' receptor that helps kill HIV infected cellsResearchers have discovered a unique set of 'super' receptors on immune cells capable of killing HIV across genetically diverse populations, making them a potential candidate for immunotherapy treatments. Published in Science Immunology, the researchers studied fifteen unique individuals who all had been infected with HIV, but have immune systems that protect them from AIDs progression. These rare
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

High food insecurity found in a sample of adults on probation in Rhode IslandA new study led by public health researchers at Tufts University School of Medicine reports significant food insecurity for adults on probation in Rhode Island. Nearly three-quarters of the participants experienced food insecurity over a 30-day period, with almost half having very low food security.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Move over, 'Laurel or Yanny': Study looks at why we hear talking as singing after many repetitionsA team from the University of Kansas has investigated the 'Speech-to-Song Illusion,' where a spoken phrase is repeated and begins to sound as if it were being sung.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
3
In desert trials, next-generation water harvester delivers fresh water from airUC Berkeley scientists who last year built a prototype harvester to extract water from the air using only the power of the sun have scaled up the device to see how much water they can capture in arid conditions in Arizona. Using a kilogram of MOF, they were able to capture about 7 ounces of water from low-humidity air each 24-hour day/night cycle. A new and cheaper MOF could double that.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New system recovers fresh water from power plantsA system devised by MIT engineers recovers fresh water from power plants. It could provide a low-cost source of drinking water for parched cities around the world, while also cutting plant operating costs.
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The Atlantic
41
Serpentwithfeet’s Songs of Supernatural IntimacyWhen a song yearns for a “you,” where does the listener envision the singer and their subject? Music videos might offer the fantasy of artists directly serenading their beloveds, but love songs often feel more private, more desperate, than that. They can be, as Madonna pointed out, like prayers: requests for impossible intervention, recited alone. On his hair-raising debut album Soil , the experi
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Feed: All Latest
300+
Behind the Scenes With the Stanford Laptop OrchestraThe computer geeks in the Stanford Laptop Orchestra celebrate ten years of music-making with a concert this weekend.
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BBC News – Science & Environment
100+
Could an emoji save your life?Scientists are campaigning for a new emoji which they feel could be vital during earthquakes.
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Scientific American Content: Global
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Powder Pulls Drinking Water from Desert AirA structure known as a metal organic framework traps water vapor by night, then releases it when heated the next day. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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