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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Scientists make first 'on demand' entanglement linkResearchers at QuTech in Delft have succeeded in generating quantum entanglement between two quantum chips faster than the entanglement is lost. Via a novel smart entanglement protocol and careful protection of the entanglement, the scientists led by Prof. Ronald Hanson are the first in the world to deliver such a quantum link on demand. This opens the door to connect multiple quantum nodes and cr
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Psychedelic drugs promote neural plasticity in rats and fliesPsychedelic drugs may have mind-altering powers in the physical sense, too. A new study has found psychedelics, specifically DOI, DMT, and LSD, can change brain cells in rats and flies, making neurons more likely to branch out and connect with one another. The work supports the theory that psychedelics could help to fight depression, anxiety, addiction, and post-traumatic stress disorder.
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Ingeniøren
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DSB får grønt lys til at købe eltog for 11 milliarderDSB vil sætte de første af de mindst 100 nye togsæt i passagerdrift i 2024. Selskabet har samtidig fået mandat til at købe flere lokomotiver og togvogne.
12h
Slack
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The Atlantic

The Atlantic Daily: Anytime and AnywhereWhat We’re Following What’s Next in North Korea? Though President Trump declared on Twitter that “there is no longer a Nuclear Threat from North Korea,” his meeting with Kim Jong Un did not secure any such denuclearization promise from Pyongyang. Rather, the summit’s main accomplishment—apart from some striking moments of spectacle —was to warm relations between Trump and Kim. The compliments Tru
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Popular Science
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What will Antarctica look like in 2070? These researchers want to show us.Environment The Ice Sheet has lost 3 trillion tons in 25 years. Given Antarctica’s complexity and global impact, its state of peril merits this kind of groundbreaking treatment.
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Feed: All Latest
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How Scientists Tracked Antarctica's Stunning Ice LossAntarctic Ice EarthThe combined results of 24 different surveys of Antarctic ice loss suggest that the rate of melting has *tripled* in the last five years.
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The Scientist RSS

Many Species of British Mammals at Risk of ExtinctionNumbers of the wildcat, greater mouse-eared bat, and black rat have critically fallen in the U.K.
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The Atlantic
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The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Cohen Flip?-Written by Lena Felton ( @lenakfelton ) and Taylor Hosking ( @TaylorHosking ) Today in 5 Lines Speaker Paul Ryan announced that the House will vote on two immigration bills next week, delivering a major blow to moderate Republicans who planned to force a vote on a set of bipartisan bills through a so-called discharge petition. After returning to the U.S. from Singapore, President Trump tweeted
48min
NYT > Science
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Huge Dust Storm on Mars Threatens NASA’s Opportunity RoverThe storm, which has blanketed a quarter of the planet, has plunged the rover into a “dark, perpetual night.”
49min
NYT > Science
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A Landmark Diet Study Was Flawed. The Researchers Stand By the Findings Anyway.A highly publicized trial in Spain found that the Mediterranean diet protects against heart disease. Now the original work has been retracted and re-analyzed, with the same result.
49min
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Higgs boson, top quarks linked in milestone collider discoveryAn observation made by an experiment at the Large Hadron Collider involving Florida Institute of Technology physicists Francisco Yumiceva, Marcus Hohlmann and Marc Baarmand has for the first time connected the two heaviest elementary particles of the Standard Model.
58min
Feed: All Latest
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This Week Shows How Hard It Is to Curb Big TechSeattle repealed its just-enacted "Amazon tax," San Francisco elected a tech-friendly mayor, net neutrality is dead, and AT&T is buying Time Warner.
1h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

More grim news for US newspapers: surveyThe troubled picture for US newspapers became even grimmer in 2017 with declines in revenue and both print and digital readership, a new research report showed Wednesday.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Twitter shift aims to deliver more news on timelinesTwitter Moments ExploreTwitter said Wednesday it would revamp user timelines as part of an effort to deliver more news and personalized content, the latest effort to attract more users to the platform.
1h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Comcast challenges Disney with $65B bid for FoxComcast Disney AT&TComcast made a $65 billion bid Wednesday for Fox's entertainment businesses, setting up a battle with Disney to become the next mega-media company.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

A seahorse named Frito is on the mend in FloridaA woman snorkeling in the Gulf of Mexico rescued a tiny seahorse that was tangled and trapped in fishing line in a pile of garbage, and now the creature is a webcam star at a Florida aquarium.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Science Says: What happens when researchers make mistakesEveryone makes mistakes, but when scientists do, the remedy goes far beyond saying you're sorry. Two fresh examples show how some journals and universities react when the need arises to set the record straight.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Climate change accelerating rise in sea levelsA new study has discovered that rising sea levels could be accelerated by vulnerable ice shelves in the Antarctic.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Organics on Ceres may be more abundant than originally thoughtA new analysis of data from NASA's Dawn mission suggests that organic matter may exist in surprisingly high concentrations on the dwarf planet's surface.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Breaking up the Murdoch empire: Who gets whatComcast Disney AT&TA large part of the Fox entertainment empire is up for sale, though Fox News Channel and other U.S. television businesses are staying with the family of media mogul Rupert Murdoch.
1h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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NASA finds weakening rainfall in BudNASA examined the rainfall rates occurring in former Hurricane Bud as it continued moving north in the Eastern Pacific Ocean, paralleling the western coast of Mexico. On June 13, Bud weakened to a tropical storm and warnings have been posted from the Mexican government.On June 12, 2018 at 7:27 p.m. EDT (2327 UTC), the Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core observatory satellite passe
1h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Research shows short gamma-ray bursts do follow binary neutron star mergersResearchers at Oregon State University have confirmed that last fall's union of two neutron stars did in fact cause a short gamma-ray burst.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Research finds fair classroom practices disarm threat of evaluation retaliationWhile tuition inflation presents a challenge for many college-bound students, an area of growing concern for many universities is "grade inflation"—in part caused when instructors grade more leniently to discourage students from retaliating by giving low teaching evaluations.
1h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Researchers explain ammonia distribution in Earth's upper atmosphereA new study co-led by University of Iowa researchers explains how ammonia is distributed in Earth's upper atmosphere.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

New research in Kenya finds sweet spot for harvesting reef fishAn age-old challenge of determining the right amount of fish to harvest from the sea has finally been overcome with the creation of a new biomass-yield model that captures all the necessary factors for accuracy, according to a new WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society) study.
1h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Researchers discover roles and teamwork of CRISPR-Cas proteinsRecently published research from the University of Georgia and UConn Health provides new insight about the basic biological mechanisms of the RNA-based viral immune system known as CRISPR-Cas.
1h
Science : NPR
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Errors Trigger Retraction Of Study On Mediterranean Diet's Heart BenefitsAn anesthesiologist who taught himself statistics identified flaws in an influential study that claimed to prove the Mediterranean diet has cardiovascular benefits. The 2013 paper is being retracted. (Image credit: Westend61/Getty Images)
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Decades of satellite monitoring reveal Antarctic ice lossAntarctic Ice EarthScientists have reviewed decades of satellite measurements to reveal how and why Antarctica's glaciers, ice shelves and sea ice are changing. Their report explains how ice shelf thinning and collapse have triggered an increase in the continent's contribution to sea level rise.
1h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Antarctica ramps up sea level riseAntarctic Ice EarthIce losses from Antarctica have increased global sea levels by 7.6 mm since 1992, with two fifths of this rise (3.0 mm) coming in the last five years alone. The findings are from a major climate assessment known as the Ice Sheet Mass Balance Inter-comparison Exercise (IMBIE). It is the most complete picture of Antarctic ice sheet change to date — 84 scientists from 44 international organizations
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The Atlantic
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Why Is Trump Protecting Scott Pruitt?Wednesday morning, The Washington Post reported that EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt had a top aide at the agency call Republican donors to try to get his wife a job. For most Cabinet officials in recent American history, such a revelation would likely be a career ender. For Pruitt, it was just Wednesday morning. This is not the first case of Pruitt appearing to use his position in the government
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Team uses severe deformation method on bulk magnetic alloys for high performanceIn a collaborative study involving Equal Channel Angular Extrusion (ECAE), a unique severe plastic deformation (SPD) process, researchers Dr. Ibrahim Karaman from Texas A&M University and Drs. Don Susan and Andrew Kustas of Sandia National Laboratories were able to improve the mechanical properties of magnetic alloys without changing their magnetic properties through microstructural refinement. Th
1h
Latest Headlines | Science News
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The Mars rover Opportunity is sleeping, not dead, NASA saysOpportunity is hunkered down in a deep sleep on Mars to ride out what’s looking to be a long dark dust storm.
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Science : NPR
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Giant Dust Storm On Mars Threatening To End NASA's Opportunity RoverThe rover has shut itself down because the solar panels aren't getting enough sunlight to charge the batteries. If the storm persists, the rover mission may be over, ending a 14-year run.
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Big Think
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Bridge Burning and the six other ways to quit your jobHere are seven styles of saying “I quit” identified by researchers Anthony Klotz and Mark Bolino. Read More
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

UI researchers explain ammonia distribution in Earth's upper atmosphereA new study co-led by University of Iowa researchers helps clarify how ammonia is present in Earth's upper atmosphere. Using computer modeling, the researchers found ammonia molecules trapped in liquid cloud droplets are released during convection where these particles freeze and subsequently collide in the upper atmosphere.
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The Atlantic
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NASA Is Really Worried About Its Mars RoverMillions of miles from Earth, tucked inside a rust-colored, rocky valley, a space robot is sleeping. NASA ’s Opportunity rover is currently hunkered down on Mars as a dust storm of unprecedented size swirls around the planet. As of this week, the tempest spans 14 million square miles, about one quarter of the entire planet, according to NASA ’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The storm blocked sunligh
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Research shows short gamma-ray bursts do follow binary neutron star mergersResearchers have confirmed that last fall's union of two neutron stars did in fact cause a short gamma-ray burst.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Research finds fair classroom practices disarm threat of evaluation retaliationWhile tuition inflation presents a challenge for many college-bound students, an area of growing concern for many universities is 'grade inflation' — in part caused when instructors grade more leniently to discourage students from retaliating by giving low teaching evaluations. Washington State University researchers say instructors can stop worrying about evaluation revenge as long as they use p
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The Atlantic
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The Bold Type Delivers on Its LeadsThis article contains light spoilers through Season 2, Episode 2 of The Bold Type. In a striking scene from The Bold Type ’s Season 2 premiere, newly enamored lovers Kat (Aisha Dee) and Adena (Nikohl Boosheri) fight about their sex life in the middle of a glamorous party. The ill-timed dispute begins with an exchange of terse words after Kat repeatedly begs Adena to join her on the red carpet for
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New on MIT Technology Review
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A giant new retail fulfillment center in China has only four employees
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Popular Science
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The weirdest things we learned this week: fake memories, sperm is not full of tiny men, and how ketchup makes the gradeScience Our editors scrounged up some truly bizarre facts. What’s the weirdest thing you learned this week? Well, whatever it is, we promise you’ll have an even weirder answer if you listen to PopSci’s newest podcast.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Geologic history of Ayeyawady River delta mapped for the first timeThe Ayeyawady River delta in Myanmar is home to millions of people, and is a hub of agricultural activity. Unlike other large rivers across the world, however, the Ayeyawady has been relatively untouched by large infrastructure and dam projects for the past 50 years, and its geologic evolution has never previously been studied.
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NYT > Science
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Trilobites: Aztec Turquoise Tiles May Solve a Mesoamerican MysteryA recent geochemical analysis calls into question the idea of extensive contact between Mesoamerican and Southwest American cultures before the Spanish invaded.
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Big Think
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How Apple’s new ‘Screen Time’ feature aims to combat phone addictionApple’s new Screen Time function will show users detailed reports on phone usage, allow users to limit access to apps, and let parents manage their kids’ screen time. Read More
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The Atlantic
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The Next Disaster in YemenThe assault on Al Hodeidah was a long time coming. The Emirati-led attack, which began at midnight Wednesday after the Iran-backed Houthis ignored a deadline from the United Arab Emirates to withdraw from the city and its adjoining port, have so far been restricted to a Houthi stronghold south of the city. The airstrikes came despite warnings from aid groups of a humanitarian disaster, and after
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New on MIT Technology Review
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Amazon’s automation goes white collar
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Live Science
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Einstein's Crude, Racist Travel Diaries Have Been Published in EnglishAlbert Einstein, who famously supported the American civil rights movement, wrote down racist ideas about Chinese, Japanese, Sri Lankan and Indian people.
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The Atlantic
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The Controversy Over Just How Much History AP World History Should CoverLike any Advanced Placement course, AP World History is intense, requiring students to absorb lots of sophisticated, detail-laden information in a relatively short amount of time: usually, a single year of high school. Yet AP World, as it is colloquially called, is a special breed of intense. The timespan the course’s curriculum covers is as expansive as its geographic focus: The material include
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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NASA finds weakening rainfall in BudNASA examined the rainfall rates occurring in former Hurricane Bud as it continued moving north in the Eastern Pacific Ocean, paralleling the western coast of Mexico. On June 13, Bud weakened to a tropical storm and warnings have been posted from the Mexican government.
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New and improved way to find baby planetsNew work from an international team of astronomers including Carnegie's Jaehan Bae used archival radio telescope data to develop a new method for finding very young extrasolar planets. Of the thousands of exoplanets discovered by astronomers, only a handful are in their formative years. Finding more baby planets will help astronomers answer the many outstanding questions about planet formation.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Antarctic fungi found to be effective against citrus cankerBrazilian researchers have identified activity against Xanthomonas citri in 29 fungi isolated from samples collected in Antarctica. One of the compounds inhibited reproduction of the bacterium by up to 98 percent. The process of purifying and submitting bioactive compounds to toxicological tests is expected to be concluded no later than 2019.
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Scientific American Content: Global
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Can Facebook Use AI to Fight Online Abuse?The task of detecting abusive posts and comments on social media is not entirely technological — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
3h
Popular Science
57
NASA lost contact with Opportunity Mars rover, but there's still hopeSpace It's caught in a storm that now covers a quarter of the planet, and is still growing. It missed it's call home to Earth yesterday, leaving it's minders on the ground worried about its welfare, and with no way to check and see if it's OK.
3h
Live Science
5
Could God Help You Live Longer?Being religious may come with a longevity boost, a new study suggests.
3h
Live Science
5
How Are Calorie Counts Calculated?Counting calories is one of the main techniques people use when trying to lose weight. But what exactly are calories, and how do food scientists determine whether a granola bar has 100 or 300 calories?
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The Atlantic
23
A Stranded Migrant Rescue Boat Reveals the Depths of the EU’s CrisisGerman Chancellor Angela Merkel warned last week of the threat facing the European Union if it fails to reach a common asylum policy. Her warning could not have been more prescient: One week later, a diplomatic crisis has broken out between France and Italy over what should be done about a rescue boat carrying more than 600 migrants off the Italian coast. And the crisis threatens to get worse. It
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Science : NPR
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Antarctica Has Lost More Than 3 Trillion Tons Of Ice In 25 YearsAntarctic Ice EarthAntarctica's ice is melting faster than was thought, say scientists who recently completed the most exhaustive assessment of the ice sheet to date. (Image credit: Ian Joughin, University of Washington )
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Scientific American Content: Global
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New Probiotic Cholera Vaccine Can Outrace the Infection's Rapid SpreadRapid-response therapies use the lethal bug’s own speed to crowd it out of the gut — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Latest Headlines | Science News
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What I actually learned about my family after trying 5 DNA ancestry testsAncestry results vary widely depending on which company you use.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Team uses severe deformation method on bulk magnetic alloys for high performanceIn a collaborative study involving Equal Channel Angular Extrusion (ECAE), a unique severe plastic deformation (SPD) process, researchers Dr. Ibrahim Karaman from Texas A&M University and Drs. Don Susan and Andrew Kustas of Sandia National Laboratories were able to improve the mechanical properties of magnetic alloys without changing their magnetic properties through microstructural refinement. Th
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New research in Kenya finds sweet spot for harvesting reef fishAn age-old challenge of determining the right amount of fish to harvest from the sea has finally been overcome with the creation of a new biomass-yield model that captures all the necessary factors for accuracy, according to a new WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society) study.
3h
The Atlantic
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After Decades of Losing Ice, Antarctica Is Now Hemorrhaging ItClimate change has not been kind to Antarctica. According to a comprehensive new study, global warming has already bled the frigid continent, which is larger than Europe, of about 2.7 trillion tons of ice. This enormous amount of ice has already raised global sea levels by as much as a centimeter. This outflow seems to be increasing: Almost half of all losses have occurred in just the last five y
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The Scientist RSS

Probiotics Prevent Cholera in Animal ModelsTwo different types of bacteria-one genetically engineered and one from cheese-defend animal intestines from Vibrio cholerae infection.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
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DNA testing can bring families together, but gives mixed answers on ethnicityDNA testing has become a new way for millions of Americans to expand their family trees and learn something about themselves, but results vary widely.
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New on MIT Technology Review
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China’s ambition to power the world’s electric cars took a huge leap forward this weekCATL’s stock has shot up since it raised nearly $1 billion in an IPO to build more lithium-ion battery plants.
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Science : NPR
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Enormous Dust Storm On Mars Threatens The Opportunity RoverWith the sun entirely blocked out by dust, the solar-powered rover has presumably fallen asleep to wait out the storm. NASA scientists say they are "very concerned," but that they hope for the best. (Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS)
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Turning the tables on the cholera pathogenResearchers at Harvard's Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering, the Massachusetts Institutes of Technology (MIT) and Boston University, led by James J. Collins are reporting a two-pronged probiotic strategy in Science Translational Medicine that is able to suppress V. cholerae's colonization of the intestinal tract in mice and to indicate their presence by simple stool sampling.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Climate change accelerating rise in sea levelsA new study from the University of Waterloo discovered that rising sea levels could be accelerated by vulnerable ice shelves in the Antarctic.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Fast-acting cholera vaccine could curb outbreaksA weakened version of the bacteria that causes cholera provides quick protection to rabbits. The vaccine may one day stop outbreaks of the deadly intestinal disease.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Antarctic ice shelves compromised by combined impacts of ocean and atmosphere warmingAn international team of scientists has discovered that the world's ice shelves may be being destabilized by forces from above and below. Scientists found that warm ocean water flowing in channels beneath Antarctic ice shelves is thinning the ice from below so much that the ice in the channels is cracking. Surface meltwater can then flow into these fractures, further destabilizing the ice shelf an
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Mesomerican turquoise may have different origin than previously thoughtThough scholars have long assumed that Aztec and Mixtec turquoise artifacts uncovered in Mesoamerica were imported from the American Southwest, a new isotopic analysis suggests these artifacts likely derived from Mesoamerican sources.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

A new vaccine and probiotic combat cholera in animal modelsIn a pair of studies, scientists have devised new vaccine-based and probiotic interventions that help prevent severe cholera infections in animal models.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

MIT engineers recruit microbes to help fight choleraMIT engineers have developed a probiotic mix of natural and engineered bacteria to diagnose and treat cholera, an intestinal infection that causes severe dehydration.
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The Atlantic
55
Incredibles 2 Is a Masterful Action MovieEvery bigshot filmmaker in Hollywood could stand to buy a ticket to Incredibles 2 and take a few notes. In an industry clogged with blockbusters, where nearly every week brings a new massively budgeted extravaganza, it’s disheartening how many of them don’t know how to stage an action sequence. Enter Brad Bird, the maestro behind two of Pixar’s greatest successes ( The Incredibles and Ratatouille
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New Scientist – News
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Alarm as ice loss from Antarctica triples in the past five yearsThe loss of Antarctica’s ice has been accelerating ominously since 2012, and could lead to big rises in sea level if the rate of loss keeps increasing
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NYT > Science
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Trilobites: Listen to the Sounds of Narwhals That Have Been Elusive to ScienceAs melting ice opens east Greenland to petroleum prospectors and cruises, scientists are rushing to study the noises made by a remote population of toothed whales.
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New Scientist – News

Vegan-friendly fashion is actually bad for the environmentAnimal-free alternatives to fur and leather are on the rise, but many use plastic materials that end up harming ocean creatures. Is there any way to dress ethically?
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New Scientist – News
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Watch a 3D-printed magnetic critter fold and move all by itselfBy embedding magnetic particles into rubber, we can 3D print little shapes that fold, morph, and move around on their own in the presence of a magnetic field
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New Scientist – News
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The brain has a special clock that tracks sleepinessA chemical clock has been found in the brains of mice that keeps track of how long it’s been since an animal last slept, and how sleepy it should feel
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New Scientist – News
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Why tidal power won’t solve the world’s renewable energy needsThere are widespread calls for the UK government not to abandon a trailblazing tidal power project, but this energy source is no green panacea, says Hans van Haren
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NYT > Science
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Antarctica Is Melting More Than Twice as Fast as in 2012Antarctic Ice EarthThe continent’s rate of ice loss is speeding up, which is contributing even more to rising sea levels.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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New research unveils true origin of ancient turquoiseNew research published today in the journal Science Advances overturns more than a century of thought about the source of turquoise used by ancient civilizations in Mesoamerica, the vast region that extends from Central Mexico to Central America. For more than 150 years, scholars have argued that the Aztec and Mixtec civilizations, which revered the precious, blue-green mineral, acquired it throug
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Ancient agricultural activity caused lasting environmental changesAgricultural activity by humans more than 2,000 years ago had a more significant and lasting impact on the environment than previously thought. The finding— discovered by a team of international researchers led by the University of British Columbia— is reported in a new study published today in the journal Science Advances.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Narwhals' acoustic behavior described using audio taggingThe clicking, buzzing and calling behavioral patterns of elusive East Greenland narwhals have been described thanks to in-depth recordings, in a study published June 13, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Susanna Blackwell from Greeneridge Sciences, Incorporated, United States of America, and colleagues.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Climate change accelerating rise in sea levelsA new study from the University of Waterloo discovered that rising sea levels could be accelerated by vulnerable ice shelves in the Antarctic.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Masses of methane from mud volcanoesIn the seabed, there are numerous microorganisms that play an important role in the global carbon cycle. Until now, however, it has not been understood to what extent geodynamic processes such as the subduction of oceanic plates influence this microbial activity and, in turn, impact the carbon balance. A study carried out by an international team of researchers, including scientists from the GFZ G
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Live Science
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Antarctica Is Losing An Insane Amount of Ice. Nothing About This Is Good.Trillions of tons of ice melted away from Antarctica during the past 25 years.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
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Here’s what narwhals sound like underwaterScientists eavesdropped while narwhals clicked and buzzed. The work could help pinpoint how the whales may react to more human noise in the Arctic.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Decades of satellite monitoring reveal Antarctic ice lossScientists from the University of Maryland, the University of Leeds and the University of California, San Diego, have reviewed decades of satellite measurements to reveal how and why Antarctica's glaciers, ice shelves and sea ice are changing. Their report, published in a special Antarctica-focused issue of the journal Nature on June 14, 2018, explains how ice shelf thinning and collapse have trig
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Patients prefer to have cancer screenings despite risks and warningsA large proportion of the American public opts to receive cancer screenings with the hope that testing will reduce their chance of cancer death. Now, a team led by University of Missouri psychological science researchers has determined that patients may want cancer screenings even if the potential harms outweigh the benefits. Researchers believe that clinicians and oncologists could develop better
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Popular Science
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Small farmers are mixing old equipment with new techTechnology The next generation of farmers use a smorgasbord of tools to get the job done. Young and small-scale farmers test new tools, refurbish old technology, and make whatever else they need to get the job done.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

People recall information better through virtual reality, says new UMD studyUniversity of Maryland researchers conducted one of the first in-depth analyses on whether people learn better through virtual, immersive environments, as opposed to more traditional platforms like a two-dimensional desktop computer or hand-held tablet.The researchers found that people remember information better if it is presented to them in a virtual environment. The results of the study were re
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Mayo Clinic discovery is first step toward new bacteria-based constipation treatmentGenetically engineered bacteria are showing promise as a new treatment for constipation, researchers at the Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine have discovered in a mouse study. The finding is significant in part because there are few approved constipation remedies on the market. The research is published in Cell Host & Microbe.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Mindfulness meditation and relaxation response have different effects on brain functionA team led by Massachusetts General Hospital investigators has identified specific effects that relaxation response training and mindfulness meditation have within the brain.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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UGA and UConn Health researchers discover roles and teamwork of CRISPR-Cas proteinsRecently published research from the University of Georgia and UConn Health provides new insight about the basic biological mechanisms of the RNA-based viral immune system known as CRISPR-Cas.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Possible marker found to predict long-term learningFor the first time, researchers have discovered a possible biomarker for long term learning. Could this new discovery help reshape how students learn and how they are taught?
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Diabetes added to high risks for people with severe mental illnessPeople with severe mental illness are more than twice as likely to have Type 2 diabetes, with even higher risks among patients who are African American or Hispanic, according to a new study led by UCSF.
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Popular Science
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Freedom in the Age of Technology Event RulesFreedom in the Age of Technology Event Rules…
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Live Science
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U.S. Spy Agencies Want to Store Data on DNA ComputersDNA and other stringy molecules could store data much more efficiently than hard drives in modern computers.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

VW says will pay 1 bn euro German fine over emissions cheatingAuto giant Volkswagen said Wednesday it would pay a one-billion-euro ($1.2 billion) fine imposed by German prosecutors over its diesel emissions cheating.
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Science | The Guardian
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The Guardian view on Albert Einstein: free thinking and hidebound attitudes | EditorialThe scientist’s empathy was signally lacking during his travels in Asia, newly published diaries reveal Albert Einstein’s humanitarian reputation almost matches his scientific stature. From the 1930s onwards he vigorously denounced racism , “a disease of white people”, once observing that “being a Jew myself, perhaps I can understand and empathise with how black people feel as victims of discrimin
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Latest Headlines | Science News
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Antarctica has lost about 3 trillion metric tons of ice since 1992Antarctica’s rate of ice loss has sped up since 1992 — mostly in the last five years, raising global sea level by almost 8 millimeters on average.
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Quanta Magazine
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Too Small for Big Muscles, Tiny Animals Use Springs“Although Galileo demonstrated the contrary more than three hundred years ago, people still believe that if a flea were as large as a man it could jump a thousand feet into the air,” wrote the biologist J.B.S. Haldane in his delightful 1926 essay, On Being the Right Size . Galileo’s square-cube law had established that as objects get larger (by, say, some linear factor n ), their surface area and
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Organics on Ceres may be more abundant that originally thoughtLast year, scientists with NASA's Dawn mission announced the detection of organic material—carbon-based compounds that are necessary components for life—exposed in patches on the surface of the dwarf planet Ceres. Now, a new analysis of the Dawn data by Brown University researchers suggests those patches may contain a much higher abundance of organics than originally thought.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Genetic soil prospecting yields wealth of potential antibioticsSoil, the source of our best antibiotics, can be more thoroughly mined for new drugs and other useful chemicals with the help of metagenomics, according to University of California, Berkeley, scientists.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Seawater yields first grams of yellowcake: Yarn-like material collects largest amount of uranium to dateFor the first time, researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and LCW Supercritical Technologies have created five grams of yellowcake—a powdered form of uranium used to produce fuel for nuclear power production—using acrylic fibers to extract it from seawater.
5h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Seeking new relationships with invasive speciesWith summer nearly here in North America, we often hear about invasive plants popping up in undesirable locations, "colonizing" different areas. But what if we shifted how "non-native" species are perceived? A Dartmouth study with two indigenous nations provides new insight into how the concept of "native" species is associated with colonialism, and how such framing runs counter to the lenses thro
5h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
6
Researchers found novel structure in the 'antennae' of light-sensing neuronsScientists at Baylor College of Medicine and Radboud University Medical Center in the Netherlands have discovered that the antennae-like structures on light-sensing neurons, called photoreceptors, have a unique feature not observed in the 'antennae' or cilia of other types of cells. The study, published in the Journal of Cell Biology, reveals that this novel functional zone plays a structural role
5h
The Atlantic
100+
The Jewish Opera Italy Couldn’t Bear to HearIn 1937, Aldo Finzi received word that his dream would come true: His newly composed opera, “Serenata al Vento,” would premiere the following year at Milan’s La Scala, one of the world’s most renowned opera houses. A successful 40-year-old composer, he’d already had his music performed in some of Italy’s most prestigious theaters, but never at La Scala. That had a special significance for him, as
5h
The Atlantic
100+
When Hamlet Starts Showing Up in Federal CourtHamlet makes sense in 2018. Almost too much sense. The contours of his tragedy, as with many of Shakespeare’s doomed characters, are startlingly familiar at a time when Americans are deeply divided over the fate of the country and its people. The story of a man exposed to the political violence of a kingdom under usurpation, some would argue, offers an eerie parallel to the lack of sanctuary or s
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Viden
100+
Ny rapport: Antarktis afsmeltning er tredobletKlimaforandringerne har fart på. Sidste år smeltede der 219 milliarder tons is fra Antarktis. Det er en tredobling på fem år.
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Fat cell filling, ketogenic diet, and the history of biochemistryRecent articles in the Journal of Lipid Research investigate how brown fat converts to white, how cells in the liver fill fat droplets, and how eating a ketogenic or calorie-restricted diet may change a mouse's metabolism.
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

MD Anderson, Houston Methodist scientists detect new ovarian cancer targetResearchers at Houston Methodist Research Institute and The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have found a prescription drug, Calcitriol, approved by the Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of calcium deficiency and kidney diseases, may increase the likelihood of surviving ovarian cancer.
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Organics on Ceres may be more abundant than originally thoughtA new analysis of data from NASA's Dawn mission suggests that organic matter may exist in surprisingly high concentrations on the dwarf planet's surface.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Genetic soil prospecting yields wealth of potential antibioticsThough soil bacteria have provided some of our best antibiotics, the drugs come from a small group of all the microbes in soil. UC Berkeley and Berkeley Lab scientists used metagenomics to sequence all the genomes of soil microbes in a teaspoon of soil to search for molecules that look like antibiotics. They found several hundred clusters of genes similar to the genes of known antibiotics, plus ot
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Cryo-EM reveals interaction between major drug targetsFor the first time, scientists have visualized the interaction between two critical components of the body's vast cellular communication network, a discovery that could lead to more effective medications with fewer side effects for conditions ranging from migraine to cancer.
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Enigma of fatty acid metabolism solved: Enzyme shape controls its activityFats are essential for our body. The core components of all fats are fatty acids. Their production is initiated by the enzyme ACC. Researchers at the University of Basel's Biozentrum have now demonstrated how ACC assembles into distinct filaments. As the researchers report in "Nature," the type of filament formed controls the activity of the enzyme and thus fatty acid production.
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Leading Antarctic experts offer two possible views of continent's futureThe next 10 years will be critical for the future of Antarctica, and choices made will have long-lasting consequences, says an international group of award-winning Antarctic research scientists in a paper released today. It lays out two different plausible future scenarios for the continent and its Southern Ocean over the next 50 years.
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Ocean waves following sea ice loss trigger Antarctic ice shelf collapseStorm-driven ocean swells have triggered the catastrophic disintegration of Antarctic ice shelves in recent decades, according to new research published in Nature today.
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Delft scientists make first 'on demand' entanglement linkResearchers at QuTech in Delft have succeeded in generating quantum entanglement between two quantum chips faster than the entanglement is lost. Entanglement — once referred to by Einstein as 'spooky action' — forms the link that will provide a future quantum internet its power and fundamental security. This opens the door to connect multiple quantum nodes and create the very first quantum netwo
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Why we make blood cells in our bonesIn humans and other mammals, the stem cells that give rise to all blood cells are located in the bone. But in fish, blood stem cells are found in the kidney. Since the late 1970s, when biologists first realized that blood develops in a specific location in the body — the 'blood stem cell niche' — they have wondered why different creatures have evolved to carry out this function in different loca
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Antarctica ramps up sea level riseIce losses from Antarctica have increased global sea levels by 7.6 mm since 1992, with two fifths of this rise (3.0 mm) coming in the last five years alone. The findings are from a major climate assessment known as the Ice Sheet Mass Balance Inter-comparison Exercise (IMBIE), and are published today in Nature. It is the most complete picture of Antarctic ice sheet change to date — 84 scientists f
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Satellites track vanishing Antarctic iceMonitoring Antarctica from space has revealed how its ice is being lost to the oceans, providing crucial insight into the continent's response to a warming climate.
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New study suggests surprising wrinkle in history of West Antarctic Ice SheetA new study reveals a surprising twist to West Antarctic Ice Sheet history. New data and modeling suggest that between roughly 14,500 and 9,000 years ago, the ice sheet partially melted and shrunk to a size even smaller than today. The loss of the massive amount of ice then spurred uplift in the sea floor — a process known as isostatic rebound. Then the ice sheet began to regrow toward today's co
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Largest ice sheet on Earth was stable throughout last warm periodThe largest ice sheet on Earth was stable throughout the last warm period in geologic time, indicating it should hold up as temperatures continue to rise.
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Much of East Antarctica remained frozen during past 8 million yearsA sizeable contributor to sea-level rise, the East Antarctic Ice Sheet's past response to a warming climate has remained controversial. Counting atoms to analyze sediment samples from the bottom of the Southern Ocean, a team of researchers has found the land-based parts of the ice sheet withstood warm atmospheric conditions during the Pliocene epoch, when greenhouse gas levels rivaled today's. The
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Shrinking ice sheet made a surprising comebackThe ice sheets near earth's poles have been constantly shrinking for the past 20,000 years. At least, that's what scientists used to think. But according to a study published today in Nature, the West Antarctic Ice Sheet has regrown in recent history — and the process was driven by its own shrinking.
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Magnetic 3D-printed structures crawl, roll, and jumpMIT engineers have created soft, 3D-printed structures whose movements can be controlled with a wave of a magnet, much like marionettes without the strings. The menagerie of structures that can be magnetically manipulated includes a smooth ring that wrinkles up, a long tube that squeezes shut, a sheet that folds itself, and a spider-like 'grabber' that can crawl, roll, jump, and snap together fast
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

How to save Antarctica (and the rest of Earth too)Decisions made in the next decade will determine whether Antarctica suffers dramatic changes that cause more than one metre of global sea level rise.
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Coral reefs losing ability to keep pace with sea-level riseMany coral reefs will be unable to keep growing fast enough to keep up with rising sea levels, leaving tropical coastlines and low-lying islands exposed to increased erosion and flooding risk, new research suggests.
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Fish 'umbrella' protects stem cells from sunStem cells that make blood cells in fish flourish in the shade provided by a newly discovered cellular 'umbrella' that keeps them safe from UV damage.
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Ice loss in Antarctica is increasingly contributing to global sea level riseLoss of ice in Antarctica has caused global sea levels to rise by 7.6 millimeters since 1992, with 40 percent of the increase happening in just the past five years, according to a team of 84 scientists, including discipline-leading experts from the University of California, Irvine.
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Reversible changes to neural proteins may explain sleep needSleep need accumulates over long periods awake, and sleep refreshes the brain. Little is known, however, of the molecular mechanisms underpinning sleep need. Using two mouse models of increased sleep need, researchers found the phosphorylation of an identifiable set of mostly synaptic proteins (SNIPPs) increases while awake and dissipates with sleep. This provides evidence that the phosphorylation
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

What saved the West Antarctic Ice Sheet 10,000 years ago will not save it todayThe retreat of the West Antarctic ice masses after the last Ice Age was reversed surprisingly about 10,000 years ago, scientists found.The reason for the rebound is that, relieved from the weight of the retreating ice, the Earth crust lifted. This made the ice re-advance towards the ocean. Unfortunately, this mechanism is much to slow to prevent dangerous sea-level rise caused by West Antarctica's
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Coral reefs losing ability to keep pace with sea-level riseMany coral reefs will be unable to keep growing fast enough to keep up with rising sea levels, leaving tropical coastlines and low-lying islands exposed to increased erosion and flooding risk, new research suggests.
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Ingeniøren

Smeltning fra Antarktis har øget havniveauet med 8 mm siden 1992På et kvart århundrede er det årlige massetab fra Vestantarktis blevet tredoblet.
5h
Big Think
79
98 companies AT&T-Time Warner will own after the $85 billion mergerAT&T Time Warner JDA federal judge ruled Tuesday that AT&T may purchase Time Warner, without any conditions, arguing that the $85 billion deal doesn’t violate antitrust law. Read More
5h
New Scientist – News
29
Stop the reckless video-assisted refereeing experiment nowThe football World Cup is about to deploy a flawed technology that risks destroying what makes the beautiful game so great, says fan Chris Nee
5h
BBC News – Science & Environment
500+
Antarctica loses three trillion tonnes of ice in 25 yearsAntarctic Ice EarthSatellites observing the White Continent detect a jump in the rate of ice being lost to the ocean.
5h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
100+
Antarctica ramps up sea level riseAntarctic Ice EarthIce losses from Antarctica have increased global sea levels by 7.6 mm since 1992, with two fifths of this rise (3.0 mm) coming in the last five years alone.
5h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
44
Why we make blood cells in our bonesIn humans and other mammals, the stem cells that give rise to all blood cells are located in the bone. But in fish, blood stem cells are found in the kidney. Since the late 1970s, when biologists first realized that blood develops in a specific location in the body—the 'blood stem cell niche'—they have wondered why different creatures have evolved to carry out this function in different locations.
5h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
76
Ocean waves following sea ice loss trigger Antarctic ice shelf collapseStorm-driven ocean swells have triggered the catastrophic disintegration of Antarctic ice shelves in recent decades, according to new research published in Nature today.
5h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Antarctic experts offer two possible views of continent's futureAntarctic Ice EarthThe next 10 years will be critical for the future of Antarctica, and choices made will have long-lasting consequences, says an international group of award-winning Antarctic research scientists in a paper released today. It lays out two different plausible future scenarios for the continent and its Southern Ocean over the next 50 years.
5h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
5
Satellites track vanishing Antarctic iceAntarctic Ice EarthMonitoring Antarctica from space has revealed how its ice is being lost to the oceans, providing crucial insight into the continent's response to a warming climate.
5h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
37
New study suggests surprising wrinkle in history of West Antarctic Ice SheetScientists generally have believed that since the end of the last Ice Age, about 15,000 years ago, the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) has been getting smaller and smaller, with its retreat triggered by a warming world and sea-level rise from collapse of Northern Hemisphere ice sheets.
5h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
100+
Much of East Antarctica remained frozen during past 8 million yearsThree major ice sheets are being closely watched by scientists as global temperatures increase, glaciers melt and sea levels rise. Of the three, the East Antarctic Ice Sheet is the largest potential contributor to sea-level rise.
5h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
100+
How to save Antarctica (and the rest of Earth too)Antarctic Ice EarthDecisions made in the next decade will determine whether Antarctica suffers dramatic changes that contribute to a metre of global sea level rise.
5h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
54
Coral reefs losing ability to keep pace with sea-level riseMany coral reefs will be unable to keep growing fast enough to keep up with rising sea levels, leaving tropical coastlines and low-lying islands exposed to increased erosion and flooding risk, new research suggests.
5h
New on MIT Technology Review
38
A few big players may have been behind Bitcoin’s huge surge last yearBitcoin Tether Price
5h
The Atlantic
89
Why Are People So Unproductive in Short Windows of Time?Have you ever decided to take the next hour before you have to go to get something done, and then mysteriously failed to accomplish anything? If so, you're not alone. This phenomenon, when knowing that the available time has a limit keeps you from using it to its fullest, is the subject of a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research . Through a series of eight different experiments, performed
5h
The Atlantic
100+
How Amazon Helped Kill a Seattle Tax on BusinessSeattle is one of the most progressive cities in the country. It’s the place where the Fight for $15 movement first gained traction, where the city council last year tried to levy a tax on the city’s richest residents, and where local government passed one of the country’s first secure scheduling ordinances to give shift workers more notice of when they’d be working. And now, Seattle businesses h
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Science | The Guardian
24
Don’t let bacteria-laden humans contaminate Mars | LetterSome terrestrial bacteria can revive after decades in space, so landing a bacteria-laden human on the planet could erase the potential for one of the greatest discoveries in human history The discovery of organic material that could be the remains of, or served as food for, ancient life on Mars is extremely exciting, but bitter-sweet ( Mars rover finds signs of life … from 3bn years ago , 8 June).
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Cryo-EM reveals interaction between major drug targetsFor the first time, scientists have visualized the interaction between two critical components of the body's vast cellular communication network, a discovery that could lead to more effective medications with fewer side effects for conditions ranging from migraine to cancer.
5h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
5
Genealogies of Mayflower passengers helps find descendantsA months-long effort to digitize the authenticated genealogies of Mayflower passengers has been completed, making it easier for people to determine if they are descended from a Pilgrim.
5h
Scientific American Content: Global
83
Can Opioid Legislation Make a Dent in the National Epidemic?Dozens of bills have been considered by the House — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Researchers found novel structure in the 'antennae' of light-sensing neuronsAntennae-like structures on photoreceptors have a unique feature not observed in the 'antennae' or cilia of other types of cells, that helps explain non-syndromic blindness.
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Seawater yields first grams of yellowcakeFor the first time, researchers have created five grams of yellowcake — a powdered form of uranium used to produce fuel for nuclear power production — using acrylic fibers to extract it from seawater.
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Seeking new relationships with invasive speciesWith summer nearly here in North America, we often hear about invasive plants popping up in undesirable locations, 'colonizing' different areas. But what if we shifted how 'non-native' species are perceived? A Dartmouth study with two indigenous nations provides new insight into how the concept of 'native' species is associated with colonialism, and how such framing runs counter to the lenses thro
5h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Researchers develop stress test to predict how diatoms will react to ocean acidificationResearchers at the Institute for Systems Biology (ISB) have shown that diatoms can withstand population collapse in an acidified environment by conserving valuable energy normally used for carbon dioxide consumption.
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

ISB develops stress test to predict how diatoms will react to ocean acidificationResearchers at the Institute for Systems Biology (ISB) have shown that diatoms can withstand population collapse in an acidified environment by conserving valuable energy normally used for carbon dioxide consumption.
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

CVIA special issue on adult congenital heart diseaseThe new journal Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications (CVIA) has just published the first issue of Volume 3. This is a special issue on adult congenital heart disease with guest Editor Diego Moguillansky of the University of Florida Medical School.
5h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
22
For 100 million years, amber freezes a tableau of Burmese bugs' life-and-death struggleOne day in Myanmar during the Cretaceous period, a tick managed to ensnare itself in a spider web. Realizing its predicament, the tick struggled to get free. But the spider that built the web was having none of it. The spider popped over to the doomed tick and quickly wrapped it up in silk, immobilizing it for eternity.
5h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Big data identifies lipids as signatures of health and diseaseBiology is swaddled in lipids: fats, oils, and even waxes envelop cells and their organelles, mediate the flow of vast biological information networks, protect fragile tissues, and store essential energy across multiple organisms.
5h
The Atlantic
49
Letters: The NYC Subway Is Not ‘Beyond Repair’The New York City Subway Is Beyond Repair Last weekend, Peter Wayner advocated for a radical overhaul of the city’s current subway system, proposing, instead, a network of subterranean highways filled with hoverboards, scooters, and autonomous vehicles. After reading “The New York City Subway Is Beyond Repair,” I felt compelled to respond to what I see as basic inaccuracies that undermine the pie
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NYT > Science
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Raccoon Climbs Minnesota Skyscraper and Becomes an Internet SensationThe stranded raccoon’s mesmerizing hours-long ascent up 25 stories in St. Paul ended early Wednesday with a rescue and some cat food.
5h
BBC News – Science & Environment
100+
UK rebuffed over Galileo sat-nav procurementDelegations to the European Space Agency vote to procure another batch of spacecraft, despite British calls to delay.
5h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Old Man River's unique chemical signatureHuman activity greatly impacts the natural chemistry of the largest river in North America—the Mississippi River. In a new, large-scale study, geologists at Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge have identified a unique chemical signature in the river.
5h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

E- textiles control home appliances with the swipe of a fingerElectronic textiles could allow a person to control household appliances or computers from a distance simply by touching a wristband or other item of clothing—something that could be particularly helpful for those with limited mobility. Now researchers, reporting in ACS Nano, have developed a new type of e-textile that is self-powered, highly sensitive and washable.
5h
Dagens Medicin

Høj risiko for hjerte-kar-sygdom skyldes primært NSAID-midlerSlidgigtpatienters forøgede risiko for hjerte-kar-sygdom skyldes primært brug af de smertestillende NSAID-midler, viser canadisk undersøgelse.
5h
Dagens Medicin

Patienter med leddegigt har markant fald i behovet for ledkirurgiLeddegigtpatienters behov for at få indsat en knæ- eller hofteprotese eller for udskiftning af andre led blev halveret i perioden 1997-2010, viser undersøgelse præsenteret på EULAR.
5h
Live Science
15
As Massive Dust Storm Rages on Mars, Opportunity Rover Falls SilentNASA's Opportunity rover on Mars did not return a call from Earth late Tuesday (June 12) while battling a massive dust storm that scientists have called "one of the most intense ever observed."
5h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Interest in tandem solar cells heats upFor decades, silicon solar cells have been used to convert energy from sunlight into electricity. However, recent improvements in perovskite alternatives are moving tandem devices—made of both silicon and perovskite—closer to market, according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly news magazine of the American Chemical Society.
5h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Attacking bacteria with shark skin-inspired surfacesSharks are often the subject of TV specials or news stories focusing on their attacks on humans. But scientists are finding that sharks could inspire a new type of surface that would attack bacteria, helping humans instead of hurting them. As reported in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces, researchers have designed a coating that is infused with antimicrobial agents and has the patterned diamond-l
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
5
Cannabis does not increase suicidal behavior in psychiatric patients: McMasterMcMaster University researchers have found there is no significant association between cannabis use and suicidal behavior in people with psychiatric disorders. The study findings contrast with pre-existing data that shows the drug is linked to an increased chance of suicidal behavior in the general population. The study was published this week in the journal Biology of Sex Differences.
6h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Lentils significantly reduce blood glucose levels, U of G study revealsReplacing potatoes or rice with pulses can lower your blood glucose levels by more than 20 per cent, according to a first-ever University of Guelph study.Researchers found that swapping out half of a portion of these starchy side dishes for lentils can significantly improve your body's response to the carbohydrates.Replacing half a serving of rice with lentils caused blood glucose to drop by up to
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Flipping the switch on itchResearchers have pinpointed a particular neuropeptide associated with transmitting itch signals in mice with atopic dermatitis. The work sheds further light on the pathways involved in transmitting itch sensations from the peripheral (skin) to the central (spinal cord) nervous system.
6h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

For 100 million years, amber freezes a tableau of tick's worst day everThis is the first time this kind of interaction between ticks and spiders has been documented in the fossil record. Even though ticks aren't a typical staple of spider diets, spiders can occasionally prey on ticks in modern ecosystems.
6h
Big Think
21
The most dangerous things in your kitchen (Infographics)Home network Porch has created infographics that depict the most dangerous kitchen items according to the 2017 U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission's National Electronic Injury Surveillance System. Read More
6h
Big Think
3
Google Translate steals the show, gets laughs, at FIFA press conferenceThe worlds of sports and technology collide for a good international chuckle. Read More
6h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Stem cell-derived organoids for testing gene delivery to retinal & photoreceptor cellsA new study that compared six of the most promising adeno-associated viral (AAV) gene therapy vectors in human retinal organoid models showed clear distinctions in the efficiency of gene transfer to both retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) and photoreceptor cells.
6h
The Atlantic
200+
Mark Sanford’s Unforgivable SinRepublicans in South Carolina eventually forgave Mark Sanford after he deserted the state they elected him to govern to carry on a love affair in Argentina . They would not forgive him, however, for deserting President Trump. Sanford, who stunned the political world in 2013 by reclaiming his seat in Congress after his scandal-plagued stint as South Carolina’s governor, lost on Tuesday night in a
6h
Dagens Medicin

Molekylære forandringer viser risiko for at udvikle leddegigtNy viden om genetiske signaturer og biomarkører kan bidrage til tidligere diagnostik af leddegigt, viser resultater præsenteret på EULAR.
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Dagens Medicin

Tidligt indsats mod gigt har effekt på langt sigtIntensiv behandling af leddegigt på et tidligt stadie giver langvarige fordele og kan måske forlænge livet.
6h
Big Think
100+
Study: Male bottlenose dolphins have names for each otherA new study of male bottleneck dolphins in Shark Bay, Australia discovers that each individual has his own distinctive name-whistle that other dolphins use when “talking” about him. Read More
6h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
28
Environmental threats put bumblebee queens under pressureResearchers found that environmental threats are piling onto the stress faced by nest-building bumblebee queens.
6h
Live Science
300+
How a Daredevil Raccoon Pulled Off a Terrifying 23-Story ClimbMPR raccoon is being hailed as a hero. But was it just scared out of its mind?
6h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Adolescents who consume diet high in saturated fats may develop poor stress skillsStudy: Adolescents who consume a diet high in saturated fats may develop poor stress coping skills, signs of post-traumatic stress disorder as adults.
6h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Attacking bacteria with shark skin-inspired surfacesSharks are often the subject of TV specials or news stories focusing on their attacks on humans. But scientists are finding that sharks could inspire a new type of surface that would attack bacteria, helping humans instead of hurting them. As reported in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces, researchers have designed a coating that is infused with antimicrobial agents and has the patterned diamond-l
6h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Neuronal activity sheds light on the origin of consciousnessA new Tel Aviv University study identifies and measures the neural activity associated with a new conscious experience. It takes researchers a step closer to solving the mystery of consciousness.
6h
Live Science
25
What's Behind the Myth That Storks Deliver Babies?Here’s the real story behind the ubiquitous myth that storks deliver babies.
6h
The Atlantic
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Trumpism's Win May Be the GOP's Loss in VirginiaWOODBRIDGE, Va.—It was half past 9 p.m. on Tuesday when Corey Stewart took to the stage at the Electric Palm, a tiki-themed restaurant right off of I-95. Politico had just named him the winner in the state’s Republican Senate primary, and it was clear that his victory speech—which focused on the stark contrasts between himself and his opponent, incumbent Democratic Senator Tim Kaine—was building
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The Atlantic
4K
Donald Trump Actually Seems to Believe He Denuclearized North KoreaDonald Trump got little of substance out of his summit with Kim Jong Un. But that didn’t stop him from making a triumphant, demonstrably false claim about how things went. Trump declared in an early-morning tweet that North Korea’s threat to America has been somehow neutralized altogether: “There is no longer a Nuclear Threat from North Korea.” In reality, Trump returned to America from the Singa
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Dagens Medicin

Fase 2-forsøg kan vise vej til behandling af sjælden sygdomEksperimentelt lægemiddel viser lovende takter i behandling af systemisk sklerose.
6h
Dagens Medicin

Ny forskning ingen forskelle mellem forskellige biologiske lægemidlerNyt studier finder ingen forskel i risiko for ondartede sygdomme blandt leddegigtpatienter med forskellige biologiske lægemidler.
6h
Scientific American Content: Global
200+
As Massive Storm Rages on Mars, Opportunity Rover Falls SilentDust clouds blotting out the sun could be the end of the solar-powered probe — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
7h
Live Science
6
Quitobaquito — Photos of a Desert OasisOne of North America's most unique desert oases is called Quitobaquito Springs.
7h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Grave consequencesFemale genital mutilation (FGM) increases the risk of developing mental illness and changes the body's reactions to stress.
7h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

E- textiles control home appliances with the swipe of a finger (video)Electronic textiles could allow a person to control household appliances or computers from a distance simply by touching a wristband or other item of clothing — something that could be particularly helpful for those with limited mobility. Now researchers, reporting in ACS Nano, have developed a new type of e-textile that is self-powered, highly sensitive and washable. A video of an e-wristband in
7h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Mediterranean-style eating with lean, unprocessed red meat improves heart disease riskAdopting a Mediterranean-style eating pattern improves heart health, with or without reducing red meat intake, if the red meat consumed is lean and unprocessed, according to a Purdue University nutrition study.
7h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Large-scale whaling in north Scandinavia may date back to 6th centuryThe intensive whaling that has pushed many species to the brink of extinction today may be several centuries older than previously assumed. This view is held by archaeologists from Uppsala and York whose findings are presented in the European Journal of Archaeology.
7h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Old Man River's unique chemical signatureHuman activity greatly impacts the natural chemistry of the largest river in North America — the Mississippi River. In a new, large-scale study, geologists at Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge have identified a unique chemical signature in the river. This study was published in Environmental Science & Technology.
7h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Big data identifies lipids as signatures of health and diseaseScientists from EPFL and the University of Wisconsin-Madison have carried out one of the most extensive lipidomics studies to date, connecting almost 150 different lipid species to their respective genetic regulators, revealing signatures of metabolic health and disease. Published in two papers in Cell Systems, the study is a landmark for metabolic health science.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Youths prescribed antipsychotics gain body fat, have increased diabetes riskDoctors sometimes prescribe antipsychotic drugs to treat behavior disorders in youths who don't respond to traditional medications. Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and Florida Atlantic University have found that young people taking antipsychotics for as little as 12 weeks experience significant gains in body fat and also become less sensitive to insulin.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Does having a blood transfusion before, during or after surgery increase the risk for a blood clot?A transfusion of red blood cells before, during or after surgery was associated with an increased risk of blood clots for patients.
7h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Study looks at differences between African-Americans, whites in statin therapyAfrican-American patients were less likely to receive guideline-appropriate statin therapy than white patients and the difference can be explained by a combination of demographic and clinical characteristics, socioeconomic status, patient beliefs and clinician factors.
7h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Metabolic effects of antipsychotic medications in youthsIncreases in body fat and decreases in insulin sensitivity were observed in youths with disruptive behavior disorders who were treated for the first time with antipsychotic medications during a 12-week randomized clinical trial.
7h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Study first to show metabolic effects of antipsychotic medications in youthsA study is the first to use gold-standard methods to test the hypothesis that antipsychotic treatment in youths adversely increases body fat and decreases insulin sensitivity. All three antipsychotics tested — oral aripiprazole, olanzapine, and risperidone, which are common first line use medications for children with nonpsychotic behavior disorders — increased not only total body fat, but also
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New Scientist – News
37
Net neutrality officially ended this week – now what?After months of public outcry and legal wrangling, a US law about how internet access can be sold has been repealed
7h
New Scientist – News
77
How can you tell if a video is a deepfake? Just look at the eyesFake videos created by AI are often so good it’s hard to tell if they are real or not, so a new fakery fighting tool tracks eyes to identify the real deal
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Futurity.org
7
This diet may boost heart health, even with red meatAdopting a Mediterranean-style eating pattern improves heart health, with or without reducing red meat intake, as long as the meat is lean and unprocessed, according to a new study. “This study is important because it shows that red meat can be part of a heart-healthy eating pattern like a Mediterranean-style eating pattern,” says Wayne W. Campbell, professor of nutrition science at Purdue Univer
7h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
New opportunities for studying the activity of neural networks in real timeScientists at the National Research Lobachevsky State University of Nizhny Novgorod have for the first time in Russia successfully used and optimized a method to determine the level of mRNA expression in living, actively functioning cells. This method is based on the use of gold RNA probes developed by Merck, Germany.
7h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Periodontal cell sheet technique promotes bone and ligament formation on dental implantResearchers used periodontal ligament (PDL)-derived stem cells to create a cell sheet, attached it to a titanium implant, and transplanted it into the mandibular bone of a dog, demonstrating the formation of a periodontal-like structure containing both cementum- and PDL-like tissue.
7h
Blog » Languages » English

July open promotions are a go!July open promotions? Don’t you mean June?? Nope! We have a special competition coming up soon, which we think you’ll really enjoy! But it also means that our regular schedule is getting shifted around a bit. So we’re opening up promotion requests now, but we won’t actually be granting promotions until Friday, July 13th at 4 PM ET – a lucky day for any player to get promoted! So make your request
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Dagens Medicin

Zoledronsyre skuffer i nyt studieNyt studie kan ikke genskabe resultater fra lovende pilotforsøg. Zoledronsyre har ingen effekt på knæsmerter eller knoglemarvsskader hos patienter med slidgigt.
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Futurity.org
5
Despite cleaning, school desks are persistently grossThe bacteria and fungi that grow on school desks come from the children who sit there, according to new research. The researchers also found that, even after a desk cleaning, the microbes were back in full force within a few days. The results, which appears in the Journal of Applied Microbiology , suggest that in times of outbreaks or for children sensitive to allergens, school officials should c
7h
Scientific American Content: Global
100+
The Battle behind the Periodic Table's Latest AdditionsFour new elements were added in 2015, but some researchers say the announcement was premature — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
7h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
34
'Gut instinct' may have been the GPS of human ancestorsA new study reveals that the nerve connecting the gut to the brain is key for remembering where food is.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
11
Scientists discover a new way to find mass extinctionsDuring the history of the Earth, there were many mass extinctions, when huge numbers of species died out. They are usually easy to identify because of the sudden extinctions, followed by a gap, and then the recovery of life.
7h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
21
Painted lady's roundtrip migratory flight is the longest recorded in butterfliesResearchers found that painted lady butterflies return from the Afrotropical region to recolonize the Mediterranean in early spring, traveling an annual distance of 12,000 km across the Sahara Desert.
7h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
7
British mammals' fight for survivalAlmost one in five of British mammal species face a high risk of extinction, according to a recent comprehensive review of their populations.
7h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
37
Dementia can be caused by hypertensionA new study indicates that patients with high blood pressure are at a higher risk of developing dementia. This research also shows (for the first time) that an MRI can be used to detect very early signatures of neurological damage in people with high blood pressure, before any symptoms of dementia occur.
7h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
UK tech retailer suffers breach of customers' card dataSmartphone seller Dixons Carphone says it is investigating a data breach of some 5.9 million customer bank card details and 1.2 million personal data records.
7h
TED Talks Daily (SD video)
500+
How to get empowered, not overpowered, by AI | Max TegmarkMany artificial intelligence researchers expect AI to outsmart humans at all tasks and jobs within decades, enabling a future where we're restricted only by the laws of physics, not the limits of our intelligence. MIT physicist and AI researcher Max Tegmark separates the real opportunities and threats from the myths, describing the concrete steps we should take today to ensure that AI ends up bein
7h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
7
NASA rover falls silent as gigantic dust storm envelops MarsA NASA rover on Mars has fallen silent as a gigantic dust storm envelops the planet and blots out the sun.
7h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
In test case for gig economy, UK court backs contractorA London plumber who claimed he was unfairly dismissed after years of working as a contractor won a court ruling Wednesday giving him employment rights, in a closely watched case testing labor rules in the so-called gig economy.
7h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
17
Trio of infant planets discovered around newborn starTwo independent teams of astronomers have uncovered convincing evidence that three young planets are in orbit around an infant star known as HD 163296. Using a new planet-finding strategy, the astronomers identified three discrete disturbances in a young star's gas-filled disk: the strongest evidence yet that newly formed planets are in orbit there.
7h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
After AT&T-Time Warner win, is Comcast-Fox a done deal?Comcast Disney AT&TComcast will likely bid for Fox's entertainment business as early as Wednesday now that a federal judge has cleared AT&T's $85 billion takeover of Time Warner.
7h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
UTSA researcher studies the impact religion has on sleep qualityChristopher Ellison, in The University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA) Department of Sociology, Terrence D. Hill, associate professor of sociology at the University of Arizona and Reed T. Deangelis '15 '17, a UTSA alumnus and a doctoral student at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, published a study analyzing how religious practices impact sleep quality in Sleep Health: Journal of the
7h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
New mechanism by which Alzheimer's disease spreads through the brain discoveredThe waste-disposal system in a cell can spread harmful protein aggregates between neurons in the brain in Alzheimer's disease, according to researchers at Linköping University, Sweden. The spread can be reduced in experiments in cultivated cells. The discovery, published in the prestigious scientific journal Acta Neuropathologica, may help the development of new diagnostic methods, and may eventua
7h
Big Think
45
Bizarre film trailer created by White House for Kim Jong-un is totally TrumpianIt’s not clear, though, whether the “trailer” is meant to influence Kim Jong-un or #45’s fans. Read More
7h
Futurity.org
34
Image shows how U.S. Christians imagine God’s facePsychologists have used a new technique to construct a composite image of what a sample of 511 American Christians think God looks like. Participants in the study saw hundreds of randomly varying face-pairs and selected which face from each pair appeared more like how they imagined God to appear. By combining all the selected faces, the researchers could assemble a composite “face of God” that re
7h
Popular Science
97
The nautilus’s impressive memory has survived five mass extinctionsScience But one thing's for sure: This creature of the deep has an incredible memory. Math, the origins of memory, and the mysteries of the deep sea can all be understood through the story of the nautilus, an ancient marine mollusk and metaphor magnet.
7h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
39
Researchers report micro-CT scan of a mouse embryo at unprecedented resolutionOne of the most vital research paths in genetics is the relationship between genes and embryonic growth. Noninvasive, whole-body 3-D imaging of embryos is highly important for establishing these relationships in order to determine the impact of specific genes on development. Mice are a widespread research model in genetics, but capturing 3-D imagery of mouse fetal development requires higher resol
7h
Dagens Medicin

Antistof kan halvere risikoen for gigtudbrudCanakinumab kan signifkant reducere tilfælde af gigtudbrud blandt patienter med åreforkalkninger
7h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
Archaeologists find ancient rock art in EgyptEgypt says archaeologists have unearthed 3,500-year-old rock art depicting bulls, donkeys and sheep in the Eastern Desert.
7h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Bitcoin hits 4-month low after currency exchange theftThe price of bitcoin has fallen to a four-month low of $6,370, days after South Korean virtual currency exchange Coinrail said hackers had stolen over $37 million, or almost a third of the virtual currency it had stored.
7h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Brexit could make UK car sector 'extinct': business lobbyThe president of Britain's main business lobby on Wednesday warned that the country's car industry risked "becoming extinct" outside the EU's customs union.
7h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
S.Africa lifts state of disaster over droughtThe South African government said Wednesday that the national state of disaster it declared in March over a drought that ravaged parts of the country had lapsed after significant rainfall.
7h
Big Think
31
Can psychedelics help prevent suicide?New research in psychedelics is showing them to be a powerful antidote to depression. We need to implement them into therapy. Read More
7h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
6
Germany admits will fall far short of 2020 climate targetThe German government acknowledged Wednesday that it will miss a 2020 target for reducing carbon dioxide emissions, but vowed to catch up "as quickly as possible".
8h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Scientists discover a new way to find mass extinctionsDuring the history of the Earth, there were many mass extinctions, when huge numbers of species died out. They are usually easy to identify because of the sudden extinctions, followed by a gap, and then the recovery of life.
8h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
56
Painted lady's roundtrip migratory flight is the longest recorded in butterfliesPreviously known to migrate from Europe to the Afrotropics during the autumn, the fate of this butterfly species and its offspring remained unknown.
8h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

British mammals' fight for survivalAlmost one in five of British mammal species face a high risk of extinction, according to the first comprehensive review of their populations for more than 20 years launched today.
8h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Test can identify patients in intensive care at risk of life-threatening infectionsPatients in intensive care units are at significant risk of potentially life-threatening secondary infections, including from antibiotic-resistant bacteria such as MRSA and C. difficile. Now, a new test could identify those at greatest risk — and speed up the development of new therapies to help at-risk patients.
8h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

ALMA discovers trio of infant planets around newborn starTwo independent teams of astronomers have used ALMA to uncover convincing evidence that three young planets are in orbit around the infant star HD 163296. Using a novel planet-finding technique, the astronomers identified three disturbances in the gas-filled disc around the young star: the strongest evidence yet that newly formed planets are in orbit there. These are considered the first planets t
8h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Trio of infant planets discovered around newborn starTwo independent teams of astronomers have uncovered convincing evidence that three young planets are in orbit around an infant star known as HD 163296. Using a new planet-finding strategy, the astronomers identified three discrete disturbances in a young star's gas-filled disk: the strongest evidence yet that newly formed planets are in orbit there.
8h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Bradford Co. water quality improves; impacts rare near shale gas wellsA new study of groundwater in a rural Pennsylvania county shows only rare instances of possible gas contamination amid an overall trend of improving water quality despite heavy Marcellus Shale development.
8h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
12
Breathing better may be an added benefit of biodiversityA Forest Service study of nearly 50,000 children in New Zealand has found that those who live in greener neighborhoods are less likely to develop asthma. However, not all greenness is a good thing—children living in areas with nonnative plant species or low plant diversity were actually at a greater risk of developing the chronic lung disease.
8h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
More harm than good: Assessing the nuclear arsenal tipping pointOne hundred. That's the number researchers argue is a pragmatic quantity of nuclear weapons for any nation to have.
8h
Feed: All Latest
100+
Did the Owl Do It? Unpacking the Weirdest Fan Theory About Netflix's 'The Staircase'A bizarre idea that never made the cut turns Netflix’s new-again docuseries into a true hoo-dunit.
8h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
96
Trio of infant planets discovered around newborn starTwo independent teams of astronomers have uncovered convincing evidence that three young planets are in orbit around an infant star known as HD 163296. Using a new planet-finding strategy, the astronomers identified three discrete disturbances in a young star's gas-filled disk: the strongest evidence yet that newly formed planets are in orbit there.
8h
The Atlantic
100+
The Unbearable Awkwardness of AutomationOn June 27, 1967, a Barclays bank in Enfield, London, debuted what is widely regarded as the first automatic teller machine , or ATM. The machine dispensed £10 at a time through the use of a special voucher that had to be purchased in advance. The system didn’t automatically deduct the amount from a customer’s balance. Instead, it functioned as a sort of steampunk check-cashing system, with custo
8h
The Atlantic
1K
Trump’s ‘Great Chemistry’ With Murderous StrongmenSome of the criticism aimed at President Trump over the North Korea summit is unpersuasive to me. I think presidents ought to meet with abhorrent foreign leaders. I disagree with those who insist that such meetings should be avoided for fear of raising the prestige of the dictator in question. And while I wish our president would’ve prepared more, I hope time proves the meeting a huge success. If
8h
Dagens Medicin

Sundhedsminister: Overbelægning er en lokal ledelsesopgaveLægefaglige direktører erkender ansvar for overbelægning, men lægefaglig direktør på Holbæk Sygehus Knut Borch-Johnsen mener, at der et misforhold mellem kapacitet og behov.
8h
Dagens Medicin

Mangel på sygeplejersker skaber ventetid for alvorligt syge kræftpatienterKræftpatienter med kræft i bugspytkirtlen venter stadig længere tid på behandling i Hovedstaden end de maksimale ventetider.
8h
Dagens Medicin

Farma-aktører rykker op på magtlistenKoncerndirektøren i Lif, Ida Sofie Jensen, formand for Medicinrådet Steen Werner Hansen og direktøren for Novo Nordisk Fonden, Birgitte Nauntofte, springer mange pladser på Dagens Medicins magtliste.
8h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
7
Magnetic treatment could help remove 'off-flavor' from winesFrom vine to wine, grapes undergo a remarkable transformation. But sometimes this makeover results in vino that doesn't taste quite right. In a study appearing in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, scientists report that they have found a way to use tiny magnetic particles to remove off-tasting substances in cabernet sauvignon without altering its desired bouquet. Eventually, they sa
8h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
6
First significant study on autism and homelessnessThe first peer-reviewed study into autism and homelessness has been published, in the journal Autism. The researchers* found evidence suggesting that autistic adults are over-represented among the homeless population. They have called for more research to understand the links between autism and homelessness, to help prevent autistic people becoming homeless and to improve support for those who are
8h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Painted lady's roundtrip migratory flight is the longest recorded in butterfliesResearchers found that painted lady butterflies return from the Afrotropical region to recolonise the Mediterranean in early spring, travelling an annual distance of 12,000 km across the Sahara Desert.
8h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Scientists discover how vitamin A drives the human lung immune system to control TBA team of scientists at Trinity College Dublin and St James's Hospital, Dublin, have shown for the first time how vitamin A effectively supports lung immunity against TB. Their research explains a crucial mechanism that underpins vitamin A as a therapeutic option for this disease.
8h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Large fenced reserves an effective way to bring wolves back to ScotlandResearch, led by the University of Sussex and the University of Kent, indicates that for wolves to be effective at directly reducing red deer numbers and allowing nature to recover in the Scottish Highlands they may need to be reintroduced to very large fenced reserve.
8h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
17
Bilinguals use inter-language transfer to deal with dyslexiaDyslexic children learning both a language that is pronounced as written –like Spanish — and a second language in which the same letter can have several sounds — such as English — are less affected by this alteration when reading or writing in the latter language. The authors of the Basque research centre BCBL warn that this is less a cure than a reduction of some of the symptoms.
8h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Lung study points to therapies for chronic coughing diseaseFresh insights into a potentially life-threatening lung disease that causes persistent coughing could pave the way for new therapies. Scientists at the University of Edinburgh have discovered how the disease impairs key cells of the immune system, leaving patients prone to repeated lung infections caused by bacteria such as pneumonia.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
Novel microplate 3-D bioprinting platform for muscle and tendon tissue engineeringThere is a strong need for medication that treats age-related degenerative muscle and tendon diseases. A critical bottleneck in the discovery and development of novel drugs for skeletal muscle is the lack of efficient and robust functional in vitro assays for compound screening.
8h
New Scientist – News
100+
The US wants to build an X-ray bomb to destroy chemical weaponsRegular explosives risk spilling chemical or biological weapons when aimed at storage sites. So the US is experimenting with using massive X-ray bursts instead
8h
Popular Science
200+
Inside the facility where Kodak brings film back to lifeTechnology Welcome back, Ektachrome! Since 2015, a growing enthusiast market and a goose from cinematic heavies such as directors J.J. Abrams and Christopher Nolan have helped 35-millimeter-film sales…
8h
Ingeniøren

Kronik: Sådan blev vindmøller en gevinst for elsystemet
8h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Study reveals simple chemical process that may have led to the origin of life on EarthResearch led by Kuhan Chandru and Jim Cleaves from the Earth-Life Science Institute at Tokyo Institute of Technology, Japan, has shown that reactions of alpha-hydroxy acids, similar to the alpha-amino acids that make up modern proteins, form large polymers easily under conditions presumed prevalent on early Earth. These alpha-hydroxy acid polymers may have aided in the formation of living systems
8h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

No link found between oral antifungal drug and stillbirthNew research from a Swedish and Norwegian team of researchers led from Karolinska Institutet does not support a suggested link between treatment with the oral antifungal drug fluconazole during pregnancy and an increased risk of stillbirth. The study is published in the prestigious medical journal JAMA.
8h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Bristol scientists discover a new way to find mass extinctionsDuring the history of the Earth, there were many mass extinctions, when huge numbers of species died out. They are usually easy to identify because of the sudden extinctions, followed by a gap, and then the recovery of life.
8h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Computer program looks five minutes into the futureScientists from the University of Bonn have developed software that can look minutes into the future: The program learns the typical sequence of actions, such as cooking, from video sequences. Then it can predict in new situations what the chef will do at which point in time. Researchers will present their findings at the world's largest Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition, which
8h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Floridians took Zika threat more seriously than rest of US — but still most did nothingThreatened by the mosquito-borne Zika virus in 2016, Florida residents felt more susceptible than others in the United States to getting the virus, were more knowledgeable about it, and were more likely to support taking community action against it. Floridians were nearly twice as likely as non-Floridians to say they took steps to protect themselves from Zika. Even so, fewer than half of Floridian
8h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Scientists can make skillful seasonal forecasts of summer temperature in western ChinaSurface air temperature (SAT) is a very important hydrological and climatic variable in western China and the ability to predict SAT skillfully is an important target for science.A tea, pf Chinese and British scientists reveal useful predictions of SAT in western China, using the GloSea5 operational forecast system from the UK Met Office.
8h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Digital devices during family time could exacerbate bad behaviorParents who spend a lot of time on their phones or watching television during family activities such as meals, playtime, and bedtime could influence their long-term relationships with their children. This is according to Brandon T. McDaniel of Illinois State University and Jenny S. Radesky of the University of Michigan Medical School, both in the US, who say so called 'technoference' can lead chil
8h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
8
Image: CubeSat micro-pulsed plasma thrusterThis micro-pulsed plasma thruster has been designed for propulsion of miniature CubeSats; its first firing is seen here. The thruster works by pulsing a lightning-like electric arc between two electrodes. This vaporizes the thruster propellant into charged plasma, which is then accelerated in the electromagnetic field set up between the electrodes.
8h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Large fenced reserves an effective way to bring wolves back to ScotlandResearch, led by the University of Sussex and the University of Kent, indicates that for wolves to be effective at directly reducing red deer numbers and allowing nature to recover in the Scottish Highlands they may need to be reintroduced to very large fenced reserve.
8h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
9
Improving nature's tools for digesting plasticEnzymes found in nature can break down certain plastics, but not well enough to support industrial recycling and stem the scourge of plastic waste. Building on what nature has provided, researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute have improved the efficiency of a leaf and branch compost cutinase that breaks down polyethylene terephthalate (PET), the plastic used in clear and colored plastic wa
8h
Dagens Medicin

Læger topper listen over sundhedsaktører med størst faglighedLægerne fylder godt til på listen over de fagligt dygtigste sundhedsaktører i landet.
8h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Observing the cell's protein factories during self-assemblyBerlin-based researchers have produced snapshots of the 'protein factories' of the cell. Their findings could set us on the path towards a new class of antibiotics. The study – a basic science study conducted by researchers from Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin and the Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics – has been published in Molecular Cell*.
9h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Tracking energy flow in large moleculesScientists from EPFL and Canada have developed a novel and unambiguous way to track energy flow in polyatomic molecules at ultrashort timescales.
9h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Tiny termite house: How termites destroy from the inside outThe National Pest Management Association has revealed a high-definition, behind-the-walls look at the destructive nature of termites through the Tiny Termite House, a first-of-its-kind, groundbreaking research study and video production.
9h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
3
More harm than good: Assessing the nuclear arsenal tipping pointFirst study of its kind shows how detrimental nuclear attack would be for the aggressor nation.
9h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Original habitat is best, but restoration still makes a big differenceA new study in The Condor: Ornithological Applications presents some of the best evidence to date that restoration efforts in Missouri's Ozark Highlands make a difference for nesting songbirds that breed there. Recent studies support that these efforts are making a positive impact on the ecosystem and increasing the survival of bird species that breed there.
9h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Bradford Co. water quality improves; impacts rare near shale gas wellsA new study of groundwater in a rural Pennsylvania county shows only rare instances of possible gas contamination amid an overall trend of improving water quality despite heavy Marcellus Shale development.
9h
The Atlantic
3
The Little-Known Nonprofit Behind the CRISPR BoomWhen Feng Zhang was a graduate student in the early 2000s, he helped make a groundbreaking discovery: Light-sensitive proteins from pond scum can actually be inserted into brain cells, giving scientists the ability to control parts of the brain with nothing much more than light. This idea spread like wildfire through neuroscience labs. It attracted Nobel buzz. It also made Zhang an expert on FedE
9h
The Atlantic
100+
The Great Moderate Republican FlameoutThe narrative that moderate House Republicans had shaken up the lower chamber lasted 35 days. In the last month, the usually go-along, get-along group of moderates adopted the mulish tactics of their conservative colleagues to try and finally break the impasse on immigration. Their effort to sidestep House leadership and bring passable immigration legislation to the floor, through what’s called a
9h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

One-step test for the detection of herbicide resistance in blackgrassA 'pregnancy-style' test which can be used on the farm to quickly detect the presence of herbicide resistance in black-grass is being launched today by Mologic Ltd, a developer of personalised diagnostics, and Newcastle University.
9h
Ingeniøren
84
Facebook får norsk vindmøllestrøm – danske forbrugere får ekstraregningFacebook offentliggjorde for nylig, at deres center i Odense skal køre på norsk vindmøllestrøm. Det giver danske skatteborgere en ekstraregning på grøn strøm til centret.
9h
New Scientist – News
64
Magnets can make wine taste better by sucking out bad flavoursTiny magnetic beads can be stirred through wine to capture unwanted chemicals, then pulled out with a magnet to improve the flavour
9h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
British mammals' fight for survivalAlmost one in five of British mammal species face a high risk of extinction, according to the first comprehensive review of their populations for more than 20 years launched today by the Mammal Society and Natural England.
9h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Tracking energy flow in large moleculesAbsorption of light energy by large molecules is what drives nature: photosynthesis, vision, the synthesis of vitamin D and many other critical processes use light energy to perform their functions.
9h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
16
South Napa earthquake linked to summer groundwater dipA summertime expansion in the Earth's crust caused by changes in groundwater may have triggered the magnitude-6.0 earthquake in California's wine country in 2014, according to a new study.
9h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Computer program looks five minutes into the futureComputer scientists from the University of Bonn have developed software that can look a few minutes into the future. The program first learns the typical sequence of actions, such as cooking, from video sequences. Based on this knowledge, it can then accurately predict in new situations what the chef will do at which point in time. Researchers will present their findings at the world's largest Con
9h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
29
Researchers map out regions where exoplanets can exist within triple star systemsResearchers from the University of the Witwatersrand in South Africa (Wits) and the University of Grenoble Alpes in France have mapped out regions where exoplanets can exist within triple star systems.
9h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
45
Scientists peep deep into a diamond to examine its defectsResearchers take a deep look into a diamond to see how the atoms in its platelet defects are arranged in the hardest natural material known to man.
9h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Geologic history of Ayeyawady River delta mapped for the first timeThe Ayeyawady River delta in Myanmar is home to millions of people, and is a hub of agricultural activity. Unlike other large rivers across the world, however, the Ayeyawady has been relatively untouched by large infrastructure and dam projects for the past 50 years, and its geologic evolution has never previously been studied.
9h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
6
Nanowires for sustainable, renewable energyRecent studies have revealed that semiconductor nanowires offer unique advantages for a wide range of applications. An EU-funded project is breaking new ground in the move towards sustainable and efficient energy harvesting by exploiting the unusual properties of these tiny yet highly controlled structures.
9h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
10
Breathing better may be an added benefit of biodiversityA Forest Service study of nearly 50,000 children in New Zealand has found that those who live in greener neighborhoods are less likely to develop asthma. However, not all greenness is a good thing–children living in areas with nonnative plant species or low plant diversity were actually at a greater risk of developing the chronic lung disease.
9h
cognitive science
1
Students who participated in a School Visit Program at a local art museum demonstrated stronger critical thinking skills when analyzing a new painting. These effects were larger for students from more disadvantaged backgrounds.submitted by /u/randomusefulbits [link] [comments]
9h
Dagens Medicin

Færre almen medicinere på årets magtlisteÅrets magtliste i Dagens Medicin, som udkommer med papiravisen fredag, vidner om en almen praksis i retræte. Blot to almen medicinere byder sig til blandt de 100 mest magtfulde på sundhedsområdet. Det er halvt så mange som sidste år.
9h
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
7
Top 5 Builds in American Chopper HistoryThe Teutuls catapulted to fame with the introduction of the "theme bike" to television in 2002. Here's five of their best, most innovative choppers. #AmericanChopper – All New, Monday @10/9c Watch live and catch up on DiscoveryGO: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/american-chopper/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Fo
9h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
Original habitat is best, but restoration still makes a big differenceA new study in The Condor: Ornithological Applications presents some of the best evidence to date that restoration efforts in Missouri's Ozark Highlands make a difference for nesting songbirds that breed there. The reduction of Missouri pine savannah and woodland areas has caused birds that rely on these habitats to decline. Current efforts to bring these habitats back are under way and include pr
9h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Making cars and planes lighter and cleaner using unidirectional fibre tapesAn EU initiative has developed a cost-effective way to produce unidirectional (UD) tape to manufacture and reinforce parts in cars and planes. The solution will make them lighter and more environmentally sound.
9h
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Why Are CDC Disease Detectives in a Cave Crawling With Snakes?The scientists aren't there for the pythons: They're there for the pythons' food.
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Apple Macs vs Windows PCs: Our Favorite AlternativesIf you're tired of waiting for Apple to address your Mac needs, consider these Windows-powered options.
9h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Research toward viable, safe batteries overcomes high resistance, low capacity solid-state barriersEngineers at the University of Maryland have developed a means to overcome obstacles in the development of solid-state batteries, primarily high resistance and low capacity. Dr. Eric Wachsman, Director of the Maryland Energy Innovation Institute and William L. Crentz Centennial Chair in Energy Research, and his group have broken these barriers through the fabrication of a uniquely microstructured
9h
Futurity.org
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Methane on Mars leads to seasonal mysteryMethane gas in the atmosphere of Mars varies locally from season to season on the red planet, according to new research. Using data collected from Curiosity, which landed on Gale Crater in 2012, the team analyzed methane gas from the crater over a five-year period. The results show that methane gas exists in the area but in amounts that are seasonal. “The mysterious thing about methane on Mars is
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
What's still threatening coastal California condors?A portrait of a California condor, one of the world's largest flying birds, hangs opposite the desk of Nathan Dodder. The image is a constant reminder of the threatened bird that the San Diego State University analytical chemist is working to help save.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Are solar panels a middle-class purchase? This survey says yesThe rate of growth in residential rooftop solar photovoltaics (PV) in Australia since 2008 has been nothing short of breathtaking.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Complex river networks better support stable watershed populationsHow are populations of living organisms maintained in changing environments? This ecological question is even more imperative as many species are increasingly threatened by climate change and human influences. A new University of Minnesota study, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, helps answer this question for riverine organisms.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Sociable animals will make compromises to remain with their groupFish will forego their own temperature preferences in order to remain part of a group, according to a new study.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Rail access improves liveability, but all regional centres are not equalOur research on the liveability of regional cities in Victoria has identified an important element: liveability in these areas requires fast, reliable and frequent rail connections to capital cities.
9h
The Atlantic

Can Hollywood Kill the Casting Couch?The casting couch is a phrase that has only ever existed as a queasy euphemism in Hollywood. In the early studio era, when the film industry was run by ultra-powerful moguls who could make or break stars, even the most iconic actresses (like Shirley Temple or Judy Garland ) were sexually harassed by producers early in their careers, as they later recounted. More recently, multiple stories about H
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
5
In physics, a famous paradox that hangs by a thread of lightImagine a metal bar that has been heated at one end. Instead of the heat gradually spreading over its entire length, the bar eventually becomes hot again at the place where it was originally. The fact that, paradoxically, a complex system returns to its original state instead of evolving toward equilibrium has drawn the attention of physicists for more than 60 years. Thanks to a series of advances
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
23
How to build a robot that mimics the moves of animals—and why you'd want toFrom slithering and walking to flying or swimming, animals are able to move and interact with their environment with relative ease. However, building a robot with the same capabilities is much more difficult.
9h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
35
Tracking down the reactivity of catalystsAn international team of chemists has found a method to accelerate the development of new catalysts. Using NMR spectroscopy together with computational chemisty, they can evaluate whether or not molecules can enable reactions.
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The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: Distress SignalDolphins and pilot whales can tell which orcas are coming for them by listening to their calls.
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Futurity.org
1
How 1 mutated gene causes hearts that don’t work wellHeart defects—the most common type of birth defect—can result from mutations in the gene CHD4. Now, researchers know the key molecular details of what happens. The CHD4 protein normally works in developing heart muscle cells to repress the production of muscle-filament proteins that are meant to operate in non-heart types of muscle cell. The failure of this repression leads to the development of
9h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
A choice between home and work – how gender inequalities at work mean women can rarely 'have it all'A 'boys club' culture and a lack of flexibility for working mothers are two of the reasons for a gender imbalance in the highest ranking positions in the City of London advertising industry—according to new research.
9h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Teaching robots how to move objectsWith the push of a button, months of hard work were about to be put to the test. Sixteen teams of engineers convened in a cavernous exhibit hall in Nagoya, Japan, for the 2017 Amazon Robotics Challenge. The robotic systems they built were tasked with removing items from bins and placing them into boxes. For graduate student Maria Bauza, who served as task-planning lead for the MIT-Princeton Team,
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Prescription drugs found in York's riversScientists have detected 29 different pharmaceutical drugs in York's two rivers – with some levels higher than previously observed across parts of Europe and Asia.
9h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
NCAR-based climate model gets a significant upgradeThe National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) has released an updated version of its flagship climate model to include a host of new capabilities—from a much more realistic representation of Greenland's evolving ice sheet to the ability to model in detail how crops interact with the larger Earth system to the addition of wind-driven waves on the model's ocean surface.
9h
Scientific American Content: Global
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The Easiest Way to Get Fit? "Incidental Movement" is KeySelling my car was one of the most beneficial things I have ever done for my health and well-being — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
10h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Wet aluminum hydroxide and oxyhydroxide particles release hydrogen when irradiatedCold War plutonium production activities created complex wastes. Vitrifying the waste for final storage is complicated by aluminum from nuclear fuel reprocessing. Knowing how aluminum particles behave in highly radioactive liquids is vital. Here, research focused on humid particles suggest that the particles' bulk properties do not change substantially upon radiolysis. Gamma radiolysis led to the
10h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Sustainable certified palm oil scheme failing to achieve goalsThere is little evidence that a certification scheme for palm oil plantations is improving protection of critically endangered orangutans in Borneo, researchers say.
10h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
Sleek telescope makes it in the Big AppleJust in time for Asteroid Day, New York's Museum of Modern Art has selected a sleek new portable telescope from French start-up Vaonis for its prestigious MoMA Design Store.
10h
The Atlantic
39
Instagram’s Wannabe-Stars Are Driving Luxury Hotels CrazyThree years ago, Lisa Linh quit her full-time job to travel the world and document it on Instagram, where she has nearly 100,000 followers; since then, she has stayed in breathtaking hotels everywhere from Mexico to Quebec to the Cook Islands. Often, she stays for free. Linh is part of an ever-growing class of people who have leveraged their social media clout to travel the world, frequently in l
10h
The Atlantic

Dear Therapist: My Sister Is Still Envious That I Was Better Than Her as a KidEditor’s Note: Every Wednesday, Lori Gottlieb answers questions from readers about their problems, big and small. Have a question? Email her at dear.therapist@theatlantic.com . Dear Therapist, My younger sister and I have always had a volatile relationship. We didn’t get along at all in junior high and high school, but after I went away to college and subsequently moved out of state, our relation
10h
The Atlantic
2
The Demise of Toys ‘R’ Us Is a WarningRebekka Dunlap A nn Marie Reinhart was one of the first people to learn that Toys “R” Us was shuttering her store. She was supervising the closing shift at the Babies “R” Us in Durham, North Carolina, when her manager gave her the news. “I was almost speechless,” she told me recently. Twenty-nine years ago, Reinhart was a new mother buying diapers in a Toys “R” Us when she saw a now hiring sign.
10h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Transparent pricing boosts business at outpatient surgical centers, study suggestsIn a small study of ambulatory surgical centers across the country, Johns Hopkins quality care researchers found that publicly listing the prices of common operations, such as uncomplicated labor and delivery and tonsillectomies, generally increased business, revenue and patient satisfaction.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Magnetic treatment could help remove 'off-flavor' from winesFrom vine to wine, grapes undergo a remarkable transformation. But sometimes this makeover results in vino that doesn't taste quite right. In a study appearing in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, scientists report that they have found a way to use tiny magnetic particles to remove off-tasting substances in cabernet sauvignon without altering its desired bouquet. Eventually, they sa
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Anthropology professor writes book on the bonds between humans, animalsRadhika's Govindrajan's book "Animal Intimacies" started attracting attention before it was even available to readers. A University of Washington assistant professor of anthropology since 2015, Govindrajan specializes in animal studies, and in the politics and culture of the Central Himalayas, where much of the research for this book was conducted.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Image: Evaluating the noise of future aircraftAs air traffic continues to surge in the U.S., neighbors who live near airports are complaining about the escalating noise. All the while, the demand for faster aircraft that travel at supersonic speeds is accelerating.
10h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
5
NASA flies large unmanned aircraft in public airspace without chase plane for first timeNASA's remotely-piloted Ikhana aircraft, based at the agency's Armstrong Flight Research Center in Edwards, California, successfully flew its first mission in the National Airspace System without a safety chase aircraft on Tuesday. This historic flight moves the United States one step closer to normalizing unmanned aircraft operations in the airspace used by commercial and private pilots.
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Viden
200+
98 procent af danske vandområder er truet: Ålegræs skal redde demKatastrofale regne- og målefejl har skjult alvorlige tilstande i fjorde, åer og kystlinjer. Nu forsøger forskere at kæmpe imod med sand og ålegræs.
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Ingeniøren
13
Mysteriet om jordens manglende kvælstof er løstI årevis har forskere undret sig over, at planter optager mere kvælstof end bidraget fra atmosfæren kan forklare. Nu har forskere fundet svaret – under jorden.
10h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
ECOSTRESS among science payloads on next space station missionA new batch of science is headed to the International Space Station aboard the SpaceX Dragon on the company's 15th mission for commercial resupply services, scheduled for launch June 29 from NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The spacecraft will deliver science that studies plant water use all over the planet, artificial intelligence, gut health in space, more efficient drug development and t
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Learning through experience in the virtual age"Tell me and I forget, teach me and I may remember, involve me and I learn."
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
60
Could studying swarm behaviors teach us how to help drones fly safely?Anyone who's seen a flock of starlings twist and turn across the sky may have wondered: How do they maneuver in such close formation without colliding?
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The Brilliant Vigilance of Seattle's Huge New SR-99 TunnelHow do you keep a tunnel safe? Hundreds of cameras, 17 jet fans, and a sprinkler system that can out-hose Splash Mountain.
10h
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A New Era of Frankensoftware Is Upon UsBut that's not necessarily a bad thing.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Image: Gravity for the lossSpace agencies of Europe, assemble!
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
New study shows carbon dioxide storage is secure climate mitigation toolNew research shows that captured carbon dioxide can be stored safely for thousands of years by injecting the liquefied gas deep underground into the microscopic pore spaces of common rocks.
10h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Economical technique removes pharmaceuticals, chemical contaminants from public water systemsAs the controversy surrounding the Environmental Protection Agency and water contamination heats up in Washington, D.C., Purdue University researchers have developed a technology to remove pharmaceuticals, including antibiotics and controlled substances, and chemical contaminants from public water systems.
10h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Properties of polycrystalline materials can be derived from microscopic single crystal samplesBy carrying out micro-mechanical testing on single crystals of nickel, ANSTO materials researchers were able to derive the bulk properties of a polycrystalline material in a way that is useful for engineering.
10h
The Atlantic
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The Silence of John BoltonPresident Donald Trump’s Singapore summit with North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un was full of showmanship, featuring photo-ops, a long press conference, and one very unusual promotional video. But one player in the scene was surprisingly quiet: John Bolton, Trump’s national-security adviser. Though Bolton was in Singapore for the summit, he has taken a lower-key approach in recent days as Trump ha
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Scientific American Content: Global
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Alien Anthropocene: How Would Other Worlds Battle Climate Change?The problem would likely plague every technological civilization throughout the universe, says astrophysicist Adam Frank — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
10h
Dagens Medicin

Fra fagligt irriteret til dybt bekymretEfter at have læst de kommentarer, som dette lille intermezzo får med på vejen af Lægevidenskabelige Selskabers (LVS) formand Henrik Ullum og fra Anton Pottegårds chef Kim Brøsen, så er min irritation blevet til en dyb bekymring.
10h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
Robots learn by checking in on team membersThe software and hardware needed to coordinate a team of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) that can communicate and work toward a common goal have recently been developed by KAUST researchers.
10h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Learning how boron evaporates will improve water desalination technologiesHigh-temperature desalination technologies can efficiently reduce the concentrations of a chemical element in seawater to make it an effective substitute for fresh water. Research into how the element boron evaporates could result in higher-quality drinking and irrigation water.
10h
Popular Science
31
Everything you need to know about added sugars (and how to avoid them)Health A guide to cutting out the least healthy part of your diet. You should already be avoiding added sugars—but you’re probably not. Whoops. With all the guidelines on what you should and shouldn’t eat floating around, it’s easy to…
10h
Science-Based Medicine
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Halotherapy – The Latest Spa PseudoscienceHalotherapy, sitting in a salt room, is the latest spa trend, just as full of pseudoscience and false claims as we have come to expect from wellness spas.
10h
Futurity.org
5
Violence can lower test scores whether kids live it or notChildren who attend school with lots of kids from violent neighborhoods can earn significantly lower test scores than do peers with classmates from safer areas, a new study suggests. “Exposure to neighborhood violence…seeps into places that you don’t expect. It can affect an entire school and how it’s able to function.” In schools where more kids have a high exposure to violence, the study shows,
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
39
Structural biology: Until the last cutRibosomes are the cell's protein factories. Researchers from Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich have now structurally characterized late stages in the assembly of the human small ribosomal subunit, yielding detailed insights into their maturation principles.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Core electron topologies in chemical bondingYNU researchers have solved the age-old mystery of why silicon cannot replace carbon in organic compounds. A new benchmark quantum chemical calculation of C2, Si2, and their hydrides reveals a qualitative difference in the topologies of core electron orbitals of organic molecules and their silicon analogues. The researchers propose other elements with carbon's propensity to reshape their core elec
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Bacterial enzymes: The biological role of europiumRare earth elements (REEs) are an indispensable component of the digital technologies that are now an integral part of everyday life. Yet their biological role has been discovered only recently. A few years ago, it became apparent that these metals are essential elements for methano- and methylotrophic bacteria. One representative is the bacterium Methylacidiphilum fumariolicum SolV, which was fou
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Graphene carpets: So neurons communicate betterA study led by SISSA and published in Nature Nanotechnology reports for the first time the phenomenon of ion trapping by graphene carpets and its effect on the communication between neurons. The researchers have observed an increase in the activity of nerve cells grown on a single layer of graphene. Combining theoretical and experimental approaches, they have shown that the phenomenon is due to th
10h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
More of the Chinese population will be exposed to heat wavesOne of the major concerns in climate change studies is how the thermal conditions for the living environment of human beings will change in the future. In a paper recently published in Atmospheric and Oceanic Science Letters , Prof. Xuejie Gao from the Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, and his coauthors, try to answer this question based on their recently completed and
10h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Novel microplate 3D bioprinting platform for muscle & tendon tissue engineeringNew research describes the development of a novel screening platform with automated production of 3D muscle- and tendon-like tissues using 3D bioprinting.
11h
Scientific American Content: Global
11
My Father, the Chemist, Teaches AnatomyMost scientists would see a dead deer on the roadside and drive on, not bring it home to butcher for dinner — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
11h
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Inside Amazon's Painstaking Pursuit to Teach Alexa FrenchAmazon tries to translate its homegrown voice assistant into a global success.
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Feed: All Latest
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How Pro-Eating Disorder Posts Evade Filters on Social MediaA new study shows how sites like Instagram and Pinterest struggle to moderate pro-ED content—or even keep recommendation algorithms from surfacing it.
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Feed: All Latest
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Google and Uber Race to Dominate the Future of Search: MapsAs the world becomes infused with tech, a fleet of companies are racing to build maps that help users navigate.
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Feed: All Latest
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The Potential Pitfalls of Sucking Carbon From the AtmosphereA new method makes negative emissions more of a reality than ever before.
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Scientific American Content: Global
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Targeting Inflammation May Protect and Restore the Brain after StrokeNew therapeutic approaches directed at the post-stroke immune response show promise in mice — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Live Science
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Giant Viruses Invent Genes Shared by No Life on EarthViruses that are bigger than bacteria also invent their own genes.
12h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Medscape report finds physicians are sexually harassed on the jobA new report from Medscape finds that more than one in 10 female physicians and 16 percent of female residents have experienced sexual harassment within the past three years. Overall, 7 percent of physicians (12 percent women, 4 percent men), and 9 percent of medical residents (16 percent women, 4 percent men) reported harassment. This is the first in a series of Medscape surveys examining this is
12h
The Atlantic
100+
The FBI’s ReckoningThe Justice Department’s Office of the Inspector General is rarely in the spotlight. But a highly anticipated report by the department’s internal watchdog will finally be released this week, ending a nearly 18-month investigation into whether the FBI acted improperly in the run-up to the 2016 presidential election. The inspector general, Michael Horowitz—commonly referred to as the DOJ’s internal
12h
BBC News – Science & Environment
9K
Daredevil raccoon's Minnesota skyscraper climbThe internet is transfixed as the animal scales a 23-floor Minnesota building for nearly a day.
12h
Live Science
200+
Psychedelic Drugs May Change the Structure of Brain CellsDrugs like LSD and ecstasy might have a surprising medical benefit
12h
Live Science
400+
'Lost' NASA Tapes Show Humans Sort of Caused Global Warming on the Moon TooWhy did the moon see a sudden temperature spike in the '70s? Blame astronaut footprints.
12h
Dagens Medicin

Danske børn har skandinavisk rekord i brug af antibiotika mod øjenbetændelseDet danske forbrug af antibiotika mod øjebetændelse hos børn er fire gange så højt som i Sverige.
12h
Ingeniøren

Her er alle de underlige måder, Facebook sporer dig påFacebook sporer dig på måder, du slet ikke havde forestillet dig. I et svar til den amerikanske Kongres redegør Facebook for alle de ting de holder øje med, når man bruger Facebook.
12h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

How 'gatekeepers' to a cell's nucleus let genetic instructions pass throughResearchers have revealed how the human nuclear pore complex is involved in the flow of genetic information.
13h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Network biology reveals pathogen targets in the model plant Arabidopsis thalianaUsing systems biology, researchers successfully identified previously unknown protein targets of plant pathogens in the flowering plant Arabidopsis thaliana, employing some of the same methods used to analyze social networks or biological networks. Their theoretical framework, they say, could help analyze other interactions between species to reveal pathogen contact points.
13h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Getting heart disease patients to exercise: Study says wearables could help but only if money is on the lineCombining financial incentives and personalized goal-setting with wearable devices may be an effective way of encouraging patients with heart disease to increase their physical activity. In patients with heart disease, regular physical activity has been shown to decrease the risk of a future heart attack, but getting these patients into a regular exercise program such as cardiac rehab has remained
13h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
To forecast winter rainfall in the Southwest, look to New Zealand in the summerScientists have discovered an atmospheric teleconnection that allows them to accurately predict winter precipitation in the southwestern United States by measuring summer sea surface temperatures near New Zealand.
13h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Cash and goal-setting help motivate heart patients to take healthy stepsWearable devices combined with financial incentives and personalized goal-setting significantly increased physical activity among ischemic heart patients.
13h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
100+
New GAIA data reveals mergers in Milky WayUniversity of Groningen astronomers have discovered relics of merger events in the Milky Way halo. Five small groups of stars appear to represent mergers with smaller galaxies, while a big 'blob' comprising hundreds of stars appears to be the remnant of a large merger event. These results were published in the Astrophysical Journal Letters on 12 June.
13h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Nickel ferrite promotes capacity and cycle stability of lithium-sulfur batteryLithium-sulfur (Li-S) battery could become practical if 20 percent of the theoretical energy densities (2600 Wh/kg or 2800 Wh/L) can be achieved. Investigators have the ambition to reach energy density of 500 Wh/kg in the near future.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
41
To forecast winter rainfall in the Southwest, look to New Zealand in the summerEl Niño was long considered a reliable tool for predicting future precipitation in the southwestern United States, but its forecasting power has diminished in recent cycles, possibly due to global climate change. In a study published today in Nature Communications, scientists and engineers at the University of California, Irvine demonstrate a new method for projecting wet or dry weather in the win
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
10
Network biology reveals pathogen targets in the model plant Arabidopsis thalianaHow are proteins in the cells of a flowering plant similar to social networks on Twitter or Facebook? And how might both of those be related to the way pathogens make plants or people sick?
13h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
77
How 'gatekeepers' to a cell's nucleus let genetic instructions pass throughStanding guard between a cell's nucleus and its main chamber, called the cytoplasm, are thousands of behemoth protein structures called nuclear pore complexes, or NPCs. NPCs are like the bouncers of a cell's nucleus, tightly guarding exactly what goes in and out. Each structure contains about 1,000 protein molecules, making NPCs some of the biggest protein complexes in our bodies. One of the most
13h
Ingeniøren

Modtager af IDAs kvindepris: At være kvinde skal ikke være en begrænsning, men heller ikke en belønningBirgit Kjærside Storm får prisen for at have inspireret og rådgivet studerende.
13h
Ingeniøren
7
DSB: Kystbanens tog og signaler lider i sommervarmenDe mange forsinkelser i maj måned skyldes det gode vejr. Også tog fra Sverige er ramt.
13h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
AT&T antitrust win may herald a new wave of media mergersAT&T Time Warner JDBrace yourself for the likely new era of media megamergers.
13h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Puerto Rico issues new data on Hurricane Maria deathsEight days after Hurricane Maria devastated Puerto Rico, Efrain Perez felt a pain in his chest.
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Dagens Medicin

Styrelse advarer igen om risiko for fejlmedicinering med gigtmedicinRegioner og kommuner får indskærpet, at de skal sikre arbejdsgange for håndtering af gigtmidlet methotrexat for at undgå fatale overdoseringer.
13h
Ingeniøren

Kæmpe kollaborativ robot løfter 170 kgEn kæmpe kollaborativ robot med en løfteevne på 170 kg blev vist frem i Odense i sidste uge. En kombination af en blød indpakning, bevægelsessensorer og forskellige arbejdstempi gør, at robotten trods sin størrelse ikke kræver afskærmning, lyder det fra den danske forhandler.
14h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Tight squeeze for Hong Kong's young professionalsAs housing prices spiral in Hong Kong, young professionals are living in ever-shrinking spaces, with box-like "nano-flats" and co-shares touted as fashionable solutions.
14h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
London hopes for bright tech future despite BrexitLondon has a bright tech future post-Brexit working closely with other European capitals but the government should open up more to immigration, London Mayor Sadiq Khan told AFP.
14h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Australia agrees Solomons internet cable after China concernAustralia will help fund and build an underseas communications cable to the Solomon Islands, it was agreed Wednesday, after the Pacific nation was convinced to drop a contract with Chinese company Huawei.
14h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Toyota investing $1 billion in Asian ride-share firm GrabToyota said Wednesday it was investing $1 billion in Asia ride-share company Grab, as the Japanese automaker looks to expand beyond its core business into the "mobility" sector.
14h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
How do you count deaths from a hurricane?How many people died in Puerto Rico from Hurricane Maria?
15h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Older melanoma patients have better response to immune checkpoint blockade therapyPatient age correlates with response to immunotherapy in melanoma and depleting regulatory T cells in young patients may have a therapeutic potential to enhance response in younger patients, according to research from The Wistar Institute.
15h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Older melanoma patients may respond to anti-PD1 immunotherapy better than younger patientsWith each decade of life, the likelihood of progression of melanoma after treatment with anti-PD1 immunotherapy decreased by 13 percent.
15h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
China's ZTE dives 39% at resumption of trading in Hong KongShares in Chinese telecoms equipment maker ZTE collapsed 39 percent Wednesday as trading in the company resumed after it reached a settlement with the United States over its handling of a sanctions violation.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Judge clears AT&T-Time Warner deal, rebuking Trump administrationAT&T Time Warner JDA US federal judge approved Tuesday the $85 billion merger of wireless and broadband giant AT&T with media-entertainment conglomerate Time Warner, delivering a stinging rebuke to Donald Trump's administration in its first major antitrust court case.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
8
Bitcoin 'whales' pulling cryptocurrency stringsBitcoin, the star of the cryptocurrency world, is widely seen as a freewheeling tool as open as the internet itself.
15h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Comcast bid for Fox is next after favorable AT&T rulingComcast Disney AT&TComcast will likely bid for Fox's entertainment business as early as Wednesday now that a federal judge has cleared AT&T's $85 billion takeover of Time Warner.
15h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Australia court paves way for Google 'underworld' defamation caseA court cleared the way for a rare defamation action against Google on Wednesday after a man claimed the global internet giant published material linking him to Australia's criminal underworld.
15h
Science | The Guardian
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Am I too narcissistic? You asked Google – here’s the answerEvery day millions of people ask Google life’s most difficult questions. Our writers answer some of the commonest queries The very fact that you’re asking this question suggests it’s more than likely you’re not. Not in the truly scientific sense of the word anyway. This is because one of the traits that tends to characterise those who exhibit excessive narcissism is an inability to engage in self-
15h
Nyheder – Forskning – Videnskab

Aviserne lod ikke kritisk mindretal komme til orde under flygtningekrisenDa flygtningekrisen var på sit højeste i efteråret 2015 og foråret 2016, fik…
15h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
5
Will Amazon's work to kill Seattle tax spook other cities?A tax on large companies such as Amazon that was meant to fight a growing homelessness crisis got rolled back during a raucous Seattle City Council meeting that exposed divisions over how much companies that have fueled booming economies should help pay to alleviate the downsides of success.
15h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
High-protein corn also resistant to parasitic weedThe world produces more corn by weight than any other cereal crop. Corn, also known as maize, is a staple food in many countries. But farmers growing corn face many challenges, such as drought, diseases, and pests.
15h
iBiology (uploads) on YouTube
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Elly Tanaka (IMP and VBC) 2: Signaling Molecules in Limb RegenerationWhy can a salamander regenerate a limb after amputation while humans can't? Elly Tanaka is studying axolotl limb regeneration to understand the molecular basis for this amazing process. https://www.ibiology.org/cell-biology/axolotl-limb-regeneration/ Talk Overview: Among four limbed animals, salamanders are the champions of regeneration. They can regenerate an amputated leg or tail, as well as va
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iBiology (uploads) on YouTube
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Elly Tanaka (IMP and VBC) 1: Axolotl Limb RegenerationWhy can a salamander regenerate a limb after amputation while humans can't? Elly Tanaka is studying axolotl limb regeneration to understand the molecular basis for this amazing process. https://www.ibiology.org/cell-biology/axolotl-limb-regeneration Talk Overview: Among four limbed animals, salamanders are the champions of regeneration. They can regenerate an amputated leg or tail, as well as var
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Ingeniøren
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Apple blokerer apps der miner kryptovaluta fra App StoreApple har ændret reglerne for App Store, så apps der miner kryptovaluta på den enhed, de er installeret på, ikke længere er tilladte.
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Ingeniøren

Frontkæmper i persondatakampen: Nu skal IT-giganter kunne bevise deres uskyldNy EU-dom giver myndigheder, virksomheder og organisationer med sider på Facebook del i ansvaret for virksomhedens behandling af persondata. Det kan presse det sociale netværk til at gøre noget ved deres »skræmmende« mangel på kontrol over brugernes data, mener tysk databeskyttelseskommisær.
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New Scientist – News
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Britain’s hedgehog population has fallen 66 per cent in 20 yearsBritain only has 58 wild mammal species to start with, and many have declined sharply in number since 1995 – with hedgehogs suffering a particularly severe fall
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Science | The Guardian
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Bumblebees use perfume patterns to tell flowers apartStudy also suggests they can spot similarities between patterns of scent and those made with colour Pollinators don’t just wing it when it comes to finding a sweet treat: the shape , colour , perfume and even electrical charge of flowers are all known to offer clues. But now researchers say bumblebees also use another floral feature to guide them: how the concentration of a scent varies across th
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BBC News – Science & Environment
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One in five British mammals at risk of extinctionThe red squirrel, the wildcat, and the grey long-eared bat face severe threats, a study says.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

High-protein corn also resistant to parasitic weedIn sub-Saharan Africa, 20 to 80% of corn yields may be lost because of a semi-parasitic plant, Striga. In areas infested with Striga, farmers may even lose their entire crops. In a new study, researchers from southern Africa identified several varieties of corn resistant or tolerant to Striga. Importantly, these varieties also have improved nutritional content, particularly protein.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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'Gut instinct' may have been the GPS of human ancestorsA University of Southern California study reveals that the nerve connecting the gut to the brain is key for remembering where food is
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Rutgers researchers develop automated robotic device for faster blood testingRutgers researchers have created an automated blood drawing and testing device that provides rapid results, potentially improving the workflow in hospitals and other health-related institutions to allow health care practitioners to spend more time treating patients. A study describing the fully automated device is published online in the journal TECHNOLOGY.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Dementia can be caused by hypertensionA new study in Cardiovascular Research indicates that patients with high blood pressure are at a higher risk of developing dementia. This research also shows (for the first time) that an MRI can be used to detect very early signatures of neurological damage in people with high blood pressure, before any symptoms of dementia occur.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Men turn to plastic surgeons for a better body image and more confidence at every ageBody confidence is an issue most often talked about among women, but a new report shows an increase in men exploring their options to gain a better body image. New statistics released by the American Society of Plastic Surgeons confirm that more men are having cosmetic procedures, with over 1.3 million procedures performed on men last year.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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The missing link in antimicrobial stewardship strategyEmpowering nurses to participate in antimicrobial stewardship programs (ASPs) is the missing link in strengthening hospital-wide antimicrobial stewardship and improving patient care, according to a new study presented at the 45th Annual Conference of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC). The research, conducted at Jefferson Health in New Jersey, shows that
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New studies demonstrate infection control strategies for measles and mumps outbreaksThe decline in vaccination rates across communities has led to the resurgence of diseases like measles and mumps, and recent outbreaks have demonstrated the importance of an integrated infection prevention response, according to new research presented at the 45th Annual Conference of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC).
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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New study identifies gaps in infection prevention and control at critical access hospitalsCritical access hospitals (CAHs) face significant challenges in their infection prevention and control (IPC) practices, according to new research presented at the 45th Annual Conference of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC). CAH is a designation given by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services to rural hospitals with 25 beds or less that are located
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Big Think
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Are there limits to the truths science can discover?Dr. Alex Berezow talks about the importance of communicating science in a clean and accurate way and why he turns to religion for the answers to some questions. Read More
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Feed: All Latest
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Self-Driving Cars Likely Won’t Steal Your Job (Until 2040)A new report finds that while some jobs, like trucking, will eventually fade, autonomous tech will benefit the economy overall.
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Live Science
75
Diverticulitis: Causes, Symptoms & TreatmentDiverticulitis can cause problems with bowel movements and a can cause severe and sudden pain in the abdomen.
18h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Primary care providers say Michigan's Medicaid expansion helped patients' health and workExtending medical insurance to low-income Michigan residents meant they had better access to health care, earlier detection of serious illnesses, better care for existing health problems and improved ability to work, attend school and live independently, according to a newly published survey of primary care providers.
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Ingeniøren
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Trods dansk signal-skandale: Norge hyrer samme leverandørAlstom, der har haft store problemer med at udruste den danske togflåde med nye signaler, er nu blevet hyret af norske Bane Nor til at gøre det samme for dem.
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Feed: All Latest
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Startup Working on Contentious Pentagon AI Project Was HackedCurrent and former employees say computers at Clarifai, which is analyzing drone images as part of Project Maven, were hacked last fall.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Dementia risk increased in 50-year-olds with blood pressure below hypertension thresholdNew findings from the long-running Whitehall II study of over 10,000 civil servants has found 50-year-olds who had blood pressure that was higher than normal but still below the threshold commonly used when deciding to treat the condition, were at increased risk of developing dementia in later life. This increased risk was seen even when the study participants did not have other heart or blood ves
21h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
50
Sleeping too much or not enough may have bad effects on healthFewer than six and more than ten hours of sleep per day are associated with metabolic syndrome and its individual components, according to a new study.
21h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
8
Graphene carpets: So neurons communicate betterScientists have experimentally observed the phenomenon of ion 'trapping' by graphene carpets and its effect on the communication between neurons. The researchers have observed an increase in the activity of nerve cells grown on a single layer of graphene. Combining theoretical and experimental approaches they have shown that the phenomenon is due to the ability of the material to 'trap' several io
21h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Research provides insights on World War II naval battle siteA new study provides precise geographic information for the preservation, long-term research, and future use of a historically important World War II battle site on the seafloor off the coast of Okinawa, Japan.
22h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Childhood vaccination exemptions rise in parts of the USNon-medical exemptions from childhood vaccinations are rising in some areas of the United States, creating a risk of vaccine-preventable disease outbreaks, argue researchers.
22h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Smoking and diabetes linked to brain calcificationsPeople who smoke or have diabetes may be at increased risk of calcifications in a region of the brain crucial to memory, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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One-third of US adults may unknowingly use medications that can cause depressionA new study suggests that more than one-third of U.S. adults may be using prescription medications that have the potential to cause depression or increase the risk of suicide.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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People who deeply grasp pain or happiness of others, process music differently in brainPeople who deeply grasp the pain or happiness of others also process music differently, say researchers. The study in Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience compared MRI scans of low- and high-empathy people. Higher empathy people process music like a pleasurable proxy for a human encounter — in brain regions for reward and social awareness. The findings may have implications for the function of mu
22h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Beyond the 'Reading Wars': How the science of reading can improve literacyA new scientific report from psychological researchers aims to resolve the so-called 'reading wars,' emphasizing the importance of teaching phonics in establishing fundamental reading skills in early childhood. The report shows how early phonics skills are advanced with a rich reading curriculum throughout the school years.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Troves from a search for new biomarkers: blood-borne RNAScientists have found a new way to trawl blood samples for snippets of RNA released by tumors or diseased organs. The method might eventually help doctors diagnose and track a wide range of medical conditions.
22h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Today's dads are engaging more with their kidsWhether it's physically being there for a baseball game or piano recital, or emotionally being there to provide warmth or support in a tough time, there appears to be a shift in how fathers are viewing their roles.
22h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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People more likely to trust, cooperate if they can tolerate ambiguityNew research indicates that individuals who are tolerant of ambiguity — a kind of uncertainty in which the odds of an outcome are unknown — are more likely to cooperate with and trust other people.
22h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Novel system mimics focus activity of the human eyeA new computational system effectively mimics the natural way the human eye corrects focus, specifically while viewing objects that are closer rather than farther away.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Mozart, meditation and a yoga mat: Oncologists welcome integrative therapies for breast cancerA breast cancer patient dealing with anxiety, depression or mood swings could soon be encouraged by her oncologist to learn meditation techniques, join a yoga class or put music to therapeutic use.
22h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Sleeping too much or not enough may have bad effects on healthFewer than six and more than ten hours of sleep per day are associated with metabolic syndrome and its individual components, according to a study published in the open access journal BMC Public Health that involved 133,608 Korean men and women aged 40-69 years.
22h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Bacterial enzymes: The biological role of europiumRare earth elements (REEs) are an indispensable component of the digital technologies that are now an integral part of our everyday life. Yet their biological role has been discovered only recently. A few years ago it became apparent that these metals are essential elements for methano- and methylotrophic bacteria. One representative is the bacterium Methylacidiphilum fumariolicum SolV, which was
22h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Structural biology: Until the last cutRibosomes are the cell's protein factories. Researchers have now structurally characterized late stages in the assembly of the human small ribosomal subunit, yielding detailed insights into their maturation principles.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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New technology has bright prospects for understanding plant biodiversityBiologists get a new look at plant biodiversity and function with new imaging technology.
22h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Scientists unravel molecular mechanisms of Parkinson's diseaseDetailed brain cell analysis has helped researchers uncover new mechanisms thought to underlie Parkinson's disease.
22h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
30
Discovery shines light on the mystery of cell death in MSResearchers have discovered a unique process of brain cell death that affects the cells that are most vulnerable in multiple sclerosis (MS). After identifying the process called pyroptosis, or fiery death, the researchers were able to block the enzyme in the brain that is responsible for it, using a drug that could potentially treat MS.
22h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
83
Block play could improve your child's math skills, executive functioningSemi-structured block play among preschool-age children has the potential to improve two skills – mathematics and executive functioning – critical to kindergarten readiness, according a new study.
22h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
9
Protective mechanism against atherosclerosis discoveredImmune cells promoting inflammation play a crucial role in the development of atherosclerosis. Scientists showed that a survival factor for those cells has also anti-inflammatory functions and a protective role in atherosclerosis. The study, published in Circulation, provides valuable new insight for atherosclerosis research and suggests a hitherto unknown, inherited risk factor for atherosclerosi
22h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
14
How can patients be protected from post-surgery opioid addiction?Greater coordination is needed between surgeons and physicians about the prescription of pain-relieving opioid drugs following surgery to help identify patients who are at risk of becoming opioid addicts.
22h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
11
Breakthrough in lignin research: Spherical particles multiply enzyme efficiencyLignin, a pulp industry by-product, could replace fossil materials.
22h
Futurity.org
4
How to talk about privilege so people will listenIf you benefit from an inequity, how you handle the situation could depend on its presentation, according to a new study. The study tested people’s willingness to surrender part of a bonus at work as a way of studying the presentation of an unjust imbalance or inequity. “When attempting to influence individuals who are in a position to help rectify financial and social inequity, the way in which
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Science | The Guardian
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Dementia risk to 50-year-olds with raised blood pressure – studyPossible reason for link could be damage from silent or mini-strokes, researchers say Fifty-year-olds with slightly raised blood pressure are at an increased risk of getting dementia in later life, a new study has suggested. Study participants had a greater risk even if they did not have other heart-related problems, the research published in the European Heart Journal said. Continue reading…
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
12
New GAIA data reveals mergers in Milky WayUniversity of Groningen astronomers have discovered relics of merger events in the Milky Way halo. Five small groups of stars appear to represent mergers with smaller galaxies, while a big 'blob' comprising hundreds of stars appears to be the remnant of a large merger event. These results were published in The Astrophysical Journal Letters on 12 June.
22h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
57
Physicists discover how to create the thinnest liquid films everPhysicists have discovered a fundamentally new way surfaces can get wet. Their study may allow scientists to create the thinnest films of liquid ever made — and engineer a new class of surface coatings and lubricants just a few atoms thick.
22h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Researchers map brain of blind patient who can see motionSince the visual processing centres of her brain went dark after a stroke, a Scottish woman has been unable to see objects. However, she has developed the remarkable ability to see objects in motion, neuroscientists at Western University in Canada have discovered.
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Feed: All Latest
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Byton's K-Byte Electric Concept Makes Self-Driving Look GoodWhile Tesla struggles, Chinese automakers like Byton are aiming to gobble up its market share with electric, someday self-driving cars.
22h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Environmental threats put bumblebee queens under pressureIn a study published today in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, researchers at the University of California, Riverside found that environmental threats are piling onto the stress faced by nest-building bumblebee queens.
23h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Deadly fungus found for first time in critically endangered amphibian speciesA fungal pathogen which has led to the extinction of entire species in South America has been recorded for the first time in critically endangered amphibians in India.
23h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Conformity trumps riskiness in social fishResearchers at the University of Bristol have discovered that more sociable fish suppress their own personality when they are with a partner.
23h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Dementia risk increased in 50-year-olds with blood pressure below hypertension thresholdNew findings from the long-running Whitehall II study of over 10,000 civil servants has found 50-year-olds who had blood pressure that was higher than normal but still below the threshold commonly used when deciding to treat the condition, were at increased risk of developing dementia in later life. This increased risk was seen even when the study participants did not have other heart or blood ves
23h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Clever bees can identify different flowers by patterns of scentNew research led by scientists from the University of Bristol and Queen Mary University of London has revealed that bumblebees can tell flowers apart by patterns of scent.
23h
Futurity.org
13
This quality makes people better at working well with othersPeople who are tolerant of ambiguity—a kind of uncertainty in which the odds of an outcome are unknown—are more likely to cooperate with and trust other people, according to new research. “…we try to predict other people without ever having full access to their ‘hidden’ states.” Tolerance of ambiguity is distinct from tolerance of risk. With risk, the probability of each future outcome is known,
23h
Futurity.org
2
Team spots new quantum property at frigid tempScientists have spotted a theorized—but never-before detected—property of quantum matter in the lab. The team proved that a particular quantum material can demonstrate electrical dipole fluctuations—irregular oscillations of tiny charged poles on the material—even in extremely cold conditions, in the neighborhood of minus 450 degrees Fahrenheit. The material, first synthesized 20 years ago, is ca
23h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
18
Core electron topologies in chemical bondingResearchers resolve the age-old mystery of why silicon cannot replace carbon in organic compounds. A new benchmark quantum chemical calculation of C2, Si2, and their hydrides for the first time reveals a qualitative difference in the topologies of core electron orbitals of organic molecules and their silicon analogues. Other elements with a similar propensity as carbon to reshape their core electr
23h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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A new kind of vaccine based on spider silkIn order to strengthen the efficacy of vaccines on the immune system — and in particular on T lymphocytes, specialized in the detection of cancer cells — researchers have developed spider silk microcapsules capable of delivering the vaccine directly to the heart of immune cells.
23h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
54
Composition of complex sugars in breast milk may prevent future food allergiesThe unique composition of a mother's breastmilk may help to reduce food sensitization in her infant, report researchers. The findings further highlight the health role of human milk oligosaccharides (HMOs), which are not found in infant formula, and underscore their potential for therapeutic interventions.
23h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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David vs Goliath: How a small molecule can defeat asthma attacksSmall molecule PM-43I prevented and reversed preexisting allergic airway disease in mice and cleared through the kidneys with no long-term toxicity.
23h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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AI senses people's pose through wallsA new wireless smart-home system could help detect and monitor disease and enable the elderly to 'age in place.'
23h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
56
Conformity trumps riskiness in social fishResearchers at the University of Bristol have discovered that more sociable fish suppress their own personality when they are with a partner.
23h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
100+
Deadly fungus found for first time in critically endangered amphibian speciesA fungal pathogen which has led to the extinction of entire species in South America has been recorded for the first time in critically endangered amphibians in India.
23h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
97
Environmental threats put bumblebee queens under pressureSpring is a busy time for bumblebee queens.
23h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
79
Clever bees can identify different flowers by patterns of scentNew research led by scientists from the University of Bristol and Queen Mary University of London has revealed that bumblebees can tell flowers apart by patterns of scent.
23h
Futurity.org
1
High-tech wound therapy doesn’t beat old-school optionCompared to standard dressings, high-tech negative pressure wound therapy devices don’t improve patient recovery from open leg fractures, new research shows. This study involved people with an “open” fracture of the leg, where the bone has broken through the skin. The broken bone is exposed to contamination and there is a higher risk of healing-related complications. In severe open leg fractures,
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The AT&T-Time Warner Merger Is a Done Deal. Now What?A judge's decision will likely be seen as good news for other pending and potential mergers but could be a wash at best for consumers.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Modern blood cancer treatments require new approach for monitoring, reporting side effectsTreatment changes including the advent of targeted and immune therapies have dramatically improved survival for blood cancers, but new report calls for improved evaluation of poorly understood side effects that may develop over time.
23h
Futurity.org
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Higher temps could slash global corn yieldsWarmer temperatures by the end of the century will reduce corn yields worldwide, according to a new study. The study also shows dramatic increases in the variability of corn yields from one year to the next and the likelihood of simultaneous low yields across multiple high-producing regions, which could lead to price hikes and global shortages. Corn, or maize, is the most widely grown crop in the
23h
The Atlantic
3
The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Merger Moves-Written by Lena Felton ( @lenakfelton ) and Taylor Hosking ( @TaylorHosking ) Today in 5 Lines After a historic one-on-one meeting, President Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un signed a joint agreement committing to pursue the complete denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula, but did not provide a timetable for doing so. Trump also held a press conference where he announced that the U.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Threatened whales and dolphins recognize predatory killer whales from their alarming callsSome killer whales prey on aquatic mammals while others, which prey on fish alone, pose on threat; so how do aquatic mammals know when they are at risk from killer whales? A new study shows that pilot whales and Risso's dolphins flea from a subset of orca calls that have many of the acoustic characteristics of mammal alarm calls, including human screams, which could warn them that the predators in
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Popular Science
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Scientists wanted to understand how baobab trees live for thousands of years. Then the ancient trees started dying.Environment The culprit is still unknown—and at large. The oldest African baobabs (between 1,100 and 2,500 years old) are dying abruptly, according to a new survey of the species published Monday.
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Popular Science
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Meet the new fastest supercomputer in the worldTechnology It's more powerful than a million high-end laptops. If you wanted to put Summit on your desk, you’d need a workstation that’s about the size of two tennis courts.
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Science : NPR
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1 In 3 Adults In The U.S. Takes Medications Linked To DepressionDepression is a possible side effect of 200 medications. Now, a new study finds people who take these drugs are, in fact, more likely to be depressed. The more drugs you take, the higher the risk. (Image credit: Glasshouse Images/Getty Images)
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Live Science
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Confused Baby Hawk Rescued from Inside Balloon TelescopeWhen the baby bird invaded the telescope scientists scrambled to make sure it wouldn't damage sensitive optics (or hurt itself).
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Big Think
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Hawaii's Kilauea volcano eruption created new land. It already has an owner.The world's newest land, created by Hawaii's volcanic outburst, already has an owner. Read More
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
6
Threatened whales and dolphins recognize predatory killer whales from their alarming callsKiller whales have a formidable reputation as one of the ocean's most ferocious predators. Hunting stealthily in packs, some populations pursue ocean-going mammals, however, other killer whales prefer to dine on a diet of fish alone, posing little or no threat to the mammals that share their waters. Knowing that some species, including birds and mammals, are capable of assessing the risk that they
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The Atlantic
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The 10 Weirdest Moments of a Very Weird SummitIt was bound to be a spectacle. This would’ve been true even apart from the outsized figures—Donald Trump and Kim Jong Un—at the center of the Singapore summit; the fact of an American president meeting a North Korean leader was itself historic. This not long after an entirely different kind of spectacle, in the form of the fierce war of words between the two last summer, with Trump’s “ fire and
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The Atlantic
9
The Atlantic Daily: Bid for PeaceWhat We’re Following Singapore Summit: President Trump met Kim Jong Un in Singapore for the first-ever summit between the U.S. and North Korean heads of state. The meeting overturned America’s previous negotiation process in a way that some experts say befits a new nuclear era. Yet while Trump made several rhetorical concessions, he exacted few new promises from Kim. For his part, the North Korea
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Feed: All Latest
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Feds Bust Dozens of Nigerian Email Scammers, but Your Inbox Still Isn’t SafeThe arrest of dozens of alleged Nigerian email scammers and their associates is a small, but important, first step toward tackling an enormous problem.
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Live Science
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What Does Chlorine Really Do to Your Body?Chlorine helps keep us safe from an otherwise bacteria-filled soup of pool water and pee. But should we fear the chemical itself?
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New on MIT Technology Review
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AT&T’s whopping $85 billion bid for Time Warner gets a legal green lightAT&T Time Warner JD
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The Scientist RSS

Prominent Salk Institute Scientist Inder Verma ResignsHis decision came as an investigation into sexual harassment allegations against him was ongoing.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
7
Rare type of tick inexplicably turns up in ArkansasA hardy, invasive species of tick that survived a New Jersey winter and subsequently traversed the mid-Atlantic has mysteriously arrived in Arkansas. No one is sure how the Longhorned tick, native to East Asia, arrived in the country, nor how it made its way to the middle of the continent.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Block play could improve your child's math skills, executive functioningSemi-structured block play among preschool-age children has the potential to improve two skills—mathematics and executive functioning—critical to kindergarten readiness, according a new study by Purdue University researchers.
1d
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Research provides insights on World War II naval battle siteThe remains of World War II naval battle sites can be found under water, but most have not yet been subject to archaeological investigation. A new International Journal of Nautical Archaeology study provides precise geographic information for the preservation, long-term research, and future use of a historically important World War II battle site on the seafloor off the coast of Okinawa, Japan.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Boring down on boronHigh-temperature desalination technologies can efficiently reduce the concentrations of a chemical element in seawater to make it an effective substitute for fresh water. Research that has investigated how the element boron evaporates could help produce higher-quality drinking and irrigation water.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Robots learn by checking in on team membersInnovative drone designs and software enables a team of drones to work together in a coordinated approach.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

103rd ESA Annual Meeting: Preview and highlightsExtreme events are made worse by human activities. The ability of ecosystems to respond depends on how resilient they are, a characteristic also undermined by land-use practices that increase effects of extreme conditions. Clearly, the sustainability of ecosystem and human well-being depends on ecosystem resilience to extreme events. The following selected sessions and events at the Annual Meeting
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Block play could improve your child's math skills, executive functioningSemi-structured block play among preschool-age children has the potential to improve two skills – mathematics and executive functioning – critical to kindergarten readiness, according a new study by Purdue University researchers.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Research provides insights on World War II naval battle siteA new International Journal of Nautical Archaeology study provides precise geographic information for the preservation, long-term research, and future use of a historically important World War II battle site on the seafloor off the coast of Okinawa, Japan.
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Inside Science
3
Soccer Referees Have Back-up in This Summer’s World CupSoccer Referees Have Back-up in This Summer’s World Cup Goal-line technology and a “VARification” system could reduce the number of controversial refereeing incidents during the tournament in Russia. WCRussia2018.jpg Image credits: Fifg/ Shutterstock Sports Tuesday, June 12, 2018 – 15:45 Peter Gwynne, Contributor (Inside Science) — When referees miss a call in the World Cup, it lives with the te
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Blog » Languages » English
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Electron Microscope Image Through the Whole RetinaEyewire is so named because we are mapping neurons of the retina. The image above shows a labeled cross-section through the whole retina, from photoreceptors to ganglion cells. It may be surprising to see just how tall the photoreceptors are — the largest being at least twice as tall as the tallest ganglion cell. The image above was generated by Seung Lab’s Sebastian Stroeh using an electron micr
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Biggest Surprises (and Missed Opportunities) of the E3 Press ConferencesIt's Tuesday, which means the E3 show floor is now open—and the press conferences, where most of the announcements and news live, just ended. Here's what you missed.
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Science : NPR
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New Research On Sound Could Make Tornado Warnings More AccurateForecasters have gotten better giving advance notice of when tornadoes might strike. Now, there's a new technology that may help researchers even more: listening for the sounds of a tornado that humans can't hear.
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