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Nyheder2018juni11

Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Researchers discover new type of stem cell stateIt's not the amount of fat, but the ability to store fat in the right locations, that equates to good metabolic health in humans. In part, for this to occur, new fat cells must be made "on demand" when the body has an energy surplus.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Doing right by the whalesThese are not good times for the North Atlantic right whale. Ship strikes and gear entanglement play major roles in the mortality of these highly endangered mammals, which now number fewer than 500. Making matters worse, climate-mediated shifts are pushing their prey out of the whales' usual feeding grounds, rendering traditional habitat-focused protection policies less than optimal.
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The Scientist RSS

North American Universities Increasingly Cancel Publisher PackagesA growing number of libraries are unbundling their subscriptions to the full suite of publishers' journals, opting for limited titles to save on costs.
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The Scientist RSS

CRISPR Efficiency Tied to Cancer-Causing ProcessTwo studies find the genome-editing technique works best when cells have a faulty DNA-damage response that's frequently present in cancers.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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SwRI to manage payload, payload systems engineering for IMAP missionSouthwest Research Institute will manage the payload and payload systems engineering for a new NASA mission that will sample, analyze and map particles streaming to Earth from the edge of interstellar space. SwRI also will provide a scientific instrument and other technology for the Interstellar Mapping and Acceleration Probe (IMAP) spacecraft, scheduled to launch in 2024.
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Science | The Guardian
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Weatherwatch: sunbathing carp grow faster and fitter than their timid cousinsCarp that soak up the sun are fitter, and bold fish benefit more by sunbathing for longer One magic late afternoon in summer, sitting on the bank of a clear, still lake in Hertfordshire, it was possible to see lines of motionless carp on the surface that appeared to be sunbathing. The idea that fish, like snakes and other ectotherms (“cold-blooded” creatures), might enjoy or benefit from sunbathi
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Ryanair recognises cabin crew union in UK (Update)Low-cost airline Ryanair said Monday it has formally recognised representation by a union of its cabin crew in Britain.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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NASA finds Tropical Storm Maliksi weakening, expandingUsually when a tropical cyclone weakens it expands and that's how Tropical Storm Maliksi has appeared in recent NASA satellite imagery as its strength wanes.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Volcanic activity, declining ocean oxygen triggered mass extinction of ancient organismsGlobal climate change, fueled by skyrocketing levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide, is siphoning oxygen from today's oceans at an alarming pace—so fast that scientists aren't entirely sure how the planet will respond.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Making the oxygen we breathe, a photosynthesis mechanism exposedArguably, the greatest fueler of life on our planet is photosynthesis, but understanding its labyrinthine chemistry, powered by sunlight, is challenging. Researchers recently illuminated some new steps inside the molecular factory that makes the oxygen we breathe.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Heritage science: Where the past looks to the futureAre crowd-sourced photos taken with mobile phones useful in collecting analytics for antiques? Can smell be used to classify degradation of plastic artifacts in museums? How are cannonballs from shipwrecks affected by conservation techniques? The answers to all these questions are found in a Special Issue on heritage science published by the journal Angewandte Chemie.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Designing a better superconductor with geometric frustrationSuperconductors contain tiny tornadoes of supercurrent, called vortex filaments, that create resistance when they move. This affects the way superconductors carry a current.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Scientists have a blast with aluminum nanoparticlesArmy scientists proved a decades-old prediction that mixing TNT and novel aluminum nanoparticles can significantly enhance energetic performance. This explosive discovery is expected to extend the reach of U.S. Army firepower in battle.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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PNNL technology clears way for ethanol-derived jet fuelASTM International recently revised ASTM D7566 Annex A5—the Standard Specification for Aviation Turbine Fuel Containing Synthesized Hydrocarbons—to add ethanol as an approved feedstock for producing alcohol-to-jet synthetic paraffinic kerosene (ATJ-SPK). The revision of ASTM D7566 Annex A5 clears the way for increased adoption of sustainable aviation fuels because ethanol feedstocks can be made fr
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The Atlantic
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Trump's Beef With Canadian MilkPresident Trump’s Twitter jab at Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau—in which he publicly called the leader of an allied country “meek and mild,” plus “dishonest & weak”—spawned a mini–cottage industry of articles ( including my own ) on the fate of the U.S.-led Western world order. And at first glance it’s puzzling why Trump would pick a fight with Canada, of all places, just as he was depart
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Heritage science: Where the past looks to the futureAre crowd-sourced photos taken with mobile phones useful in collecting analytics for antiques? Can smell be used to classify degradation of plastic artifacts in museums? How are cannonballs from shipwrecks affected by conservation techniques? The answers to all these questions are found in a Special Issue on heritage science published by the journal Angewandte Chemie.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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McLean investigators suggest that brain circuits could unlock new psychiatric treatmentsThe findings of the studies highlight the complexity of brain inhibitory systems and the importance of taking a subtype-, circuit- and neuronal population-specific approach to develop future therapeutic strategies using cell type-specific drug delivery.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Making the oxygen we breathe, a photosynthesis mechanism exposedOxygen photosynthesis has to be the greatest giver of life on Earth, and researchers have cracked yet another part of its complex and efficient chemistry. The more we know about it, the better we may be able to tweak photosynthesis, should it come under environmental duress, or should we need to boost crop productivity.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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PARP inhibitor improves overall response rates in small cell lung cancer patientsIn a randomized, Phase II trial led by researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, adding the PARP inhibitor veliparib to a standard chemotherapy agent improved overall response rates (ORR) in patients with small cell lung cancer (SCLC). Researchers also identified a select group of patients — those whose tumors expressed SLFN11 — who also saw a progression-free survival (P
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Live Science
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1 Million Habitable Planets Could (Theoretically) Orbit a Black Hole. Here's HowA black hole could have 1 million planets orbiting near it that are potentially capable of supporting life as we know it, an astrophysicist suggests.
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Live Science
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What Secrets Lurk in Kim Jong Un's Personal Toilet?Kim Jong Un is apparently protective of his poo. Can it really reveal state secrets?
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Evidence for a new property of quantum matter revealedA theorized but never-before detected property of quantum matter has now been spotted in the lab.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Orange peels may hold secret to airborne medicine, safer bridgesEngineering Assistant Professor Andrew K. Dickerson and graduate student Nicholas M. Smith have figured out the mechanics of how oranges release that thin stream of fragrant oil when squeezed. They characterized the orange peels' structure and figured out the role the layers have to create the microjet dynamic. By mimicking nature's mechanism of an orange layer, pharmaceutical companies may be abl
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Framework identifies genetic missense mutations linked to autism spectrum disorderA new study established a computationally integrated approach to investigate the functional impact of missense mutations.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Nano-decorations in nature's subsurface water filterAfter years of working on this problem, Johnson has found an answer that could help water managers better prepare for and respond to outbreaks caused by rain and floods. The answer involves chemistry, physics. . . and a little bit of decorative nanoscience.
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New on MIT Technology Review
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Congress wants to keep America first in quantum computing
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NYT > Science
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Extremely Large, Extremely Expensive: The Race for the Next Giant TelescopesEven as astronomers await a verdict on construction of a huge telescope on Mauna Kea, they are still trying to figure out how to pay for the next stargazing Goliaths.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Researchers identify new gene changes that point to elevated prostate cancer riskFredrick R. Schumacher, Ph.D., a cancer epidemiology researcher at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, and an international team of more than 100 colleagues have identified 63 new genetic variations that could indicate higher risk of prostate cancer in men of European descent. The findings, published in a research letter in Nature Genetics, contain significant implications for whic
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Volcanic activity, declining ocean oxygen triggered mass extinction of ancient organismsResearchers from Florida State University have found the first conclusive evidence that millions of years ago, powerful volcanoes pumped Earth's atmosphere full of carbon dioxide, draining the oceans of oxygen and driving a mass extinction of marine organisms.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Experiments at Berkeley Lab help trace interstellar dust back to solar system's formationExperiments conducted at Berkeley Lab helped to confirm that samples of interplanetary particles — collected from Earth's upper atmosphere and believed to originate from comets — contain dust leftover from the initial formation of the solar system.
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New on MIT Technology Review
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Russia is using the World Cup to kick off its 5G efforts
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Feed: All Latest
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It's Nearly Impossible to Hold North Korea to Nuclear PromisesIt's unclear still what the historic summit between Donald Trump and Kim Jong Un might yield. But holding North Korea accountable will be tricky no matter what.
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Big Think
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Why predicting suicide is a difficult and complex challengeIn the wake of suicides by high-profile and much-beloved celebrities Kate Spade and Anthony Bourdain, psychologists and psychiatrists say that suicide is too complex and indeterminate for humans to predict. Read More
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The Atlantic
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Donald Trump Is No Ronald Reagan“We’re like the piggy bank that everybody’s robbing,” President Donald Trump said at a Saturday news conference at the G7 summit in Canada. “And that ends.” The president, who perceives that the U.S. is being treated unfairly by its trading partners, had imposed tariffs on steel and aluminum imports from Canada, Mexico, and the European Union, along with a threat of further penalties. After a pre
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Inside Science
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Caution: Self-Driving Cars AheadCaution: Self-Driving Cars Ahead Researchers examining the future of self-driving cars believe we can't expect to take our eyes off the road any time soon. Driver_free_car.jpg Image credits: BMW AG Rights information: CC BY-SA 3.0 Technology Monday, June 11, 2018 – 14:30 Katharine Gammon, Contributor (Inside Science) — The potential of driverless cars seems extraordinary: no more awkwardly waiti
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Squashing cyberbullying: New approach is fast, accurateResearchers have designed a new technique for spotting nasty personal attacks on social media networks like Instagram.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Proactive conservation management strategy urged for North Atlantic right whaleMarine ecologists urge a more proactive conservation management strategy for the North Atlantic right whale.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Patients' self-diagnosis of personality disorders not as far off as previously believedResearchers think the gap between a psychologists' diagnosis and a patient's self-evaluation might not be as extreme as previously perceived when both are using the same evaluation tools.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Device attaches to damaged heart, enabling delivery of multiple therapy dosesA team of researchers is hoping to halt the progression from heart attack to heart failure with a small device called 'Therepi.' The device contains a reservoir that attaches directly to the damaged heart tissue. A refill line connects the reservoir to a port on or under the patient's skin where therapies can be injected either by the patient or a healthcare professional.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Are you really you when you're hungry?What makes someone go from simply being hungry to full-on 'hangry'? More than just a simple drop in blood sugar, this combination of hunger and anger may be a complicated emotional response involving an interplay of biology, personality and environmental cues.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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MOF material offers selective, reversible and repeatable capture of toxic atmospheric gasScientists have developed a metal-organic framework material with a selective, fully reversible and repeatable capability to remove atmospheric nitrogen dioxide gas in ambient conditions. The discovery, confirmed by researchers using neutron scattering, could facilitate air filtration technologies that capture and convert targeted gases, including carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases, for lon
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Popular Science
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Strange signals from space may be the result of spinning diamond dustSpace Lucy in the sky with nanodiamonds. Jane Greaves wanted to look at dust, but the numbers coming in from the Green Bank Telescope didn’t match up with anything that she expected to see.
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Live Science
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Can Turning Air into Gasoline Really Reverse Climate Change?A new paper proposes sucking carbon dioxide out of the air and turning it into gasoline. Can this really stop climate change?
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Framework identifies genetic missense mutations linked to autism spectrum disorderA new study published in Nature Genetics established a computationally integrated approach to investigate the functional impact of missense mutations.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Stanford nectar research sheds light on ecological theoryDifferent species almost always coexist — whether it's big animals on the plains, bugs in a jungle or yeasts in flower nectar — but how that works is complicated. Now, Stanford researchers have teased apart competing theories of how species live together.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Fueling a deep-sea ecosystemMiles beneath the ocean's surface in the dark abyss, vast communities of subseafloor microbes at deep-sea hot springs are converting chemicals into energy that allows deep-sea life to survive — and even thrive — in a world without sunlight. Until now, however, measuring the productivity of subseafloor microbe communities — or how fast they oxidize chemicals and the amount of carbon they produce
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Predicted environmental changes could significantly reduce global production of vegetablesThe global production of vegetables and legumes, which are an important part of healthy diets, could be significantly reduced through predicted future changes to the environment, according to new research published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Experiments trace interstellar dust back to solar system's formationA team of scientists, led by University of Hawai'i at Manoa researcher Hope Ishii, discovered that certain interplanetary dust particles contain dust leftover from the initial formation of the solar system.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

RNA changes aided sunflower's rapid evolutionary transformation, domesticationA new University of Colorado Boulder-led study sheds light on the genetic mechanisms that allowed sunflowers to undergo a relatively rapid evolutionary transition from wild to domesticated in just over 5,000 years.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Warmer climate will dramatically increase the volatility of global corn cropsWarmer temperatures by the end of this century will dramatically increase the volatility in global supplies of corn, the most widely grown crop in the world.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Regenerative bandage accelerates healing in diabetic woundsA Northwestern University team has developed a new device, called a regenerative bandage, that quickly heals these painful, hard-to-treat sores without using drugs. During head-to-head tests, Northwestern's bandage healed diabetic wounds 33 percent faster than one of the most popular bandages currently on the market.
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The Atlantic
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How to Tame a Zombie FungusIn the summer of 2015, at a scientific conference in New Hampshire, I was chatting with a biologist named John McCutcheon when an excited young Japanese researcher came up and introduced himself. His name was Yu Matsuura, and like McCutcheon, he had been studying the microbes that live inside cicadas —stout bugs that are known for their loud songs. He had found something that was about to blow Mc
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Popular Science
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In photos: A car's journey from trash heap to brand-new engineCars Watch junkyard cars get new life as engine blocks. Like people, cars die. But they won't be buried. U.S. scrappers recycle some 13 million autos each year. Shred, melt, repeat: Here's how wrecked cars become new…
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NYT > Science
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Nonfiction: Is Our Obsession With Wellness Doing Us In?In “Natural Causes,” Barbara Ehrenreich argues that our quest for perfect health is fundamentally misguided.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Exploring the dusty prehistory of the solar systemThe solar system as we know it formed about 4.6 billion years ago as fields of interstellar dust orbiting the sun aggregated into planets and smaller objects. Presolar dust particles no longer exist in the inner solar system, as they were long ago destroyed, reformed, and reaggregated in multiple phases. From the vantage of such a long period of time, astronomers can only make inferences about its
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Predicted environmental changes could significantly reduce global production of vegetablesThe study, led by the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine (LSHTM), is the first systematically to examine the extent to which projected changes such as increases in temperature and reduced water availability could affect the production and nutritional quality of common crops such as tomatoes, leafy vegetables and pulses.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Warmer climate will dramatically increase the volatility of global corn cropsCorn, or maize, is the most widely grown crop in the world. Used in food, cooking oil, industrialized foods, livestock feed and even automobile fuel, the crop is one that both rich and poor people rely upon.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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RNA changes aided sunflower's rapid evolutionary transformation, domesticationA new University of Colorado Boulder-led study sheds light on the genetic mechanisms that allowed sunflowers to undergo a relatively rapid evolutionary transition from wild to domesticated in just over 5,000 years.
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The Atlantic
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The World Needs Netflix MinisAt 10 p.m. on the final Wednesday of May, shrouded in the darkness of our basement, my wife and I did something we used to do quite often, but now—in the 23rd year of our marriage—we do only rarely. We sat on our couch and watched a television show at the time it aired. The occasion: The series finale of The Americans , FX’s gripping six-season Cold War drama. Although this was the first episode
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Fueling a deep-sea ecosystem: Surprisingly productive microbes are a key source of food in the abyssMiles beneath the ocean's surface in the dark abyss, vast communities of subseafloor microbes at deep-sea hot springs are converting chemicals into energy that allows deep-sea life to survive—and even thrive—in a world without sunlight. Until now, however, measuring the productivity of subseafloor microbe communities—or how fast they oxidize chemicals and the amount of carbon they produce—has been
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Science : NPR
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A Science Writer Explores The 'Perversions And Potential' Of Genetic TestsCarl Zimmer wondered what secrets lurked in his genetic code — so he decided to have his genome sequenced. He writes about the implications of the study of genetics in She Has Her Mother's Laugh. (Image credit: Westend61/Getty Images)
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Popular Science
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How to relocate a uterusScience A womb will nurture a baby regardless of the body that hosts it. A womb isn't loyal to its original surroundings. As researchers have demonstrated, a uterus will nurture a baby regardless of the body that hosts it.
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Popular Science
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Even the clothes you donate probably end up in a landfillEnvironment Well-intentioned recyclers can't keep up with our fast fashion habit. If you’ve ever dropped off a bag of last year’s clothes at Goodwill, you probably didn’t think you were contributing to waste.
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New on MIT Technology Review
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Oculus founder Palmer Luckey is starting a virtual border-wall company
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Big Think
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Researchers at MIT create "psychopathic" AIThey fed it data from "the darkest corners of Reddit forums." Read More
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Journal of Neuroscience study explains what makes aggressive mice so violentHigher levels of FosB in NAc neurons were associated with more intense behaviors by aggressive mice defending their home cage from an intruder. Overexpressing FosB in aggressive mice also increased their dominance over an opponent when they faced each other in a narrow tube. While increased FosB in dopamine D1 receptor expressing medium spiny neurons (D1-MSNs) was associated with increased aggress
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Doing right by the whalesUCSB marine ecologist Erin Meyer-Gutbrod and colleagues urge a more proactive conservation management strategy for the North Atlantic right whale.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Implantable device delivers drugs straight to the heartA refillable, implantable device, sits directly on the heart and delivers drugs and other therapies to treat the after-effects of a heart attack.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Genome-editing tool could increase cancer riskTherapeutic use of gene editing with the so-called CRISPR-Cas9 technique may inadvertently increase the risk of cancer, according to a new study. Researchers say that more studies are required in order to guarantee the safety of these 'molecular scissors' for gene-editing therapies.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Ingesting honey after swallowing button battery reduces injury and improves outcomesA team of ear, nose, and throat specialists has demonstrated that eating honey after swallowing a button battery has the potential to reduce serious injuries in small children.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Further drivers of ocean deoxygenation identifiedMeasurements as well as model calculations equally show that the oxygen inventory of the oceans is decreasing. However, the models underestimate this decrease significantly making projections into the future problematic.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Criticism from parents affects how children's brains respond to emotional informationChildren of highly critical parents show less attention to emotional facial expressions, according to new research.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Pandoravirus: Giant viruses invent their own genesThree new members have been added to the Pandoravirus family. Researchers offer an explanation to their puzzling giant genomes with many orphan genes: pandoviruses appear to be factories for new genes — and therefore new functions. From freaks of nature to evolutionary innovators, giant viruses continue to shake branches on the tree of life!
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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If your eyes wrinkle when you smile or frown, you appear more sincereResearchers have shown that our brains are pre-wired to perceive wrinkles around the eyes as conveying more intense and more sincere emotions. This eye-wrinkle feature, called the Duchenne marker, occurs across multiple facial expressions, including smiles, expressions associated with pain, and — as found by these researchers — expressions of sadness.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Large-scale study indicates novel, abundant nitrogen-fixing microbes in surface oceanA large-scale study of the Earth's surface ocean indicates the microbes responsible for fixing nitrogen there — previously thought to be almost exclusively photosynthetic cyanobacteria — include an abundant and widely distributed suite of non-photosynthetic bacterial populations.
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Live Science
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Is Expired Sunscreen Better Than No Sunscreen?Can sunscreen still protect you if it's past its expiration date?
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Many at risk for HIV despite lifesaving pillMultiple barriers may stop high-risk individuals from accessing an HIV drug that can reduce the subsequent risk of infection, according to a new University of Michigan study.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Army scientists have a blast with aluminum nanoparticlesArmy scientists proved a decades-old prediction that mixing TNT and novel aluminum nanoparticles can significantly enhance energetic performance. This explosive discovery is expected to extend the reach of US Army firepower in battle.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Patients' self-diagnosis of personality disorders not as far off as previously believedPurdue University researchers think the gap between a psychologists' diagnosis and a patient's self-evaluation might not be as extreme as previously perceived when both are using the same evaluation tools.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

UNC-Chapel Hill researchers ask Americans 'What does God look like?'A team of psychologists at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill have used a new technique to construct what a large sample of 511 American Christians think God looks like.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Better outcomes for patients using single-pill combination for blood pressurePeople who are prescribed a combination pill to manage their high blood pressure are more likely to take their medicine as instructed and have better health outcomes than those who take the same medications prescribed as separate pills, according to a new study published today.
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New on MIT Technology Review
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Cancer link casts pall over CRISPR
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Negative emotions are murkier, less distinct in adolescenceAdolescents don't distinguish between negative emotions as clearly as younger children and adults in their 20s do, according to new findings. The study sheds light on how experiences of emotion vary at different ages and why adolescence may be a particularly vulnerable period in emotional development.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Making mistakes while studying actually helps you learn betterContrary to popular belief, when a person makes a mistake while learning, it improves their memory for the right information, but only if the error is close to the correct answer, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Fathers' early parenting quality affected by mothersHow a new mother reacts to her partner's early interactions with their baby may affect his parenting quality later on, a new study suggests. Researchers found that fathers did not perform as well as a parent to their 9-month-old child if the dads felt their partner was critical of their parenting skills six months earlier.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Mu­sic play­school en­hances chil­dren's lin­guistic skillsWeekly music playschool significantly improved the development of children's vocabulary skills.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Asthma diagnosed with nasal brush testResearchers have identified a genetic biomarker of asthma that can be tested for using a simple nasal brush and basic follow-up data analysis. This inexpensive diagnostic test can accurately identify mild to moderate asthma and differentiate it from other respiratory conditions.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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How to slow down EbolaThe phylogenetic tree of the 2013-2016 Ebola epidemic doesn't just tell us how the Ebola virus was able to evolve: it also reveals which events and preventive measures accelerated or slowed down its spread. These findings open up new perspectives for the containment of epidemics.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Treg cells protect babies from getting HIV infection from their mothersScientists now report that Treg cells, a type of regulatory lymphocyte, may be protecting babies in the womb from getting infected with the HIV virus when the mother is infected.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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A 'super' receptor that helps kill HIV infected cellsResearchers have discovered a unique set of 'super' receptors on immune cells capable of killing HIV across genetically diverse populations, making them a potential candidate for immunotherapy treatments. The researchers studied fifteen unique individuals who all had been infected with HIV, but have immune systems that protect them from AIDs progression. These rare individuals, called HIV controll
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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A hydrogel restores breathing after spinal cord injury in animal modelsLab tests demonstrate that a hydrogel could help repair damaged spinal nerves that control breathing, an advance that could eventually be developed into new patient treatment.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Discovery of the oldest mammal in Brazil pays tribute to David BowieBrasilestes stardusti lived around 70 million years ago and was named after Ziggy Stardust, the singer's iconic persona. Description was based on a fossilized tooth. It's the 1st indication that placental mammals and dinosaurs co-existed in South America. For scientists, fossil features showed similarities with another pre-historic mammal found in India, suggesting both shared a common ancestral n
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Viden
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Solenergi suger vand ud af ørkenluftEt særligt pulver kan høste vand direkte fra ørkenluft – på en billig måde. Det kan være med til at løse problemet med vandmangel i de mest tørre områder, mener dansk professor.
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Popular Science
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Last week in tech: Bye for now, Net NeutralityTechnology With Apple announcements behind us and new video games ahead, we charge into a new week. Check out the latest version of our podcast.
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The Scientist RSS

Anheuser-Busch Wont Fund Controversial NIH Alcohol StudyThe company's announcement comes weeks after enrollment was suspended.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Squashing cyberbullying: New approach is fast, accurateResearchers at the University of Colorado Boulder have designed a new technique for spotting nasty personal attacks on social media networks like Instagram.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

The language of facial expressionsUniversity of Miami Psychology Professor Daniel Messinger collaborated with researchers at Western University in Canada to show that our brains are pre-wired to perceive wrinkles around the eyes as conveying more intense and sincere emotions.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Nano-decorations in nature's subsurface water filterAfter years of working on this problem, Johnson has found an answer that could help water managers better prepare for and respond to outbreaks caused by rain and floods.The answer involves chemistry, physics. . . and a little bit of decorative nanoscience.
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The Atlantic
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Travel Monday: A Photo Trip to the Abandoned Village of HoutouwanIn the Pacific Ocean, east of Shanghai, China, lies tiny Shengshan Island, which is less than three miles across. The hilly island is home to several fishing villages, including Houtouwan, which was abandoned in the 1990s. Once a thriving community, the now-empty brick houses of Houtouwan stand completely covered by blankets of vegetation. Many tourists visit the picturesque village daily. AFP ph
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NYT > Science
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Meet ‘the Million-Dollar Palate’ Behind a Flood of New FoodsFrom a lab at Oregon State, Sarah Masoni works with companies big and small to create flavors, develop products and market them.
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NYT > Science
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Blurred Vision, Burning Eyes: This Is a Lasik Success?Some patients who undergo the eye surgery report a variety of side effects. They may persist for years, studies show.
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Quanta Magazine
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The Physics of Glass Opens a Window Into BiologyThe ebb and flow of vehicles along congested highways was what first drew Lisa Manning to her preferred corner of physics, during the summer before she began her graduate studies at the University of California, Santa Barbara. She was mesmerized by the emergent behaviors in the traffic flow — “how you could start out with local rules between cars and get waves of jams through traffic,” she said.
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Viden
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Flyder skraldet? Så høj ’skraldekarakter’ får din kommunePå Frederiksberg og i Aalborg er der masser af skraldespande, mens aarhusianerne må gå langt for at komme af med affaldet. Og det får flere til at smide det på jorden.
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Feed: All Latest
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AI Made a Movie With a 'Silicon Valley' Star—and the Results Are Nightmarishly EncouragingBenjamin, as the AI is known, assembled 'Zone Out' from thousands of hours of old films and green-screen footage of professional actors—in 48 hours.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Algorithm predicts dangerous low blood pressure during surgeryScientists have developed an algorithm that predicts potentially dangerous low blood pressure, or hypotension, that can occur during surgery. The algorithm identifies hypotension 15 minutes before it occurs in 84 percent of cases, the researchers report in a new study published in the Online First edition of Anesthesiology, the peer-reviewed medical journal of the American Society of Anesthesiolog
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Researchers discover new type of stem cell stateJohn Bracht, American University biology assistant professor, and his students discovered a new type of cell state that could help ensure one always has the ability to generate healthy fat cells.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Discovery of the oldest mammal in Brazil pays tribute to David BowieBrasilestes stardusti lived around 70 million years ago and was named after Ziggy Stardust, the singer's iconic persona. Description was based on a fossilized tooth. It's the first indication that placental mammals and dinosaurs co-existed in South America. For scientists, fossil features showed similarities with another prehistoric mammal found in India, suggesting both shared a common ancestral
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Designing a better superconductor with geometric frustrationStudy shows a magnet-controlled 'switch' in superconductor configuration provides unprecedented flexibility in managing the location of vortex filaments, altering the properties of the superconductor.
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Slips of the ear: When knowledge deceives perceptionMisperception of speech results from a weak representation of the difference between what we expect to hear and what is actually said, according to a human neuroimaging study published in JNeurosci. The research provides new evidence for how the brain creates perceptual illusions when speech is degraded at cocktail parties, in song lyrics or for older listeners.
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Drug delivery system maintains breathing after spinal cord injury in ratsResearchers have devised a safe and effective way to deliver therapeutic molecules to the cervical spinal cord after injury in female rats. Reported in JNeurosci and, this clinically-relevant approach could help to repair the neural connections that control breathing in spinal cord injury (SCI) patients.
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What makes aggressive mice so violentAggressive behavior and the motivation to act aggressively have distinct molecular bases, according to a study of male mice published in JNeurosci. This finding suggests the possibility of reducing aggression by targeting a protein associated with addiction in a reward region of the brain.
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A hydrogel restores breathing after spinal cord injury in animal modelsLab tests demonstrate that a hydrogel could help repair damaged spinal nerves that control breathing, an advance that could eventually be developed into new patient treatment.
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Big Think
300+
This new solution to the Fermi paradox is unsettling for two reasonsIf the universe is teeming with life, where is everybody? If this physicist is correct, they have one foot in their graves. Read More
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Big Think
100+
Study finds mysterious link between food allergies and autismA new study of CDC survey data shows that children with autism spectrum disorder are more than twice as likely to have a food allergy, causing scientists to ask which comes first. Read More
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BBC News – Science & Environment
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Scientists shocked by mysterious deaths of ancient treesMany of the oldest and largest specimens of Africa's baobab tree have died over the past 12 years.
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Scientific American Content: Global
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Suicide Prediction Remains Difficult Despite Decades of ResearchMedical professionals say the causes, predictors are too complex — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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How to slow down EbolaThe phylogenetic tree of the 2013-2016 Ebola epidemic doesn't just tell us how the Ebola virus was able to evolve: it also reveals which events and preventive measures accelerated or slowed down its spread. These findings were presented in Nature Communications and open up new perspectives for the containment of epidemics.
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Ethnic minority enterprise in Scotland 'is promising but needs more support to succeed'Ethnic minority entrepreneurs in Scotland need more engagement and support from the government and key industry partners to start and grow successful businesses, according to research by the University of Strathclyde.
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A liberal accent: Linguistics team documents language changes in southwest KansasA Kansas State University linguistics team has found that people in southwest Kansas are developing a distinct accent.
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New Scientist – News
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NASA’s Opportunity rover is stuck in a huge dust storm on MarsA dust storm bigger than North America has blown up on Mars, and it’s blocking out the sunlight that powers NASA’s ageing Opportunity rover. Is this its last gasp?
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How Pharma Hides Data About Farm Antibiotic UseOther nations report and track exactly how and where antibiotics are given to livestock, but in the US, that data is tied up in political football.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
21
Fermi satellite celebrates 10 years of discoveriesOn June 11, NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope celebrates a decade of using gamma rays, the highest-energy form of light in the cosmos, to study black holes, neutron stars, and other extreme cosmic objects and events.
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Mount Sinai team diagnoses asthma with nasal brush testMount Sinai researchers have identified a genetic biomarker of asthma that can be tested for using a simple nasal brush and basic follow-up data analysis. This inexpensive diagnostic test can accurately identify mild to moderate asthma and differentiate it from other respiratory conditions.
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Mu­sic play­school en­hances chil­dren's lin­guistic skillsAccording to the research conducted at the University of Helsinki, weekly music playschool significantly improved the development of children's vocabulary skills.
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The Atlantic
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A Warning to Kim Jong UnAt the risk of adopting Donald Trump’s own Manichaean worldview, there are two basic options for anyone dealing with the president: Cozy up or keep your distance. This is true in both domestic politics and international affairs. Stateside, the dangers—reputational as well as legal—of closeness with Trump have become clear, and the past weekend showed the perils for world leaders who tried to get
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Germany hits Mercedes with mass diesel recall (Update)Germany ordered Monday the recall of some 774,000 vehicles from Mercedes-Benz maker Daimler across Europe, citing illegal "defeat devices" designed to conceal high levels of harmful emissions from regulators' tests.
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Scientific American Content: Global
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Society Needs to Flip Its Disaster Spending, Insurance Report SaysCommunities would get more value by spending before a disaster, instead of after — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Large-scale study indicates novel, abundant nitrogen-fixing microbes in surface oceanMove over, cyanobacteria! A large-scale study of the Earth's surface ocean indicates the microbes responsible for fixing nitrogen there—previously thought to be almost exclusively photosynthetic cyanobacteria-include an abundant and widely distributed suite of non-photosynthetic bacterial populations.
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New on MIT Technology Review
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This is where internet memes come fromTwo Reddit and 4chan communities are especially good at spreading and “weaponizing” them.
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New Scientist – News
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Africa’s 2000-year-old trees of life are suddenly dying offIn the past decade most of the oldest baobabs, many of them sprouted over two millennia ago, have died unexpectedly and few new ones are sprouting
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New Scientist – News
82
Gene editing embryonic stem cells might increase risk of cancerGenome editing with CRISPR may select for cells with mutations in a key anti-cancer gene, but now we know of this risk it should be possible to ensure treatments are still safe
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New Scientist – News
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Clouds of spinning diamonds around stars solve an old mysteryTiny diamonds in clouds circling bright young stars may be the source of unexplained microwave radiation from space that has baffled astronomers since 1996
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The Atlantic
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The Ballad of Ray Arnold“Hold on to your butts.” It’s the iconic catchphrase of Ray Arnold, the bespectacled, chain-smoking chief engineer of Jurassic Park, played by Samuel L. Jackson in Steven Spielberg’s classic 1993 film. Released 25 years ago, Jurassic Park is filled with groundbreaking visual effects and memorable action sequences. But Ray Arnold doesn’t really witness any of the fun. The beleaguered middle manage
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Your internet use could change as 'net neutrality' endsFCC Ajit Pai Net USYour ability to watch and use your favorite apps and services could start to change—though not right away—following the official demise Monday of Obama-era internet protections.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Work Begins on New SLAC facility for revolutionary accelerator scienceThe Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory has started to assemble a new facility for revolutionary accelerator technologies that could make future accelerators 100 to 1,000 times smaller and boost their capabilities.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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NASA observed the once-hurricane Aletta intensify, now weakening quicklyWhen Tropical Storm Aletta intensified and became a hurricane in the eastern Pacific Ocean the Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite passed overhead to analyze the major hurricane's rainfall rates. Over the weekend of June 9 and 10, however, Aletta ran into adverse conditions and weakened quickly.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Satellite shows this bud's a major hurricane for you, Eastern Pacific OceanThe second major hurricane of the Eastern Pacific Ocean season formed after the first hurricane, Aletta, weakened. NOAA's GOES-West satellite captured an image of Hurricane Bud on June 11.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Computer science researcher meets updated phishing attacks head onIn this age of cyberattacks and data breaches, most email users are on the lookout for, and understand the potential risks of, messages and attachments coming from unfamiliar sources.
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Large-scale study indicates novel, abundant nitrogen-fixing microbes in surface oceanA large-scale study of the Earth's surface ocean indicates the microbes responsible for fixing nitrogen there — previously thought to be almost exclusively photosynthetic cyanobacteria-include an abundant and widely distributed suite of non-photosynthetic bacterial populations.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Fathers' early parenting quality affected by mothersHow a new mother reacts to her partner's early interactions with their baby may affect his parenting quality later on, a new study suggests. Researchers found that fathers did not perform as well as a parent to their 9-month-old child if the dads felt their partner was critical of their parenting skills six months earlier.
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New on MIT Technology Review
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What Kim Jong-un’s stool might reveal, if he would only let us take a peek
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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New bolometer is faster, simpler, and covers more wavelengthsBolometers, devices that monitor electromagnetic radiation through heating of an absorbing material, are used by astronomers and homeowners alike. But most such devices have limited bandwidth and must be operated at ultralow temperatures. Now, researchers say they've found a ultrafast yet highly sensitive alternative that can work at room temperature—and may be much less expensive.
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NYT > Science
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Basics: Secrets of the Y ChromosomeIt’s not just what makes males into males. The sex chromosome also influences health in hidden ways, some experts believe, and may even explain why men have shorter life spans.
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Live Science
62
New Blood Test Could Predict Preterm Labor 2 Months Before It HappensTwo newly developed blood tests may help moms-to-be accurately answer this ever-popular question: When is your baby due?
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Crash test dummies based on older bodies could reduce road fatalitiesEurope's population is ageing rapidly, yet the majority of car safety equipment is tested using dummies modelled on people under the age of 65. Now researchers are developing vehicles and equipment designed specifically for the physical attributes and abilities of older bodies.
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Viden
95
Veldækket mødebord giver ekstra deller på mavenVi småspiser, når vi er på arbejde. Og det bliver til mange kalorier på en arbejdsuge, viser ny undersøgelse.
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Making mistakes while studying actually helps you learn betterContrary to popular belief, when a person makes a mistake while learning, it improves their memory for the right information, but only if the error is close to the correct answer, according to a study published in the journal, Memory.
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A better device for measuring electromagnetic radiationResearchers have developed a better bolometer, a device for measuring electromagnetic radiation. The new technology, from MIT and elsewhere, is faster, simpler, and covers more wavelengths.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Satellite shows this Bud's a major hurricane for you, Eastern Pacific OceanThe second major hurricane of the Eastern Pacific Ocean season formed after the first hurricane, Aletta, weakened. NOAA's GOES-West satellite captured an image of Hurricane Bud on June 11.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Extra vigilance required to combat growing sophistication of phishing attacksEnterprising hackers can spoof the email address of a trusted friend, co-worker, or business and send forged emails to victims. With the right amount of social engineering, it's easy to obtain crucial and sensitive information from an unsuspecting recipient with a simple request.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

NASA observed the once-Hurricane Aletta intensify, now weakening quicklyWhen Tropical Storm Aletta intensified and became a hurricane in the eastern Pacific Ocean the Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite passed overhead to analyze the major hurricane's rainfall rates. Over the weekend of June 9-10, however, Aletta ran into adverse conditions and weakened quickly.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Negative emotions are murkier, less distinct in adolescenceAdolescents don't distinguish between negative emotions as clearly as younger children and adults in their 20s do, according to findings published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. The study sheds light on how experiences of emotion vary at different ages and why adolescence may be a particularly vulnerable period in emotional development.
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Double-checking diabetes medications may reduce re-hospitalizationsIn a paper to be published in the Diabetes Care journal, Brigham and Women's Hospital physician Alexander Turchin, M.D., MS, and his colleagues assessed medication reconciliation programs at BWH and Massachusetts General Hospital, and found that they seem to be working.
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New aircraft-scheduling models may ease air travel frustrationsFlight schedules that allow for a little carefully designed wiggle room could prevent the frustration of cascading airport delays and cancellations. By focusing on the early phases of flight schedule planning and delays at various scales, researchers have developed models to help create schedules that are less susceptible to delays and easier to fix once disrupted.
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Science : NPR
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How Hunger Pangs Can Make Nice People 'Hangry'For someone to become "hangry," context is key. People need to be in a negative situation or subject to negative stimuli to have a hangry response. (Image credit: Malte Mueller/Getty Images/fStop)
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Hurricane Bud strengthens off Mexico's Pacific coastHurricane Bud on Monday strengthened into a category three storm in the Pacific off the Mexican coast, but was still expected to remain well offshore, US and Mexican meteorologists said.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Wastewater treatment plants are key route into UK rivers for microplasticsWater samples from UK rivers contained significantly higher concentrations of microplastics downstream from wastewater treatment plants, according to one of the first studies to determine potential sources of microplastics pollution.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Booming world of play revs E3 video game extravaganzaPulse-pounding new video games and more ways to enjoy them are at the center of the Electronic Entertainment Expo extravaganza officially kicking off here on Tuesday.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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'Shocking' die-off of Africa's oldest baobabs: studySome of Africa's oldest and biggest baobab trees—a few dating all the way back to the ancient Greeks—have abruptly died, wholly or in part, in the past decade, researchers said Monday.
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10
American Sign Language and English language learners: New linguistic research supports the need for policy changesA new study of the educational needs of students who are native users of American Sign Language (ASL) shows glaring disparities in their treatment by the US Department of Education. The article, 'If you use ASL, should you study ESL? Limitations of a modality-b(i)ased policy,' by Elena Koulidobrova (Central Connecticut State University), Marlon Kunze (Gallaudet University) and Hannah Dostal (Unive
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Millennials: Bet for the futureA 'Soviet person' is becoming a phenomenon of the past. Social change is being driven by people who came of age in the 1990s and 2000s. The youngest adult generation is millennials. They form and speed up the trends, but are not in a hurry to 'grow up'. A new paper by Professor of the Higher School of Economics Vadim Radaev is dedicated to the paradox of the young and the generation differences in
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Wastewater treatment plants are key route into UK rivers for microplasticsWater samples from UK rivers contained significantly higher concentrations of microplastics downstream from wastewater treatment plants, according to one of the first studies to determine potential sources of microplastics pollution.
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1
Research shows if your eyes wrinkle when you smile or frown, you appear more sincereResearchers at Western University have shown that our brains are pre-wired to perceive wrinkles around the eyes as conveying more intense and more sincere emotions. This eye-wrinkle feature, called the Duchenne marker, occurs across multiple facial expressions, including smiles, expressions associated with pain, and — as found by these researchers — expressions of sadness.
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Artificial gene defect reveals target to fight genetic diseaseFanconi anemia (FA) is caused by defective genes for DNA-repair leading to bone marrow failure, developmental abnormalities and increased cancer risk. Using genome-wide genetic approaches, researchers at CeMM systematically screened for the loss of an additional gene that could rescue the disease — and found it. The corresponding protein turned out to be a potential target that could be therapeut
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Big Think
100+
Study: Ancient Incas were better at skull surgery than Civil War doctorsWho needs a hole in the head? As it turns out, lots of people in ancient hospitals did. Why was one society so good at keeping people alive after it opened up their skulls? Read More
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Science : NPR
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More Rain, More Development Spell Disaster For Some U.S. CitiesClimate change is increasing the frequency of rainstorms in many parts of the U.S., and those storms bring more rain. Many communities don't have the drainage systems needed to handle all the water. (Image credit: David McFadden/AP)
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Science : NPR
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Why Are Some of Africa's Biggest Baobab Trees Dying Off?A new survey of baobab trees in Africa finds that many of the oldest have died or significantly deteriorated in the last decade. Scientists say climate change and human intervention could be culprits. (Image credit: Panoramic Images/Getty Images)
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New Scientist – News
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Parkinson’s disease may be caused by virus that kills gut bugsPeople with Parkinson's seem to have some differences in their gut microbiome – but is this cause or consequence?
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
35
Criticism from parents affects how children's brains respond to emotional informationChildren of highly critical parents show less attention to emotional facial expressions, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University at New York.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Turbocharge for lithium batteriesA team of material researchers from Juelich, Munich, and Prague has succeeded in producing a composite material that is particularly suited for electrodes in lithium batteries. The nanocomposite material might help to significantly increase the storage capacity and lifetime of batteries as well as their charging speed. The researchers have published their findings in the journal Advanced Functiona
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Taking a closer look at 'electrifying' chemistryWith the increasing availability of electrical energy from renewable sources, it will be possible in the future to drive many chemical processes using an electric current. This will facilitate the use of sustainable methods to manufacture products or fuels. However, exactly how these electrocatalysts work is not yet fully understood. This could now all change with a new method developed by researc
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Manipulated enzymesTU Graz researchers managed for the first time ever to 'retrain' an enzyme to build ring-shaped molecular structures instead of performing its natural task of reducing double bonds. The work was published in Angewandte Chemie, and is relevant for the production of pharmaceuticals and plant protection products.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Why are sight and sound out of sync?The way we process sight and sound are curiously out of sync by different amounts for different people and tasks, according to a new study from City, University of London.
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1
Philosopher warns against 'drifting into state terrorism'Philosopher Michael Quante calls for social debate on ethically justifiable warfare.
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1
Solar cells combining silicon with perovskite have achieved record efficiency of 25.2 percentIn Neuchâtel, Switzerland, researchers from EPFL and CSEM have combined silicon- and perovskite-based solar cells. The resulting efficiency of 25.2 percent is a record for this type of tandem cell. Their innovative yet simple manufacturing technique could be directly integrated into existing production lines, and efficiency could eventually rise above 30 percent.
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DIY brings high throughput to continuous cell culturingBioengineers from Rice University, Boston University and MIT have created an open-source, do-it-yourself system that combines the control of automated cell-culturing systems that can run for months with the scale of high-throughput systems that grow dozens of cultures at once.
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MD Anderson Therapeutics Discovery team identifies and advances a drug that targets metabolic vulnerability and impairs cancer cell growth and survivalA drug discovered and advanced by The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center's Institute for Applied Cancer Science (IACS) and the Center for Co-Clinical Trials (CCCT) inhibits a vital metabolic process required for cancer cells' growth and survival.
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Safety protocol breaches: ways to prevent infection transmission in health care settingDuring 325 observations, researchers at the University of Utah and University of Michigan identified 283 protocol violations, which could increase the risk of self-contamination of health care personnel and transmission of antibiotic-resistant organisms to patients.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Reviving the protector: new tactic against medulloblastomaScientists have a new tactic with potential for fighting medulloblastoma, the most common and most aggressive form of brain tumor in children.
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Diamond dust shimmering around distant starsSome of the tiniest diamonds in the universe — bits of crystalline carbon hundreds of thousands of times smaller than a grain of sand — have been detected swirling around three infant star systems in the Milky Way. These microscopic gemstones are neither rare nor precious; they are, however, exciting for astronomers who identified them as the source of a mysterious cosmic microwave 'glow' emanat
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2
'Surgery in a pill' a potential treatment for diabetesOrally administered material temporarily coats the intestine, reduces blood sugar spikes in preclinical study.
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New target for treating heart failure identified by Penn Medicine researchersChanges in cellular struts called microtubules (MT) can affect the stiffness of diseased human heart muscle cells, and reversing these modifications can lessen the stiffness and improve the beating strength of these cells isolated from transplant patients with heart failure. Investigators aim to develop therapies that seek out the damaged MTs to reverse their harmful influence.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Further drivers of ocean deoxygenation identifiedMeasurements as well as model calculations equally show that the oxygen inventory of the oceans is decreasing. However, the models underestimate this decrease significantly making projections into the future problematic. In a study published today in the international journal Nature Geoscience, four GEOMAR researchers reveal the gaps in the models and identify further, previously underestimated dr
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Discovery in the sky with nanodiamondsA faint and mysterious stream of microwaves emanating from star systems far out in the Milky Way could be caused by tiny diamonds, new research has suggested.
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1
Genome-editing tool could increase cancer riskTherapeutic use of gene editing with the so-called CRISPR-Cas9 technique may inadvertently increase the risk of cancer, according to a new study from Karolinska Institutet, Sweden, and the University of Helsinki, Finland, published in Nature Medicine. Researchers say that more studies are required in order to guarantee the safety of these 'molecular scissors' for gene-editing therapies.
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Prostate cancer DNA test identifies men with six-fold increased riskA major new study of more than 140,000 men has identified 63 new genetic variations in the DNA code that increase the risk of prostate cancer.Researchers devised a new test combining these single letter genetic variants with more than 100 others previously linked to prostate cancer, to predict which men were most at risk of developing the disease during their lifetime.
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Scientists watch bacteria 'harpoon' DNA to speed their evolutionIndiana University researchers have directly observed for the first time how bacteria use appendages thousands of times thinner than a human hair to absorb DNA. The work could help advance efforts stop antibiotic-resistant bacteria.
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How physically active are adolescents, young adults?Adolescents girls and young adult females (ages 12 to 29) reported less physical activity than their male counterparts and physical activity dropped off sharply during the transition from adolescence to young adulthood, with disparities by race and income seen among some groups.
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USC scientists help identify genetic markers for prostate cancer in global DNA downloadAn international research team including USC scientists found telltale genetic markers that can be used to predict those most at risk of prostate cancer, a disease common for older men.
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1
MOF material offers selective, reversible and repeatable capture of toxic atmospheric gasLed by the University of Manchester, scientists have developed a metal-organic framework material with a selective, fully reversible and repeatable capability to remove atmospheric nitrogen dioxide gas in ambient conditions. The discovery, confirmed by researchers using neutron scattering at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, could facilitate air filtration technologies that
1d
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Implantable device delivers drugs straight to the heartA refillable, implantable device, sits directly on the heart and delivers drugs and other therapies to treat the after-effects of a heart attack.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

'Therepi' device attaches to heartA team of researchers is hoping to halt the progression from heart attack to heart failure with a small device called 'Therepi.' The device contains a reservoir that attaches directly to the damaged heart tissue. A refill line connects the reservoir to a port on or under the patient's skin where therapies can be injected either by the patient or a healthcare professional.
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A new therapy proves effective against brain metastasisA study published in Nature Medicine by a team led by Manuel Valiente, head of the Brain Metastasis Group at the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO), shows that the administration of silibinin in patients with brain metastasis reduces lesions without causing any adverse effects. This preliminary trial provides proof of concept that this compound could be a new effective and safe alterna
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Key cancer-fighting gene's secret weapons revealedMelbourne scientists have discovered how the most important gene in preventing human cancer, p53, is able to stop the development of lymphoma — a type of blood cell cancer — and potentially other types of cancer as well.
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The Atlantic
100+
U.S. Allies Are Helping Trump Undermine Global TradeIf it’s a trade war Donald Trump wants, U.S. allies have warned, it’s a trade war he’ll get. In response to the American president’s recent decision to impose steep tariffs on aluminum and steel imports from Europe, Mexico, and Canada, leaders from all three have challenged the tariffs at the World Trade Organization (WTO). They have also announced their own retaliatory levies on American goods.
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The Atlantic
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Robert De Niro’s Toothless ProtestFor the first two hours and 40 minutes of the 2018 Tony Awards, everything went according to the playbook. There were wry, funny introductions from the hosts, Sara Bareilles and Josh Groban; there were warm but nonspecific nods to political flashpoints from Patti LuPone and Andrew Garfield; there was the omnipresent reminder that the Tonys are for the theater kids, a tribe of performers, players,
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The Atlantic
9K
Trees That Have Lived for Millennia Are Suddenly DyingAround 1,500 years ago, shortly after the collapse of the Roman Empire, a baobab tree started growing in what is now Namibia. The San people would eventually name the tree Homasi, and others would call it Grootboom, after the Afrikaans words for “big tree.” As new empires rose and fell, Homasi continued growing. As humans invented paper money, printing presses, cars, and computers, Homasi sproute
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Big Think
75
These 2 stars have a "hyper-fast" 38-minute orbitIt's the fastest orbit found in space so far. Read More
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Popular Science
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Could astrobiology research convince us to fight climate change?Space Step one: realize we’re not alone. These changes are dramatic and long-lasting enough that some scientists think we’re at the dawn of the Anthropocene, a proposed new geological epoch defined by our…
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cognitive science
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A paper in PB&R extends work on the compatibility of speech sounds and shapes to names and faces.submitted by /u/markmana [link] [comments]
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Science | The Guardian
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Trials begin of a saliva test for prostate cancerSimple DNA test might help to identify those men at greatest risk of developing the disease Doctors have begun a trial of a simple saliva test that aims to spot the top 10% of men who are most at risk of developing prostate cancer . One in eight men develop prostate cancer at some point in their lives. The test draws on more than 150 DNA markers to identify the 10% of men who have nearly a threef
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Science | The Guardian
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Astronomers find source of stars' mysterious microwavesFor 20 years scientists have wondered what creates the curious streams of radiation in the Milky Way Mysterious streams of microwaves that come from far across the galaxy have been traced to immense clouds of spinning diamonds that swirl around newly-born stars. Astronomers have been stumped by the strange waves since they were first spotted more than 20 years ago, but now appear to have solved t
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Feed: All Latest
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You Can't Take This Photo: Shooting Western Landscapes Like They've Never Been Seen—at NightPhotographer Adam Kasteff puts his own spin on landscape photography.
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)
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Why the secret to success is setting the right goals | John DoerrOur leaders and institutions are failing us, but it's not always because they're bad or unethical, says venture capitalist John Doerr — often, it's simply because they're leading us toward the wrong objectives. In this practical talk, Doerr shows us how we can get back on track with "Objectives and Key Results," or OKRs — a goal-setting system that's been employed by the likes of Google, Intel a
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
100+
Robust MOF material exhibits selective, fully reversible and repeatable capture of toxic atmospheric gasLed by the University of Manchester, an international team of scientists has developed a metal-organic framework material (MOF) that exhibits a selective, fully reversible and repeatable capability to remove nitrogen dioxide gas from the atmosphere in ambient conditions. This discovery, confirmed by researchers using neutron scattering at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, c
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
500+
Nanodiamonds responsible for mysterious source of microwaves across the Milky WayFor decades, astronomers have puzzled over the exact source of a peculiar type of faint microwave light emanating from a number of regions across the Milky Way. Known as anomalous microwave emission (AME), this light comes from energy released by rapidly spinning nanoparticles—bits of matter so small that they defy detection by ordinary microscopes. (The period on an average printed page is approx
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
200+
Scientists watch bacteria 'harpoon' DNA to speed their evolutionIndiana University scientists have made the first direct observation of a key step in the process that bacteria use to rapidly evolve new traits, including antibiotic resistance.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
300+
'Surgery in a pill' a potential treatment for diabetesOver the last decade, bariatric surgeons have made strides in performing weight loss surgery that not only reverses obesity but can also reverse type 2 diabetes in patients with both conditions. Despite dramatic improvements in quality of life and diabetes remission, the number of patients who pursue surgery remains relatively low, according to Ali Tavakkoli, MD, co-director of the Center for Weig
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
68
DIY brings high throughput to continuous cell culturingRice University's Caleb Bashor never planned to be an inventor or do-it-yourselfer, but there was no other way to do the microbiology experiments he envisioned.
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Toxicant levels up to 99 percent less in myblu™ aerosols compared to cigarette smokeA new aerosol chemistry study presented at the 1st Scientific Summit — Tobacco Harm Reduction: Novel products, Research & Policy, has revealed toxicant levels in myblu pod-system e-cigarette aerosols are up to 99 percent lower than in cigarette smoke.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Study points to possible treatment target for aggressive liver cancer in kidsA protein in the cell nucleus already targeted therapeutically for several types of cancer has now been linked to an aggressive form of pediatric liver cancer called hepatoblastoma (HBL), according to a study published in the Nature journal Communications Biology. Scientists at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center report that laboratory testing indicates the protein, PARP1, may be an effe
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Glittering Diamond Dust in Space Might Solve a 20-Year-Old MysteryThe Milky Way is strewn with sparkling, spinning microscopic diamonds, which might explain an unusual microwave glow — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Further drivers of ocean deoxygenation identifiedMeasurements as well as model calculations equally show that the oxygen inventory of the oceans is decreasing. However, the models underestimate this decrease significantly making projections into the future problematic. In a study published today in the international journal Nature Geoscience, four GEOMAR researchers reveal the gaps in the models and identify previously underestimated drivers for
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You don’t need a pilot’s license to control Larry Page’s new flying cars
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People who 'see the glass as half full' are more likely to fall prey to marketing scamsConsumers who perceive the benefits of large sums of money promised in mass marketing scams (MMS) are more likely to discount the risks and fall prey to perpetrators, according to new research co-authored by the University of Plymouth.
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'Tricking' bacteria into hydroxylating benzeneResearchers at Nagoya University used bacteria to convert benzene into phenol. They developed 'decoy' molecules — modified amino acids — mimicking the native substrates of a genetically expressed oxygenase enzyme. When absorbed by live E.coli cells, the decoys were misrecognized as substrates of the oxygenase, which became activated. The bacteria then oxidized a supplied benzene source, needing
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Study confirms lifting weights reduces depressionA review of 33 trials confirms that loading your body does your brain good. Read More
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Canadisk virksomhed indfanger CO2 til en sjettedel af prisenFor bare 100 dollars pr. ton – eller en sjettedel af, hvad det hidtil har kostet – kan CO2 trækkes ud af luften og omdannes til klimaneutralt brændstof.
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Pandoravirus: Giant viruses invent their own genesThree new members have been added to the Pandoravirus family by researchers at the CNRS and Aix-Marseille Université, working with partners at CEA, Inserm and Université Grenoble-Alpes. Researchers offer an explanation to their puzzling giant genomes with many orphan genes: pandoviruses appear to be factories for new genes — and therefore new functions. From freaks of nature to evolutionary innov
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New epigenetic drug against Mantle Cell LymphomaA new study by doctor Manel Esteller's group at IDIBELL presents an epigenetic drug capable of slowing down cell growth in Mantle Cell Lymphoma (MCL).
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New 28-GHz transceiver paves the way for future 5G devicesScientists at Tokyo Tech have designed and fabricated a tiny, but incredibly fast, reliable, and accurate 28-GHz transceiver meant for stable high-speed 5G communications. The fabricated transceiver trumps previous designs in various regards by taking a new approach for beam steering.
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Deep-freezing of orange juice can increase the absorption of beneficial compoundsThe cold treatments have two opposite effects. On one hand, they cause the carotenoids to degrade (negative effect) and, on the other hand, they generate an increase in the bioaccessibility of the carotenoids (positive effect). Taking these two effects into account, it can be concluded that deep-frozen juices that are defrosted to room temperature or in a microwave are potentially better at increa
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I.Coast to destroy cocoa trees in fight against virusIvory Coast, the world's biggest cocoa producer, announced Monday it would rip up 100,000 hectares (250,000 acres) of cocoa trees in a bid to roll back a plant virus called swollen shoot.
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The Atlantic
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A Senior White House Official Defines the Trump Doctrine: ‘We’re America, Bitch’Many of Donald Trump’s critics find it difficult to ascribe to a president they consider to be both subliterate and historically insensate a foreign-policy doctrine that approaches coherence. A Trump Doctrine would require evidence of Trump Thought, and proof of such thinking, the argument goes, is scant. This view is informed in part by feelings of condescension, but it is not meritless. Barack
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The Atlantic
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Trump May Doom the Medium He LovesHe’s the cable-television president. Donald Trump starts his days with cable news, staffs his administration with talking heads, and regularly consults with Fox News hosts. But what the president may not realize is that his administration is pushing a position in federal court, in a case expected to be decided Tuesday, that risks killing the very medium he loves. Trump’s affection for cable is we
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The Atlantic
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‘Cargo-Bike Moms’ Are Gentrifying the NetherlandsIn the Netherlands, it’s hard not to be impressed, or even overwhelmed, by the sheer number of bicycles in all forms, colors, and sizes. People here see cycling as a normal mode of transportation, not just a weekend leisure activity. The Dutch use their bikes to carry groceries, electronics, and sometimes even furniture. It’s not uncommon to see a parent biking with one child up front, another on
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Futurity.org
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What if Alzheimer’s comes from axon ‘transport’ not amyloids?For more than 20 years, the “amyloid hypothesis” has guided much of the leading research on Alzheimer’s disease, but some researchers are going in a different direction. The amyloid theory focuses on one of the disease’s most salient traits: the formation of unusual plaques—or buildups of protein—in patients’ brains. In Alzheimer’s, these plaques are made from a protein known as beta-amyloid. As
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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New Tesla software to offer 'full' autonomy, Musk saysAn update to Tesla's Autopilot software coming in August will enable "full self-driving features" for the automaker's electric cars, chief executive Elon Musk says.
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Dagens Medicin

Freitag: Det mest seriøse udspil i min tidRegeringens nye udspil for fremtidens almen praksis 'En læge tæt på dig' vækker stor jubel hos de praktiserende læger. Også selvom udspillet nok kommer ti år for sent.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Antioxidants slow down senescence in plantsAging is a complex process involving lots of different mechanisms. One of the main processes on which aging is based is the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROSs are molecules formed as a result of a sequential one-electron reduction of oxygen. They are extremely chemically active and oxidize many compounds inside the cells. This leads to malfunctions in cellular molecular mechanisms an
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Futurity.org
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Too much ‘junk food’ tied to massive seabird die-offScientists now have the first definitive answer to what caused one of the largest bird die-offs ever recorded: starvation, brought on by shifts in ocean conditions linked to a changing climate. “When we see these mass mortality events, that’s the ecosystem saying, in big neon letters, that something is wrong.” In the fall of 2014, West Coast residents witnessed a strange, unprecedented ecological
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Approaching an ideal amino acid synthesis using hydrogenOsaka University researchers demonstrated a reductive alkylation method for the functionalization of substituted amines using hydrogen, which is efficiently catalyzed by innocuous main-group catalysts. Their reaction generated water as the sole byproduct. The presented reaction is highly versatile and environmentally benign, and therefore expected to be applied to wide areas of chemical synthesis.
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Researchers identify new type of depressionDepression is a mental disorder that affects over 300 million people around the world. While treatments exist, many of them are based on one hypothesis of how depression arises. Patients that do not fit this mold may not be getting benefits. A study led by Hiroshima University (HU), which was published online this May in Neuroscience, shed light on how one protein called RGS8 plays a role in depre
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Post-stroke delivery of neurotrophic factor MANF promotes functional recovery in ratsThe neurotrophic factor MANF is neuroprotective when administered before experimental stroke. MANF also promoted reversal of stroke-induced behavioural impairments when administered directly into rat brain tissue two to three days after stroke.
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Breaking laws, making glassIBS researchers have designed an innovative method to study how interacting particles behave at temperatures close to absolute zero, and found a situation where the laws of thermodynamics and statistical mechanics are not respected, energy is not evenly distributed, and equilibrium is not reached.
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Otago researchers help unlock answers about leptospirosis in AfricaUniversity of Otago researchers are helping lead international studies which have discovered that exposure to cattle and rice farming are risk factors for the devastating disease leptospirosis in northern Tanzania.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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A webcam is enough to produce a real-time 3-D model of a moving handCapturing hand and finger movements within milliseconds is becoming increasingly important for many applications, from virtual reality to human-machine interaction and Industry 4.0. So far, its enormous technical demands have limited possible applications. Computer scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Informatics have now developed a software system involving the interaction of various neura
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The Surprisingly Cool Physics of Pushing a Block Against a WallYou might think this is just a boring physics problem—but you'd be wrong.
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A self-balancing exoskeleton lets wheelchair users walk againAn exoskeleton is being tested that helped a wheelchair user to walk for several hours without pain. It supports its own weight and mimics the wearer’s natural gait
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Futurity.org
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Cute quolls could ‘learn’ not to taste poison toadsSpeeding up natural selection in order to save small carnivorous marsupials called northern quolls could have big implications for saving endangered species around the world. Researchers have released a population of northern quolls on Indian Island in Australia’s remote Northern Territory to see if their offspring can survive living alongside toxic cane toads. A cane toad looks an appetizing mea
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Startup uses artificial intelligence to analyze vehicle driver behaviorBrazilian startup Cobli has specialized in technological solutions for vehicle fleet monitoring and management. It is currently focusing on safety and refining a tool to identify driver behavioral patterns by analyzing data collected by a solar-powered tracker.
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Popular Science
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How to tell if you really have a feverDIY Feverish or fever-ish? Everyone knows the number 98.6. But although we all think of that as the average human temperature in degrees F, human bodies are all different, which means that 98.6°F…
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A system purely for developing high-performance, big data codesPlinyCompute, a big data platform designed specifically for developing high-performance and data-intensive codes, will be unveiled by Rice University computer scientists at this week's 2018 ACM SIGMOD conference in Houston.
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The Fontan circulationIn the current issue of Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications (Volume3, Number 1, 2018, pp. pp. 107-122(X); DOI: 10.15212/CVIA.2017.0041), researchers Ahmed Kheiwa, Anushree Agarwal and Anitha John from University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, US and George Washington University, Washington, DC, US provide a summary of the Fontan surgeries and resultant physiology, discuss
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The adult ventricular septum; a unique portion of the left and right ventricleIn the current issue of Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications (Volume 3, Number 1, 2018, pp. pp. 93-95(3); DOI: 10.15212/CVIA.2017.0023), C. Richard Conti and John W. Petersen from the University of Florida Medical School, Gainesville, FL, US consider the adult ventricular septum.
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D-Transposition of the great arteries: a new era in cardiologyIn the current issue of Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications (Volume 3, Number 1, 2018, pp. pp. 85-92(8); DOI: 10.15212/CVIA.2017.0037), Angeline D. Opina and Wayne J. Franklin from the Baylor College of Medicine and Texas Children's Hospital, Houston, TX, US consider the D-transposition of the great arteries.
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Heart transplantation for adult CHD: Overview and special considerationsIn the current issue of Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications (Volume 3, Number 1, 2018, pp. pp. 73-84(12); DOI: 10.15212/CVIA.2017.0043), Dipankar Gupta, Jana Reid, Diego Moguillansky, Renata Shih, Mark S. Bleiweis, Frederick J. Fricker and Biagio A. Pietra from the University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, US consider how with improvements in surgical and medical management, the number of pa
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
17
Micro-plastics in the AntarcticAntarctica's most remote and pristine habitats are contaminated with micro-plastic waste and persistent hazardous chemicals, new research shows.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
New method helps make orthotopic brain-tumor imaging clearer and fasterCurrently, tumors inside the central nervous system are among the most challenging cancers to diagnose. Different from conventional brain-imaging techniques, near-infrared fluorescence imaging (NIR) demonstrates particular merits including being nonhazardous, offering fast feedback, and having higher sensitivity.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
36
Measuring metabolites in algae one cell at a timeIn the search for new sources of consumables, scientists have come to realize that life itself could be the solution. Metabolic engineers have altered the metabolism of living organisms to make new drugs, biodegradables and biofuels. One of the best examples in modern times is penicillin. Metabolic engineering bacteria has improved the production rate of this drug more than 100 times.
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Ingeniøren
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Tesla sætter raketmotorer på den nye RoadsterTeknologi fra SpaceX og komprimeret luft skal give Teslas kommende sportsvogn superkræfter.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Scandinavian bumblebees survive by incubating their eggsIt is a sure sign that spring is in the air: The sight of a bumblebee queen buzzing around spring flowers on a sunny day. But sometimes, when she is flying around, she is actually not looking for flowers, but on the hunt for a good place to build a nest.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Coral tricks for adapting to ocean acidificationA process that changes the regulation of genes could help corals acclimatize to the impacts of global warming.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Digital assistant teaches runners healthier running styleStudies show that heel runners have an overall injury rate that is approximately twice as high compared to forefoot runners, according to Antonio Krüger, professor of computer science at Saarland University in Saarbrücken. There, Krüger is the leader of the Innovative Retail Laboratory at DFKI, and with Professor Julia Knopf, manages the newly founded Research Center for Digital Education. Hence,
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
First public forecasts from ViEWS, a political Violence Early-Warning SystemThe challenges of preventing, mitigating and adapting to large-scale political violence are daunting, particularly when violence escalates where it is not expected. With funding from the European Research Council, ViEWS: a political Violence Early-Warning System at Uppsala University, is developing a system that is rigorous, data-based, and publicly available. On 7 June, ViEWS released its first p
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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The hunt for life on Mars—new findings on rock 'chimneys' could hold key to successThe search for life on Mars has taken a step forward with the NASA Curiosity rover's discovery of organic matter on the bottom of what was once a lake. It may once have been part of an alien life form or it might have a non-biological origin – either way this carbon would have provided a food source for any organic living thing in the vicinity.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Automation has the potential to improve gender equality at workIf predictions are right, automation will transform work as we know it. But it's difficult to know exactly which – and how many – jobs will be affected. Although there is a huge debate over just these questions, one area frequently overlooked is how automation will affect the prospect of gender equality.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
Urban agriculture—Europe's untapped potentialBy 2050, two thirds of the world's population will live in urban areas, according to the United Nations. The shift away from rural living creates challenges for food security, the environment and people's well-being.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
9
A new system optimises electric transmission from offshore wind farmsScientists from Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M) have designed a new control system for wind turbines in offshore wind farms that allows power transmission to the coast in a more flexible and cheaper way than current solutions.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Vorticity regulates waves in fluidsA study by Politecnico di Torino published in the journal Physical Review E demonstrates that a wave in a fluid requires amplified vorticity and not only amplified energy in order to change the nature of the flow
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Big Think
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The clear food winners—and losers—for the environmentA new study from the University of Oxford reveals what foods are, and are not, healthy for the environment. Read More
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Futurity.org
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Turning blood samples into neurons takes just 4 proteinsResearchers have discovered how to convert human immune cells in blood directly into functional neurons in the laboratory in about three weeks with the addition of just four proteins. The dramatic transformation doesn’t require the cells to first enter a state called pluripotency but instead occurs through a more direct process called transdifferentiation. “Blood is one of the easiest biological
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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New study examines impacts of fracking on water supplies worldwideUsing hydraulic fracturing to extract oil and natural gas from shale is a common technique used worldwide. Because the technique requires large amounts of water, however, it raises the question of whether it could lead to water shortages or competition with other water uses, especially agriculture.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Special issue to highlight climate science for service partnership between China and the UKResearch highlights of the Climate Science for Service Partnership China appear on June 7, 2018 in a special issue of Advances of Atmospheric Sciences, a journal published by Springer.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Are you really you when you're hungry?What makes someone go from simply being hungry to full-on 'hangry'? More than just a simple drop in blood sugar, this combination of hunger and anger may be a complicated emotional response involving an interplay of biology, personality and environmental cues, according to research published by the American Psychological Association.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

His bundle pacing: rebirth of an important technique for pacing the intrinsic conduction systemIn the current issue of Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications (Volume 3, Number 1, 2018, pp. pp. 61-71(11); DOI: 10.15212/CVIA.2017.0030), Michael R. Kaufmann, Matthew S. McKillop, Thomas A. Burkart, Mark Panna, William M. Miles and C. Richard Conti from the Department of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610, US consider His bundle pacing; an important technique for pacing
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Atrial arrhythmias including atrial fibrillation in congenital heart disease: Mechanisms, substrate identification and interventional approachesIn the current issue of Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications (Volume 3, Number 1, 2018, pp. pp. 41-59(19); DOI: 10.15212/CVIA.2017.0053), Jerold S. Shinbane and Philip M. Chang from Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, US and the Departments of Pediatrics and Internal Medicine, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL, US consi
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Left ventricular systolic function after pulmonary valve replacementIn the current issue of Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications (Volume 3, Number 1, 2018, pp. pp. 21-30(10); DOI 10.15212/CVIA.2017.0050), Ali N. Zaidi and W. Aaron Kay from Columbus Ohio Adult Congenital Heart Disease Program, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, US consider how following reparative surgery for tetralogy of Fallot or critical pulmonary stenosis (PS), patients frequently
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The surgical management of Ebstein anomalyIn the current issue of Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications (Volume3, Number 1, 2018, pp. pp. 13-20(8); DOI 10.15212/CVIA.2017.0052), Karl M. Reyes, Eric I-Hun Jeng, Susan Cooke, David Hall and Mark S. Bleiweis from the Congenital Heart Center and the Division of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, United States consider the surgical management of Eb
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Pulmonary arterial hypertension medical management of the adult patient with CHDIn the current issue of Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications (Volume3, Number 1, 2018, pp. pp. 1-8(8); DOI 10.15212/CVIA.2017.0038), Ali Ataya, Julian Chung, Jessica Cope and Hassan Alnuaimat from Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, and Department of Pharmacy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, US consider how congenital heart disease (CHD)-associated pulmonary art
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Oldest plague bacteria genome analyzed by Russian-German teamThe team comprised researchers from Kazan Federal University and Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History. The bacteria were retrieved from a mass grave in Samara Oblast, Russia. As evidence showed, that particular strain contained key virulence factors ancestral to those which later caused pandemics of the 6th century (Eastern Roman Empire), 14th century (Eurasia), and 19th century (
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Dagens Medicin

Disse 16 initiativer skal udbygge praksislægers rolleNyt regeringsudspil med 16 initiativer skal sikre flere læger, fortsat høj kvalitet og en mere dynamisk almen praksis.
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Dagens Medicin

Ny ledende overlæge for arbejds- og samfundsmedicinsk afdeling i HolbækTil august tiltræder Ann Lyngberg som ledende overlæge på arbejds- og samfundsmedicin afdeling på Holbæk Sygehus.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Study shows plastic waste can be converted into energy and fuelsPlastic waste is flooding our landfills and leaking into the oceans, with potentially disastrous effects. In fact, the World Economic Forum predicts that if current production and waste management trends continue, by 2050 there could be more plastic than fishes in the ocean.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
6
An organic solution to heal plants and help them growA new biopesticide based on a patented extremophile bacterium is on its way. Funding under the SME Instrument has enabled the company that created this solution to spread the word and consider future plans.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Does the smell of blood make us hungry?As the public filed through the Science Gallery Melbourne's exhibition Blood – Attract and Repel last year, 64 intrepid types agreed to be part of a scientific experiment. Unknown to the participants, the research students accosting people at the door were attempting to find out how blood thirsty we really are.
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A new AI can focus on one voice in a crowdThe artificial intelligence can ignore background noise in videos and focus on what a particular person is saying.
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Motorola Moto G6 Review: Affordable ExcellenceThe Moto G6 still reigns supreme as the best cheap Android phone for $250 or less. Our full WIRED review.
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New on MIT Technology Review
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Goodbye net neutrality, for nowFCC Ajit Pai Net ISPs
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Religion is uniquely human, but computer simulations may help us understand religious behaviorWhen disaster strikes, people often turn to religion for comfort and support. A powerful recent example of this comes from a study called "Faith after an Earthquake," by prominent New Zealand religion and society researchers Chris Sibley and Joseph Bulbulia. They document an uptick in religious service attendance in the city of Christchurch, New Zealand, after a large and deadly earthquake in earl
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
13
Image: Star-circling bubble of gasThis turbulent celestial palette of purple and yellow shows a bubble of gas named NGC 3199, blown by a star known as WR18 (Wolf-Rayet 18).
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Researcher studies effects of microplastics on the oceanAnyone who has ever struggled with knowing which plastic items they can or cannot place in their recycling bin will appreciate the complex task facing Professor Rob Hale and his students at William & Mary's Virginia Institute of Marine Science.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
7
If people with learning disabilities can't consent to marry, they're at risk of forced marriageIn a recent landmark case, a mother received the first conviction in England for forcing someone to marry. She had tricked her daughter, then aged 17, into travelling to Pakistan to be married as soon as she turned 18. The girl had a learning disability, but this was only very briefly reported in press coverage of the case.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Tools to better predict floods and droughtsThe fact that water accounts for about 71% of the Earth's surface is common knowledge. What is less known, however, is that this water mass is constantly redistributing and that such changes can be responsible for floods and droughts. The EGSIEM project set out to integrate the redistribution of this mass into Earth Observation data products, in order to help predict these events.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Transporting micronutrients more efficientlyETH researchers have genetically modified a key variety of rice, making it very efficient at enriching its grains with iron and zinc.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Turtle tagged in Brazil reaches UK territoryA turtle tagged by University of Exeter scientists in Brazil has swum thousands of miles – and is now in the waters of a UK overseas territory.
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Organic Compounds Found in Martian SoilResearchers also found seasonal variations in atmospheric methane on the planet that may have a geological or biological origin.
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The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: Hirsute and HowA newly described species of shrimp, Odontonia bagginsi, has been named after Bilbo Baggins.
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The Scientist RSS

Europe Favors Mission-Oriented Research in 100B Budget ProposalThe plan would also allow non-EU countries to pay to participate in EU research programs, albeit without wielding 'decisional power.'
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Boson sampling with photons found to produce useful output in spite of photon leaks for quantum supremacyA team of researchers from China, Germany and the U.S. has found that boson sampling with photons is a viable option for testing for quantum supremacy, despite photons leaking from a given test system. In their paper published in the journal Physical Review Letters, the group describes testing the idea using photons emitted from a quantum dot.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
A bird's eye view of changing glaciersEvery March, glacier "watchers" take to the skies to photograph snow and ice clinging to high peaks along the length of New Zealand's Southern Alps.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
25
How traffic signals favour cars and discourage walkingTraffic signals give priority to motor vehicles over pedestrians. This inequality undermines many of the stated goals of transport, health and environment policy.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Image: Hawaii lava flowCopernicus Sentinel-2 images from 23 May and 7 June 2018 show changes in lava flow from the Kilauea volcano on Hawaii's Big Island. It is estimated that around 600 homes have been destroyed in one of the volcano's most destructive eruptions in modern times.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Clone wars—finding buggy code copiesCode is ubiquitous and most industries around the world rely on code-based software to keep day-to-day operations running, said Chanchal Roy, associate professor in the Department of Computer Science.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
46
Best of Last Week – Confirming Einstein's elevator, exciting news from Mars and medicines being improperly prescribedIt was another good week for physics as a team at the U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technology conducted an atomic clock comparison that confirmed key assumptions of 'Einstein's elevator'—one of the principles underlying the theory of general relativity. And a team working on the CMS project at the Large Hadron Collider reported that they were looking to answer the question "Who gets th
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Ingeniøren
64
Minister åbner for at udskyde FM-slukEfter kritiske spørgsmål til planen om at slukke for FM-nettet i 2021, åbner Mette Bock nu for at udskyde datoen.
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Dana Foundation
1
Aphasia Awareness Month Interview with Kenneth Heilman, M.D.For a devastating language disorder that affects almost two million people in the US alone, about 85 percent of people in a national survey have never heard the term “aphasia.” More common than Parkinson’s disease, cerebral palsy, or muscular dystrophy, it does not discriminate according to age, race, or gender. With June being Aphasia Awareness Month, we asked Kenneth M. Heilman , M.D., to help
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Why We Won't Miss OpioidsThey are not the great all-purpose painkillers they've been cracked up to be — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Mangoes helped improve cardiovascular and gut health in womenA new study conducted at the University of California, Davis found that two cups of mangoes a day had beneficial effects on systolic blood pressure among healthy postmenopausal women.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Large study finds workplace foods contribute to unhealthy eatingA study of 5,222 employees across the US found that the foods people get at work tend to contain high amounts of sodium and refined grains and very little whole grains and fruit.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Federal food aid to Puerto Rico high in salt, sugarAn analysis of 10 consecutive days of federal food aid delivered during the aftermath of Hurricane Maria reveals that much of this food exceeded the dietary limits for sodium, added sugars and saturated fats outlined in federal dietary guidelines.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Adapting lifestyle habits can quickly lower blood pressureA program aimed at helping people modify lifestyle factors such as diet and exercise is as effective as medication at reducing blood pressure.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Tracing the impacts of food and nutrition policiesMany policies are being implemented or considered to try to steer people toward healthier food choices. The Nutrition 2018 meeting will feature studies that evaluate the impacts of existing policies and seek to inform the design of future ones.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
From jeans to fibres to garment tags—novel recycling for more sustainable fashionIt's a well-known fact that the fashion industry is one of the biggest industrial polluters in the world. Based on 2015 estimates, it's responsible for 1 715 million tonnes of annual CO2 emissions and produces around 92 million tonnes of solid waste per year. On average, 79 billion cubic metres of water are consumed for clothing production yearly – enough water to fill almost 32 million Olympic-si
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Enzyme found to control formation of collagen carriers and inhibit collagen secretionResearchers at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) have identified an enzyme that controls how much collagen cells secrete. As collagen imbalance is linked to a range of human diseases, the study provides clues to new therapeutic strategies. Moreover, the findings could facilitate efficient production of collagen for the food, cosmetic and pharmaceutical industries.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
31
Robotic work cell conducts high-throughput testing instantlyToday, with 3-D printing, you can make almost anything in a matter of hours. However, making sure that part works reliably takes weeks or even months.
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The Atlantic
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The Most Honest Out-of-Office MessageSome weeks ago, I emailed a professor to ask for an interview for a story. Seconds later, I got his out-of-office response. “I am out of the office and expect to have only infrequent email access,” the message said. Pretty standard stuff. He’d respond to my email when he returned. Then I kept reading. Thank you for your message. Email received between [these dates] will be deleted from this serve
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The Atlantic
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Being Black in America Can Be Hazardous to Your HealthImage above: Kiarra Boulware and her niece at Penn North, an addiction-recovery center in Baltimore One morning this past September, Kiarra Boulware boarded the 26 bus to Baltimore’s Bon Secours Hospital, where she would seek help for the most urgent problem in her life: the 200-some excess pounds she carried on her 5-foot-2-inch frame. To Kiarra, the weight sometimes felt like a great burden, an
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Amazon supplier under fire for poor China working conditionsElectronics giant Foxconn announced Monday it had started an investigation after a labour group alleged illegal working conditions at one of its Chinese factories producing Kindles, tablets and smart speakers for Amazon.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
Tricking bacteria into hydroxylating benzeneNagoya University researchers use E.coli to convert benzene into phenol, simplifying a chemical reaction that is difficult by conventional methods
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
5
Approaching an ideal amino acid synthesis using hydrogenOsaka University researchers demonstrated a reductive alkylation method for the functionalization of substituted amines using hydrogen, which is efficiently catalyzed by innocuous main-group catalysts. Their reaction generated water as the sole byproduct. The presented reaction is highly versatile and environmentally benign, and therefore expected to be applied to wide areas of chemical synthesis.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
67
Building a robotic eel that swims through your bodyAs a kid, physicist Seth Fraden loved the movie "Fantastic Voyage," about a microscopic submarine traveling through a human bloodstream. Almost 10 years ago, Fraden began a quest to create a robotic eel he could send on a similar journey, though it wouldn't be for entertainment. The eel would be designed to deliver a drug to cells or genes. And to capture the flexibility of the real sea creature,
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
8
French farmers block refineries over palm oil importsDozens of French farmers blocked access to 13 refineries across the country on Monday to protest plans to import palm oil for use in biofuels, a move they denounce as unfair competition which jeopardises their livelihood.
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Ingeniøren

Kronik: Holistisk samarbejdsform i byggeriet barberer budgettet
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Ingeniøren
51
VM-bolden flyver kortere end forgængerenDen nye VM-bold deler mange aerodynamiske egenskaber med sin forgænger. Ved hårde spark flyver den dog ca. 10 procent kortere.
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Futurity.org
5
How much does our galaxy weigh?A new technique for estimating the mass of the Milky Way galaxy promises more reliable results, especially when it’s applied to large datasets generated by current and future surveys, according to new research. It’s impossible to “weigh” a galaxy simply by looking at it—much less when the observer happens to be inside of it, as is the case with our Milky Way. The study, which appears in the Astro
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Live Science
100+
Here's What Happens to a Styrofoam Cup Under the Deep Sea's Crushing PressureWith #ShrunkenCupOff, ocean scientists were crushing it on Twitter.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Microsoft looks past next-gen Xbox to cloud gamesThe head of Xbox on Sunday said Microsoft is hard at work on a next-generation console along with a cloud service that would let players stream games to any device.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
400+
Tiny defects in semiconductors created 'speed bumps' for electrons—researchers cleared the pathUCLA scientists and engineers have developed a new process for assembling semiconductor devices. The advance could lead to much more energy-efficient transistors for electronics and computer chips, diodes for solar cells and light-emitting diodes, and other semiconductor-based devices.
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The Atlantic
1K
That Merkel Photo Is More Like a Meme Than a Renaissance PaintingWhat do you see in the now-famous photograph of Angela Merkel and Donald Trump at the G7 Summit? Perhaps you see a woman leader, in a room full of men, scolding a petty man refusing to cooperate. You might see a bold U.S. president patriotically defying those who would stand in the way of what’s best for the United States. You might see one more indicator of the West’s decline as a unified politi
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
82
Opportunity hunkers down during dust storm (Update)NASA engineers received a transmission from Opportunity on Sunday morning—a positive sign despite the worsening dust storm. Data from the transmission let engineers know the rover still has enough battery charge to communicate with ground controllers at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. Science operations remain suspended.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Researchers develop virtual composer assistantExperts from the Institute of Cyber Intelligence Systems at the National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Russia) are currently developing a virtual composer assistant that will be able to analyze the emotional state of music composers and follow their logic. Despite the high level of development of music theory, the process of creating music is still hard to formally algorithmize, since it is i
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
German prosecutors raid Audi boss over diesel cheatingGerman prosecutors said Monday they had raided the home of Rupert Stadler, chief executive of Volkswagen subsidiary Audi, over suspicion of fraud related to diesel emissions cheating by the firm.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
5
Why your boss should not make you aware of your incompetenceHave you ever compared your work performance to a colleague's? It's a daily habit for most of us, and can often have a positive impact.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
UK firms to reveal boss-staff pay gaps under draft lawCompanies listed in Britain will be required to reveal the gap between the salaries of their chief executives and employees under draft legislation introduced in parliament on Monday.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
6
Thai turtle's plastic-filled stomach highlights ocean crisisStartling images of plastic shreds, rubber bands and other debris found jammed in the stomach of a green turtle in Thailand have highlighted the crisis of waste-strewn seas following the widely publicised death of a whale this month.
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NYT > Science
200+
Trilobites: Do You Know What Lightning Really Looks Like?Paintings by artists over centuries have consistently underestimated the number of root-like veins in a lightning strike, researchers found.
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Futurity.org
30
New clues to language issues in kids with autismResearchers have identified a link between a neurotransmitter imbalance and connectivity between regions of the brain that plays a role in social communication and language. Their new study also found two tests that could lead to more precise medical treatments. One in 59 children in the United States lives with a form of autism spectrum disorder, according to the Centers for Disease Control and
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
36
UK to offer Stephen Hawking fellowshipsExceptional students in mathematics and physics can compete for research fellowships in honour of the late British physicist Stephen Hawking, who died in March, the government announced on Monday.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
15
Scientists in Germany seek to find mass of neutrinoResearchers in Germany have started collecting data with a 60 million euro ($71 million) machine designed to help determine the mass of the universe's lightest particle.
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Scientific American Content: Global
100
Could Connected Cars Pose a New Threat to Smart Cities?Next-generation transportation systems are relatively easy to trick — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
100+
Key difference between humans and other mammals is skin deep, says studyWhile humans and other species share some of the same genetic information, new research found that humans are unique among mammals when it comes to the types and diversity of microorganisms on our skin. This difference could have implications for our health and immune systems.
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Live Science
300+
This Claw-Faced Sea Monster Was Literally Born to KillYikes.
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The Atlantic
21K
Today’s Masculinity Is StiflingIn hindsight, our son was gearing up to wear a dress to school for quite some time. For months, he wore dresses—or his purple-and-green mermaid costume—on weekends and after school. Then he began wearing them to sleep in lieu of pajamas, changing out of them after breakfast. Finally, one morning, I brought him his clean pants and shirt, and he looked at me and said, “I’m already dressed.” He was
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Key difference between humans and other mammals is skin deep, says studyWhile humans and other species share some of the same genetic information, new research found that humans are unique among mammals when it comes to the types and diversity of microorganisms on our skin. This difference could have implications for our health and immune systems.
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Dagens Medicin

Få alle nyheder fra den store reumatologiske kongres i AmsterdamDagens Medicin er på plads sammen med 14.000 læger og sundhedsprofessionelle ved den store reumatologiske kongres EULAR 2018
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Feed: All Latest
200+
How Tech Shaped San Francisco’s Unresolved Mayor’s RaceThis was supposed to be the election where the city rebelled against years of tech-fueled growth. It's not turning out that way.
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Feed: All Latest
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The FCC's Net Neutrality Rules Are Dead, but the Fight Isn'tEfforts continue in Congress, the states, and the courts, to prevent internet providers from blocking or favoring certain content.
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Feed: All Latest
100+
How a Uranium Hunter Sniffs Out Nuclear WeaponsEvery bit of uranium ore has a chemical fingerprint specific to its source on Earth. Track the metal, and you can track the ne’er-do-well who took it.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
56
The sun shrinks a teensy bit when it’s feeling activeThe radius of the sun gets slightly smaller during periods of high solar activity, researchers say.
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Scientific American Content: Global
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In the Battle against Lyme Disease, the Ticks Are WinningThe illness is still widely and falsely believed, even by doctors, to be easy to diagnose and readily treatable — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Scientific American Content: Global
200+
A Theory with No Strings Attached: Can Beautiful Physics Be Wrong? [Excerpt]A physicist decries the trend of chasing after aesthetically pleasing theories that lack empirical evidence — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Scientific American Content: Global
62
On a Wing and a Song–Bats Belt Out High-Pitched Tunes to Woo MatesThe complexity of the winged mammals’ vocalizations offer clues to the singers’ size and strength — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
5
Ingesting honey after swallowing button battery reduces injury and improves outcomesA team of ear, nose, and throat (ENT) specialists has demonstrated that eating honey after swallowing a button battery has the potential to reduce serious injuries in small children.
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Science | The Guardian
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Killer robots will only exist if we are stupid enough to let themAs long as humans are sensible when they create the operating programs, robots will bring enormous benefits to humanity, says expert The idea of killer robots rising up and destroying humans is a Hollywood fantasy and a distraction from the more pressing dilemmas that intelligent machines present to society, according to one of Britain’s most influential computer scientists. Sir Nigel Shadbolt, p
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New Scientist – News
200+
A renewables revolution is afoot – but who will benefit?Donald Trump's commitment to coal is short-sighted and wrong-headed. A 100 per cent renewable future is coming – and other countries will reap the rewards
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Feed: All Latest
1K
Inside Anduril, Palmer Luckey's Bid to Build a Border WallHow the Oculus founder, along with ex-Palantir executives, plans to reinvent national security, starting with Trump's agenda.
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Feed: All Latest
400+
A Single Drone Helped Mexican Police Drop Crime 10 PercentOver four months, police in Ensenada, south of Tijuana, used a DJI drone to help make 500 arrests and cut robberies by 30 percent.
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Ingeniøren

Techtopia #56: Alle lande vil have en smart cityPodcast: På globalt plan kæmper storbyer om at være den smarteste smart city, og selvom Kairo, København og Shanghai ikke ligner hinanden på overfladen, så deler de utrolig mange af de samme problemstillinger i bestræbelserne på at blive smarte.
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Ingeniøren
7
Facebook tillader "særligt udvalgte" firmaer adgang til brugerdataFacebook har tilladt "særligt udvalgte" firmaer adgang til brugerdata – og tillader det stadigvæk.
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Ingeniøren
21
Nyt spil bygger på Skats data om 2,5 mio. biler: Scan vilkårlig bil, indtag rattet virtuelt og kørGaming: Har din nabo en bil, der er lige lidt frækkere end din, så er der godt nyt. Det danske spil StreetCars tager udgangspunkt i data fra Skats motorregister og lader dig køre råddent i naboens nye øse.
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Ingeniøren
18
DAB-distributør: Danske bilister kan også misse trafikmeldinger efter FM-slukNorske lastbilchauffører mener, at dårlig DAB-dækning får dem til at misse vigtige trafikmeddelelser. I Norge skyldes det dårlig dækning, men i Danmark kan helt andre problemer give samme resultat.
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Ingeniøren
29
10 cm sand skal redde miljøet i Odense FjordSDU står i spidsen for verdens første storskalaforsøg med sand-capping, der skal genskabe havbund og lysforhold, så ålegræs kan vokse.
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The Atlantic
300+
Trump Could Transform the U.S.–North Korea RelationshipDonald Trump is an ignorant, egotistical man. And in his summit on Tuesday with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, those character defects may be America—and the world’s—best hope. The conventional Washington debate about North Korea’s nuclear-weapons program goes something like this. On one side sit centrist foreign-policy experts who acknowledge that it’s unlikely Pyongyang will give up its nukes
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
100+
Mutation links bipolar disorder to mitochondrial diseaseMutations in the gene ANT1 may confer a risk for bipolar disorder through a complex interplay between serotonin and mitochondrial signaling in the brain. These two pathways have been separately implicated in bipolar disorder, but the link between levels of the neurotransmitter serotonin and mitochondrial dysfunction had not been established. Researchers at the RIKEN Center for Brain Science (CBS)
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Erectile dysfunction means increased risk for heart disease, regardless of other risk factorsMen with erectile dysfunction are at greater risk for heart attacks, strokes and sudden cardiac death. New study provides strongest link to date between sexual dysfunction and cardiovascular risk. Erectile dysfunction can be an important factor for physicians in gauging cardiovascular risk. Men with erectile dysfunction warrant further testing and more aggressive management of cardiovascular risk
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Science : NPR
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Oil Industry Copes With Climate Impacts As Permafrost ThawsThawing permafrost in Alaska's Arctic is making it harder for oil companies to operate there. But a cottage industry has cropped up with new gadgets to help. (Image credit: Mark Thiessen/AP)
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Dagens Medicin

Nyt udspil skal løse manglen på praktiserende lægerMed 16 nye initiativer og en bevilling på 600 mio. kr. optrapper regeringen indsatsen i forhold til manglen på praktiserende læger. Udspillet 'En læge tæt på dig' præsenteres i dag.
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Science : NPR
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The Perils Of Pushing Kids Too Hard, And How Parents Can Learn To Back OffPart of a parent's job is to help kids do their best, but pushing too hard can backfire. Research shows kids in high-achieving communities are at higher risk of anxiety, depression and substance use. (Image credit: Francesco Zorzi for NPR)
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Ingeniøren
5
Speed pedelec-forsøg sables ned: Transportminister ser intet galt i detAt tillade 15-årige at køre på cykelstien på speed pedelecs møder kritik fra næsten alle sider. Færdselsstyrelsen imødekommer dog ikke til kritikken, og det ser ministeren intet problem i.
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Viden
71
Nyt job til Google Street View-bilerne: Skal tjekke luftkvaliteten i KøbenhavnKøbenhavns Kommune og techgiganten er gået sammen om at måle luftforureningen i Københavns gader.
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Viden
6
Investorer poster millioner i ny fynsk robot-guldfuglSalget af Universal Robots til amerikanske investorer åbner nu op for et nyt robot-eventyr i Odense, hvor On Robot får 100 millioner kroner fra danske investorer og Vækstfonden.
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Dagens Medicin

Læger udskriver mindre inhalationsmedicin til KOL-patienterFærre patienter med KOL får inhalationssteroid, mens flere bliver behandlet med langtidsudvidende lægemidler.
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Science-Based Medicine
500+
Science-based medicine versus other ways of knowingIt has been our position that science is the most effective means of determining medical treatments that work and whose benefits outweigh their risks. Those who promote pseudoscientific or prescientific medicine, however, frequently appeal to other ways of knowing, often ancient knowledge from other cultures and pointing out deficiencies in SBM to justify promoting their treatments. Do their justi
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
US tariffs on car imports are a double-edged swordUS President Donald Trump's threat to tax imported cars in the name of national security risks weakening domestic manufacturers, but could accelerate the renegotiation of the North American Free Trade Agreement.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
China's Xiaomi announces pioneering listing planSmartphone maker Xiaomi on Monday became the first Chinese company to announce plans to issue securities on mainland China markets under a trial programme aimed at encouraging the country's tech giants to list at home.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Cryptocurrencies tumble after S. Korea hackCryptocurrencies plunged in Asia on Monday after a hack on a South Korean exchange sparked fresh concerns about the safety of the digital units.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
42
Slow motion playback makes football referees harsherFootball referees penalize situations more severely when watching them in slow motion compared to real time, according to a study published in the open access journal of the Psychonomic Society, Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications.
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Science | The Guardian
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When size does matter – Big Beasts: Last of the Giants – in picturesPatrick Aryee’s gets up close and personal with some of the world’s biggest creatures in his new three-part series. Episode one airs on Sky1, Wednesday 13 June, 9pm Continue reading…
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
300+
Choice matters: The environmental costs of producing meat, seafoodWhich food type is more environmentally costly to produce—livestock, farmed seafood, or wild-caught fish?
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Dagens Medicin

Sundhedsstyrelsen udvider med tre nye cheferSundhedsstyrelsen ansætter en vicedirektør, og udvider samtidig chefgruppen med yderligere to chefer. ‘Strategisk satsning’, kalder direktør Søren Brostrøm beslutningen.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
300+
Physicists create new class of 2-D artificial materialsIn 1965, a renowned Princeton University physicist theorized that ferroelectric metals could conduct electricity despite not existing in nature.
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Ingeniøren

Kæmpe it-projekt vil koste Skat milliarder: Tidsplanen allerede skredet med to årNye toldregler fra EU betyder kæmpe udskiftning af it-systemer hos Skat. Udgifterne løber op i to milliarder kroner, viser aktindsigt.
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Ingeniøren

Kommer din kultur heller ikke ud i hjørnerne?En mellemleder i en koncern (som jeg ikke arbejder for), fortæller mig om store problemer med manglende samarbejde, opgaver der falder mellem stolene, folk der ikke tager ansvar og generel risiko aversion. Han møder kolleger der altid svarer “Nej – ikke mit bord!” og derfor præges kulturen mere a…
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Feed: All Latest
100+
'Westworld' Recap, Season 2 Episode 8: The Great Ghost Nation MysteryTurns out many of those fan theories about Westworld's warriors were way off the mark.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
6
Rutgers physicists create new class of 2D artificial materialsIn 1965, a renowned Princeton University physicist theorized that ferroelectric metals could conduct electricity despite not existing in nature. For decades, scientists thought it would be impossible to prove the theory by Philip W. Anderson, who shared the 1977 Nobel Prize in physics. It was like trying to blend fire and water, but a Rutgers-led international team of scientists has verified the t
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Drug may quell deadly immune response when trauma spills the contents of our cells' powerhousesWhen trauma spills the contents of our cell powerhouses, it can evoke a potentially deadly immune response much like a severe bacterial infection.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
8
Choice matters: The environmental costs of producing meat, seafoodA new study appearing online June 11 in the journal Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment considers which food type is more environmentally costly to produce: livestock, farmed seafood or wild-caught fish.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Reporting and evaluating wait times for urgent hip fracture surgery in Ontario, CanadaAbout two-thirds of patients admitted to hospital in Ontario for hip fracture did not receive surgery during the recommended time window of 24 hours, according to a new study in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Children with neuroblastoma have an elevated risk of long-term psychological difficultiesA new study reveals that pediatric neuroblastoma patients are at elevated risk for long-term psychological impairment. In addition, those who experience such impairment as they get older tend to require special education services and to not go on to college. The findings are published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society.
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Ingeniøren
500+
Forsøg med speed pedelec mødte et bjerg af kritik: Tvinges stadig igennemFærdselsstyrelsen vender det blinde øje til den massive kritik af deres forsøgsordning med speed pedelecs. Det betyder, at 15-årige uden kørekort vil kunne køre op til 45 km/t på cykelstierne.
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NYT > Science
200+
Retro Report: Scientists Can Design ‘Better’ Babies. Should They?Advances in reproductive technology have put genetic choices within reach of prospective parents. But critics warn of ethical peril.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Enzyme found to control formation of collagen carriers and inhibit collagen secretionResearchers at Tokyo Tech have identified an enzyme that controls how much our cells secrete collagen. As collagen imbalance is linked to a range of human diseases, the study provides clues to new therapeutic strategies. Moreover, the findings could facilitate efficient production of collagen for the food, cosmetic and pharmaceutical industries.
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The Atlantic
100+
Westworld: Ghost Nation, RevealedEvery week for the second season of Westworld , three Atlantic staffers will discuss new episodes of HBO’s cerebral sci-fi drama. David Sims: As Westworld rushes to its epic Season 2 conclusion, viewers were due at least one more special episode, something akin to “ The Riddle of the Sphinx ,” that fleshes out the wider universe of Delos and the history of the park Robert Ford and Arnold created.
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BBC News – Science & Environment
4K
How many animals are born in the world every day?Calculating the number of daily births takes in the very largest and smallest creatures.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Slow motion playback makes football referees harsherFootball referees penalize situations more severely when watching them in slow motion compared to real time, according to a study published in the open-access journal of the Psychonomic Society, Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
13
30 percent of the UK's natural gas could be replaced by hydrogen, cutting carbon emissionsAlmost a third of the natural gas fueling UK homes and businesses could be replaced by hydrogen, a carbon free fuel, without requiring any changes to the nation's boilers and ovens, a pioneering study by Swansea University researchers has shown.
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Futurity.org
31
This gel sucks humidity out of the roomA new gel-like material not only dehumidifies ambient air to improve comfort, but also harnesses the moisture in the air to function as a sun or privacy screen, conductive ink, and even a battery. All these properties are inherent in the material after water absorption, without a need for external power. The hydrogel is a form of zinc oxide—a compound found in sunscreen—can absorb water from the
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Futurity.org
27
Gulf of Mexico’s 2018 ‘dead zone’ could be size of ConnecticutA new forecast says this summer’s Gulf of Mexico “dead zone”—an area of low to no oxygen that can kill fish and other marine life—will be approximately 5,780 square miles, about the size of Connecticut. The 2018 forecast is similar to the 33-year average Gulf of Mexico dead zone of 5,460 square miles and is smaller than last year’s 8,776-square-mile dead zone, which was the largest measured since
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Futurity.org
8
Can lay people provide mental health care in Kenya?The majority of the world’s population lives in low-income countries with extremely limited access to mental health care. This gap is largest in African nations, which have the world’s lowest ratio of mental health professionals: just 1.4 per 100,000 people. For more than a decade, researchers have been exploring ways to close that gap for nearly 50 million orphans in Africa who are grieving the
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Futurity.org
3
For better diagnosis, watch proteins fold in real-time10A new method can examine protein assembly in real time, in living cells, to find problems in the process and diagnose the resulting diseases, according to new research. Proteins in the body need to be perfectly arranged, or folded, to do their jobs. When there is a misfolding, a number of problems and diseases—including diseases of aging and different cancers—can result. “Normally this is done
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Science | The Guardian
500+
Converting bad fat to good fat: a new means of tackling obesityScientists develop a method of turning white fat to brown fat, which burns calories faster Scientists have developed a radical approach to treating obesity in which “bad” white fat is converted into “good” brown fat tissue that burns calories far more rapidly. So far the technology, which involves converting fat cells in a bioreactor, has only been tested in human cells and in mice, but if the te
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Science | The Guardian
100+
Antibiotic resistance could be countered by anti-bacterial virusesResearch found some patients had lower E coli levels after being given cocktail of ‘phages’ Viruses that invade bacteria but leave human cells alone could help scientists find ways around the growing problem of antibiotic resistance, researchers have said. A study has showed that a cocktail of bacteriophages, or “phages”, resulted in no side effects when given to individuals with gastrointestinal
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Moderate and extreme temperatures could increase the risk of occupational injuriesCold and heat increase the risk of occupational injury in Spain by 4 percent and 9 percent, respectively.
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Science : NPR
500+
Coyote In The CrosshairsDuring coyote hunting derbies, contestants vie to kill more coyotes than their competitors. Wildlife activists believe the competitions are unethical, and are pushing to make them a thing of the past. (Image credit: Alexi Horowitz/NPR)
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
18
American toddlers consume too much added sugarA new study suggests children in the US begin consuming added sugar at a very young age and that many toddlers' sugar intake exceeds the maximum amount recommended for adults.
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Science | The Guardian
77
Starwatch: all lined up – the Moon, Venus and PolluxVenus and the waxing crescent Moon are visible in the constellation Cancer this week, pointing towards the brightest star in Gemini For the whole of this week, Venus continues to be the most noticeable object in the western evening sky, despite its low altitude. On the evening of 16 June, it is joined by a thin crescent moon. Only 13.1% of the moon’s surface will be illuminated by the sun. The ch
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