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Nyheder2018juni12

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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Speculative wormhole echoes could revolutionize astrophysicsThe scientific collaborations LIGO and Virgo have detected gravitational waves from the fusion of two black holes, inaugurating a new era in the study of the cosmos. But what if those ripples of space-time were not produced by black holes, but by other exotic objects? A team of European physicists suggest an alternative—wormholes that can be traversed to appear in another universe.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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'Surgery in a pill' a potential treatment for diabetesOrally administered material temporarily coats the intestine, reduces blood sugar spikes in preclinical study.
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Scientific American Content: Global
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Sexual Harassment Remains Common in the SciencesA massive report paints a stark picture of a pervasive problem — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

NASA finds heavy rainmaking thunderstorms in Hurricane BudPowerful Hurricane Bud sat near the coast of southwestern Mexico when NASA's Aqua satellite observed some very high, towering thunderstorms within. Because of its close proximity to land, warnings are already in effect for areas in Mexico.
3min
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

NASA catches Aletta's degeneration into a remnant low-pressure areaWhen NASA's Terra satellite passed over the Eastern Pacific Ocean it captured an image of a fading tropical cyclone. Tropical Cyclone Aletta was a whisper of its former self as it degenerated into a remnant low-pressure area.
3min
The Scientist RSS

National Academies: Policies Must Change to Curb Sexual HarassmentA report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine found that despite increased attention on inappropriate behavior, efforts to reduce misconduct have not worked.
3min
Feed: All Latest
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The Secret History of the Racy Module That Almost Ruined Dungeons & DragonsOf all the Dungeons & Dragons quests out there, finding a copy of "Palace of the Silver Princess" may be the hardest.
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Big Think
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Why breakups are so hard and how to cope with themMost people will experience feelings of deep loss and distress after a long-term relationship breakup. Read More
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Inside Science

The Science of the World CupSports The physiology, technology and science behind the beautiful game. 06/12/2018 Inside Science Staff https://www.insidescience.org/world-cup
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Live Science
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Smartwatches Are Saving Lives, But Don't Call Them Doctor (Yet)Apple Watches and Fitbits have inadvertently saved lives. But how far are we from replacing our annual checkup with a glance at our wrist?
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The Atlantic
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San Francisco Still Doesn’t Know Who Its Mayor Will BeA week has passed since San Franciscans went to the polls to choose their next mayor, and the only thing the city knows for sure is that its ranked-choice voting system has produced the closest mayoral election in decades. On election night, it looked like former state Senator Mark Leno would prevail over London Breed, president of the city’s Board of Supervisors, to finish the term of Mayor Ed L
23min
Big Think
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Russia is teaching workers how to smile for 2018 FIFA World CupRussian workers are being taught the art of smiling in order to seem more welcoming to the 1.5 million tourists expected to attend the 2018 FIFA World Cup this week in Moscow. Employees in the service industry, such as FIFA and Russian metro workers, are receiving crash courses in smiling … Read More
29min
Big Think
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Dominos Pizza is fixing America's roads, one pothole at a timeWe, for one, welcome our new pizza overlords. Read More
29min
Popular Science
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NASA's Opportunity rover is sleeping through a massive dust storm on MarsSpace The rover shut down science activities a few days ago. By June 6, the dust hung thick enough in the sky to draw a veil across the Sun.
30min
New on MIT Technology Review
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Tesla’s reorganization will slash thousands of jobsTesla Elon Musk Autopilot
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)
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What we'll learn about the brain in the next century | Sam RodriquesIn this imaginative talk, brain researcher Sam Rodriques takes us on a thrilling tour of the next 100 years in neuroscience. He envisions strange (and sometimes frightening) innovations that may be the key to understanding and treating brain disease — like lasers that drill tiny holes in our skulls and allow probes to study the electrical activity of our neurons.
33min
BBC News – Science & Environment
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Top hatWith the first 500mph runs now pushed back to mid-2019, there is more time to prepare the world's first supersonic car.
39min
BBC News – Science & Environment
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Big cat spatThe US has more captive tigers than the rest of the world has wild ones. Why?
39min
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

NASA finds heavy rainmaking thunderstorms in Hurricane BudPowerful Hurricane Bud sat near the coast of southwestern Mexico when NASA's Aqua satellite observed some very high, towering thunderstorms within. Because of its close proximity to land, warnings are already in effect for areas in Mexico.
44min
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Honey may reduce injury in children who have swallowed button batteriesIngestion of button batteries, which are frequently found in the household setting, can rapidly lead to caustic esophageal injury in infants and children. A new study published in The Laryngoscope found that drinking honey or Carafate® (a cherry- flavored duodenal ulcer prescription) may help reduce esophageal damage.
44min
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

NASA catches Aletta's degeneration into a remnant low-pressure areaWhen NASA's Terra satellite passed over the Eastern Pacific Ocean it captured an image of a fading tropical cyclone. Tropical Cyclone Aletta was a whisper of its former self as it degenerated into a remnant low-pressure area.
44min
New on MIT Technology Review
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Tomorrow’s surgeons are learning by doing in VR
45min
Live Science
5
What Causes Uncombable Hair Syndrome?Only around 100 people worldwide are known to be affected by this rare genetic disorder, but scientists think it could be more.
53min
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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3-D view of Amazon forests captures effects of El Nino droughtThree-dimensional measurements of the central Brazilian Amazon rainforest have given NASA researchers a detailed window into the high number of branch falls and tree mortality that occur in response to drought conditions. They found that 65 percent more trees and large branches died due to an El Niño-driven drought in 2015-2016 than compared to an average year. Understanding the effects of prolong
57min
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

3-D view of Amazon forests captures effects of El Niño droughtThree-dimensional measurements of the central Brazilian Amazon rainforest have given NASA researchers a detailed window into the high number of branch falls and tree mortality that occur in response to drought conditions. They found that 65 percent more trees and large branches died due to an El Niño-driven drought in 2015-2016 than compared to an average year.
59min
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Binging, purging and fasting more common in overweight, obese young adultsYoung adults who are overweight or obese are twice as likely as their leaner peers to binge and purge, use laxatives or diuretics, or force themselves to vomit as a means of controlling their weight, according to a new study led by UCSF Benioff Children's Hospitals.
59min
The Scientist RSS

Africas Oldest Baobab Trees Are Dying SuddenlyAlthough more evidence is needed to pin down a cause, researchers suspect that climate change is to blame.
1h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Tesla cuts 9 pct. of workforce in bid to post a profitTesla Elon Musk AutopilotElectric car maker Tesla Inc. is laying off about 3,600 workers mainly from its salaried ranks as it slashes costs in an effort to deliver on CEO Elon Musk's promise to turn a profit in the second half of the year.
1h
Popular Science
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Activated charcoal is showing up everywhere—here are four reasons to avoid itHealth Food trends are rarely based in scientific fact. Some vendors of these products claim that activated charcoal can boost your energy, brighten your skin and reduce wind and bloating. The main claim, though, is that…
1h
Live Science
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US Christians Think God Looks a Lot Like ThemWhat does God look like? U.S. liberals and conservatives may perceive the Almighty differently, as do young and old people, a new study finds.
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New on MIT Technology Review
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We can now use AI to see through walls
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Discovery shines light on the mystery of cell death in MSResearchers at the University of Alberta have discovered a unique process of brain cell death that affects the cells that are most vulnerable in multiple sclerosis (MS). After identifying the process called pyroptosis, or fiery death, the researchers were able to block the enzyme in the brain that is responsible for it, using a drug that could potentially treat MS.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Young drivers with autism spectrum disorder may need more time to learn basic driving skillsWhen first learning to drive, young adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have more difficulty with basic driving skills compared to those with typical development (TD), reports a study in the Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics, the official journal of the Society for Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Platform uses artificial intelligence to diagnose Zika and other pathogensMethod created in Brazil combines mass spectrometry analysis of blood serum with an algorithm that recognizes patterns associated with diseases from various origins. Adoption of machine learning technique allows the program to adapt itself to possible viral mutations.
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Frequent use of the ER fell after the Affordable Care ActThe odds of being a frequent user of California's emergency departments dropped in the two years following the implementation of major provisions of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) in January 2014, according to a new study led by UC San Francisco.
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Dialogue toward a human-relevant paradigm for biomedical research echoed in South AmericaSouth American scientists call for strategy and funding for human-specific approaches in biomedical research and toxicology, emphasizing mechanistic understanding and non-animal technology infrastructures such as iPSC and microphysiological systems.
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Childhood vaccination exemptions rise in parts of the USNon-medical exemptions from childhood vaccinations are rising in some areas of the United States, creating a risk of vaccine-preventable disease outbreaks, argue Peter Hotez, Melissa Nolan, Jackie Nolan, and Ashish Damania in a Policy Forum article in PLOS Medicine.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Small children and pregnant women may be underdosed in current malaria regimenCurrent recommended dosing regimens for the most widely used treatment for uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria may be sub-optimal for the most vulnerable populations of patients, according to a study published this week in PLOS Medicine, led by Professor Joel Tarning of the WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network and the Mahidol Oxford Tropical Medicine Research Network.
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Feed: All Latest
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North Korea Has Promised to Denuclearize Lots of Times AlreadyDonald Trump got out of Kim Jong Un a promise that North Korea has already made—and broken—multiple times.
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NYT > Science
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Matter: A Crispr Conundrum: How Cells Fend Off Gene EditingScientists may need to bypass a cell’s cancer defenses in order to successfully edit its DNA. The finding raises questions about gene-editing advances.
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NYT > Science
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Last March of the ‘Wooden Elephants’: Africa’s Ancient Baobabs Are DyingResearchers fear the trees are parched by drought and rising temperatures linked to climate change.
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Live Science
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Abu Simbel: The Temples That MovedBesides their grandeur, the Abu Simbel temples are notable because they were moved in 1964 to make way for the High Aswan Dam.
2h
Popular Science
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Huawei's Matebook X Pro laptop is much more than a MacBook Pro cloneGadgets It seems like an Apple knockoff, but it's one of the best Windows laptops around. This Aluminum laptop has a lot going for it.
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Feed: All Latest
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Forget X-Ray Vision. You Can See Through Walls With RadioResearchers at MIT, actualizers of all things science fiction, have taken a different tack to seeing through walls: radio waves.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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ZTE shares set to resume trading after US reprieveShares in Chinese smartphone maker ZTE are set to resume trading in Hong Kong Wednesday, after the company reached a settlement with American authorities for violating US sanctions.
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New on MIT Technology Review
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Bill Gates’s energy fund is laying its first bets, and they’re on grid storage
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Flood damage would double without coral reefs: studyLoss of coral reefs around the world would double the damage from coastal flooding, and triple the destruction caused by storm surges, researchers said Tuesday.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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EU Parliament to phase out plastic water bottlesThe European Parliament has told its lawmakers and staff to set an example for EU citizens by no longer drinking water from plastic bottles by next year.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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GM: Trump tariffs driving up costsUS President Donald Trump's harsh tariffs on steel and aluminum are increasing costs for US auto giant General Motors but the company is examining the fallout, GM's chief executive said Tuesday.
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The Atlantic
300+
What Anthony Bourdain Understood About AuthenticityAccording to Anthony Bourdain, he became a chef because it looked cool. “I came into the business when cooks still smoked on the line and wore headbands,” he wrote in the New Yorker essay that began his rise from unknown New York City chef to international star at age 42. “I wanted it all: the cuts and burns on hands and wrists, the ghoulish kitchen humor, the free food, the pilfered booze, the c
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The Atlantic
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The Sweet Revenge of Ocean’s 8This article contains minor spoilers for the plot of Ocean’s 8. Ocean’s 8 , the Gary Ross–directed installment of the heist franchise, opens with an incarcerated Debbie Ocean (Sandra Bullock) convincing her parole board that her most urgent aspiration is “a simple life” on the outside. As soon as her request is granted though, Debbie retreats into the comfort of her cons. In quick succession, she
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Scientific American Content: Global
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Could Science Diplomacy Be the Key to Stabilizing International Relations?As a common and apolitical language, science brings allies and adversaries together with technology and innovation to address cross-border challenges — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Transcriptional signature of the decidua in preeclampsia [Biological Sciences]An emerging concept is that the genesis of preeclampsia is rooted in dysregulated decidualization (1). In PNAS, Garrido-Gomez et al. (2) demonstrate a distinct transcriptional signature in the endometrial stromal cells (ESCs) of preeclampsia patients compared with control cells during in vitro decidualization (before pregnancy) and in vivo decidualization (after…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
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Electronic cigarette aerosols induce DNA damage and reduce DNA repair: Consistency across species [Biological Sciences]We read with great interest the work of Lee et al. (1), in which the authors report that mice exposed to electronic cigarette aerosol have increased levels of DNA lesions and decreased DNA repair activity. This work sparked important discussion both in PNAS (2, 3) and science media (4). We…
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Reply to Queimado et al.: E-cigarettes induce DNA damage and inhibit DNA repair in mice and human cells [Biological Sciences]We believe that Queimado et al. (1) may have inadvertently missed several key details presented in our recent PNAS publication (2). First, for the determination of nicotine effects on DNA adduct formation and DNA repair activity, the nicotine concentrations used for 1-h treatments of human lung and bladder epithelial cells…
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Two-way mixed-effects methods for joint association analysis using both host and pathogen genomes [Statistics]Infectious diseases are often affected by specific pairings of hosts and pathogens and therefore by both of their genomes. The integration of a pair of genomes into genome-wide association mapping can provide an exquisitely detailed view of the genetic landscape of complex traits. We present a statistical method, ATOMM (Analysis…
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Mapping an ancient city with a century of remotely sensed data [Anthropology]The rapidly growing global population places cultural heritage at great risk, and the encroachment of modern settlement on archaeological sites means that valuable information about how past societies worked and interacted with the environment is lost. To manage and mitigate these risks, we require knowledge about what has been lost…
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Gene cluster conservation provides insight into cercosporin biosynthesis and extends production to the genus Colletotrichum [Agricultural Sciences]Species in the genus Cercospora cause economically devastating diseases in sugar beet, maize, rice, soy bean, and other major food crops. Here, we sequenced the genome of the sugar beet pathogen Cercospora beticola and found it encodes 63 putative secondary metabolite gene clusters, including the cercosporin toxin biosynthesis (CTB) cluster….
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Potent and selective antitumor activity of a T cell-engaging bispecific antibody targeting a membrane-proximal epitope of ROR1 [Applied Biological Sciences]T cell-engaging bispecific antibodies (biAbs) present a promising strategy for cancer immunotherapy, and numerous bispecific formats have been developed for retargeting cytolytic T cells toward tumor cells. To explore the therapeutic utility of T cell-engaging biAbs targeting the receptor tyrosine kinase ROR1, which is expressed by tumor cells of various…
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

In vitro reconstitution of sortase-catalyzed pilus polymerization reveals structural elements involved in pilin cross-linking [Biochemistry]Covalently cross-linked pilus polymers displayed on the cell surface of Gram-positive bacteria are assembled by class C sortase enzymes. These pilus-specific transpeptidases located on the bacterial membrane catalyze a two-step protein ligation reaction, first cleaving the LPXTG motif of one pilin protomer to form an acyl-enzyme intermediate and then joining…
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Sequential activation of human signal recognition particle by the ribosome and signal sequence drives efficient protein targeting [Biochemistry]Signal recognition particle (SRP) is a universally conserved targeting machine that mediates the targeted delivery of ∼30% of the proteome. The molecular mechanism by which eukaryotic SRP achieves efficient and selective protein targeting remains elusive. Here, we describe quantitative analyses of completely reconstituted human SRP (hSRP) and SRP receptor (SR)….
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Protein kinase C{alpha} gain-of-function variant in Alzheimer’s disease displays enhanced catalysis by a mechanism that evades down-regulation [Biochemistry]Conventional protein kinase C (PKC) family members are reversibly activated by binding to the second messengers Ca2+ and diacylglycerol, events that break autoinhibitory constraints to allow the enzyme to adopt an active, but degradation-sensitive, conformation. Perturbing these autoinhibitory constraints, resulting in protein destabilization, is one of many mechanisms by which…
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Structural basis for MTR4-ZCCHC8 interactions that stimulate the MTR4 helicase in the nuclear exosome-targeting complex [Biochemistry]The nuclear exosome-targeting (NEXT) complex functions as an RNA exosome cofactor and is involved in surveillance and turnover of aberrant transcripts and noncoding RNAs. NEXT is a ternary complex composed of the RNA-binding protein RBM7, the scaffold zinc-knuckle protein ZCCHC8, and the helicase MTR4. While RNA interactions with RBM7 are…
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Dynamic action potential clamp predicts functional separation in mild familial and severe de novo forms of SCN2A epilepsy [Biophysics and Computational Biology]De novo variants in SCN2A developmental and epileptic encephalopathy (DEE) show distinctive genotype–phenotype correlations. The two most recurrent SCN2A variants in DEE, R1882Q and R853Q, are associated with different ages and seizure types at onset. R1882Q presents on day 1 of life with focal seizures, while infantile spasms is the…
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Transcription factor profiling reveals molecular choreography and key regulators of human retrotransposon expression [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Transposable elements (TEs) represent a substantial fraction of many eukaryotic genomes, and transcriptional regulation of these factors is important to determine TE activities in human cells. However, due to the repetitive nature of TEs, identifying transcription factor (TF)-binding sites from ChIP-sequencing (ChIP-seq) datasets is challenging. Current algorithms are focused on…
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Activated integrins identify functional antigen-specific CD8+ T cells within minutes after antigen stimulation [Immunology and Inflammation]Immediate β2-integrin activation upon T cell receptor stimulation is critical for effective interaction between T cells and their targets and may therefore be used for the rapid identification and isolation of functional T cells. We present a simple and sensitive flow cytometry-based assay to assess antigen-specific T cells using fluorescent…
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Mesenchymal MAPKAPK2/HSP27 drives intestinal carcinogenesis [Medical Sciences]Mesenchymal cells in the microenvironment of cancer exert important functions in tumorigenesis; however, little is known of intrinsic pathways that mediate these effects. MAPK signals, such as from MAPKAPK2 (MK2) are known to modulate tumorigenesis, yet their cell-specific role has not been determined. Here, we studied the cell-specific role of…
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Role of CD40 and ADAMTS13 in von Willebrand factor-mediated endothelial cell-platelet-monocyte interaction [Medical Sciences]Monocyte extravasation into the vessel wall is a key step in atherogenesis. It is still elusive how monocytes transmigrate through the endothelial cell (EC) monolayer at atherosclerosis predilection sites. Platelets tethered to ultra-large von Willebrand factor (ULVWF) multimers deposited on the luminal EC surface following CD40 ligand (CD154) stimulation may…
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

KDM4B protects against obesity and metabolic dysfunction [Medical Sciences]Although significant progress has been made in understanding epigenetic regulation of in vitro adipogenesis, the physiological functions of epigenetic regulators in metabolism and their roles in obesity remain largely elusive. Here, we report that KDM4B (lysine demethylase 4B) in adipose tissues plays a critical role in energy balance, oxidation, lipolysis,…
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Metaproteomics method to determine carbon sources and assimilation pathways of species in microbial communities [Microbiology]Measurements of stable carbon isotope ratios (δ13C) are widely used in biology to address questions regarding food sources and metabolic pathways used by organisms. The analysis of these so-called stable isotope fingerprints (SIFs) for microbes involved in biogeochemical cycling and microbiota of plants and animals has led to major discoveries…
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Maturation of polycistronic mRNAs by the endoribonuclease RNase Y and its associated Y-complex in Bacillus subtilis [Microbiology]Endonucleolytic cleavage within polycistronic mRNAs can lead to differential stability, and thus discordant abundance, among cotranscribed genes. RNase Y, the major endonuclease for mRNA decay in Bacillus subtilis, was originally identified for its cleavage activity toward the cggR-gapA operon, an event that differentiates the synthesis of a glycolytic enzyme from…
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
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NT3-chitosan enables de novo regeneration and functional recovery in monkeys after spinal cord injury [Neuroscience]Spinal cord injury (SCI) often leads to permanent loss of motor, sensory, and autonomic functions. We have previously shown that neurotrophin3 (NT3)-loaded chitosan biodegradable material allowed for prolonged slow release of NT3 for 14 weeks under physiological conditions. Here we report that NT3-loaded chitosan, when inserted into a 1-cm gap…
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Doc2-mediated superpriming supports synaptic augmentation [Neuroscience]Various forms of synaptic plasticity underlie aspects of learning and memory. Synaptic augmentation is a form of short-term plasticity characterized by synaptic enhancement that persists for seconds following specific patterns of stimulation. The mechanisms underlying this form of plasticity are unclear but are thought to involve residual presynaptic Ca2+. Here,…
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

A theta rhythm in macaque visual cortex and its attentional modulation [Neuroscience]Theta rhythms govern rodent sniffing and whisking, and human language processing. Human psychophysics suggests a role for theta also in visual attention. However, little is known about theta in visual areas and its attentional modulation. We used electrocorticography (ECoG) to record local field potentials (LFPs) simultaneously from areas V1, V2,…
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Mediator subunit MED31 is required for radial patterning of Arabidopsis roots [Plant Biology]Stem cell specification in multicellular organisms relies on the precise spatiotemporal control of RNA polymerase II (Pol II)-dependent gene transcription, in which the evolutionarily conserved Mediator coactivator complex plays an essential role. In Arabidopsis thaliana, SHORTROOT (SHR) and SCARECROW (SCR) orchestrate a transcriptional program that determines the fate and asymmetrical…
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

The glycerol backbone of phospholipids derives from noncarbohydrate precursors in starved lung cancer cells [Cell Biology]Cancer cells are reprogrammed to consume large amounts of glucose to support anabolic biosynthetic pathways. However, blood perfusion and consequently the supply with glucose are frequently inadequate in solid cancers. PEPCK-M (PCK2), the mitochondrial isoform of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), has been shown by us and others to be functionally expressed…
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

{beta}-Catenin-dependent mechanotransduction dates back to the common ancestor of Cnidaria and Bilateria [Developmental Biology]Although the genetic regulation of cellular differentiation processes is well established, recent studies have revealed the role of mechanotransduction on a variety of biological processes, including regulation of gene expression. However, it remains unclear how universal and widespread mechanotransduction is in embryonic development of animals. Here, we investigate mechanosensitive gene…
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Global signal of top-down control of terrestrial plant communities by herbivores [Ecology]The theory of “top-down” ecological regulation predicts that herbivory suppresses plant abundance, biomass, and survival but increases diversity through the disproportionate consumption of dominant species, which inhibits competitive exclusion. To date, these outcomes have been clear in aquatic ecosystems but not on land. We explicate this discrepancy using a meta-analysis…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
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Comprehensive phylogeny of ray-finned fishes (Actinopterygii) based on transcriptomic and genomic data [Evolution]Our understanding of phylogenetic relationships among bony fishes has been transformed by analysis of a small number of genes, but uncertainty remains around critical nodes. Genome-scale inferences so far have sampled a limited number of taxa and genes. Here we leveraged 144 genomes and 159 transcriptomes to investigate fish evolution…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Experimental evidence for delayed contingent cooperation among wild dwarf mongooses [Evolution]Many animals participate in biological markets, with strong evidence existing for immediate cooperative trades. In particular, grooming is often exchanged for itself or other commodities, such as coalitionary support or access to food and mates. More contentious is the possibility that nonhuman animals can rely on memories of recent events,…
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

CFH and VIPR2 as susceptibility loci in choroidal thickness and pachychoroid disease central serous chorioretinopathy [Genetics]Central serous chorioretinopathy (CSC) is a common disease affecting younger people and may lead to vision loss. CSC shares phenotypic overlap with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). As recent studies have revealed a characteristic increase of choroidal thickness in CSC, we conducted a genome-wide association study on choroidal thickness in 3,418…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

HCMV glycoprotein B subunit vaccine efficacy mediated by nonneutralizing antibody effector functions [Immunology and Inflammation]Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is the most common congenital infection worldwide, frequently causing hearing loss and brain damage in afflicted infants. A vaccine to prevent maternal acquisition of HCMV during pregnancy is necessary to reduce the incidence of infant disease. The glycoprotein B (gB) + MF59 adjuvant subunit vaccine platform is…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Protection from cytomegalovirus viremia following glycoprotein B vaccination is not dependent on neutralizing antibodies [Immunology and Inflammation]Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is an important pathogen in transplant patients and in congenital infection. Previously, we demonstrated that vaccination with a recombinant viral glycoprotein B (gB)/MF59 adjuvant formulation before solid organ transplant reduced viral load parameters post transplant. Reduced posttransplant viremia was directly correlated with antibody titers against gB consistent…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Aldehyde dehydrogenase 3A1 activation prevents radiation-induced xerostomia by protecting salivary stem cells from toxic aldehydes [Medical Sciences]Xerostomia (dry mouth) is the most common side effect of radiation therapy in patients with head and neck cancer and causes difficulty speaking and swallowing. Since aldehyde dehydrogenase 3A1 (ALDH3A1) is highly expressed in mouse salivary stem/progenitor cells (SSPCs), we sought to determine the role of ALDH3A1 in SSPCs using…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Selection of Plasmodium falciparum cytochrome B mutants by putative PfNDH2 inhibitors [Microbiology]Malaria control is threatened by a limited pipeline of effective pharmaceuticals against drug-resistant strains of Plasmodium falciparum. Components of the mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) are attractive targets for drug development, owing to exploitable differences between the parasite and human ETC. Disruption of ETC function interferes with metabolic processes including…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Increase in chemokine CXCL1 by ER{beta} ligand treatment is a key mediator in promoting axon myelination [Neuroscience]Estrogen receptor β (ERβ) ligands promote remyelination in mouse models of multiple sclerosis. Recent work using experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) has shown that ERβ ligands induce axon remyelination, but impact peripheral inflammation to varying degrees. To identify if ERβ ligands initiate a common immune mechanism in remyelination, central and peripheral…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Navigation of brain networks [Neuroscience]Understanding the mechanisms of neural communication in large-scale brain networks remains a major goal in neuroscience. We investigated whether navigation is a parsimonious routing model for connectomics. Navigating a network involves progressing to the next node that is closest in distance to a desired destination. We developed a measure to…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Local apoptotic-like mechanisms underlie complement-mediated synaptic pruning [Neuroscience]C1q, a member of the immune complement cascade, is implicated in the selective pruning of synapses by microglial phagocytosis. C1q-mediated synapse elimination has been shown to occur during brain development, while increased activation and complement-dependent synapse loss is observed in neurodegenerative diseases. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying C1q-controlled synaptic pruning…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Functional diversification of Arabidopsis SEC1-related SM proteins in cytokinetic and secretory membrane fusion [Plant Biology]Sec1/Munc18 (SM) proteins contribute to membrane fusion by interacting with Qa-SNAREs or nascent trans-SNARE complexes. Gymnosperms and the basal angiosperm Amborella have only a single SEC1 gene related to the KEULE gene in Arabidopsis. However, the genomes of most angiosperms including Arabidopsis encode three SEC1-related SM proteins of which only…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Limiting global-mean temperature increase to 1.5-2 {degrees}C could reduce the incidence and spatial spread of dengue fever in Latin America [Sustainability Sciences]The Paris Climate Agreement aims to hold global-mean temperature well below 2 °C and to pursue efforts to limit it to 1.5 °C above preindustrial levels. While it is recognized that there are benefits for human health in limiting global warming to 1.5 °C, the magnitude with which those societal…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Correction for Spence et al., Revealing the specificity of regulatory T cells in murine autoimmune diabetes [Correction]IMMUNOLOGY AND INFLAMMATION Correction for “Revealing the specificity of regulatory T cells in murine autoimmune diabetes,” by Allyson Spence, Whitney Purtha, Janice Tam, Shen Dong, Youmin Kim, Chia-Hsin Ju, Teague Sterling, Maki Nakayama, William H. Robinson, Jeffrey A. Bluestone, Mark S. Anderson, and Qizhi Tang, which was first published April…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Correction for Zhu et al., CSI1, PATROL1, and exocyst complex cooperate in delivery of cellulose synthase complexes to the plasma membrane [Correction]PLANT BIOLOGY Correction for “CSI1, PATROL1, and exocyst complex cooperate in delivery of cellulose synthase complexes to the plasma membrane,” by Xiaoyu Zhu, Shundai Li, Songqin Pan, Xiaoran Xin, and Ying Gu, which was first published March 26, 2018; 10.1073/pnas.1800182115 (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 115:E3578–E3587). The authors note that…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

In This Issue [This Week in PNAS]Mongooses recall cooperation to reciprocate in kind Dwarf mongooses. Image courtesy of Shannon Wild (photographer). Social animals exchange services, such as grooming, in return for others, such as enabling access to food and mates and warding off rival groups. However, whether nonhuman animals reciprocate based on a memory of recent…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
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Joint statement on EPA proposed rule and public availability of data [Editorials]We are writing in response to a proposed rule announced by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in a 24 April 2018 press release (1). The release reads, “The rule will ensure that the regulatory science underlying Agency actions is fully transparent, and that underlying scientific information is publicly available in…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

QnAs with Joanne Chory [QnAs]Few plant biologists would imagine the honor of a walk down a glitzy red carpet. However, that is where Joanne Chory, a member of the National Academy of Sciences and a professor at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies in La Jolla, California, found herself in December 2017. She, along…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Astronomical metronome of geological consequence [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]In PNAS, Kent et al. (1) describe a remarkable geochronologic correlation arising between the continental Triassic–Jurassic Newark Basin strata of eastern North America and the time-equivalent Chinle Formation of western North America that has far-reaching consequences for geology and astronomy, as follows. A Brief Retrospective In geology, a reliable “metronome”…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Resolving the ray-finned fish tree of life [Evolution]The Challenge of Reconstructing Fish Phylogeny When it comes to vertebrate evolutionary history, our understanding of lobe-finned fishes—the branch of the vertebrate tree leading to coelacanths plus the tetrapods (amphibians, turtles, birds, crocodiles, lizards, snakes, and mammals)—far outstrips our knowledge of ray-finned fishes (Actinopterygii). Actinopterygians exhibit extraordinary species ri
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Recombinant cytomegalovirus glycoprotein B vaccine: Rethinking the immunological basis of protection [Immunology and Inflammation]Development and licensure of a vaccine against human CMV infection is a major public health priority. Although the major driving force for a CMV vaccine is prevention of congenital infection—since CMV is the most common viral cause of permanent neurodevelopmental disability in infants globally (1)—other patient populations, in particular recipients…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Fluctuating radiocarbon offsets observed in the southern Levant and implications for archaeological chronology debates [Anthropology]Considerable work has gone into developing high-precision radiocarbon (14C) chronologies for the southern Levant region during the Late Bronze to Iron Age/early Biblical periods (∼1200–600 BC), but there has been little consideration whether the current standard Northern Hemisphere 14C calibration curve (IntCal13) is appropriate for this region. We measured 14C…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Consequences of resistance evolution in a Cas9-based sex conversion-suppression gene drive for insect pest management [Applied Biological Sciences]The use of a site-specific homing-based gene drive for insect pest control has long been discussed, but the easy design of such systems has become possible only with the recent establishment of CRISPR/Cas9 technology. In this respect, novel targets for insect pest management are provided by new discoveries regarding sex…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

MINFLUX monitors rapid molecular jumps with superior spatiotemporal resolution [Applied Physical Sciences]Compared with localization schemes solely based on evaluating patterns of molecular emission, the recently introduced single-molecule localization concept called MINFLUX and the fluorescence nanoscopies derived from it require up to orders of magnitude fewer emissions to attain single-digit nanometer resolution. Here, we demonstrate that the lower number of required fluorescence…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Metastable quasicrystal-induced nucleation in a bulk glass-forming liquid [Applied Physical Sciences]This study presents a unique Mg-based alloy composition in the Mg–Zn–Yb system which exhibits bulk metallic glass, metastable icosahedral quasicrystals (iQCs), and crystalline approximant phases in the as-cast condition. Microscopy revealed a smooth gradual transition from glass to QC. We also report the complete melting of a metastable eutectic phase…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Heme redox potentials hold the key to reactivity differences between nitric oxide reductase and heme-copper oxidase [Biochemistry]Despite high structural homology between NO reductases (NORs) and heme-copper oxidases (HCOs), factors governing their reaction specificity remain to be understood. Using a myoglobin-based model of NOR (FeBMb) and tuning its heme redox potentials (E°′) to cover the native NOR range, through manipulating hydrogen bonding to the proximal histidine ligand…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Fluctuating hydrogen-bond networks govern anomalous electron transfer kinetics in a blue copper protein [Biophysics and Computational Biology]We combine experimental and computational methods to address the anomalous kinetics of long-range electron transfer (ET) in mutants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa azurin. ET rates and driving forces for wild type (WT) and three N47X mutants (X = L, S, and D) of Ru(2,2′-bipyridine)2 (imidazole)(His83) azurin are reported. An enhanced ET…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Convergent evolution of tertiary structure in rhodopsin visual proteins from vertebrates and box jellyfish [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Box jellyfish and vertebrates are separated by >500 million years of evolution yet have structurally analogous lens eyes that employ rhodopsin photopigments for vision. All opsins possess a negatively charged residue—the counterion—to maintain visible-light sensitivity and facilitate photoisomerization of their retinaldehyde chromophore. In vertebrate rhodopsins, the molecular evolution of the…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

How electrostatic networks modulate specificity and stability of collagen [Biophysics and Computational Biology]One-quarter of the 28 types of natural collagen exist as heterotrimers. The oligomerization state of collagen affects the structure and mechanics of the extracellular matrix, providing essential cues to modulate biological and pathological processes. A lack of high-resolution structural information limits our mechanistic understanding of collagen heterospecific self-assembly. Here, the…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

An intermediate along the recovery stroke of myosin VI revealed by X-ray crystallography and molecular dynamics [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Myosins form a class of actin-based, ATPase motor proteins that mediate important cellular functions such as cargo transport and cell motility. Their functional cycle involves two large-scale swings of the lever arm: the force-generating powerstroke, which takes place on actin, and the recovery stroke during which the lever arm is…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
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Inner Workings: Microscopy lights up stem cells in action [Cell Biology]As developmental and cell biologist Valentina Greco stood on a stage in Philadelphia last December, candid time-lapse shots of some of the body’s most elusive cells flashed behind her in quick succession. These stem cells, photographed in a living mouse, were caught in the acts of dividing, differentiating, and interacting…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

TAp73 contributes to the oxidative stress response by regulating protein synthesis [Cell Biology]TAp73 is a transcription factor that plays key roles in brain development, aging, and cancer. At the cellular level, TAp73 is a critical homeostasis-maintaining factor, particularly following oxidative stress. Although major studies focused on TAp73 transcriptional activities have indicated a contribution of TAp73 to cellular metabolism, the mechanisms underlying its…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Unimolecular reaction of acetone oxide and its reaction with water in the atmosphere [Chemistry]Criegee intermediates (i.e., carbonyl oxides with two radical sites) are known to be important atmospheric reagents; however, our knowledge of their reaction kinetics is still limited. Although experimental methods have been developed to directly measure the reaction rate constants of stabilized Criegee intermediates, the experimental results cover limited temperature ranges…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

A molecular perspective for global modeling of upper atmospheric NH3 from freezing clouds [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]Ammonia plays a key role in the neutralization of atmospheric acids such as sulfate and nitrates. A few in situ observations have supported the theory that gas-phase NH3 concentrations should decrease sharply with altitude and be extremely low in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS). This theory, however, seems…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Empirical evidence for stability of the 405-kiloyear Jupiter-Venus eccentricity cycle over hundreds of millions of years [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]The Newark–Hartford astrochronostratigraphic polarity timescale (APTS) was developed using a theoretically constant 405-kiloyear eccentricity cycle linked to gravitational interactions with Jupiter–Venus as a tuning target and provides a major timing calibration for about 30 million years of Late Triassic and earliest Jurassic time. While the 405-ky cycle is both unimodal…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Dynamic regimes of electrified liquid filaments [Engineering]We investigate the dynamics of an electrified liquid filament in a nozzle-to-substrate configuration with a close separation. The interplay between compressive viscous and electrostatic stresses dictates previously undocumented transitions between dynamic regimes of “jetting,” “coiling,” and “whipping.” In particular, the onsets of both coiling and whipping instabilities are significantly influenc
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Geometric hydrodynamics via Madelung transform [Mathematics]We introduce a geometric framework to study Newton’s equations on infinite-dimensional configuration spaces of diffeomorphisms and smooth probability densities. It turns out that several important partial differential equations of hydrodynamical origin can be described in this framework in a natural way. In particular, the Madelung transform between the Schrödinger equation…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Face recognition accuracy of forensic examiners, superrecognizers, and face recognition algorithms [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]Achieving the upper limits of face identification accuracy in forensic applications can minimize errors that have profound social and personal consequences. Although forensic examiners identify faces in these applications, systematic tests of their accuracy are rare. How can we achieve the most accurate face identification: using people and/or machines working…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Implications of Zika virus and congenital Zika syndrome for the number of live births in Brazil [Social Sciences]An increase in microcephaly, associated with an epidemic of Zika virus (ZIKV) in Brazil, prompted the World Health Organization to declare a Public Health Emergency of International Concern in February 2016. While knowledge on biological and epidemiological aspects of ZIKV has advanced, demographic impacts remain poorly understood. This study uses…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Patterns of everyday activities across social contexts [Social Sciences]Social-scientific theory and research give rise to conflicting expectations regarding the extent to which individuals’ everyday lives in modern society follow predictable patterns of behavior. Much previous research has addressed this issue implicitly by documenting widespread trends in patterns of “time use” or “time allocation,” including trends in time devoted…
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Science | The Guardian
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The Guardian view on the ethics of AI: it’s about Dr Frankenstein, not his monster | EditorialGoogle’s ethical principles for the use of artificial intelligence are little more than a smokescreen, but they show that many engineers are rightly worried by the possible uses of the technology they’re developing Frankenstein’s monster haunts discussions of the ethics of artificial intelligence: the fear is that scientists will create something that has purposes and even desires of its own and w
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The Atlantic
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Images From Ramadan 2018This year’s Ramadan, the Islamic month of fasting and prayer, will come to a close with Eid al-Fitr, the festival of the breaking of the fast, on June 14. For the past month, Muslims around the world have refrained from eating, drinking, smoking, and having sex during daylight hours in order to focus on spirituality, good deeds, and charity. Collected here, a look at the traditions, ceremonies, f
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The Atlantic
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The Balloonfest That Went Horribly WrongIn the popular imagination, balloons often represent freedom and joy. But as every adult knows, there is also a profound disillusionment that accompanies the release of a balloon as a child—namely, what goes up must come down, and often with a loud pop. And so it went with the 1.5 million balloons that were released in September 1986 over the city of Cleveland. The United Way of Cleveland, a nonp
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Carrying stand-by-antibiotics encourages travelers to careless antibiotic useTravelers carrying standby antibiotics take them more often than those traveling without such drugs, shows a recent study conducted at the University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital. Having antibiotics packed in the bags allows their use — against recommendations — also for mild and moderate diarrhea.
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Big Think
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How to become a millionaireBecoming a millionaire is not out of grasp for the ordinary person. Here are tried and tested methods for wealth creation to get your plan in action. Read More
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Big Think
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Heavy drinking increases the risk of Alzheimer’s, and now we know whyDrinking heavily over a long period of time has been known to cause early-onset Alzheimer’s. But the forces behind this phenomenon have been a mystery, until now. Read More
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Live Science
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There Are Vast Clouds of Tiny, Shimmering Diamonds Hiding All Over Our GalaxyThe little glowing diamonds have been screwing up research into the Big Bang for years, but scientists only just found the culprit.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Scientists unravel molecular mechanisms of Parkinson's diseaseDetailed brain cell analysis has helped researchers uncover new mechanisms thought to underlie Parkinson's disease.
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Scientific American Content: Global
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CRISPR-Edited Cells Linked to Cancer Risk in 2 StudiesThe preliminary findings raise questions about one of the ways this tech edits genomes — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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David vs Goliath: How a small molecule can defeat asthma attacksAn invisible particle enters your lungs. The next thing you know breathing becomes difficult. You are having as asthma attack. Asthma is one of the most common and difficult to endure chronic conditions. About 30 million Americans experience asthma attacks and 3 million have a severe, therapy-resistant form of the disease. In some cases, the condition can be fatal.
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Live Science
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Watch Strange, Glowing Bacteria Harpoon and Swallow DNA to EvolveAn astonishing new video shows a bacterium reach out into space, snatch a piece of DNA and stuff that DNA into its own body.
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Big Think
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North Korea agrees to ‘complete denuclearization’ at summit, but details are fewIn an unprecedented summit on Tuesday, North Korea has pledged to denuclearize the Korean Peninsula, though the vague promise comes with significant concessions from the U.S. Read More
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Study links content of service members' art to their trauma levelsA new study conducted at the National Intrepid Center of Excellence found that military service members recovering from PTSD who still identified as a member of a unit have lower levels of psychological injuries.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

A new kind of vaccine based on spider silkIn order to strengthen the efficacy of vaccines on the immune system — and in particular on T lymphocytes, specialized in the detection of cancer cells — researchers from the universities of Geneva, Freiburg, Munich, and Bayreuth, in collaboration with the German company AMSilk, have developed spider silk microcapsules capable of delivering the vaccine directly to the heart of immune cells.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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New technology has bright prospects for understanding plant biodiversityBiologists get a new look at plant biodiversity and function with new imaging technology developed at the University of Alberta.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Structural biology: Until the last cutRibosomes are the cell's protein factories. Researchers from Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich have now structurally characterized late stages in the assembly of the human small ribosomal subunit, yielding detailed insights into their maturation principles.
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Science | The Guardian
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Einstein's travel diaries reveal 'shocking' xenophobiaPrivate journals kept by the scientist and humanitarian icon show prejudiced attitudes towards the people he met while travelling in Asia The publication of Albert Einstein’s private diaries detailing his tour of Asia in the 1920s reveals the theoretical physicist and humanitarian icon’s racist attitudes to the people he met on his travels, particularly the Chinese. Written between October 1922 a
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Science : NPR
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Meanwhile, Scott Pruitt …Greek yogurt, mattresses and environmental deregulation. (Image credit: Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
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Scientific American Content: Global
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Rising Temperatures Could Cut Corn ProductionUnrestrained warming could reduce yields of the staple crop, as well as many vegetables and legumes — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Quanta Magazine
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The Universe Is Not a Simulation, but We Can Now Simulate ItIn the early 2000s, a small community of coder-cosmologists set out to simulate the 14-billion-year history of the universe on a supercomputer. They aimed to create a proxy of the cosmos, a Cliffs Notes version in computer code that could run in months instead of giga-years, to serve as a laboratory for studying the real universe. The simulations failed spectacularly. Like mutant cells in a petri
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Bacterial enzymes: The biological role of europiumRare earth elements (REEs) are an indispensable component of the digital technologies that are now an integral part of our everyday life. Yet their biological role has been discovered only recently. A few years ago it became apparent that these metals are essential elements for methano- and methylotrophic bacteria. One representative is the bacterium Methylacidiphilum fumariolicum SolV, which was
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

International collaboration studies the predictability of earthquakesAt four centers in California, New Zealand, Europe and Japan — and in countless labs across the globe — CSEP's experiments and its rigorous testing procedures have shed light on the predictability of earthquakes, according to a special focus section published June 13 in Seismological Research Letters.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
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This heavy element has a football-shaped atomic nucleusThree nobelium isotopes have oblong nuclei, and some sport a ‘bubble’ center.
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New Scientist – News
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Psychedelics may help your brain cells form new connectionsLSD and other members of the psychedelic family make neurons grow more branches, potentially explaining how they might treat depression
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Big Think
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Bizarre film trailer created by White House for Kim Jong-un is totally TrumpianIt’s not clear, though, whether the “trailer” is meant to influence Kim Jong-un or #45’s fans. Read More
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Scientists have sized up the heaviest atomic nucleus yetThree nobelium isotopes have oblong nuclei, and some sport a ‘bubble’ center.
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Ekstrem varme slår Afrikas tusind år gamle baobabtræer ihjelDe ældste baobabtræer er 2.500 år gamle. Men de seneste 12 år er de begyndt at uddø. Måske på grund af klimaforandringer, vurderer forskere.
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This Bubble Artisan Might Blow Up, But She Won't Go PopMelody Yang knows that bubbles are a lot like us—they need water, air, and a loving touch in order to thrive.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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International collaboration studies the predictability of earthquakesSince 2007, the Collaboratory for the Study of Earthquake Predictability or CSEP has been studying earthquake forecast models to find out how well each model stacks up against its competitors, and how well each forecast predicts later seismic activity.
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The Atlantic
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Apple's Airpods Are an OmenThe moment I put the Apple AirPods in my ears, I feel like I’ve already dropped them in the toilet. They are so small and slippery. The mere act of removing these precious, wireless ear buds from their lozenge-shaped case makes them feel like a futuristic cure to unknown ills. I am late to adopt them, so I indulge a marvel. I take one out of an ear; this time I feel like I’m sure to ingest it, ev
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Researchers map the genome of testicular cancerIn a collaborative, multi-institution effort to map the genetic and genomic changes in cancer, researchers led by UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center's Katherine Hoadley, Ph.D., analyzed 137 testicular germ cell tumors for potential mutations and other molecular changes. They identified molecular features of testicular germ cell cancers that could inform future efforts to improve treatment
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Troves from a search for new biomarkers: blood-borne RNAScientists have found a new way to trawl blood samples for snippets of RNA released by tumors or diseased organs. The method might eventually help doctors diagnose and track a wide range of medical conditions.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New GAIA data reveals mergers in Milky WayUniversity of Groningen astronomers have discovered relics of merger events in the Milky Way halo. Five small groups of stars appear to represent mergers with smaller galaxies, while a big 'blob' comprising hundreds of stars appears to be the remnant of a large merger event. These results were published in The Astrophysical Journal Letters on 12 June.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Core electron topologies in chemical bondingYNU researchers resolve the age-old mystery of why silicon cannot replace carbon in organic compounds. A new benchmark quantum chemical calculation of C2, Si2, and their hydrides for the first time reveals a qualitative difference in the topologies of core electron orbitals of organic molecules and their silicon analogues. Other elements with a similar propensity as carbon to reshape their core el
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Video conferencing helps PCPs improve liver disease care, survival ratesProviding physicians with virtual access to specialists can be lifesaving to liver disease patients. A new study by University of Michigan gastroenterologists finds that it boosts survival rates by 54 percent.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Dr. Robert Myerburg contributes editorial to JAMA on ECG screening and cardiac risksRobert J. Myerburg, M.D., professor of medicine and physiology, and the American Heart Association Chair in Cardiovascular Research at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, contributed an editorial to the Journal of the American Medical Association placing in perspective some of the conclusions in new recommendations from the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) regarding the us
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New Scientist – News
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Antimatter neutrinos caught shape-shifting between flavoursWe’ve seen antineutrinos morphing from one ‘flavour’ to another, and it could help us figure out why the universe is full of normal matter and not antimatter
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

David vs Goliath: How a small molecule can defeat asthma attacksSmall molecule PM-43I prevented and reversed preexisting allergic airway disease in mice and cleared through the kidneys with no long-term toxicity.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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People more likely to trust, cooperate if they can tolerate ambiguity, study findsNew research published in Nature Communications indicates that individuals who are tolerant of ambiguity — a kind of uncertainty in which the odds of an outcome are unknown — are more likely to cooperate with and trust other people.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Composition of complex sugars in breast milk may prevent future food allergiesThe unique composition of a mother's breastmilk may help to reduce food sensitization in her infant, report researchers at the University of California San Diego School of Medicine with colleagues in Canada. The findings, publishing in the June 15 issue of Allergy, further highlight the health role of human milk oligosaccharides (HMOs), which are not found in infant formula, and underscore their p
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Study: Today's dads are engaging more with their kidsWhether it's physically being there for a baseball game or piano recital, or emotionally being there to provide warmth or support in a tough time, there appears to be a shift in how fathers are viewing their roles.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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The true power of the solar windThe planets and moons of our solar system are continuously being bombarded by particles from the sun. On the Moon or on Mercury, the uppermost layer of rock is gradually eroded by the impact of sun particles. New results show that previous models of this process are incomplete. The effects of solar wind bombardment are much more drastic than previously thought.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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The loss of a parent is the most common cause of brood failure in blue titsComplete brood failure in blue tits is almost always associated with the sudden and permanent disappearance of one of the parents. Scientists show in their study that the remaining parent substantially increased its effort to raise at least some of the chicks, which turned out to be successful in two thirds of the nests.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Farmers increasingly relying on agricultural contractorsMore farmers are relying on external companies to carry out major work, new research shows.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Sea urchins see with their feetSea urchins lack eyes, but can see with their tentacle-like tube feet instead, previous research has indicated. Now, researchers have tested their vision in a new study, and shown that while sea urchins have fairly low resolution vision — it is good enough to fulfill their basic needs.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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New optical sensor can determine if molecules are left or right 'handed'A team has designed a nanostructured optical sensor that for the first time can efficiently detect molecular chirality — a property of molecular spatial twist that defines its biochemical properties.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Citizen science: A powerful tool to combat invasive giant slugsWith the help of citizen science, researchers have unraveled the close correlation between weather conditions and the appearances of a giant slug species, enabling them to predict the slug's activity on the following day.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Better physical fitness and lower aortic stiffness key to slower brain agingThe rate of decline in certain aspects of memory may be explained by a combination of overall physical fitness and the stiffness of the central arteries.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Long periods of viral suppression shown to reduce cancer risk in aging HIV populationEarly, sustained antiretroviral therapy (ART), which results in long-term viral suppression, helps to prevent AIDS-defining cancers and also non-AIDS-defining cancers, to a lesser degree. However, patients with long-term viral suppression still had excess cancer risk compared to uninfected patients.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Volcanic activity, declining ocean oxygen triggered mass extinction of ancient organismsGlobal climate change, fueled by skyrocketing levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide, is siphoning oxygen from today's oceans at an alarming pace — so fast that scientists aren't entirely sure how the planet will respond.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Orange peels may hold secret to airborne medicine, safer bridgesEngineers have figured out the mechanics of how oranges release that thin stream of fragrant oil when squeezed. They characterized the orange peels' structure and figured out the role the layers have to create the microjet dynamic. By mimicking nature's mechanism of an orange layer, pharmaceutical companies may be able to develop a less expensive and less complex way to deliver airborne medication
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Predicted environmental changes could significantly reduce global production of vegetablesThe global production of vegetables and legumes, which are an important part of healthy diets, could be significantly reduced through predicted future changes to the environment, according to new research.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Fueling a deep-sea ecosystemMiles beneath the ocean's surface in the dark abyss, vast communities of subseafloor microbes at deep-sea hot springs are converting chemicals into energy that allows deep-sea life to survive — and even thrive — in a world without sunlight. Until now, however, measuring the productivity of subseafloor microbe communities — or how fast they oxidize chemicals and the amount of carbon they produce
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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RNA changes aided sunflower's rapid evolutionary transformation, domesticationA new study sheds light on the genetic mechanisms that allowed sunflowers to undergo a relatively rapid evolutionary transition from wild to domesticated in just over 5,000 years.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Warmer climate will dramatically increase the volatility of global corn cropsWarmer temperatures by the end of this century will dramatically increase the volatility in global supplies of corn, the most widely grown crop in the world.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Regenerative bandage accelerates healing in diabetic woundsResearchers have developed a new device, called a regenerative bandage, that quickly heals painful, hard-to-treat sores without using drugs. During head-to-head tests, the new bandage healed diabetic wounds 33 percent faster than one of the most popular bandages currently on the market.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Genetic markers for prostate cancerScientists found telltale genetic markers that can be used to predict those most at risk of prostate cancer, a disease common for older men.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Drug may quell deadly immune response when trauma spills the contents of our cells' powerhousesWhen trauma spills the contents of our cell powerhouses, it can evoke a potentially deadly immune response much like a severe bacterial infection.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Diamond dust shimmering around distant starsSome of the tiniest diamonds in the universe — bits of crystalline carbon hundreds of thousands of times smaller than a grain of sand — have been detected swirling around three infant star systems in the Milky Way. These microscopic gemstones are neither rare nor precious; they are, however, exciting for astronomers who identified them as the source of a mysterious cosmic microwave 'glow' emanat
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Physicists create new class of 2D artificial materialsIn 1965, a renowned physicist theorized that ferroelectric metals could conduct electricity despite not existing in nature. For decades, scientists thought it would be impossible to prove the theory by Philip W. Anderson, who shared the 1977 Nobel Prize in physics. It was like trying to blend fire and water, but a Rutgers-led international team of scientists has verified the theory.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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New target for treating heart failureChanges in cellular struts called microtubules (MT) can affect the stiffness of diseased human heart muscle cells, and reversing these modifications can lessen the stiffness and improve the beating strength of these cells isolated from transplant patients with heart failure. Investigators aim to develop therapies that seek out the damaged MTs to reverse their harmful influence.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Key difference between humans and other mammals is skin deepWhile humans and other species share some of the same genetic information, new research found that humans are unique among mammals when it comes to the types and diversity of microorganisms on our skin. This difference could have implications for our health and immune systems.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Slips of the ear: When knowledge deceives perceptionMisperception of speech results from a weak representation of the difference between what we expect to hear and what is actually said, according to a human neuroimaging study. The research provides new evidence for how the brain creates perceptual illusions when speech is degraded at cocktail parties, in song lyrics or for older listeners.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Reviving the protector: New tactic against medulloblastomaScientists have a new tactic with potential for fighting medulloblastoma, the most common and most aggressive form of brain tumor in children.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Drug targets metabolic vulnerability and impairs cancer cell growth and survivalA new drug inhibits a vital metabolic process required for cancer cells' growth and survival.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Post-stroke delivery of neurotrophic factor MANF promotes functional recovery in ratsThe neurotrophic factor MANF is neuroprotective when administered before experimental stroke. MANF also promoted reversal of stroke-induced behavioural impairments when administered directly into rat brain tissue 2 to 3 days after stroke.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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New type of depression identifiedDepression is a mental disorder that affects over 300 million people around the world. While treatments exist, many of them are based on one hypothesis of how depression arises. Patients that do not fit this mold may not be getting benefits. A new study shed light on how one protein called RGS8 plays a role in depression behaviors.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Approaching an ideal amino acid synthesis using hydrogenResearchers demonstrated a reductive alkylation method for the functionalization of substituted amines using hydrogen, which is efficiently catalyzed by innocuous main-group catalysts. Their reaction generated water as the sole byproduct. The presented reaction is highly versatile and environmentally benign, and therefore expected to be applied to wide areas of chemical synthesis.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
50
Solar cells combining silicon with perovskite have achieved record efficiency of 25.2 percentResearchers have combined silicon- and perovskite-based solar cells. The resulting efficiency of 25.2 percent is a record for this type of tandem cell. Their innovative yet simple manufacturing technique could be directly integrated into existing production lines, and efficiency could eventually rise above 30 percent.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
6
Manipulated enzymesResearchers managed for the first time ever to 'retrain' an enzyme to build ring-shaped molecular structures instead of performing its natural task of reducing double bonds. The work is relevant for the production of pharmaceuticals and plant protection products.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
9
Artificial gene defect reveals target to fight genetic diseaseFanconi anemia (FA) is caused by defective genes for DNA-repair leading to bone marrow failure, developmental abnormalities and increased cancer risk. Using genome-wide genetic approaches, researchers systematically screened for the loss of an additional gene that could rescue the disease — and found it. The corresponding protein turned out to be a potential target that could be therapeutically e
4h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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New 28-GHz transceiver paves the way for future 5G devicesScientists have designed and fabricated a tiny, but incredibly fast, reliable, and accurate 28-GHz transceiver meant for stable high-speed 5G communications. The fabricated transceiver trumps previous designs in various regards by taking a new approach for beam steering.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Deep-freezing of orange juice can increase the absorption of beneficial compoundsResearchers show how certain types of cold treatment that are used by the citrus fruits industry in the preparation of juices have a great impact on the color of orange juice and on the concentration and bioaccessibility of the carotenoids present in the juice.
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NYT > Science
200+
How Universities Deal With Sexual Harassment Needs Sweeping Change, Panel SaysCurrent policies and programs have failed overwhelmingly to address and prevent the problem, said a report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine.
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Live Science
26
Is 'Fortnite' Sending Kids to Therapy?Are kids becoming addicted to the world's most popular video game?
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Futurity.org
5
‘Smart antibiotics’ kill C. diff and spare good bacteriaA new approach to killing C. difficile that silences key bacterial genes while sparing other bacteria may provide a new way to treat the most common hospital-acquired bacterial infection in the United States, according to new research. While conventional antibiotics treat bacterial infections, they can also cause a condition in the colon called C. difficile infection, due to the drug killing both
4h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

National Academies report on sexual harassment in academiaA systemwide change to the culture and climate in higher education is needed to prevent and effectively respond to sexual harassment, says a new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Claiming credit for cyberattacksThe decision to acknowledge sponsorship of an attack is often linked to whether the attacker hopes to draw attention to a cause or to actually influence events, says political scientist Evan Perkoski.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Inequality: My unfair disadvantage, not your unearned privilegeEfforts to address social inequalities in income, education and employment opportunity can be boosted simply by the manner in which that inequity is presented. If you benefit from an inequity, how you handle the situation could depend upon how it is described to you, according to new research from Duke's Fuqua School of Business.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Recipe for perfect balance of breaks and repairs in our genome could help fight cancerScientists at the University of Sheffield have discovered what keeps the perfect balance of breaks and repairs in our DNA — something which could help improve the success of chemotherapy and combat neurodegeneration associated with ageing.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Temple scientists eradicate cancer cells through dual targeting of DNA repair mechanismsBRCA proteins serve a critical role in cellular DNA repair, but when mutated they allow genetic error replication, facilitating cancer development. If the repair system is disabled in cancer cells, they use backup repair mechanisms and adapt to alternative repair pathways, a survival mode that underlies their ability to evade targeted drug therapies.Now, Temple scientists show it's possible to eli
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

One-third of US adults may unknowingly use medications that can cause depressionA new study from University of Illinois at Chicago researchers suggests that more than one-third of U.S. adults may be using prescription medications that have the potential to cause depression or increase the risk of suicide.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Alzheimer's disease: How amyloid aggregates alter neuronal functionWhile the harmful effects of amyloid peptide aggregates observed in Alzheimer's disease are well established, the mechanism through which they act on brain cells remains ill-defined. Researchers from CNRS and universite de Bordeaux have just revealed that they alter the usual functioning of connections between neurons by interacting with a key enzyme of synaptic plasticity. The results will be pub
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Study identifies protein's role in mediating brain's response to stressA study led by Massachusetts General Hospital investigators has identified a critical role for a protein called Kruppel-like factor 9 in the brain's response to stress, which has implications for protecting against the effects of stress in conditions like major depression and post-traumatic stress disorder.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

USPSTF recommendation statement on screening for cardiovascular disease risk with ECGThe US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends against adding screening with electrocardiography (ECG) to standard risk assessment to prevent cardiovascular disease (CVD) events in adults without symptoms at low risk.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Is use of prescription medications with depression as possible side effect common?More than one-third of US adults may use prescription medications that have depression as a possible side effect.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

High-tech treatment of open leg wounds no better than using regular dressingsA new study of open leg fractures suggests there is no difference to patient recovery whether high-tech negative pressure wound therapy devices are used, compared to standard dressings.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

A call to neuroscientists to help reveal root causes of chemobrainThough well documented, cancer-related cognitive impairment (CRCI), known colloquially as chemobrain or chemofog, remains a mystery regarding its underlying neurological causes. In a Forum paper published June 12 in the journal Trends in Neurosciences, researchers at the National Cancer Institute propose a new approach to studying CRCI and call for changes in the way it's diagnosed.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
19
Psychedelic drugs promote neural plasticity in rats and fliesPsychedelic drugs may have mind-altering powers in the physical sense, too. A new study, published June 12 in the journal Cell Reports, found psychedelics, specifically DOI, DMT, and LSD, can change brain cells in rats and flies, making neurons more likely to branch out and connect with one another. The work supports the theory that psychedelics could help to fight depression, anxiety, addiction,
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
4
Psychedelic drugs, ketamine change structure of neuronsIn a paper published on June 12 in the journal Cell Reports, UC Davis researchers show that a wide range of psychedelic drugs, including LSD and MDMA, impact the structure and function of neurons, potentially leading to new treatments for depression, anxiety, and related disorders.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Indoor farms could fine-tune the flavours of our foodA new way to farm indoors using different wavelengths of light could boost the taste of fruits, salads and herbs, while also increasing food supply and nutritional value.
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Futurity.org
3
Biomarker suggests another perk of service dogs for veteransVeterans with post-traumatic stress disorder may benefit physiologically from using service dogs, new research shows. “Our long-term research goal is to quantify how service dogs may affect the health and well-being of military members and veterans with PTSD,” says Maggie O’Haire, assistant professor of human-animal interaction at Purdue University. “This study compared a group of veterans with P
5h
Popular Science
26
How to know if your post-workout pain is actually life-threatening rhabdoHealth There's such a thing as pushing yourself too hard. Intense muscle pain after exercise is usually just a minor case of overworked muscles. However, it can also be a sign of a far more serious condition.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Direct costs of Daimler diesel recall in Europe limitedAutomaker Daimler's recall and software fixes for 774,000 Mercedes-Benz cars and vans in Europe will likely cost close to or more than 100 million euros ($118 million.)
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
8
Inequality: My unfair disadvantage, not your unearned privilegeEfforts to address social inequalities in income, education and employment opportunity can be boosted simply by the manner in which that inequity is presented, according to new research from Duke University's Fuqua School of Business.
5h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Sexual harassment rampant in science, culture change urgedSexual harassment is rampant in academic science, and colleges and universities that train new scientists need a system-wide culture change so women won't be bullied out of the field, a national advisory group said Tuesday.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
8
New optical sensor can determine if molecules are left or right 'handed'A University of Central Florida team has designed a nanostructured optical sensor that for the first time can efficiently detect molecular chirality—a property of molecular spatial twist that defines its biochemical properties.
5h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
18
Potential new treatment for drug addiction relapse revealedResearch reveals a new potential mechanism for combating drug addiction relapse.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
12
Mother's attitude to baby during pregnancy may have implications for child's developmentMothers who 'connect' with their baby during pregnancy are more likely to interact in a more positive way with their infant after it is born, according to a new study. Interaction is important for helping infants learn and develop.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Novel system mimics focus activity of the human eyeWith aging comes deteriorating vision. At SIGGRAPH 2018, attendees will have the chance to test a new computational system that effectively mimics the natural way the human eye corrects focus, specifically while viewing objects that are closer rather than farther away.
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Ingeniøren
1
Machine learning finder frem til spionflyMens USA har opgivet at bruge machine learning til at opdage terrorister, tyr medier til samme metoder inden for kognitiv teknologi til at træne computere i at udpege spionfly anvendt af de amerikanske efterretningstjenester.
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New on MIT Technology Review
100+
Some day you may be able to monitor your stomach from your smartphone
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The Atlantic
94
How to Fight Amazon (Before You Turn 29)Tim Tomkinson Shortly after I met Lina Khan, her cellphone rang. The call was from a representative of a national organization, regarding a speech it had asked her to give. Khan was courteous on the phone, but she winced momentarily after hanging up. “That was the American Bar Association,” she confessed. “I don’t know if I’ve passed the bar yet.” This feeling—that Khan’s ideas are in high demand
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The Atlantic
3K
Trump Got Nearly Nothing From Kim Jong UnOn Tuesday, in Singapore, Donald Trump and Kim Jong Un shook hands, strode along colonnades, dined on stuffed cucumber and beef short rib confit, and signed a joint statement. But if this was, as Trump declared afterward, “a very important event in world history,” the president has little of substance to show for it beyond chummier relations with Kim—for the moment, at least. In the joint stateme
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The Atlantic
21
Yemen Is Not a SideshowAfter three years of a grinding, bloody stalemate, the war in Yemen may be reaching an inflection point. Hoping to deliver a knockout blow, the joint United Arab Emirates’ and Yemeni forces are moving up the Red Sea coast towards the port city of Hodeidah . The UAE aims to wrest it from the Houthi rebels, and, in so doing, deprive them of vital revenues, strike a psychological blow, and pressure
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
7
People who deeply grasp pain or happiness of others, process music differently in brainPeople who deeply grasp the pain or happiness of others also process music differently, say researchers at Southern Methodist University, Dallas and UCLA. The study in Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience compared MRI scans of low- and high-empathy people. Higher empathy people process music like a pleasurable proxy for a human encounter — in brain regions for reward and social awareness. The fin
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Beyond the 'Reading Wars': How the science of reading can improve literacyA new scientific report from an international team of psychological researchers aims to resolve the so-called 'reading wars,' emphasizing the importance of teaching phonics in establishing fundamental reading skills in early childhood. The report, published in Psychological Science in the Public Interest, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science, shows how early phonics skills are ad
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Novel system mimics focus activity of the human eyeAt SIGGRAPH 2018, attendees will have the chance to test a new computational system that effectively mimics the natural way the human eye corrects focus, specifically while viewing objects that are closer rather than farther away.
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
New optical sensor can determine if molecules are left or right 'handed'A University of Central Florida team has designed a nanostructured optical sensor that for the first time can efficiently detect molecular chirality — a property of molecular spatial twist that defines its biochemical properties.
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Getting to the heart of congenital cardiac defectsHeart defects are the most common type of birth defect, and can be caused by mutations in the gene CHD4. Researchers at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine have now revealed key molecular details of how CHD4 mutations lead to heart defects.
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Researchers map brain of blind patient who can see motionSince the visual processing centres of her brain went dark after a stroke, a Scottish woman has been unable to see objects. However, she has developed the remarkable ability to see objects in motion, neuroscientists at Western University in Canada have discovered.
5h
TED Talks Daily (SD video)
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The journey through loss and grief | Jason B. RosenthalIn her brutally honest, ironically funny and widely read meditation on death, "You May Want to Marry My Husband," the late author and filmmaker Amy Krouse Rosenthal gave her husband Jason very public permission to move on and find happiness. A year after her death, Jason offers candid insights on the often excruciating process of moving through and with loss — as well as some quiet wisdom for any
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Farmers increasingly relying on agricultural contractors, new research showsMore farmers are relying on external companies to carry out major work, new research shows.
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The Atlantic
300+
A Radically Woke and Deeply Conservative Commencement AddressIn a more equal world, Danielle Allen would be a lousy public speaker to offset her almost comically impressive resume. As an undergraduate at Princeton, she won a Marshall Scholarship to Cambridge. Then she completed a doctoral degree in classics and accepted a job at the University of Chicago. In her first four years there, while turning her dissertation on democratic Athens into a book and win
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Potential new treatment for drug addiction relapse revealedResearch published in Addiction Biology by scientists at the University of Bath reveals a new potential mechanism for combatting drug addiction relapse.
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Newly-approved therapy provides improved quality of life for midgut neuroendocrine tumor patientsThe Journal of Clinical Oncology published new data from the NETTER-1 clinical trial highlighting the impact of Lutathera on patients' quality of life. The results showed that treatment with Lutathera provides significantly longer time to deterioration of quality of life for patients compared to those treated with octreotide LAR alone.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Graphene carpets: So neurons communicate betterA work led by SISSA and published on Nature Nanotechnology reports for the first time experimentally the phenomenon of ion 'trapping' by graphene carpets and its effect on the communication between neurons. The researchers have observed an increase in the activity of nerve cells grown on a single layer of graphene. Combining theoretical and experimental approaches they have shown that the phenomen
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Rheumatology leaders urge HHS to adopt drug policy principles that protect patient accessIn response to the Trump Administration's American Patients First drug pricing blueprint, the American College of Rheumatology — which represents more than 7,700 rheumatologists and rheumatology health professionals in the US 0- today issued a set of policy principles that rheumatology leaders urge federal officials to adopt as they consider drug policy changes affecting the health care of chroni
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Sea urchins see with their feetSea urchins lack eyes, but can see with their tentacle-like tube feet instead, previous research has indicated. Now, researchers at Lund University in Sweden have tested their vision in a new study, and shown that while sea urchins have fairly low resolution vision — it is good enough to fulfil their basic needs.
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Breakthrough in lignin research: Spherical particles multiply enzyme efficiencyLignin, a pulp industry by-product, could replace fossil materials.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

The loss of a parent is the most common cause of brood failure in blue titsSingle parent males generally do worse, probably because they are not able to keep their chicks warm. Their findings are published today in the Journal of Animal Ecology.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Putting animals in their best light—Researchers find some shades of LED lamps threaten wildlifeA new generation of outdoor lights spreading across landscapes require greater scrutiny to reduce harm to wildlife, says a USC-led research group that developed a new tool to help fix the problem.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
30
Researchers create method that can quickly and accurately detect infectionsA new study by Waldemar Gorski, professor and chair of the UTSA Department of Chemistry, and Stanton McHardy, associate professor of research in chemistry and director of the UTSA Center for Innovative Drug Discovery, describes a method that could show quickly and accurately whether a person has been infected with harmful bacteria or other pathogens. Additionally, this new method shows the exact s
5h
Futurity.org
4
Drone delivery could make your medications cheaperResearchers have developed mathematical models aimed at understanding the costs and logistics of developing drone operation centers and determining the appropriate type and number of drones along with their optimal delivery routes. New technology in the form of drones has the potential to ease some of the burdens on rural patients and caregivers, but little is known about how drone-aided health c
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Science : NPR
500+
Fires And Drought Close Forests In Colorado And New MexicoIn southwestern Colorado, residents of more than 2,000 homes have been ordered to evacuate, and the San Juan National Forest is closed to visitors due to extreme risks. (Image credit: AP)
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Risk in supply chains differs by industry, new report findsA new joint report published today (12 June) by Cranfield School of Management and Dun & Bradstreet investigates the level of supply chain risk faced by European companies with international supplier relationships.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
38
New insights into the contribution of land ice to sea level riseA new study led by scientists from the University of Bristol has provided an up-to-date insight into the impact of melting land ice on sea levels.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Breakthrough in cell imaging could have major impact in crime labsA Virginia Commonwealth University researcher has developed a procedure for identifying the source of cells present in a forensic biological sample that could change how cell types are identified in samples across numerous industries.
5h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
60
A surprising twist on skyrmionsVortex structures are common in nature, reaching from swirls in our morning coffee to spiral galaxies in the universe. Vortices are been best known from fluid dynamics. Take the example of a tornado. Air circulates around an axis, forming a swirl, and once formed, the twisted air parcels can move, deform, and interact with their environment without disintegrating. A skyrmion is the magnetic versio
5h
Live Science
100+
Roadside C-Section Pulls a Live Fawn from a Dead DeerIn Oklahoma, a fawn was delivered by a roadside C-section after its mother was struck by a car and killed.
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The Atlantic
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Kim Jong Un’s Propaganda VictoryKim Jong Un is probably feeling pretty good right now. A year ago, the North Korean leader was trading threats with President Trump; on Tuesday, he was shaking hands with him in Singapore. And in what must count as the swiftest political rehabilitation since the Soviets freed political prisoners after Khrushchev denounced Stalin, Trump called Kim “a very talented man” who “loves his country very
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The Atlantic
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Trump’s Effusive, Unsettling Flattery of Kim Jong UnMonday evening, as Donald Trump and Kim Jong Un met in Singapore, ABC briefly preempted its popular show The Bachelorette to convey the important news. Some viewers were miffed, but they might have noticed some similarities between the two shows, from the pageantry to the semi-scripted, uncanny quasi-reality. And then there was President Trump himself, who, in his comments following his meetings
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
5
Making quantum puddlesA team of physicists at the University of Vermont have discovered a fundamentally new way surfaces can get wet. Their study may allow scientists to create the thinnest films of liquid ever made—and engineer a new class of surface coatings and lubricants just a few atoms thick.
6h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

How can patients be protected from post-surgery opioid addiction?Greater coordination is needed between surgeons and physicians about the prescription of pain-relieving opioid drugs following surgery to help identify patients who are at risk of becoming opioid addicts. This is according to Michael Klueh of the University of Michigan in the US who led a retrospective review of medical specialty areas to find out which are most likely to prescribe opioids for the
6h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Protective mechanism against atherosclerosis discoveredImmune cells promoting inflammation play a crucial role in the development of atherosclerosis. Scientists at CeMM and the Medical University of Vienna in collaboration with the University of Cambridge showed that a survival factor for those cells has also anti-inflammatory functions and a protective role in atherosclerosis. The study, published in Circulation, provides valuable new insight for ath
6h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Making quantum puddlesA team of physicists at the University of Vermont have discovered a fundamentally new way surfaces can get wet. Their study may allow scientists to create the thinnest films of liquid ever made–and engineer a new class of surface coatings and lubricants just a few atoms thick.
6h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Farmers increasingly relying on agricultural contractors, new research showsMore farmers are relying on external companies to carry out major work, new research shows.
6h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

More of the Chinese population will be exposed to heat wavesOne of the major concerns in climate change studies is how the thermal conditions for the living environment of human beings will change in the future. Scientists found that a general increase in effective temperature in the future leads to a large increase in population exposure to very hot days.
6h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

NIH initiative aims to tackle opioid misuse, addiction, enhance pain managementIn the JAMA Viewpoint, 'Helping to End Addiction Over the Long-Term: The Research Plan for the NIH HEAL Initiative,' National Institutes of Health Director Francis S. Collins, M.D., Ph.D., and coauthors discuss an interdisciplinary program aimed at advancing addiction and pain research in the United States to improve treatments for opioid misuse and addiction and to enhance pain management.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

NIH leadership outlines interdisciplinary FY2018 research plan for HEAL InitiativeIn a perspective published today in The Journal of the American Medical Association, National Institutes of Health leadership detail components of a newly released research plan for the Helping to End Addiction Long-term (HEAL) Initiative. The HEAL Initiative is a trans-NIH effort launched in April 2018 to advance national priorities in addressing the opioid crisis through science.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Children with kidney disease show blood flow changes in brainBlood flow changes in the brains of children, adolescents and young adults with chronic kidney disease may explain why many face a higher risk of cognitive impairment, according to a new study.
6h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Smoking and diabetes linked to brain calcificationsPeople who smoke or have diabetes may be at increased risk of calcifications in a region of the brain crucial to memory, according to a new study.
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Big Think
54
Uber files a patent for A.I. that will identify drunk passengers before pick upIn the patent filed by Uber, it's clear that the ride company's A.I. software will use a number of data points to decide if a passenger is drunk—and how, then, to proceed. Read More
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
16
Sharks can have bellybuttons – and other facts about their incredible diversityThe first thing that pops into most people's minds when they think of sharks is of big dumb fish with pointy teeth that are to be greatly feared. But as someone who spends their days studying these creatures, I know just how wrong that image is. For one, thing the diversity of sharks is astounding. The differences between species can even make it seem like some of these animals are barely related.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Digital addiction—how technology keeps us hookedThe World Health Organisation is to include "gaming disorder", the inability to stop gaming, into the International Classification of Diseases. By doing so, the WHO is recognising the serious and growing problem of digital addiction. The problem has also been acknowledged by Google, which recently announced that it will begin focusing on "Digital Well-being".
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
Starch can replace normal plastic in food packagingEventually all petroleum-based material in food packaging will have to be replaced with bio-based material. Research done at Karlstad University shows that a mixture of starch and other polymers forms an equally effective protective barrier.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Sea urchins see with their feetSea urchins lack eyes, but can see with their tentacle-like tube feet instead, previous research has indicated. Now, researchers at Lund University in Sweden have tested their vision in a new study, and shown that while sea urchins have fairly low resolution vision—it is good enough to fulfill their basic needs.
6h
Ingeniøren

Byggeforsker: Alle tager fejl i talkrigen om energibesparelserRegeringen vil fjerne støtten til energirenoveringer af boliger med henvisning til beregninger fra Statens Byggeforskningsinstitut (SBi). Men SBis tal er forkerte, mener Hofor. Begge parter tager fejl, siger byggeforskeren bag beregningerne.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

The loss of a parent is the most common cause of brood failure in blue titsComplete brood failure in blue tits is almost always associated with the sudden and permanent disappearance of one of the parents. Peter Santema and Bart Kempenaers from the Max Planck Institute for Ornithology in Seewiesen show in their study that the remaining parent substantially increased its effort to raise at least some of the chicks, which turned out to be successful in two thirds of the ne
6h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Genetic discovery will help clinicians identify aggressive versus benign bone tumorsThe first genetic marker for the bone tumor, osteoblastoma, has been discovered by scientists at the Wellcome Sanger Institute and their collaborators. Whole-genome and transcriptome sequencing of human bone tumors revealed that a genetic change that affects the transcription factor, FOS, is a hallmark mutation of osteoblastoma. The results, published in Nature Communications, will help clinicians
6h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Nickel ferrite promotes capacity and cycle stability of lithium-sulfur batteryRecently, Xue-Ping Gao and co-workers from Nankai University reported that nickel ferrite nanofibers via electrospinning technology are developed as novel polar host of sulfur, thus leading to high volumetric capacity and good cycle stability of the sulfur-based composite with the high tap density, due to the strong adsorption ability towards soluble polysulfides by heavy nickel ferrite.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
A new kind of vaccine based on spider silkTo fight cancer, researchers increasingly use vaccines that stimulate the immune system to identify and destroy tumour cells. However, the desired immune response is is not always guaranteed. In order to strengthen the efficacy of vaccines on the immune system—and in particular on T lymphocytes, specialized in the detection of cancer cells—researchers from the universities of Geneva (UNIGE), Freib
6h
New on MIT Technology Review
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Machine learning predicts World Cup winnerResearchers have predicted the outcome after simulating the entire soccer tournament 100,000 times.
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Scientific American Content: Global
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Harassers Aren't Brilliant Jerks, They're Bad Scientists–and They Cost All of UsTolerating bad behavior means wasted tax dollars, disrupted scientific advancements and weakened innovation. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Latest Headlines | Science News
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In her short life, mathematician Emmy Noether changed the face of physicsA century after she published a groundbreaking mathematical theory, Emmy Noether gets her due.
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Futurity.org
3
Blame inflammation when antidepressants don’t work?Depressed patients who have not responded to multiple antidepressants exhibit evidence of increased inflammation, according to a new study. The study shows that antidepressant treatment resistance is associated with increased inflammatory markers in patients with depression. One third of patients with depression fail to respond to currently available antidepressant medications. Previous studies a
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
5
The Teutuls Are Back! | American ChopperHow did the Teutuls end up as TV stars, and where did their story leave off when American Chopper stopped filming? We bring you up to speed on Senior, Junior and Mikey's roles in the family business. #AmericanChopper – All New, Monday @10/9c Watch live and catch up on DiscoveryGO: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/american-chopper/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us
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Dagens Medicin

Arbejdstilsynet giver et stigende antal påbud til sygehuseArbejdstilsynet har givet ti påbud i 2018 til hospitalsafdelinger på grund af for stor arbejdsmængde og tidspres.
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Dagens Medicin

Fjernelse af mandler og polypper kan give KOL og astmaEt nyt studie viser, at når et barn får fjernet mandler eller polypper, er der en større risiko for at udvikle luftvejssygdomme senere i livet.
6h
Dagens Medicin

Innovationsminister: Vigtigt at sikre rammerne for offentlig ledelseFokuser på borgerne og udvikl lederne, er budskaberne fra regeringens Ledelseskommision. Lægeforeningen vil have ryddet op i detailstyring og aktivitetspres.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
Falling honeybee numbers inspire heat treatments and smart beehivesThe number of honeybees, wild bees and other pollinators has been falling in Europe in the last few decades. Pests, pathogens, pesticides and climate change have all driven bee mortality to worrying levels. Currently, Europe has about 13 million less honeybee colonies than are needed for proper crop pollination.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Breakthrough in lignin research—spherical particles multiply enzyme efficiencyResearchers at Aalto University and York University have succeeded in creating a water-repellent composite structure out of lignin particles, in which the enzymes or biocatalysts can be separated from surrounding water. The breakthrough was accomplished when the researchers discovered that, by regulating the surface charge of single lignin particles, enzymes can be made to adhere to the surface of
6h
Popular Science
56
Bill Faloon has pursued immortality for decades. Now he's got lots of company. What does science have to say?Science Is there any truth to anti-aging schemes? Bill Faloon has pursued immortality for decades. Now he's got lots of company. What does science have to say about it?
6h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

On-site pathology testing in remote Australia benefits patients and cuts costsRemote Australian Indigenous communities are benefiting from the use of portable, point of care testing devices to quickly diagnosis acutely ill patients. The devices are also helping healthcare staff identify patients who can be treated locally. In a study of six communities, researchers found the devices were reducing medical evacuations by 35 percent for patients with chest pain, acute diarrhoe
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

The true power of the solar windThe planets and moons of our solar system are continuously being bombarded by particles from the sun. On the Moon or on Mercury, the uppermost layer of rock is gradually eroded by the impact of sun particles. New results show that previous models of this process are incomplete. The effects of solar wind bombardment are much more drastic than previously thought. These findings are important for the
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Mother's attitude to baby during pregnancy may have implications for child's developmentMothers who 'connect' with their baby during pregnancy are more likely to interact in a more positive way with their infant after it is born, according to a study carried out at the University of Cambridge. Interaction is important for helping infants learn and develop.
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Futurity.org
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Listen: Michael Pollan on psychedelics, death, and depressionIn Michael Pollan’s latest book, he’s a willing, if reluctant, participant in the emerging study of positive impact of psychedelic drugs like acid on human mental health. “Your book is a trip!” says Deirdre English, lecturer in the Graduate School of Journalism at the University of California, Berkeley, as she opens a conversation with Pollan about the book, How to Change Your Mind: What the New
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
Recently launched twin satellites create 'the Himalaya Plot'Less than three weeks after launch, the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment Follow-On (GRACE-FO) mission has successfully completed its first mission phase and demonstrated the performance of the precise microwave ranging system that enables its unique measurements of how mass migrates around our planet.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
48
Improving electron transfer in enzymatic biofuel cellsA team of researchers with members from institutions in Singapore, China and the U.K. has found a way to improve electron transfer in enzymatic biofuel cells. In their paper published in the journal Nature Energy, they describe their technique and how well it works. Huajie Yin and Zhiyong Tang with Griffith University in Australia and the National Center for Nanoscience and Technology in China, of
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
18
Putting animals in their best light: Some shades of LED lamps threaten wildlifeA research team identifies harmful effects to wildlife as LED lights proliferate. Some hues, including blues and whites, imperil creatures while other wavelengths are more benign. They devised an interactive web-based tool to help people make wildlife-friendly choices in outdoor lighting.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
16
New method can quickly and accurately detect infectionsTwo chemistry researchers have developed a method that can show quickly and accurately whether a person has been infected with harmful bacteria or other pathogens. Additionally, this new method shows the exact severity of infection in a person.
6h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Better physical fitness and lower aortic stiffness key to slower brain agingThe rate of decline in certain aspects of memory may be explained by a combination of overall physical fitness and the stiffness of the central arteries, researchers from Swinburne's Centre for Human Psychopharmacology have found.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
3
Putting animals in their best light — USC researchers find some shades of LED lamps threaten wildlifeA USC research team identifies harmful effects to wildlife as LED lights proliferate. Some hues, including blues and whites, imperil creatures while other wavelengths are more benign. They devised an interactive web-based tool to help people make wildlife-friendly choices in outdoor lighting.
7h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Fruit and vegetable prescriptions encourage children to eat healthyA new study shows that a fruit and vegetable prescription program implemented in Flint, Mich.,, can improve access to healthy foods for underserved children.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Citizen science — A powerful tool to combat invasive giant slugsWith the help of citizen science, researchers have unraveled the close correlation between weather conditions and the appearances of a giant slug species, enabling them to predict the slug's activity on the following day.
7h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Mozart, meditation and a yoga mat: Oncologists welcome integrative therapies for breast cancerA breast cancer patient dealing with anxiety, depression or mood swings could soon be encouraged by her oncologist to learn meditation techniques, join a yoga class or put music to therapeutic use. Today, The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), published its endorsement of integrative therapy guidelines recently established by the Society for Integrative Oncology (SIO).
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Here's how 'question bursts' make better brainstormsWhen faced with a question, the impulse is to spit out an answer. But asking more and better questions can sometimes get you further.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Researchers study molecular gas in the galaxy Markarian 273An international group of scientists has recently conducted a study of molecular gas in the northern nucleus of an ultra-luminous infrared galaxy known as Markarian 273. The research, which reveals physical and chemical properties of the galaxy's disc and its outflow, was presented in a paper published May 30 on arXiv.org.
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Dagens Medicin

Her er de ti sundhedsaktører med størst gennemslagskraftEn række politikere og to læger er blandt de ti personer med størst gennemslagskraft i sundhedssektoren.
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Live Science
71
3-Legged Jaguar Gives Birth to Cubs in Argentina ParkA first-time mother, a three-legged jaguar named Tanya, gave birth last week to a pair of cubs — the first cubs born in Argentina's Iberá National Park in decades.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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The wisdom of pearl farmingWhy exactly do little white nuggets from the sea cost so much? And how have humans hacked the biological process that makes them?
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Furbo Dog Camera Review: Remotely Amuse Your PetsThe Furbo helps you keep an eye on your dog and reward them, too.
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The Physics of a Puzzling Perpetual Motion MachineNope, this YouTube video hasn’t just changed everything we know about energy.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Finding faults in the electrical gridA West Aussie researcher has developed software that could help us avoid another Black Saturday catastrophe
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

How do kangaroos breathe while they hop?If you hop like a kangaroo, you might be able feel the air being pushed out of your lungs. Here's why it happens and why it matters.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
UTSA researchers create method that can quickly and accurately detect infectionsTwo chemistry researchers at The University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA) have developed a method that can show quickly and accurately whether a person has been infected with harmful bacteria or other pathogens. Additionally, this new method shows the exact severity of infection in a person.
7h
Nyheder – Forskning – Videnskab

Ny undersøgelse om unges online kriminalitetSociologisk Institut har udarbejdet en undersøgelse af danske unges online-kriminalitet for Det…
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New on MIT Technology Review
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AI could get 100 times more energy-efficient with IBM’s new artificial synapsesCopying the features of a neural network in silicon might make machine learning more usable on small devices like smartphones.
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Futurity.org
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Tiny ‘eel’ could one day slither through your veinsResearchers report initial steps toward creating a microscopic “eel” that would swim through the bloodstream to deliver a drug to cells or genes. And, to capture the flexibility of the real sea creature, it would take the form of a gel that could glide through water. As a kid, physicist Seth Fraden loved the movie Fantastic Voyage , about a microscopic submarine traveling through a human bloodstr
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Shoppers' movements might come down to fears of caves and the 'butt brush'Shopping is something we all do, albeit some more reluctantly than others. It is the modern version of hunting and gathering – how we provide essentials and food for our families. We seem to do it effortlessly, moving from aisle to aisle, from store to store, paying little attention to the process. Indeed, many shop on auto-pilot, while their minds are occupied with other things.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Neutrinos weighed by the world's most precise scaleWhat is the mass of neutrinos? To answer one of the most fundamental and important open questions in modern particle physics and cosmology, the KATRIN Karlsruhe Tritium Neutrino Ex-periment was designed and built.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Physiological benefits may be experienced by veterans with PTSD who use service dogsA new study shows how veterans with PTSD may benefit physiologically from using service dogs. This study used a physiological marker to define the biobehavioral effects of service dogs on veterans with PTSD.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Basketball teams playing for survival in critical NBA playoffs are more likely to loseA new study finds that basketball teams playing for survival in critical NBA playoff games are more likely to lose. This study is the first to illustrate 'choking' in a real-world team sports environment. The results suggest that 'choking' is a common phenomenon in high-stakes situations and may be applicable to a variety of high-pressure performance situations, including those found in the workpl
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Urban violence can hurt test scores even for kids who don't experience itChildren who attend school with many kids from violent neighborhoods can earn significantly lower test scores than peers with classmates from safer areas.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
71
Quantum LEGO—building ultracold moleculesCooling matter is not easy. Atoms and molecules have the tendency to jump around, to rotate and to vibrate. Freezing these particles by slowing them down is a complicated process. For individual atoms, physicists have figured out over the years how to carry out this cooling process, using techniques like laser cooling, where finely tuned lasers remove energy from the particles. Molecules, on the o
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
9
The true power of the solar windThe planets and moons of our solar system are continuously being bombarded by particles hurled away from the sun. On Earth this has hardly any effect, apart from the fascinating northern lights, because the dense atmosphere and the magnetic field of the Earth protect us from these solar wind particles. But on the Moon or on Mercury things are different: There, the uppermost layer of rock is gradua
7h
The Atlantic
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The Character Who Made Me Love Brooklyn Nine-NineWhen I first met Amy Santiago, she was everything I never knew I wanted in a television character. I encountered the Cuban-American NYPD detective in early 2014, after Brooklyn Nine-Nine won two Golden Globes in its first season and landed on my radar. Initially, it seemed like a formulaic comedy about an immature cop, Jake Peralta (Andy Samberg), butting heads with a new captain, Raymond Holt (A
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Fate of massive AT&T-Time Warner merger in US judge's handsThe fate of the AT&T-Time Warner merger, a massive media deal opposed by the government that could shape how much consumers pay for streaming TV and movies, rests in the hands of a federal judge.
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Ingeniøren
3
Punktligheden på Kystbanen er i frit faldPassagererne mellem København og Helsingør har siden begyndelsen af året oplevet flere forsinkede tog.
7h
Scientific American Content: Global
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Microbes Living in Antarctic Huts Produce Novel Chemical CompoundsScientists are now testing whether the fungi have any pharmaceutical potential — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Physiological benefits may be experienced by veterans with PTSD who use service dogsA new study shows how veterans with PTSD may benefit physiologically from using service dogs. This study, led by the Purdue University College of Veterinary Medicine, is the first published research to use a physiological marker to define the biobehavioral effects of service dogs on veterans with PTSD.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
9
Researchers investigate the correlation between wind and wave height in the Arctic OceanAn international research team has found an increase in high waves and winds in the ice-free waters of the Arctic Ocean, a potentially dangerous navigational tipping point for the 'new and unusual' state of the waters.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Finally, hope for a syphilis vaccineDespite efforts to eradicate it, syphilis is on the rise. It is the second leading cause of stillbirth and miscarriage worldwide, and if left untreated it can cause strokes, dementia, and other neurological disease. Until now, most health agencies focused on treating infected people and their sex partners — but new discoveries may make a vaccine possible.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Multiple lasers could be replaced by a single microcombEvery time we send an e-mail, a tweet, or stream a video, we rely on laser light to transfer digital information over a complex network of optical fibers. Dozens of high-performance lasers are needed to fill up the bandwidth and to squeeze in an increasing amount of digital data. Researchers have now shown that all these lasers can be replaced by a single device called a microcomb.
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Popular Science
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Can this flu drug really stop Ebola in its tracks?Health The unusual uses of off-label drugs. An ethics committee in the Democratic Republic of the Congo recently approved the use of a drug originally developed to fight influenza to treat Ebola patients.
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Futurity.org
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New 2D materials don’t exist in nature but conduct electricityScientists have verified a 53-year-old theory on ferroelectric metals that could spawn a new class of multifunctional devices, a new study reports. In 1965, Philip W. Anderson, a Princeton University physicist, theorized that ferroelectric metals could conduct electricity despite not existing in nature. For decades, scientists thought it would be impossible to prove the theory. It was like trying
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Science : NPR
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After High School, Young Women's Exercise Rates PlungeAfter they lose access to high school sports, young women — especially young women of color — generally get less exercise than they should, a study suggests, and far less exercise than young men get. (Image credit: FatCamera/Getty Images)
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Study finds film critics, like filmmakers and casts, are largely white and maleFilms like Crazy Rich Asians, The Spy Who Dumped Me, BlacKkKlansman and The Happytime Murders are poised to provide a much-needed dose of diversity to theaters this summer. But as audiences look to critical reviews to determine if these movies are worth the ticket price, what perspectives are available? A new study from the USC Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism reveals that the fil
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The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: Memory JoggerScientists can livestream how the mouse brain's hippocampus maps the physical world and accesses those memories.
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E3 Game Deals: PS4, Xbox One, Nintendo Switch (2018)While Sony, Microsoft, and Nintendo debut new games at E3, they're rolling out deep discounts on the old ones.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
7
By the skin of their teeth—DNA traces reveal what kind of pigs lived in Bronze Age HallstattSalt has been mined at Hallstatt since the Bronze Age, including for the preservation of pork meat. Bone fragments and teeth found in the area provide evidence of an organized meat industry, especially of pork. Residual DNA in these prehistoric specimens can reveal information about the genetic origins of the pigs. Using a specially developed method, researchers from Vetmeduni Vienna and the Vienn
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The Atlantic
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What to Eat in the Texas SuburbsIn my daily life as an East Coast journalist, pretty much all I eat is lentils, salad, and lentil salads. The thing is, I recently returned to my homeland, Texas, for a reporting trip. Before you ask, hipster, I’m not from Austin, or even Houston. I’m from the gosh-dang suburbs of Dallas, where lentils and salads are less plentiful, and beef and cheese are … more so. Midway through it, I travel
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The Atlantic
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Gossiping Is GoodW ord on the street is that gossip is the worst. An Ann Landers advice column once characterized it as “the faceless demon that breaks hearts and ruins careers.” The Talmud describes it as a “three-pronged tongue” that kills three people: the teller, the listener, and the person being gossiped about. And Blaise Pascal observed, not unreasonably, that “if people really knew what others said about
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Scientific American Content: Global
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How Fathers Can Change What It Means to Be a ManThere are strong negative stereotypes about males—but how we see dads could change that — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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New method makes weather forecasts right as rainMeteorologists have known for some time that rainfall forecasts have flaws, as failure to take into account factors such as evaporation can affect their accuracy. Now, researchers from the University of Missouri have developed a system that improves the precision of forecasts by accounting for evaporation in rainfall estimates, particularly for locations 30 miles or more from the nearest National
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Citizen science—A powerful tool to combat invasive giant slugsWith the help of citizen science, researchers have unraveled the close correlation between weather conditions and the appearances of a giant slug species, enabling them to predict the slug's activity on the following day.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
7
The big global space agencies rely on Australia – let's turn that to our advantageIn the conversation around Australia's space agency, the brand leaders – the US National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the European Space Agency (ESA) – have had relatively little airplay.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Protecting plants intelligentlyWe must reduce the environmental and health risks of pesticides. However, rather than banning them completely, Robert Finger advocates an intelligent approach to crop protection.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
No launch from Australia—something missing from our plans for the new space raceFor the past 20 years, Australia has attempted to stake its claim in the lucrative commercial space industry.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Serving up a sheep milk smoothieShifting consumers' mindset to sheep milk is the objective of a fun and informative stand at this week's National Fieldays that mixes the resources of Massey University staff and students.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
A new micro-robot delivers drugs in capsulesAn international team of researchers, led by Professor Hongsoo Choi, Director of DGIST-ETH Microrobot Research Center, has developed capsule-type microrobots that can encapsulate cells and drugs and deliver them to targeted parts of the human body. Unlike conventional methods that install cells or drugs outside of micro robots, the lids of these microrobots can be open and closed.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Do summer jobs provide lifelong benefits for teens?Fewer teens in the U.S. are spending their summers flipping burgers, mowing grass or performing other types of seasonal jobs than did prior generations, labor experts report. University of Illinois Extension educator Kathy Sweedler, whose focus area is consumer economics, spoke recently with News Bureau education editor Sharita Forrest about what teens can gain from summer jobs.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
Hurricanes may lead to resilience—good news follows bad for Puerto Rico's tropical forestsWith fierce winds and flooding rains, hurricanes can be disasters for people—and for ecosystems.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
75
Archaeologists uncover remains of a horrifying Iron Age battle in DenmarkWe might not know exactly what happened on this battlefield in Denmark, 2,000 years ago. But one thing is certain: It was violent.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
6
Small group math instruction benefits young childrenTeaching math to small groups of low-income, minority kindergartners has a positive impact on their learning and can help bridge the divide with higher-income peers, say University of Michigan researchers.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Researchers find enzymes naturally select their own polymer sequencesAs free-flowing enzymes travel amid a sea of polymers, a Northwestern Engineering team has found those enzymes prefer to join certain polymer sequences over others, a discovery that could lead to applications in a diverse array of fields ranging from nuclear waste processing to drug delivery.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
Simulation for grid transmission, distributionRenewable energy is on the rise, especially in California, where utility companies are mandated to get at least half of their power from renewable resources, such as solar and wind, by 2030. It may be a positive development for the environment, but questions linger about how electricity generated by residential solar panels and home battery storage can affect the stability of the electrical grid.
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Live Science
100+
The Incas Mastered the Grisly Practice of Drilling Holes in People's SkullsIt came down to hygiene and the Incans would have sometimes used their bare fingers during trepanation surgery.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
Study shows today's dads are engaging more with their kidsSociologists at BYU and Ball State have found that a majority of fathers today are relatively involved in their children's lives.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
Heavier rains and manure mean more algae bloomsOn June 6, 2018, the Center for Limnology reported that a toxic algae bloom had begun to spread across Lake Mendota. It quickly led to the closure of beaches around Madison's largest lake.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
KATRIN experiment investigates neutrino massNeutrinos are everywhere, and yet their presence is rarely felt. Scientists have assumed for decades that, because they interact so little with matter, neutrinos must lack any measurable mass. But recent experiments have shown that these "ghostly" particles do in fact hold some weight. Ever since, the hunt has been on to pin down a neutrino's mass—a vanishingly small measurement that could have hu
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Live Science
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3,000-Year-Old Geoglyphs May Depict the HeavensAncient people would have entered the sprawling stone structures through doorways.
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Dagens Medicin

Kongres giver også plads til negative resultaterEULAR har også plads til studier, som falder negativt ud, og til studier som tager fat i de blødere værdier som patientens egen sygdomsopfattelse, behov for information og rehabilitering, mener professor Kim Hørslev-Petersen, Gigthospitalet i Gråsten.
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Dagens Medicin

Reumatologer sætter fokus på patientens sygdomsoplevelseFlere danske bidrag til årets EULAR-kongres sætter fokus på patientnære forhold som smerte og ekstrem træthed, fortæller Lars Erik Kristensen, forskningschef på Parker Instituttet på Frederiksberg Hospital.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Rising CO2 may increase dangerous weather extremes, whatever happens to global temperaturesNew research from the University of Oxford and collaborators at several other institutions, including the University of Bristol, provides compelling evidence that meeting the global warming target of 1.5°C may not be enough to limit the damage caused by extreme weather.
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The Hustlers Fueling Cryptocurrency’s Marketing MachineAs Google and Facebook ban ads for cryptocurrency projects, and the SEC cracks down on hype, backers are employing unconventional strategies to find investors.
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LA Is Doing Water Better Than Your City. Yes, That LAWith climate change on the horizon, Los Angeles is rushing to pull water from surprising sources. The goal: aqueous independence.
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99
The Crazy Hacks One Woman Used to Make Money on Mechanical TurkA new book describes how a Mechanical Turker used alarms and shortcuts to make $20 an hour, at the cost of her health.
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Inside a Chemist’s Quest to Hack Evolution and Cure Genetic DiseaseDavid Liu is a scientific superhero on a mission to knock out genetic mutants.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
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Sunshine is making Deepwater Horizon oil stick aroundSunlight created oxygen-rich oil by-products that are still hanging around eight years after the Deepwater Horizon spill.
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The Atlantic
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The Prison Mental-Health Crisis, Viewed From the InsideSeveral years ago, when I was editing politics coverage for The Atlantic ’s website, a fellow at the magazine dropped an unusual envelope on my desk. He’d been sifting through submissions in the magazine’s slush pile and thought I might be interested. The envelope was hand-addressed and had a big red stamp on it reading “ATTICA CORREC FAC.” Enclosed was an essay, typed in Courier font on an old-f
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New on MIT Technology Review
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AI could help the construction industry work faster—and keep its workforce accident-freeThe construction industry, long a technology laggard, is hiring data scientists to boost efficiency.
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Scientific American Content: Global
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Life among the MonkeysWorking at a remote research camp in Ethiopia, you realize that humans are just one small cog, among a million others, in the great wheel of life — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
43
Scientists find 'patterns in the noise' that could help make more accurate crop performance predictionsNew research led by an Iowa State University agronomist identifies clear patterns in how plants react to different environments that could lead to new ways of predicting crop performance.
9h
Live Science
54
How Did a Tick Temporarily Paralyze a Little Girl?A five-year-old girl in Mississippi temporarily lost the ability to walk after she developed "tick paralysis."
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Dagens Medicin

Nye data kan åbne for mere præcis diagnostik af spondylartritDansk Reumatologisk Selskabs nytiltrådte formand Oliver Hendricks håber bl.a. på flere data på EULAR, som kan kvalificere diagnostikken af spondylartrit.
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Dagens Medicin

Flere data peger på mindre behov for udskiftning af ledLærestolsprofessor Lene Dreyer ser frem til præsentationer på EULAR af flere data for biologisk behandlings betydning for reduktion i behovet for alloplastikker.
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Dagens Medicin

Videncenter har mange bidrag med til EULARProfessor Merete Hetland, Videncenter for Gigt og Rygsygdomme på Rigshospitalet, Glostrup, skal på årets EULAR-kongres bl.a. følge præsentationen af centrets mange bidrag.
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Scientific American Content: Global
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Hawaii Volcano Terms Explained [Slide Show]From a'a to vog, a guide to the terminology used to describe the ongoing eruption of Kilauea — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
6
Louboutin wins EU court battle over red-soled shoesFrench luxury shoe designer Christian Louboutin won the support of Europe's highest court Tuesday over trademarking his signature red-soled high-heeled shoes.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
58
NIST neutron detection method—long-sought workaround to helium shortage?Doctors use X-rays to see inside people, and scientists use neutrons to peer inside advanced materials and devices such as fuel cells to better understand and improve them. But a critical shortage of a rare form of helium used for detecting neutrons—which are difficult to spot directly—threatens to slow advances in this critical type of materials research.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

China auto sales rise 7.9 percent in May as electrics surgeChina's auto sales rose 7.9 percent in May from a year earlier as purchases of electric and gasoline-electric hybrid vehicles more than doubled to 102,000, an industry group reported Tuesday.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Breakthrough method predicts resistance to antibiotics under developmentGiven the ever-increasing threat of antibiotic resistance, European researchers have developed a method to rapidly test new antibiotic candidates for their potential to be hit by emerging resistance. The high-throughput mutagenesis method, dubbed DIvERGE, reveals probable resistance within days, making it a fast and cost-effective tool to guide antibiotic development. Moreover, DIvERGE has widespr
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
34
How SMS texts on corruption helped to empower Ugandan voters at the pollsUganda, in eastern Africa, is notoriously corrupt, and many Ugandans have little faith that their leaders will provide them with honest information. But a new study conducted in the country suggests that mobile telephone technology and official information about budget corruption can help citizens hold politicians accountable at election time.
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Science : NPR
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Clicker Training For Dogs Is Adapted To Help Surgeons Learn QuicklyThe clicker became a popular tool for dog training in the 1980s. It has also caught on with humans — helping people to become better dancers, fishermen, golfers, and now, surgeons. (Image credit: Angela Hsieh/NPR)
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Science : NPR
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More Than Half Of The Nation's Nuclear Power Plants Are At Risk Of ClosingThe nuclear energy industry is having trouble competing against cheaper natural gas and renewable energy. So it's begun touting its low greenhouse gas emissions as it seeks public subsidies.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Paying communities for forest management activities supports social relationshipsNew research shows that paying communities in Mexico to conserve and manage their jointly-owned property doesn't just benefit the environment—it strengthens social relationships and a sense of community within those areas as well.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
Turbocharge for lithium batteriesA team of material researchers from Juelich, Munich, and Prague has succeeded in producing a composite material that is particularly suited for electrodes in lithium batteries. The nanocomposite material might help to significantly increase the storage capacity and lifetime of batteries as well as their charging speed. The researchers have published their findings in the journal Advanced Functiona
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Taking a closer look at 'electrifying' chemistryThe future of chemistry is 'electrifying.' With the increasing availability of electrical energy from renewable sources, it will be possible in the future to drive many chemical processes using an electric current. This will facilitate the use of sustainable methods to manufacture products or fuels, replacing current processes based on fossil fuels. However, exactly how these electrocatalysts work
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Pandoravirus: Giant viruses invent their own genesThree new members have been isolated and added to the Pandoravirus family by researchers at the Structural and Genomic Information Laboratory (CNRS/Aix-Marseille Université), working with partners at the Large Scale Biology Laboratory (CEA/Inserm/Université Grenoble-Alpes) and at CEA-Genoscope. This strange family of viruses, with their giant genomes and many genes with no known equivalents, surpr
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Breaking laws, making glassThe laws that explain how pizza gets uniformly cooked in an oven are not valid for systems of atoms at ultracold temperatures. A team of researchers at the Center for Theoretical Physics of Complex Systems, within the Institute for Basic Science (IBS, South Korea) has designed an innovative method to study how interacting particles behave at temperatures close to absolute zero, and found a situati
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Special issue to highlight climate science for service partnership between China and the UKNow in its fifth year, with more than 100 scientific publications under its belt, the Climate Science for Service Partnership China (CSSP China) has helped improve understanding of the effects of climate change on society and is forging new ways to reduce the risks associated with climatic extremes.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Discovery of the oldest mammal in Brazil pays tribute to David BowieBrasilestes stardusti is the name given to the oldest known mammal found in Brazil. It lived in what is now the northwest of São Paulo State at the end of the Mesozoic Era between 87 million and 70 million years ago. It is the only Brazilian mammal known to have coexisted with the dinosaurs.
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Ingeniøren
1
Bertel Haarder: Regeringens modstand mod nordiske byggeregler er meningsløsSom det eneste land i Norden bakker Danmark ikke op om at harmonisere de nordiske byggeregler, fordi Danmark satser på EU-harmonisering. Meningsløst argument, mener Bertel Haarder, der er medlem af Nordisk Råds Grænsehindringsråd
10h
The Atlantic
400+
The Supreme Court Blesses Voter Purges“The dissents have a policy disagreement, not just with Ohio, but with Congress,” Justice Samuel Alito primly pronounced Monday in his majority opinion in Husted v. A. Philip Randolph Institute , the Ohio “voter purge” case. “But this case presents a question of statutory interpretation, not a question of policy.” Whenever a court claims to be engaged in policy-free statutory interpretation, chec
10h
The Atlantic
2K
Congress May Declare the Forever WarA rising generation of Americans has never known peace. Very soon, in Iraq or Afghanistan or Syria or Somalia or Libya or perhaps elsewhere, an 18-year-old man or woman will be deployed by the United States military to risk his or her life in a War on Terror that began before they were even born . Already, every single spring, roughly 3.5 million high-school graduates reach adulthood with no memo
10h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
45
Multiple lasers could be replaced by a single microcombEvery time we send an e-mail, a tweet, or stream a video, we rely on laser light to transfer digital information over a complex network of optical fibers. Dozens of high-performance lasers are needed to fill up the bandwidth and to squeeze in an increasing amount of digital data. Researchers have now shown that all these lasers can be replaced by a single device called a microcomb.
10h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
22
Researchers investigate the correlation between wind and wave height in the Arctic OceanAn international research team led by Takuji Waseda, a professor of the University of Tokyo, Japan, has found an increase in high waves and winds in the ice-free waters of the Arctic Ocean, a potentially dangerous navigational tipping point for the "new and unusual" state of the waters.
10h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Manipulated enzymes—researchers set milestone in biocatalysis researchTU Graz researchers managed for the first time ever to 'retrain' an enzyme to build ring-shaped molecular structures instead of performing its natural task of reducing double bonds. The work was published in Angewandte Chemie, and is relevant for the production of pharmaceuticals and plant protection products.
10h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
200+
New 28-GHz transceiver paves the way for future 5G devicesScientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology have designed and fabricated a tiny, but incredibly fast, reliable, and accurate 28-GHz transceiver meant for stable high-speed 5G communications. The fabricated transceiver trumps previous designs in various regards by taking a new approach for beam steering.
10h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
5
New wind turbines show high efficiency in low windsVTT Research Centre of Technology (VTT) has explored the potential and economic benefits of new wind power technology. The technology would greatly increase the benefits of wind energy and enable the competitive utilisation of wind power in Finland. Heavy investments are being made in wind power, which highlights the importance of this new and competitive technology. Wind power accounts for around
10h
Ingeniøren

Regnefejl: Sundhedsplatformen giver alligevel ikke Region H aktivitetsfald på 600 millionerI Region Hovedstadens Økonomirapport for andet kvartal står der, at Sundhedsplatformen kommer til at koste aktivitetsnedgang for 600 millioner i år. Nu viser det sig, at regionen ved en fejl har kopieret tallet fra en tidligere rapport.
10h
Ingeniøren
5
Daimler tilbagekalder 774.000 biler i EuropaMotorstyringen i Daimler-biler har tilladt for høj NOx-udledning. Derfor har den tyske trafikminister netop forpligtet bilproducenten til at tilbagekalde 774.000 biler på tværs af Europa.
10h
New Scientist – News
100+
To combat white nationalist extremism, first understand itThere are many assumptions underlying our ideas about why someone becomes a terrorist. The evidence does not always back them up
11h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Basketball teams playing for survival in critical NBA playoffs are more likely to loseA new study finds that basketball teams playing for survival in critical NBA playoff games are more likely to lose. This study is the first to illustrate 'choking' in a real-world team sports environment. The results suggest that 'choking' is a common phenomenon in high-stakes situations and may be applicable to a variety of high-pressure performance situations, including those found in the workpl
11h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Patients unable to resume work after heart attack face depression and financial hardshipAbout 90 percent of people who suffer a major heart attack return to work. However, of the patients who can't return to work or must work less, many report poor quality of life, depression and moderate to extreme financial hardship, including trouble affording medications. People readmitted to the hospital after a heart attack are less likely to return to work.
11h
Ingeniøren
2
Vi skifter elpaneler ud med varmepumperVarmepumper vinder frem, og brændeovnen hjælper pillefyret.
11h
Ingeniøren

Topsøefamilien gør klar til børsnoteringEn eller flere investorer, der vil få en ejerandel på over 10 pct., skal være med til at gøre virksomheden klar til en børsnotering om 5-7 år.
11h
Ingeniøren

København kan se frem til problemer med elforsyningenGennemsnitsforbrugeren manglede strøm i 25 minutter i 2017, hvor især en fejl på Svanemølleværket var med til at trække gennemsnittet for udetid op. Fremadrettet har især det indre København behov for nyinvesteringer, konkluderer Energinet i ny redegørelse.
11h
Ingeniøren

Machine learning skal spare brændstof for DFDSDFDS’ spritnye data science-afdeling udruster rederiets flåde med machine learning.
11h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Immune response associated with inflammation and joint damage in rheumatoid arthritisTo diagnose rheumatoid arthritis, antibodies to the amino acid citrulline are commonly measured. A new study from Uppsala University shows that a broad mix of different antibodies in the joints is the dominant factor that can be associated with severe inflammation and joint damage. These findings, published in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, may lead to improved diagnostics.
12h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Urban violence can hurt test scores even for kids who don't experience itChildren who attend school with many kids from violent neighborhoods can earn significantly lower test scores than peers with classmates from safer areas.
12h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
8
Urban violence can hurt test scores even for kids who don't experience itChildren who attend school with many kids from violent neighborhoods can earn significantly lower test scores than peers with classmates from safer areas, according to a new Johns Hopkins University study.
12h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
33
'Norman,' when artificial intelligence goes psychoNo, it's not a new horror film. It's Norman: also known as the first psychopathic artificial intelligence, just unveiled by US researchers.
12h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Storm-battered Dominica braces for new hurricane seasonWith the hurricane season starting up again in the Atlantic, Irvince Auguiste is feeling vulnerable.
12h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
5
Deadly battles continue to power hit video gamesBandits, soldiers, demons, zombies, aliens and other enemies will be shot, stabbed, bludgeoned, incinerated, or even blow up on the show floor of the Electronic Entertainment Expo opening here Tuesday.
12h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Vietnam passes cybersecurity law despite privacy concernsVietnamese legislators on Tuesday passed a contentious cybersecurity law, which critics say will hurt the economy and further restrict freedom of expression.
12h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Guatemala rescuers rush to find last volcano survivorsScores of civil defense and rescue workers scrambled Monday to try to find any unlikely survivors of the Fuego volcano's deadly eruption more than a week on.
12h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Chinese electric carmaker Byton raises $500 mn to take on TeslaChina-based electric car startup Byton has raised $500 million as it ramps up efforts to take on rivals like Tesla.
12h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
Ubisoft sees blockbusters shaped by fans and starsFrench video game giant Ubisoft is teaming up with a firm founded by actor Joseph Gordon-Levitt to crowd source material for a forthcoming title, the companies announced Monday on the eve of the Electronic Entertainment Expo (E3).
13h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Seattle poised to repeal new tax opposed by AmazonSeattle leaders said Monday that they plan to repeal a tax on large companies like Amazon and Starbucks as they face mounting pressure from businesses, an about-face just a month after unanimously approving the measure to help pay for efforts to combat a growing homelessness crisis.
13h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
Some lava evacuees may return to homes during 'stable' flowOfficials on Hawaii's Big Island let some people back into their homes and scaled down emergency operations Monday as lava flowed into the ocean on a path that wasn't threatening new areas.
13h
Feed: All Latest
62
With a 'Lite' App, Uber Moves to Win Over IndiaUber Lite should make the ride-hailing service easier to use in emerging markets where service is spotty and data is limited.
13h
Science-Based Medicine
300+
Do Sunscreens Cause Cancer?Elizabeth Plourde thinks sunscreens cause cancer rather than preventing it. She blames sunscreens for everything from coral reef die-offs to autism. Neither her evidence nor her reasoning stand up to scrutiny.
13h
Big Think
27
How your level of self-esteem determines the success of ‘envy marketing'Marketers have long used envy as a tactic to sell products, but a new study suggests that it only works on people with a high sense of self-esteem. Read More
13h
Science | The Guardian
100+
The Reason I Jump: autism memoir becomes a theatre-maze in ScotlandAutistic performers share their own stories in an outdoor production which turns Naoki Higashida’s remarkable book into a journey through a labyrinth The theatre can be a difficult place for people with autism. I remember taking my son when he was younger. I could feel him squirming, trapped in the seat next to me, confused by the strange convention where people seem to be talking to you but you
14h
Science | The Guardian
36
How can climate policy stay on top of a growing mountain of data?Tracking all the relevant publications on climate change has become impossible. Climate science and policy need a new approach for an age of big literature When the lines between scientific facts, legitimate disagreements and uncertainties about climate change are being deliberately blurred – not least by world leaders like Donald Trump and Recep Tayyip Erdoğan – the work of the Intergovernmental
14h
Ingeniøren

Sundhedsplatformen: Rigshospitalet forventer nedgang i aktivitet på 600 mio. kr.Sundhedsplatformen mindsker stadigvæk aktiviteten på danske sygehuse. Det koster penge, og Rigshospitalet kan miste flere hundrede millioner kroner i år, viser ny rapport.
14h
Science | The Guardian
500+
Teleportation: will it ever be a possibility?Instant travel seems further away than when Captain Kirk first reanimated, but scientists are fighting to make it happen Star Trek has a lot to answer for. Not content to tease us with unreasonable expectations of phasers and warp drive, it also thrust into the popular imagination the idea of teleportation, in which we step into a giant scanner of some sort and instantaneously find ourselves some
15h
Science | The Guardian
300+
Lunacy? Far from it – you really could live on the moon | Chris HadfieldGovernments should work with private space companies to make lunar colonies a reality in our lifetime • Chris Hadfield is an astronaut The history of all species is that our offspring tend to leave home in search of new habitations and locations in which to settle and live. That’s how bumblebees, ants and human populations have spread across the planet. Incremental exploration is followed by sett
15h
cognitive science
1
Scientists develop better way of treating diabetessubmitted by /u/davyeminy [link] [comments]
15h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Cancer: More targeted use of immunotherapySNSF-supported researchers have discovered a method for predicting the likelihood of success when treating cancer with immunotherapy.
16h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Multiple lasers could be replaced by a single microcombEvery time we send an e-mail, a tweet, or stream a video, we rely on laser light to transfer digital information over a complex network of optical fibers. Dozens of high-performance lasers are needed to fill up the bandwidth and to squeeze in an increasing amount of digital data. Researchers have now shown that all these lasers can be replaced by a single device called a microcomb.
16h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
4
Researchers investigate the correlation between wind and wave height in the Arctic OceanAn international research team has found an increase in high waves and winds in the ice-free waters of the Arctic Ocean, a potentially dangerous navigational tipping point for the 'new and unusual' state of the waters.
16h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
6
AI senses people's pose through wallsMIT CSAIL's wireless smart-home system could help detect and monitor disease and enable the elderly to 'age in place.'
16h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Living with the stigma of diabetesA team at the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (RI-MUHC) report that teen and young adult (aged 14-24 years) type 1 diabetes sufferers often experience stigma, which leads them to neglect treatment and tread dangerously close to suffering medical emergencies. This study is the first of its kind to estimate the stigma prevalence in this age group and type 1 diabetes, which
16h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
3
Finally, hope for a syphilis vaccineDespite efforts to eradicate it, syphilis is on the rise. It is the second leading cause of stillbirth and miscarriage worldwide, and if left untreated it can cause strokes, dementia, and other neurological disease. Until now, most health agencies focused on treating infected people and their sex partners — but new discoveries may make a vaccine possible, UConn Health researchers report in the Ju
16h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Multilingual students have improved in academic achievement since 2003Multilingual students, who speak a language or more than one language other than English at home, have improved in reading and math achievement substantially since 2003, finds a new study published in Educational Researcher by Michael J. Kieffer, associate professor of literacy education at New York University.
16h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Sex matters: Addressing the Alzheimer's disease research gapTo prevent and treat Alzheimer's disease, scientists need to better understand how the disease differs between women and men, according to a paper published June 12 in Alzheimer's & Dementia: The Journal of the Alzheimer's Association.
16h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Multilingual students have improved in academic achievement since 2003Multilingual students, who speak a language or more than one language other than English at home, have improved in reading and math achievement substantially since 2003, finds a new study published in Educational Researcher by Michael J. Kieffer, associate professor of literacy education at New York University's Steinhardt School of Culture, Education and Human Development.
16h
The Atlantic
300+
A Handshake Decades in the Making“It was not easy to get here,” Kim Jong Un said shortly after meeting Donald Trump on Tuesday morning in Singapore. This, after the ravages of the Korean War, decades of violent flare-ups in a conflict that never really ended, 25 years of failed nuclear negotiations, and many months of Trump and Kim threatening each other with nuclear armageddon, was quite the understatement. What was perhaps mos
16h
Live Science
45
What is Vitamin B5 (Pantothenic Acid)?Vitamin B5, also called pantothenic acid and pantothenate, is vital to living a healthy life. Like all B vitamins, it helps the body turn food into energy.
17h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
79
1. 45 million children's lives saved by Hib and pneumococcal vaccines since 2000Childhood deaths from two leading bacterial causes of pneumonia and meningitis, pneumococcus and Hib, declined sharply during the period 2000 to 2015, especially as vaccines against these pathogens were introduced in high-burden countries, according to new estimates.
17h
Ingeniøren
21
Nordiske lande – minus Danmark – vil ensarte regler for at få billigere byggeriSverige, Norge, Finland, Island og Åland vil harmonisere deres bygningsreglementer for at få prisen på nybyggeri ned. Transport-, bygnings- og boligminister Ole Birk Olesen tror mere på EU-samarbejde.
17h
Science | The Guardian
500+
It's Hooray for Climate Scientists Day (formerly Hug a Climate Scientist Day) | First Dog on the Moon12 June is the day to express thanks to climate scientists #hoorayforclimatescientists Sign up here to get an email whenever First Dog cartoons are published Get all your needs met at the First Dog shop if what you need is First Dog merchandise and prints Continue reading…
17h
The Scientist RSS

This Flu Season Killed 172 KidsVaccination reduced the risk of death by two-thirds for children with no other health problems.
18h
Science : NPR
200+
Hungry, Hungry Hippocampus: Why and How We EatFood fills many of our needs. Hunger is just one. Paul Rozin explains the profound role that food plays in our lives. (Image credit: GraphicaArtis/Getty Images)
19h
Scientific American Content: Global
10
Prez (of AMA) Issues Call to Arms-ScienceAt the AMA annual meeting the organization's president petitioned for an evidence-based, science-driven analysis of gun violence and solutions. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
20h
The Atlantic
100+
This Is Bigger Than a Meeting With Kim Jong Un“Remind me of Secretary Kerry’s visit to Tehran, or the time that Obama met with” Iranian President Hassan Rouhani, John Delury, a Korea expert at Yonsei University, challenged me when we got together in Seoul in May. I couldn’t, because those things never happened. And that was precisely Delury’s point. What Donald Trump is doing with North Korea is in fact “bolder” than what Barack Obama did wi
20h
Futurity.org
5
Watch how bacteria ‘harpoon’ DNA to develop drug resistanceScientists have made the first direct observation of a key step in the process bacteria use to rapidly develop antibiotic resistance and other traits. Researchers recorded the first images of bacterial appendages—over 10,000 times thinner than human hair—as they stretched out to catch DNA. The bacteria can then incorporate the DNA fragments into its own genome through a process called DNA uptake
20h
Futurity.org
2
How things go from straight-forward to chaoticEngineers have developed mathematical tools that determine when randomness emerges in any stochastic (random) system. The research looks to answer a long-standing question: When does randomness set in during a “random walk?” “…we can see the prelude to chaos so that people might have the ability to intervene and reverse a trend.” Picture a herd of sheep or cattle emerging from a shed or barn to g
20h
Feed: All Latest
100+
UK's Thatcham Research Is Grading Autopilot Systems the Right WayTesla Elon Musk AutopilotThe non-profit will soon start evaluation systems like Tesla's Autopilot not just on how they drive, but on how easy they are to understand.
21h
Futurity.org
26
These meat and fish choices hurt the environment mostWhich food type is more environmentally costly to produce—livestock, farmed seafood, or wild-caught fish? The answer is that it depends, according to a new study. But in general, industrial beef production and farmed catfish are the most taxing on the environment, while small, wild-caught fish and farmed mollusks like oysters, mussels, and scallops have the lowest environmental impact, according
21h
Futurity.org
4
Tiny tremors may not warn of big earthquakes to comeTiny underground tremors called foreshocks were thought to be able to predict the possibility of a big earthquake on the way. Now, a new study suggests they may be indistinguishable from ordinary earthquakes. The previous evidence came from a 7.6 magnitude earthquake in 1999 near Izmit, Turkey, that killed more than 17,000 people. A 2011 study in the journal Science found that the deadly quake wa
21h
Futurity.org
6
T cells can foster HIV infection in the brainA new study finds that T cells, a type of white blood cell and an essential part of the immune system, are sufficient by themselves to establish and maintain an HIV infection in the brain. “These results are paradigm changing,” says co-corresponding author J. Victor Garcia, professor of medicine at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine and a member of the UNC Institute for Global He
21h
Futurity.org
1
Clot-building immune cells help lung tumors spreadResearchers have found that by helping to form clots within tumors, immune cells that flock to a particular type of lung cancer are actually building a foundation for the tumor to spread within the body. “…while there is so much focus on activating parts of the immune system to attack cancer, there is also a ‘Jekyll and Hyde’ process going on in most tumors…” Researchers discovered that, for a pa
21h
Feed: All Latest
17
Could Ketamine Be the New Prozac?The club drug might be the next big depression treatment—but how best to use it remains unknown.
21h
Futurity.org
1
Tax on medical devices resulted in cuts to R&DCompanies cut funding for research and development in response to a tax imposed on medical devices as part of the Affordable Care Act, according to new research. Daeyong Lee, an assistant professor of human development and family studies at Iowa State University, examines how certain provisions of the federal health care reform law have affected families and firms. His latest paper, published in
21h
Live Science
50
Yes, There Are Bacteria on Your Kitchen Towel. No, They Won't Make You SickYour kitchen towel may harbor a number of different bacteria, a new study finds. But can your towel really make you sick?
21h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
15
1.35 million children's lives saved by HiB and pneumococcal vaccines since 2000Childhood deaths from two leading bacterial causes of pneumonia and meningitis, pneumococcus and Hib, declined sharply during the period 2000 to 2015, especially as vaccines against these pathogens were introduced in high-burden countries, according to new estimates from a team led by scientists at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.
21h
Big Think
200+
Why are unscientific beliefs increasing among millennials?We don’t have to stop inquiring or wondering about the far-flung vistas of reality, we just need to do it with some good old-fashioned logic. Read More
22h
Science | The Guardian
25K
Giant African baobab trees die suddenly after thousands of yearsDemise of nine out of 13 of the ancient landmarks linked to climate change by researchers Some of Africa’s oldest and biggest baobab trees have abruptly died, wholly or in part, in the past decade, according to researchers. The trees, aged between 1,100 and 2,500 years and in some cases as wide as a bus is long, may have fallen victim to climate change, the team speculated. Continue reading…
22h
Latest Headlines | Science News
100+
Opportunity rover waits out a huge dust storm on MarsNASA’s Opportunity rover is in low-power mode to preserve battery life while a vast dust storm blankets part of the Red Planet.
22h
The Atlantic
15
The Atlantic Daily: Vastly More DifficultWhat We’re Following G7 Gripes: Hours after the G7 summit, President Trump lashed out on Twitter at Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and retracted his endorsement of the joint communique on trade and other issues signed at the meeting. Trump’s conflict with Canada is rooted in a long-standing trade dispute over dairy. More broadly, it fits a diplomatic pattern in the Trump administration of
22h
The Atlantic
1K
What One Professor’s Case for Hating Men MissedLast week, Suzanna Danuta Walters, a professor of sociology and director of the Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Program at Northeastern University, posed the question, “Why can’t we hate men?” Because hate speech remains protected by the First Amendment, we can peruse her argument in The Washington Post , preempt anyone inclined to mistake it for mainstream feminism, and respond with persu
22h
Popular Science
69
Your kitchen towels are probably gross, but so is your whole lifeHealth Bacteria is everywhere—just keep the bad stuff at bay. The researchers reached this conclusion by culturing bacteria from 100 kitchen towels collected after a full month of use.
22h
Popular Science
55
A casual video gamer’s guide to 2018 E3 announcementsXbox Microsoft E3 SpencerTechnology Start stretching your thumbs because there are lots of new video games ahead. The big announcements from Nintendo, Sony, Microsoft, Bethesda, and the other heavy hitters in the video game world.
22h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
28
Evidence for a new property of quantum matter revealedA theorized but never-before detected property of quantum matter has now been spotted in the lab.
22h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
57
Experiments trace interstellar dust back to solar system's formationExperiments have helped to confirm that samples of interplanetary particles — collected from Earth's upper atmosphere and believed to originate from comets — contain dust leftover from the initial formation of the solar system.
22h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
15
Making the oxygen we breathe, a photosynthesis mechanism exposedOxygen photosynthesis has to be the greatest giver of life on Earth, and researchers have cracked yet another part of its complex and efficient chemistry. The more we know about it, the better we may be able to tweak photosynthesis, should it come under environmental duress, or should we need to boost crop productivity.
22h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
17
Investigators suggest that brain circuits could unlock new psychiatric treatmentsThe findings of the studies highlight the complexity of brain inhibitory systems and the importance of taking a subtype-, circuit- and neuronal population-specific approach to develop future therapeutic strategies using cell type-specific drug delivery.
22h
NYT > Science
500+
Global Health: As an H.I.V. Prevention Drug Surged in Australia, Condom Use FellInfection rates declined despite an rise in unprotected sex, suggesting widespread use of the drug may mitigate the effects of riskier behavior.
22h
The Atlantic
15
The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Cogito, Ergo Summit-Written by Lena Felton ( @lenakfelton ) and Taylor Hosking ( @Taylor__Hosking ) Today in 5 Lines President Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un are expected to meet on Tuesday morning in Singapore, marking the first-ever meeting between a sitting American president and a North Korean leader. Hours before the historic summit, the White House said that talks between the two countries “ have m
22h
Live Science
64
'Hobbit' Shrimp with Hairy Feet Discovered Living Inside Hole in Sea SquirtThe itty-bitty shrimp shares more than a feature or two with the protagonist of J.R.R. Tolkien's 1937 children's fantasy novel.
23h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
5
Hawaii volcano unleashes more small blasts, snaking lavaSmall explosions at the summit of an erupting Hawaii volcano could send ash into communities.
23h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Don't trust the tech giants? You likely rely on them anyway (Update)If technology giants like Facebook, Google and Amazon face a common threat to their dominance, it probably lies in a single word: trust.
23h
Big Think
84
Cryptocurrency markets tank after hackers hit South Korea exchangeOn Monday, a relatively small South Korean cryptocurrency exchange revealed hackers had made off with about $37 million in coins, spooking markets worldwide. Read More
23h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
7
NASA finds Tropical Storm Maliksi weakening, expandingUsually when a tropical cyclone weakens it expands and that's how Tropical Storm Maliksi has appeared in recent NASA satellite imagery as its strength wanes.
23h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2K
Researchers ask Americans 'What does God look like?'A team of psychologists at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill have used a new technique to construct what a large sample of 511 American Christians think God looks like.
23h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
A Liberal accent: Linguistics team documents language changes in southwest KansasLanguage changes are happening in southwest Kansas, a Kansas State University linguistics team has found. People in Liberal, Kansas, and other communities are developing a distinct accent, and the language change is a sign of a vibrant and growing community, researchers say.
23h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
39
Nano-decorations in nature's subsurface water filterWhen bacteria and viruses get into well water and make people sick, often the contamination comes after heavy rain or flooding. In 2000, more than 2,300 people in Walkerton, Ontario, got sick when, after unusually heavy rains. E. coli bacteria found their way to drinking water wells. Seven people died.
23h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
Ethnic minority enterprise in Scotland 'is promising but needs more support to succeed'Ethnic minority entrepreneurs in Scotland need more engagement and support from the government and key industry partners to start and grow successful businesses, according to research by the University of Strathclyde.
23h
Live Science
100+
New Barrel-Shaped Structure Discovered Inside SpermHuman sperm cells are well-studied, so scientists were completely surprised to find a previously unknown structure in the little swimmers.
23h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
50
Nectar research sheds light on ecological theoryA sticky drop of nectar clinging to the tip of a hummingbird's beak drips into the next flower the bird visits. With that subtle change, the microbes within that drop are now in a new environment, teeming with other microbes. This small example of species forced to coexist in the real world has helped the Fukami Lab at Stanford University unravel the relative importance of two theories scientists
23h

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