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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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New type of photosynthesis discoveredThe discovery changes our understanding of the basic mechanism of photosynthesis and should rewrite the textbooks.
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Science current issue
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Preparing ocean governance for species on the move
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Ingeniøren
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Datatilsynet til virksomheder på Facebook: I skal indgå aftale om fælles dataansvarNy EU-dom betyder, at virksomheder og myndigheder, der har eller vil oprette en 'fanside' på Facebook, skal indgå en aftale med virksomheden om ansvarsfordeling for databehandling. Det udtaler Datatilsynet.
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LATEST

Live Science
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This Supercomputer Can Calculate in 1 Second What Would Take You 6 Billion YearsIt's the fastest, and smartest, supercomputer.
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Feed: All Latest
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Google’s Employee Diversity Numbers Haven’t Really ImprovedThe share of Google employees who are women, black, or Latinx barely budged last year, as the company was riven by internal debate over its diversity policies.
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The Scientist RSS

Humans are Making Mammals Return to the Night LifeWhile shifts in behavior could help wildlife and people coexist, they might also affect the animals' survival.
20min
The Atlantic
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Was Comey’s Letter to Congress Driven By Fear He’d Be Impeached?In his accounts of his decision to notify Congress that the FBI investigation into Hillary Clinton’s emails had been re-opened in the waning days of the 2016 election, former FBI Director James Comey has always said he was trying to protect the FBI, despite the personal sacrifice that might entail. “I knew this would be disastrous for me personally, but I thought this is the best way to protect t
31min
The Atlantic
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The World Cup Is Russia’s Latest Makeover AttemptThe soccer World Cup, which began Thursday in Russia, could be perceived as a celebration of the world’s love for the beautiful game. It could also, as Boris Johnson, the U.K. foreign secretary, put it, seem like an “ emetic prospect, frankly, to think of Putin glorying in this sporting event .” Indeed, the sporting aspect of the Cup notwithstanding, the tournament is yet another attempt by Russi
31min
Live Science
4
Dangerous, Golden 'Hair' Sprouts from Hawaii VolcanoPele's hair is beautiful — and dangerous.
34min
Big Think
3
Stephen Hawking's words will be beamed into a black hole after his memorial serviceHis words are being beamed by satellite into a black hole about 3,457 light years away. Read More
36min
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Mammals going nocturnal to avoid humansHuman activity is causing the planet's mammals to flee daylight for the protection of night, according to a new study from the University of California, Berkeley.
48min
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Early birds less prone to depressionA study of 32,000 women found that those with an early chronotype, or sleep-wake preference, were significantly less likely to develop depression.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Researchers can count on improved proteomics methodPrinceton's Martin Wühr has improved upon his method to accurately count the proteins present in a cell under different circumstances. 'The TMTc+ method is in a kind of sweet spot compared to the other methods [of isobaric tagging],' Wühr says. 'It provides superb measurement accuracy and precision, it's at least as sensitive as any other method, and it's compatible with around ten times more mass
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The Atlantic
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Watchdog Report Dismantles Trump Claims, But Slams Comey and the FBIA report by the Justice Department’s internal watchdog found no political bias in the conduct of an investigation into Hillary Clinton’s use of a private email server and account, but it offers a scathing condemnation of how former FBI Director James Comey and other FBI employees handled aspects of the investigation, including extensive violations of Justice Department rules and protocols. The re
49min
Live Science
8
Why Is This Tree Covered in a Ghostly Web?No, a spider didn't build this web — hundreds or thousands of tiny caterpillars did.
50min
Feed: All Latest
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Inspector General Criticizes FBI and James Comey, But Some Want MoreThe report found no evidence that politics influenced the outcome of the 2016 probe, frustrating those on the right hungry for proof of corruption.
52min
Science | The Guardian
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Spacewatch: Japan's new 'spy cam' cuts through the cloudsTanegashima space centre sends into orbit all-weather IGS radar satellite in 16th mission to keep eye on the neighbours This month Japan launched the 16th mission in its spy satellites programme, using the IGS Radar 6 spacecraft, part of the information gathering satellite scheme run by the country’s intelligence agency. This programme consists of optical and radar spacecraft, and supports civili
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Dana Foundation

Brain Awareness Week 2018 in PhotosThree months ago, Brain Awareness Week was celebrated by thousands of people in 43 countries. Activities engaged kids, adults, and seniors in lessons about the brain and its importance in our everyday lives—sometimes through a straightforward talk or a lab tour, and other times through creative endeavors such as a concert or a movie screening. We collect images of these events from around the wor
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Children in India demonstrate religious tolerance, study findsA new investigation of how children reason about religious rules reveals a remarkable level of acceptance of different religions' rules and practices.
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Feed: All Latest
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SEC Says Ether and Bitcoin Cryptocurrencies Aren't SecuritiesTop officials from the SEC have publicly stated that the world's two most popular cryptocurrencies are *not* like stocks and bonds, a relief for people who own them.
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Inside Science

Study of Treated Wastewater Detects Chemicals from Drug Production FacilitiesStudy of Treated Wastewater Detects Chemicals from Drug Production Facilities Nationwide study shows how pharmaceutical manufacturing facilities can increase levels of medical compounds in waterways. SewageTreatmentPlant (002).jpg Image credits: SKY2015/ Shutterstock . Earth Thursday, June 14, 2018 – 14:15 Anna Katrina Hunter, Contributor (Inside Science) — With many a daily flush of a toilet, a
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New on MIT Technology Review
26
Cheap lidar gets a big win in deal with VolvoVolvo Luminar LIDAR
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Big Think
2
Huge currency zones don’t work – we need one per cityMost of history was multi-currency, with distinct currencies linked to cities, not countries. This now tends to be forgotten. Read More
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New on MIT Technology Review
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EOS’s $4 billion crypto-democracy has just launched—and it’s probably going to be ruled by fat catsA new blockchain aims to vastly speed up transactions, but it was incredibly slow in getting off the ground.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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International research team finds brain changes linked to sleep needWe've all experienced going to bed tired and waking up refreshed, yet how that happens at the molecular level remains a mystery. An international study published today in Nature sheds new light on the biochemistry of sleep need in the brain.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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When emotional memories intrude, focusing on context could help, study findsWhen negative memories intrude, focusing on the contextual details of the incident rather than the emotional fallout could help minimize cognitive disruption and redirect the brain's resources to the task at hand, suggests a new study by psychologists at the University of Illinois.
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Big Think
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For most of history, humans got smarter. That's now reversing.We were gaining 3 IQ points per decade for many, many years. Now, that's going backward. Could this explain some of our choices lately? Read More
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Anonymous Twitter troll convicted of abuse in BelgiumA Belgian court has convicted an anonymous Twitter user of harassment after the social media giant supplied his identity, in the country's first case of its kind, officials said Thursday.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
8
Ancient Native American remains reburied on California isleThe mystery behind the skull of an ancient man discovered in the eroding coastline of a remote Southern California island has been laid to rest along with the bones unearthed by researchers.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
Many animals are shifting from day to night to avoid peopleLions and tigers and bears are increasingly becoming night owls because of us, a new study says.
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)
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How I'm bringing queer pride to my rural village | Katlego Kolanyane-KesupileIn a poetic, personal talk, TED Fellow Katlego Kolanyane-Kesupile examines the connection between her modern queer lifestyle and her childhood upbringing in a rural village in Botswana. "In a time where being brown, queer, African and seen as worthy of space means being everything but rural, I fear that we're erasing the very struggles that got us to where we are now," she says. "Indigenizing my q
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
35
Modern alchemists are making chemistry greenerAncient alchemists tried to turn lead and other common metals into gold and platinum. Modern chemists in Paul Chirik's lab at Princeton are transforming reactions that have depended on environmentally unfriendly precious metals, finding cheaper and greener alternatives to replace platinum, rhodium and other precious metals in drug production and other reactions.
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Big Think
2
We now know what a spiritual awakening looks like inside the brainNeuroscientists are now beginning to unravel the neurobiological processes that take place inside the brain, during a spiritual awakening. Read More
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New on MIT Technology Review
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The SEC says Ethereum’s cryptocurrency isn’t a securitySEC Ethereum W. Hinman
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Social rejection is painful and can lead to violence. Mindfulness may provide a solution.People who have greater levels of mindfulness — or the tendency to maintain attention on and awareness of the present moment — are better able to cope with the pain of being rejected by others, according to a new study led by a team of Virginia Commonwealth University researchers.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Caesar's last breath and Einstein's lost fridge (video)Are you breathing air molecules that were once exhaled by Caesar, Joan of Arc or Madame Curie? And why did Albert Einstein try to break into the refrigerator business? Writer Sam Kean, author of Caesar's Last Breath and The Disappearing Spoon, explains in this video, in which Reactions partners with PBS to find America's favorite book as part of the Great American Read.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

ExCITe Center releases first national study of K-12 education makerspacesDrexel University's ExCITe Center released Making Culture, the first in-depth examination of K-12 education makerspaces nationwide, revealing the significance of cultural aspects of making that enable learning. The research highlights how makerspaces foster a range of positive student learning outcomes, but also reflect some of the gaps in inclusion common in the STEM fields. The ExCITe Center is
1h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
19
A sprinkle of platinum nanoparticles onto graphene makes brain probes more sensitiveGraphene electrodes could enable higher quality imaging of brain cell activity thanks to new research by a team of engineers and neuroscientists at the University of California San Diego.
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Big Think
4
How augmented reality will make street art come to lifeA moving mural by street artist Eduardo Kobra is one of the first fruits of a revolution about to take the art world by storm. Read More
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Popular Science
28
A warmer planet might make deadly bacteria more resistant to antibioticsNexus Media News Rising global temperatures are making it more difficult to combat bacteria with antibiotics. Rising global temperatures are making it more difficult to combat bacteria with antibiotics.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Elevated androgens don't hinder dads' parenting—at least not in lemursStudies have shown that when men marry and have children, they often see a decline in their androgen levels—or their levels of male sex hormones. Scientists think this could be due to the fact that androgens, such as testosterone, are commonly associated with aggression and mate competition, and could therefore impede dads' abilities to bond with and care for their children.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
34
Researchers identify 121 giant planets that may have habitable moonsWe've all heard about the search for life on other planets, but what about looking on other moons?
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Big Think
3
New 3D hologram technology projects soccer games on your kitchen tableMillions of people will watch the 2018 FIFA World Cup this week on TVs and computers. But new technology suggests the next World Cup might be watched through 3D holograms. Read More
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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New position paper recommends treatment options for nightmare disorder in adultsA variety of treatment options may be effective for nightmare disorder in adults, according to a position paper from the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM).
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Modern alchemists are making chemistry greenerModern alchemists are trying to replace precious metals with greener, cheaper alternatives. Princeton Chemistry Professor Paul Chirik and his team have synthesized an epilepsy medication using one-electron oxidation that replaces rhodium and dichloromethane with the much greener cobalt and methanol. "Earth-abundant catalysts [can] not only replace the precious metal ones, but they offer distinct a
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
31
Lab creates conductive 3-d carbon blocks that can be shaped for applicationsRice University scientists have developed a simple way to produce conductive, three-dimensional objects made of graphene foam.
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Science current issue
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HIV–No time for complacency
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Science current issue

News at a glance
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Science current issue

Seaweed masses assault Caribbean islands
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Science current issue

Quantum physics could get big boost from U.S. Congress
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Science current issue
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Report details persistent hostility to women in science
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Science current issue
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Seafloor fiber optic cables can listen for earthquakes
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Science current issue

Stricter Chinese student visas raise alarm
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Science current issue

Far from over
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Science current issue

The mother of all challenges
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Science current issue

Building TRUST in an LGBTQ-hostile country
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Science current issue

Babies who dodge HIV may not be unscathed
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Science current issue

Dark nights, bright stars
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Science current issue

Status symbol
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Science current issue

Poster couple
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Science current issue

The pill exchange
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Science current issue

The loyal opposition
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Science current issue

The Sunshine State's dark cloud
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Science current issue

A tool for finding rare marine species
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Science current issue

Crystallizing a memory
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Science current issue

Scaling of human brain size
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Science current issue

Animals feel safer from humans in the dark
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Science current issue

Facing your fears
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Science current issue
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Understanding spatial environments from images
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Science current issue

Asperger's chilling complicity
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Science current issue

Platforms of power
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Science current issue

Conservation accord: Let countries govern
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Science current issue

Conservation accord: Cash is not enough
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Science current issue

Conservation accord: Corporate incentives
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Science current issue

Response–Conservation accord
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Science current issue

Nocturnal refuge
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Science current issue

A scene-internalizing computer program
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Science current issue

An intrinsic magnetic tunnel junction
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Science current issue

Lower-energy photons do the work, too
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Science current issue

Seeing ghosts
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Science current issue

Mesoamerican turquoise locally sourced
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Science current issue

Disentangling specific memories
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Science current issue

Designer bugs as drugs
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Science current issue

Modeling memory differentiation in T cells
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Science current issue

Chronic stress as a survival tactic
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Science current issue

Reconsidering resonator sensing
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Science current issue

How to make bioactive alkaloids
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Science current issue

The mechanisms of fear attenuation
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Science current issue

Tackling microtubule-tau interactions
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Science current issue

Shifts in brain regions with brain size
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Science current issue

Environmental DNA tracks rare species
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Science current issue

Letting thymocytes go
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Science current issue

Spontaneous HIV controllers
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Science current issue

In the company of top quarks
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Science current issue

Salmon teleconnection disservice
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Science current issue

Gut bacteria relieve epilepsy
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Science current issue

RNA processing for metabolic control
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Science current issue

Variants may affect disease heritability
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Science current issue

A quantum enhancement for plasmonic sensors
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Science current issue

Edge cases cause trouble
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Science current issue
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Neural scene representation and renderingScene representation—the process of converting visual sensory data into concise descriptions—is a requirement for intelligent behavior. Recent work has shown that neural networks excel at this task when provided with large, labeled datasets. However, removing the reliance on human labeling remains an important open problem. To this end, we introduce the Generative Query Network (GQN), a framework
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Science current issue
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Photochemistry beyond the red limit in chlorophyll f-containing photosystemsPhotosystems I and II convert solar energy into the chemical energy that powers life. Chlorophyll a photochemistry, using red light (680 to 700 nm), is near universal and is considered to define the energy "red limit" of oxygenic photosynthesis. We present biophysical studies on the photosystems from a cyanobacterium grown in far-red light (750 nm). The few long-wavelength chlorophylls present ar
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Science current issue

Giant tunneling magnetoresistance in spin-filter van der Waals heterostructuresMagnetic multilayer devices that exploit magnetoresistance are the backbone of magnetic sensing and data storage technologies. Here, we report multiple-spin-filter magnetic tunnel junctions (sf-MTJs) based on van der Waals (vdW) heterostructures in which atomically thin chromium triiodide (CrI 3 ) acts as a spin-filter tunnel barrier sandwiched between graphene contacts. We demonstrate tunneling
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Science current issue

Probing magnetism in 2D van der Waals crystalline insulators via electron tunnelingMagnetic insulators are a key resource for next-generation spintronic and topological devices. The family of layered metal halides promises varied magnetic states, including ultrathin insulating multiferroics, spin liquids, and ferromagnets, but device-oriented characterization methods are needed to unlock their potential. Here, we report tunneling through the layered magnetic insulator CrI 3 as
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Science current issue

Normative brain size variation and brain shape diversity in humansBrain size variation over primate evolution and human development is associated with shifts in the proportions of different brain regions. Individual brain size can vary almost twofold among typically developing humans, but the consequences of this for brain organization remain poorly understood. Using in vivo neuroimaging data from more than 3000 individuals, we find that larger human brains sho
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Science current issue

Synapse-specific representation of the identity of overlapping memory engramsMemories are integrated into interconnected networks; nevertheless, each memory has its own identity. How the brain defines specific memory identity out of intermingled memories stored in a shared cell ensemble has remained elusive. We found that after complete retrograde amnesia of auditory fear conditioning in mice, optogenetic stimulation of the auditory inputs to the lateral amygdala failed t
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Science current issue
29
The influence of human disturbance on wildlife nocturnalityRapid expansion of human activity has driven well-documented shifts in the spatial distribution of wildlife, but the cumulative effect of human disturbance on the temporal dynamics of animals has not been quantified. We examined anthropogenic effects on mammal diel activity patterns, conducting a meta-analysis of 76 studies of 62 species from six continents. Our global study revealed a strong eff
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Science current issue

Missing enzymes in the biosynthesis of the anticancer drug vinblastine in Madagascar periwinkleVinblastine, a potent anticancer drug, is produced by Catharanthus roseus (Madagascar periwinkle) in small quantities, and heterologous reconstitution of vinblastine biosynthesis could provide an additional source of this drug. However, the chemistry underlying vinblastine synthesis makes identification of the biosynthetic genes challenging. Here we identify the two missing enzymes necessary for
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Science current issue

Reactivation of recall-induced neurons contributes to remote fear memory attenuationWhether fear attenuation is mediated by inhibition of the original memory trace of fear with a new memory trace of safety or by updating of the original fear trace toward safety has been a long-standing question in neuroscience and psychology alike. In particular, which of the two scenarios underlies the attenuation of remote (month-old) fear memories is completely unknown, despite the impetus to
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Science current issue
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Near-atomic model of microtubule-tau interactionsTau is a developmentally regulated axonal protein that stabilizes and bundles microtubules (MTs). Its hyperphosphorylation is thought to cause detachment from MTs and subsequent aggregation into fibrils implicated in Alzheimer’s disease. It is unclear which tau residues are crucial for tau-MT interactions, where tau binds on MTs, and how it stabilizes them. We used cryo–electron microscopy to vis
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Science current issue

Ghost cytometryGhost imaging is a technique used to produce an object’s image without using a spatially resolving detector. Here we develop a technique we term "ghost cytometry," an image-free ultrafast fluorescence "imaging" cytometry based on a single-pixel detector. Spatial information obtained from the motion of cells relative to a static randomly patterned optical structure is compressively converted into
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Science current issue

New Products
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Science current issue

Technology Feature | Translating big data: The proteomics challenge
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Science current issue

Hitting the wall
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Science current issue

Induction of CD4 T cell memory by local cellular collectivityCell differentiation is directed by signals driving progenitors into specialized cell types. This process can involve collective decision-making, when differentiating cells determine their lineage choice by interacting with each other. We used live-cell imaging in microwell arrays to study collective processes affecting differentiation of naïve CD4 + T cells into memory precursors. We found that
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Science current issue

Unresolved endoplasmic reticulum stress engenders immune-resistant, latent pancreatic cancer metastasesThe majority of patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) develop metastatic disease after resection of their primary tumor. We found that livers from patients and mice with PDA harbor single disseminated cancer cells (DCCs) lacking expression of cytokeratin 19 (CK19) and major histocompatibility complex class I (MHCI). We created a mouse model to determine how these DCCs develop. Intr
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Science current issue

Improving mechanical sensor performance through larger dampingMechanical resonances are used in a wide variety of devices, from smartphone accelerometers to computer clocks and from wireless filters to atomic force microscopes. Frequency stability, a critical performance metric, is generally assumed to be tantamount to resonance quality factor (the inverse of the linewidth and of the damping). We show that the frequency stability of resonant nanomechanical
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Science current issue

Comment on "Satellites reveal contrasting responses of regional climate to the widespread greening of Earth"Forzieri et al . (Reports, 16 June 2017, p. 1180) used satellite data to show that boreal greening caused regional warming. We show that this positive sensitivity of temperature to the greening can be derived from the positive response of vegetation to boreal warming, which indicates that results from a statistical regression with satellite data should be carefully interpreted.
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Science current issue

Response to Comment on "Satellites reveal contrasting responses of regional climate to the widespread greening of Earth"Li et al . contest the idea that vegetation greening has contributed to boreal warming and argue that the sensitivity of temperature to leaf area index (LAI) is instead likely driven by the climate impact on vegetation. We provide additional evidence that the LAI-climate interplay is indeed largely driven by the vegetation impact on temperature and not vice versa, thus corroborating our original
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Scientific American Content: Global
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Puerto Rico's Water System Stutters Back to NormalService is supposedly restored to most customers, but some say water is now unclean — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Sepsis-3 criteria 'preferable' in prognostication of critically ill patientsResearchers from the University of Ottawa sought to compare the prognostic accuracy of the Sepsis-3 septic shock criteria with the SIRS-based septic shock criteria for prediction of in-hospital mortality among patients hospitalized with suspected infection, receiving a RRT assessment for acute deterioration.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Synodos for NF2 Consortium publishes key results of its workThe Synodos for NF2 consortium of the Children's Tumor Foundation (CTF) today published its first set of results in the scientific journal PLOS ONE. Synodos is CTF's innovative team science collaborative that brings researchers, clinicians and patients together in a shared data environment in order to develop treatments for NF patients at an accelerated pace. The $3 million project is a combined e
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Non-coding DNA changes sex determinationScientists have identified a key enhancer of Sox9 — a gene critical for male sex development — and demonstrated that deleting this non-coding DNA results in male-to-female sex reversal.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Syringe exchange program played key role in controlling HIV outbreakA study by researchers investigating the 2015 HIV outbreak in Scott County, Indiana, found that a syringe services program is an important tool to control and prevent HIV outbreaks among people who inject drugs in a nonurban area.
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Popular Science
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Even if you live in a city, you can get health benefits from natureHealth Visiting city parks can give your health a boost, but not all green spaces are created equal Nature is great for our health, and even city parks make a difference—if you put in the work of seeking them out…
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Drexel's ExCITe Center releases first national study of K-12 education makerspacesDrexel University's ExCITe Center released Making Culture, the first in-depth examination of K-12 education makerspaces nationwide, revealing the significance of cultural aspects of making that enable learning. The research highlights how makerspaces foster a range of positive student learning outcomes, but also reflect some of the gaps in inclusion common in the STEM fields.
2h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Researchers develop molecular assembly method for cancer therapy and diagnosticsCancer is a complex disease to treat, and yet the operating principle of many current treatments is to simply kill healthy cells a little slower than cancerous ones. In response, an international team of researchers from Russia and Australia has developed a sophisticated nanoparticle-based treatment.They created a universal assembly method, which allows a number of molecules with therapeutic and d
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The Atlantic
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Black Holes Really Know How to Savor Their MealsIn 2005, astronomers detected a burst of infrared light coming from the heart of a galaxy nearly 150 million light-years from Earth. They had been studying the night sky for supernovae, the glittering explosions that mark the deaths of stars, but this seemed different. Intrigued, they decided to keep an eye on it. After years of observations, the astronomers have determined the source of this bur
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The Atlantic
81
Ivana’s Turn in the Trump ShowNEW YORK CITY—“‘Which kinds of herbs do you use?’” the man said, apparently a question that means something. “Everyone wants to know!” We are not here for the herbs. We are here for Ivana Trump—and exclusively Ivana Trump. An amalgam of reporters, photographers, disgruntled cameramen, women with lips like small plush toys who would just love another glass of the white, thanks! , and others had ga
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The Atlantic
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Photos: Soccer Fields Around the WorldOne of the most appealing aspects of soccer is its simplicity—a ball, some open space, goal markers, and you can play. As the 2018 World Cup kicks off in Russia, with matches held in massive modern arenas, here is a look at the beautiful game in action in some smaller and more unusual venues around the world, including pitches built on a glacier, on a beach, floating in a river, made of straw, on
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NYT > Science
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Trilobites: Black Hole Drags Star to Dusty DeathAstronomers thought they saw an exploding star, but in fact it was a star having its guts ripped out by a black hole.
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Live Science
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Stephen Hawking's Family Will Beam His Voice Toward a Black HoleThe physicist's remains will be interred at Westminster Abbey between those of Isaac Newton and Charles Darwin. Meanwhile, his voice will stream through space.
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Dagens Medicin

Pneumokokvaccination har tvivlsom effekt på gigtpatienter i biologisk behandlingKun 30 pct. af de vaccinerede gigtpatienter opnåede et beskyttende niveau af antistoffer mod pneumokokker, viser undersøgelse fra Regionshospital Nordjylland, Hjørring, som er blevet præsenteret på EULAR.
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Dagens Medicin

Mange patienter kan trappes ned i biologisk behandlingEt projekt fra Region Hovedstaden, som har undersøgt muligheden for at indføre en ny guideline for biologisk behandling af leddegigtpatienter, peger på, at næsten to ud af tre succesfuldt kan få reduceret deres medicindosis.
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The Atlantic
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Why Aren’t Top Democrats Acknowledging the Black Women Running for Office?Jeannine Lee Lake decided to run for Congress after Donald Trump won the 2016 presidential election because she wanted to show her teenage daughter that she was willing to take a stand against Trump’s pejorative comments about women and minorities. Lake, a 48-year-old black woman, said she ran for her daughter, and for her nieces and nephews. “This president has disregarded us and placed us in a
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Scientific American Content: Global
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"Ghost" Cytometry May Improve Cancer Detection, Enable New ExperimentsThis new cell-sorting method could offer more options in the lab and clinic — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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System allows surveillance cameras to 'talk' to the public through individual smartphonesPurdue University researchers have created a technology that allows public cameras to send personalized messages to people without compromising their privacy. The team developed a real-time end-to-end system called PHADE to allow this process, known as private human addressing.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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UTSW researchers find transport molecule has unexpected roleUT Southwestern researchers recently reported a basic science finding that might someday lead to better treatments for neurodegenerative diseases like a hereditary form of Lou Gehrig's disease.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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A sprinkle of platinum nanoparticles onto graphene makes brain probes more sensitiveGraphene electrodes could enable higher quality brain imaging thanks to new research by a team of engineers and neuroscientists at UC San Diego. The researchers developed a technique, using platinum nanoparticles, to lower the impedance of graphene electrodes by 100 times while keeping them transparent. In tests on transgenic mice, the electrodes were able to record and image neuronal activity (ca
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Sculpting with graphene foamRice University scientists have developed a simple way to produce conductive, three-dimensional objects made of graphene foam. The material can be a building block for energy storage or flexible sensing applications.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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EEG can determine if a depressed patient will do better on antidepressants or talk therapyA simple, in-office EEG-based test can help determine if a depressed patient will do better on antidepressants or talk therapy.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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UW study shows how instruction changes brain circuitry inUsing MRI measurements of the brain's neural connections, or 'white matter,' UW researchers have shown that, in struggling readers, the neural circuitry strengthened — and their reading performance improved — after just eight weeks of a specialized tutoring program.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Elevated androgens don't hinder dads' parenting — at least not in lemursSurprising new research findings show that male lemurs' androgen levels increase the more they engage in child care behaviors. This was unexpected, since androgens are commonly associated with aggression and mate competition, which could potentially impede nurturing behaviors.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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New type of photosynthesis discoveredThe discovery changes our understanding of the basic mechanism of photosynthesis and should rewrite the textbooks.It will also tailor the way we hunt for alien life and provide insights into how we could engineer more efficient crops that take advantage of longer wavelengths of light.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Climate change has fish moving faster than regulations can keep upThe world's system for allocating fish stocks is being outpaced by the movement of fish species in response to climate change, according to a study undertaken by an international team of marine ecologists, fisheries and social scientists, and lawyers.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Non-coding DNA changes the genitals you're born withMale mice grow ovaries instead of testes if they are missing a small region of DNA that doesn't contain any genes — a finding that could help explain disorders of sex development in humans, at least half of which have an unknown genetic cause.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Climate change means fish are moving faster than fishing rules, Rutgers-led study saysClimate change is forcing fish species to shift their habitats faster than the world's system for allocating fish stocks, exacerbating international fisheries conflicts, according to a study led by a Rutgers University-New Brunswick researcher. The study, published online in the journal Science today, showed for the first time that new fisheries are likely to appear in more than 70 countries all o
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Learning a scene that's unseen, without human helpScientists at Google DeepMind have developed a machine-learning system that can 'observe' a scene from multiple angles and predict what the same space would look from an entirely different view — one not encountered during training.
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Two-faced South Asian monsoons both propagate and purify pollution in the airAn airborne research campaign exploring the 'self-cleaning capacity' of the atmosphere has revealed summer monsoons in South Asia may both purify the air of some pollutants but disperse others.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Undersea fiber optics: A new way to detect quakesMonitoring earthquake-induced changes in fiber optic cables on the ocean floor represents a new way to detect quakes, researchers say.
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Humans are causing mammals to increasingly adopt the nightlifeHuman activity is driving many mammals worldwide to be more active at night, when they are less likely to encounter humans, a new study reveals.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Astronomers see distant eruption as black hole destroys starScientists get first direct images showing fast-moving jet of particles ejected as a supermassive black hole at the core of a galaxy shreds a passing star.
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Sorting ghostsA team made of a scientific start-up company and academic researchers has invented a new cell identification and sorting system called Ghost Cytometry. The system combines a novel imaging technique with artificial intelligence to identify and sort cells with unprecedented high-throughput speed. The scientists leading the project hope that their method will be used to identify and sort cancer cells
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

The neurons that rewrite traumatic memoriesNeuroscientists at EPFL have located the cells that help reprogram long-lasting memories of traumatic experiences towards safety, a first in neuroscience. The study is published in Science.
3h
Big Think
2
6 revelations from Facebook’s 500-page response to the U.S. SenateFacebook CambridgeIn about 500 pages of documents, Facebook responded to questions from U.S. senators about privacy, monopoly, and political discourse on the world’s largest social media platform. Read More
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New Scientist – News
200+
Your brain absolutely cannot resist doughnuts – here’s whyFoods that are high in both carbohydrates and fats super-charge the activity in our brain’s reward centre, explaining why we find them so appealing
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Scientific American Content: Global
4K
Humans Are Driving Other Mammals to Become More NocturnalThe shift could change which prey animals hunt or make it harder to find food — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Big Think
10
The Dark Forest theory: A terrifying explanation of why we haven’t heard from aliens yetThe Fermi Paradox asks us where all the aliens are if the cosmos should be filled with them. The Dark Forest Theory says we should pray we never find them. Read More
3h
Dagens Medicin

Tæt opfølgning med MR-scanninger bremser inflammation hos leddegigtpatienterResultater fra det store danske IMAGINE-RA studie peger på, at løbende opfølgning med MR-scanninger, eventuelt kombineret med optrapning af medicin, kan reducere inflammation, men ikke progression i ledødelæggelse.
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Dagens Medicin

Leddegigt hos mødre kan påvirke fosterGravide, der har leddegigt, har øget risiko for tidlig fødsel og for at føde børn med lavere fødselsvægt.
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Dagens Medicin

Komorbiditet og højt BMI har store konsekvenser for leddegigtpatienterLangtidsdata viser, at leddegigtpatienters komorbiditet og vægt på sigt kan have stor negativ betydning for deres funktionsniveau og helbredsrelaterede livskvalitet.
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Dagens Medicin

Kombinationsbehandling kan bremse sygdomsudviklingNSAID-middel og TNF-hæmmere reducerer radiografisk progression hos patienter med Bechterews sygdom.
3h
Dagens Medicin

Risiko for depression følger alvorlighed af gigtsygdomAlvorsgraden af slidgigt i knæene er associeret med symptomer på depression, viser nyt studie.
3h
Science | The Guardian

Sex-change mice research could help humans, say scientistsRemoval of enhancer 13 DNA strands caused males to grow ovaries and female genitalia, helping research on human sexual development disorders Scientists have turned male mice into females by snipping out strands of their DNA in work that could shed light on sexual development disorders which arise in humans. The male mice grew ovaries and female genitalia instead of the more conventional male anat
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Science | The Guardian
1
Inside the AEF, the climate denial group hosting Tony Abbott as guest speakerThe Australian Environment Foundation has secured a former prime minister to speak. But what does it actually do? Securing a former prime minister to speak at your organisation is no doubt a coup for many groups. Singapore’s Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy recently got Kevin Rudd. Australia’s Nelson Mandela Day committee has snaffled Julia Gillard for their next annual lecture. Continue read
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Science | The Guardian

Human activity making mammals more nocturnal, study findsResearch involving 62 species found mammals spent relatively less time being active during the day when humans were nearby Human disturbance is turning mammals into night owls, with species becoming more nocturnal when people are around, research has revealed. The study, encompassing 62 species from around the globe, found that when humans were nearby, mammals spent relatively less time being act
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Latest Headlines | Science News
64
Underwater fiber-optic cables could moonlight as earthquake sensorsThe seafloor cables that ferry internet traffic across oceans may soon find another use: detecting underwater earthquakes.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
4
Distant moons may harbor lifeResearchers at the University of California, Riverside and the University of Southern Queensland have identified more than 100 giant planets that potentially host moons capable of supporting life. Their work will guide the design of future telescopes that can detect these potential moons and look for tell-tale signs of life, called biosignatures, in their atmospheres.
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The Atlantic
400+
Fear of Humans Is Making Animals Around the World Go NocturnalIn 2011, the wildlife biologist Justin Brashares and his students set up a series of camera traps in and around Ruaha National Park in southern Tanzania. They were studying the effects of human activities on antelope reproduction, but their cameras soon revealed an odd and far more obvious pattern. While the antelope inside the park were active during the day, those outside the park, closer to hu
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The Atlantic
65
The Neuroscientific Case for Facing Your FearsPeter, aged 3, was scared of rabbits. So Mary Cover Jones kept bringing him rabbits. At first, she’d take a caged rabbit up to Peter, while he ate some candy and played with other children. At first, Peter was terrified by the mere presence of a rabbit in the same room. But soon, he allowed the animal to get closer—12 feet, then four, then three. Eventually, Peter was happy for rabbits to nibble
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Scientific American Content: Global
14
Giant Black Hole Swallows a Star and Belches Out a Superfast Particle JetA decade-long international effort to track a star’s death by black hole could lift the veil on galaxy formation in the early universe — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
7
Flying spiders sense meteorological conditions, use nanoscale fibers to float on the windSpiders take flight on the smallest of breezes by first sensing the wind, and then spinning out dozens of nanoscale fibers up to seven meters long, according to a study publishing June 14 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by Moonsung Cho, Ingo Rechenberg, Peter Neubauer, and Christoph Fahrenson at the Technische Universität in Berlin. The study provides an unprecedentedly detailed look at th
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
AI-driven ultrafast technology visually identifies cells without imagesA team from a scientific start-up company and academic researchers has invented a new cell identification and sorting system called Ghost Cytometry. The system combines a novel imaging technique with artificial intelligence to identify and sort cells with unprecedented high-throughput speed. The scientists leading the project hope that their method will be used to identify and sort cancer cells ci
3h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
200+
Astronomers see distant eruption as black hole destroys starFor the first time, astronomers have directly imaged the formation and expansion of a fast-moving jet of material ejected when the powerful gravity of a supermassive black hole ripped apart a star that wandered too close to the cosmic monster.
3h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
Climate change means fish are moving faster than fishing rules, study saysClimate change is forcing fish species to shift their habitats faster than the world's system for allocating fish stocks, exacerbating international fisheries conflicts, according to a study led by a Rutgers University-New Brunswick researcher.
3h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
Non-coding DNA changes the genitals you're born withMale mice grow ovaries instead of testes if they are missing a small region of DNA that doesn't contain any genes, finds a new paper published in Science.
3h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

DNA 'fossils' in fish, amphibians, and reptiles reveal deep diversity of retrovirusesRetroviruses, a broad category of viruses that infect humans and other vertebrates, have much greater diversity than previously thought, according to new research presented in PLOS Pathogens by Xiaoyu Xu and colleagues at Nanjing Normal University, China.
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New on MIT Technology Review
63
A computer program that learns to “imagine” the world shows how AI can think more like usDeepMind’s advance could lead to machines that can make better sense of a scene.
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Viden

Microsoft vil fjerne kasser, køer og kassemedarbejdere fra fremtidens supermarkedMicrosoft går Amazon i bedene og vil gøre supermarkederne kasseløse. Angiveligt i samarbejde med verdens største butikskæde Walmart.
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Feed: All Latest
68
World Cup 2018: How to Secure Your Devices When Traveling in RussiaRussia expects as many as 2 million visitors during the 2018 World Cup, most of whom should take extra precautions against the country's many cyber risks.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Microsoft follows Amazon in pursuit of cashier-less storesMicrosoft Amazon WalmartMicrosoft is working on automated checkout technology that could help retailers compete with Amazon's new cashier-less stores.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
10
EU sets higher target for renewable energy by 2030The EU agreed Thursday to raise its consumption target from wind, solar and other renewable energy sources, aiming for 32 percent by 2030 rather than the previous 27 percent.
3h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
Lake Tahoe clarity sinks to all-time low in 2017Scientists at Lake Tahoe say the clarity of the alpine lake that straddles the California-Nevada line sank to an all-time low last year.
3h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
Black + white = Not white: Understanding how multiracial individuals are categorizedHow you perceive someone who is multiracial matters. Historically, the answer to that question for someone who was black-white multiracial had repercussions for who that person could marry, what school he or she could attend and other forms of discrimination the individual might experience.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
NASA finds small strength in newly formed Tropical Depression 08WTropical Depression 08W formed around the same time as Tropical Storm 07W, and both are in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean basin. While 07W formed to the northeast of Taiwan, 08W formed to Taiwan's southwest. NASA's Terra satellite captured an infrared image of the 08W that revealed a concentrated area of strong storms as it neared Taiwan.
3h
BBC News – Science & Environment
500+
Gene therapy reverses rat's paralysisExperts say the findings could be life-changing for millions of patients.
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Black + white = Not whiteA new study suggests that the so-called 'minority bias' exerts a powerful influence — important since one in five Americans is expected to identify as multiracial by 2050.University of Utah psychology professor Jacqueline M. Chen, lead author of the study published by the Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, that found observers were most likely to categorize someone who is black-white mult
3h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
4
More harm than good: Assessing the nuclear arsenal tipping pointThe first study of its kind shows how detrimental nuclear attack would be for the aggressor nation.
3h
Dagens Medicin

Forskning peger mod nye behandlinger for patienter med LupusTo nye studier viser lovende resultater i forhold til behandling af systemisk lupus erythematosus.
3h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
TNT could be headed for retirement after 116 years on the jobScientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory and the U.S. Army Research Laboratory in Aberdeen, Maryland have developed a novel "melt-cast" explosive material that could be a suitable replacement for Trinitrotoluene, more commonly known as TNT.
3h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
NASA finds heaviest rainfall north of Tropical Storm Bud's centerNASA's Terra satellite captured an infrared image of Tropical Storm Bud that revealed strongest storms were in a band extending from north to east of the center. That's where the heaviest rainfall was occurring. Despite the heaviest rain being over the Eastern Pacific Ocean, tropical storm force winds were lashing southern Baja California.
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Science : NPR
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Does Vitamin D Really Protect Against Colorectal Cancer?The jury's been out on whether low blood levels of vitamin D increase the risk of colorectal cancer. Researchers say a new review involving more than 12,000 people strongly suggests the answer is yes. (Image credit: Dorling Kindersley/Getty Images/Dorling Kindersley)
4h
The Atlantic
80
There’s Something Fishy About U.S.-Canada Trade WarsIf U.S. politicians’ love affair with tariffs seems novel, it’s really the latest installment in an on-again, off-again romance. And it’s one that has been much more passionate in the past. In the decades after the Civil War, the “tariff question” was the biggest issue in American elections. On everything from wool to sugar, the U.S. government slapped steep fees on goods passing through its bord
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Ingeniøren

Supercomputere giver danske forskere gennemslagskraftUgens initiativ er et borgerforslag fra nogle af landets fremmeste måleeksperter, der vil give Danmark en tidssvarende lovgivning om tid. Ugens forvirring er sterile neutrinoer.
4h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Daily text message may improve adherence and treatment outcomes in patients with goutThe results of a study presented today at the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR 2018) demonstrate significant improvements in adherence and clinical outcomes in gout patients who received a daily text message to remind them to take allopurinol.
4h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
NASA finds heaviest rainfall north of Tropical Storm Bud's centerNASA's Terra satellite captured an infrared image of Tropical Storm Bud that revealed strongest storms were in a band extending from north to east of the center. That's where the heaviest rainfall was occurring. Despite the heaviest rain being over the Eastern Pacific Ocean, tropical storm force winds were lashing southern Baja California.
4h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
TNT could be headed for retirement after 116 years on the jobScientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory and the US Army Research Laboratory in Aberdeen, Md., have developed a novel 'melt-cast' explosive material that could be a suitable replacement for Trinitrotoluene, more commonly known as TNT.
4h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Emergency departments help close gaps in opioid abuse and addiction treatmentFollowing emergency care for an opioid overdose, an emergency department-facilitated transition to outpatient care is more likely to lead to healthier patient outcomes when it begins with Medication-Assisted Treatment (MAT) in the emergency department, according to a review of current evidence published in Annals of Emergency Medicine.
4h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
ACP calls for continued efforts in reducing physician burdens in Red Tape RoundtableExcessive administrative tasks divert physicians' time and focus away from patient care, the American College of Physicians (ACP) told a panel of members of Congress this afternoon.
4h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
NASA finds small strength in newly formed Tropical Depression 08WTropical Depression 08W formed around the same time as Tropical Storm 07W, and both are in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean basin. While 07W formed to the northeast of Taiwan, 08W formed to Taiwan's southwest. NASA's Terra satellite captured an infrared image of the 08W that revealed a concentrated area of strong storms as it neared Taiwan.
4h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
There's Waldo!Caltech researchers in collaboration with Cedars-Sinai and West Virginia University have discovered the neurons that activate when a person finds an item they are looking for.
4h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Racial differences uncovered in debilitating itchy skin conditionAn international team led by Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers has conducted what is believed to be the largest detailed published study of people with a poorly understood skin condition known as prurigo nodularis (PN). Such studies collect information on a whole subset of people at once and at a particular point in time.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Combining NSAIDs and TNFi may reduce radiographic progression in ankylosing spondylitisThe results of a cohort study presented at the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR 2018) showed that, in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) taking tumour necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors, the addition of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) was associated with significantly less radiographic progression in a dose-related manner at four years.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Financial literacy linked to lower hospitalization risk in older adultsCould being more knowledgeable about finances help to keep you out of the hospital? Older adults with higher financial literacy are at lower risk of being hospitalized, reports a study in the July issue of Medical Care. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.
4h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Gene therapy restores hand function after spinal cord injury in ratsResearchers at King's College London have shown that rats with spinal cord injuries can re-learn skilled hand movements after being treated with a gene therapy that could be switched on and off using a common antibiotic.
4h
cognitive science
1
Brains May Teeter Near Their Tipping Pointsubmitted by /u/NaiveSkeptic [link] [comments]
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Science | The Guardian
21
Paws and play: gene treatment helps rats with spinal cord injury regain their nerveHopes for injured humans and larger animals as groundbreaking gene therapy helps mend damaged nerves on the spine of rodents by dissolving scar tissue Rats with spinal cord injuries have regained the use of their paws after being given a groundbreaking gene therapy that helps to mend damaged nerves in the spine. The new therapy works by dissolving the dense scar tissue that forms a thick barrier
4h
Big Think
5
10 things Eastern thinkers discovered centuries before the WestThe West has been doing well scientifically for a few hundred years now, but it took almost a thousand years for it to catch up to the Middle East. Here are ten of the biggest discoveries the Islamic world got first. Read More
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The Atlantic
17
How Not to Scout for Soccer TalentI n 2001, Nadia Nadim , a 12-year-old Afghan girl living with her mother and sisters in a Danish refugee center, looked up and noticed a soccer ball in the branches of a tree. On the other side of a nearby fence were lush soccer fields where youth teams from the local town practiced. Players sometimes sent balls flying into the woods near the center. Spotting more, Nadim and her friends shook the
4h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
5
Dads often earn more, even if they're not harder workersWhen it comes to earning potential, it pays to be a dad, new UBC research suggests.
4h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Rheumatoid arthritis in pregnancy associated with low birth weight and premature birthThe results of a study presented today at the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR 2018) demonstrate that pregnancies in women with rheumatoid arthritis are associated with premature delivery and low birth weight.
4h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Youth-R-Coach: A peer-to-peer program for young people suffering with chronic diseaseThe details of a youth project presented today at the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR 2018) demonstrate how, by empowering patients to become 'experts-by-experience,' young people can give support to peers as well as provide insights into living with a chronic illness as a young person.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
American College of Physicians urges federal court to reject lawsuit seeking to overturn essential patient protectionsThe American College of Physicians, together with the American Medical Association, the American Academy of Family Physicians, the American Academy of Pediatrics, and the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry have filed an amicus curiae (friend of the court) brief in the case of Texas vs. the United States.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Five new species of snail-sucking snakes discoveredNew research led by the American Museum of Natural History has uncovered five new species of snakes in Ecuador and Peru with peculiar dining etiquette: they suck the viscous bodies of snails out of their shells. The new species, most of which are considered endangered or vulnerable, are described today in the journal Zookeys, which also includes a new evolutionary tree for the diverse group of sna
4h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Dust clouds can explain puzzling features of active galactic nucleiMany large galaxies have a bright central region called an active galactic nucleus, powered by matter spiraling into a supermassive black hole. Gas clouds around the AGN emit light at characteristic wavelengths, but the complexity and variability of these emissions has been a longstanding puzzle. A new study explains these and other puzzling features of active galactic nuclei as the result of smal
4h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

3D imaging and computer modeling capture breast duct developmentWorking with hundreds of time-lapse videos of mouse tissue, a team of biologists joined up with civil engineers to create what is believed to be the first 3D computer model to show precisely how the tiny tubes that funnel milk through the breasts of mammals form.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Clinical advances in systemic lupus erythematosusThe results of two studies presented today at the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR 2018) demonstrate exciting advances for individuals suffering from systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The first is a phase II clinical study of a promising oral treatment, baricitinib. The second demonstrates the effective use of shingles vaccine in SLE patients who are particularly prone to this inf
4h
Quanta Magazine
100+
Brains May Teeter Near Their Tipping PointGerardo Ortiz remembers well the time in 2010 when he first heard his Indiana University colleague John Beggs talk about the hotly debated “critical brain” hypothesis, an attempt at a grand unified theory of how the brain works. Ortiz was intrigued by the notion that the brain might stay balanced at the “critical point” between two phases, like the freezing point where water turns into ice. A con
4h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
NASA finds Tropical Storm 07W near Kadena Air Base, OkinawaNASA satellite imagery captured Tropical Storm 07W soon after it developed near Kadena Air Base on the island of Okinawa, Japan in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean.
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Science | The Guardian
1
John Rowan obituaryMy colleague John Rowan, who has died aged 93, was known as the father of British humanistic psychology – a field to which he made vital literary and theoretical contributions. Humanistic psychology , which emphasises human existential values and radical therapy approaches, reached Britain from the US during the countercultural years of the 1950s and 60s. John joined the Association for Humanisti
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Dads often earn more, even if they're not harder workersWhen it comes to earning potential, it pays to be a dad, new UBC research suggests.The study, published in the journal Work, Employment and Society, found that men often receive a wage boost when they become fathers — even if they're not necessarily working harder. In fact, when their work is scrutinized more closely through performance reviews, for example, the researchers found that the wage bo
4h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
NASA finds Tropical Storm 07W near Kadena Air Base, OkinawaNASA satellite imagery captured Tropical Storm 07W soon after it developed near Kadena Air Base on the island of Okinawa, Japan, in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean.
4h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Depressive symptoms associated with disease severity in patients with knee osteoarthritisThe results of a study presented today at the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR 2018) demonstrate that among individuals with radiographic knee osteoarthritis (OA), decreased physical performance and greater structural disease severity are associated with a higher risk of experiencing depressive symptoms.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Increased helmet use in alpine sports fails to reduce risk of traumatic brain injuryA new study published in Wilderness & Environmental Medicine confirms that helmets are generally effective in protecting skiers and snowboarders from head injuries, but questions their effect in reducing traumatic brain injury, especially concussion.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Spontaneous fluctuations of brain activity influence what you seeLuca Iemi from HSE University, jointly with Niko A Busch from Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität, have found that the state of excitability of the brain — indexed byspontaneous neural oscillations — biases a person's subjective perceptual experience, rather than their decision-making strategy. The findings will be published in eNeuro under the title 'Moment-to-moment fluctuations in neuronal exci
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The Atlantic
500+
New York Goes After the Trump FoundationThe New York attorney general filed suit against the Donald J. Trump Foundation and its board of directors on Thursday, including the president and his three eldest children, alleging a years-long pattern of illegal behavior, including self-dealing and unlawful coordination with Trump’s presidential campaign. The suit, filed on the president’s 72nd birthday, brings back to the foreground a series
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Video: Caesar's last breath and Einstein's lost fridgeAre you breathing air molecules that were once exhaled by Caesar, Joan of Arc or Madame Curie? And why did Albert Einstein try to break into the refrigerator business?
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NYT > Science
100+
Trilobites: Using Harpoon-Like Appendages, Bacteria ‘Fish’ for New DNASeeing how microbes snatch new genetic material from their environment could help in the fight against antibiotic resistance.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Repair and regeneration of peripheral nerves possible with dual polymer hydrogel adhesiveResearchers have demonstrated that a novel biocompatible adhesive made of two naturally derived polymers is 15 times stronger than adhesive materials currently used for nerve reconstruction and can support the survival, extension, and proliferation of cells essential for nerve regeneration. The study showing the regenerative potential of this new hydrogel adhesive in vitro and when implanted in a
4h
Scientific American Content: Global
11
Antarctic Melt Rate Has Tripled in the Last 25 YearsWith ice loss speeding up, previous sea level rise projections may be too low — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Significant increase in self-harm attempts following ankylosing spondylitis diagnosisThe results of a population study presented today at the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR 2018) demonstrate a significantly increased rate of self-harm attempts in inflammatory arthritis (IA), particularly following a diagnosis of Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS).
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
161 genetic factors for myopia identifiedThe international Consortium for Refractive Error and Myopia (CREAM) recently published the worldwide largest genetic study of myopia, which identified 161 genetic factors for short-sightedness.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Personel management – when self-doubt misjudges achievementIndividuals who have a pervasive sense that their reputations are not justified by their achievements may suffer from impostor syndrome. In such a case, a new study shows, negative feedback can lead to a real deterioration in performance.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
UAlberta research identifies possible new pathway to treat anxietyWilliam Colmers, a University of Alberta professor in the Department of Pharmacology, has identified a new pathway in the brain that might be a good target for a drug to reduce the symptoms of anxiety.
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Rise of carbapenem-resistant EnterobactericaeaeInfections with bacteria resistant to carbapenems, a group of highly effective antibiotics, pose a significant threat to patients and healthcare systems in all EU/EEA countries, warns ECDC in a Rapid Risk Assessment.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Parents ranked cancer prevention as number one provider reason for HPV vaccinationParents ranked cancer prevention as the most compelling reason health care providers can give for recommending the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, according to a survey led by University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers.
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Big Think
10
Astronomers find galaxy unchanged since early universeGalaxy NGC 1277 is revealed as a relic galaxy that’s barely changed since it formed 10 billion years ago, giving scientists a rare chance to look into the past. Read More
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The Economist: The world this week
34
KAL’s cartoonWorld Cup Russia V. Putin
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The Economist: The world this week

Politics this week
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The Economist: The world this week

Business this week
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Study finds behavioral-related youth hospitalizations complicated by suicidalityA recent study published in American Psychiatric Association's Psychiatric Services journal found previous research on youth hospitalizations associated with behavioral and mental disorders failed to adequately consider children exhibiting suicidality or self-harm.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Novel in vitro approaches for toxicity testing of inhaled substancesIntegrated approaches that avoid the use of animals to assess the toxicity of inhaled materials may include a computational model to screen for chemical reactivity, a human tissue-based assay to predict the absorption of a chemical into the respiratory tract, and other types of advanced systems based on in vitro and in vivo respiratory biology.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Few early parent education programs available to help dadsUmpteen books and programs are available to help new moms before and after their child is born, but the same can't be said for fathers, a new University of Michigan study found.
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The Atlantic
16
Kanye West’s Rock-and-Roll MomentKanye West has put a lot of words into the world this year—in tweets, epic-length interviews, and an album-a-week producing spree—but his most memorable statements haven’t been verbal. They’ve been beats, as in the sleek rattle of Pusha T’s Daytona . Or they’ve been images: the crackling bonfire of the Wyoming release party for his album Ye , or the infamous signed MAGA hat he put on Twitter. Or
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Big Think
4
Jail sentences for drugs: Harsher than we wantAddiction Now has developed infographics based on a survey of 1,000 people who were asked what they thought would be appropriate sentences for drug crimes. It’s pretty different than what they really are. Read More
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Repair and regeneration of peripheral nerves possible with dual polymer hydrogel adhesiveResearchers have demonstrated that a novel biocompatible adhesive made of two naturally derived polymers is 15 times stronger than adhesive materials currently used for nerve reconstruction and can support the survival, extension, and proliferation of cells essential for nerve regeneration.
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Early source of irritable bowel syndrome discoveredMichigan State University scientists have identified an early cause of intestinal inflammation, one of the first stages of inflammatory bowel disease and irritable bowel syndrome, which afflict around 11 percent of the world's population.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Tripling the energy storage of lithium-ion batteriesScientists have synthesized a new cathode material from iron fluoride that surpasses the capacity limits of traditional lithium-ion batteries.
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Online information on vaccines and autism not always reliable, study showsGoogle search results in several countries can provide unreliable information based on old, 'weak' scientific studies. Researchers analyzing the top 200 websites in a search for 'vaccines autism' found that 10-24 percent had a negative stance on vaccines, which can potentially impact on public health. The approach of using search results to monitor information available could be a useful tool for
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NYT > Science
30
Trilobites: This Burrowing Clam Is Not Boring. It Uses Acid to Make Its Home.Researchers have solved the mystery of how this small species of giant clam forms its own cave inside the rock of a coral reef.
5h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Britain eases visa rules with eye on post-Brexit migration planBritain said Thursday it is easing visa rules to address a shortage of doctors and also encourage tech entrepreneurs as it prepares a new post-EU immigration system, an issue that drove the Brexit vote.
5h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Agency considers dropping wolf protectionsThe federal government is considering another attempt to drop legal protections for gray wolves across the lower 48 states, reopening a lengthy battle over the predator species.
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Live Science
300+
Russia Wants to Blast Space Junk with Laser CannonRussia's space agency is developing a novel method for dealing with space junk: vaporizing it with lasers.
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Viden
500+
Kokain eller alkohol: Hvad er farligst?De to stoffer påvirker hovedet, kroppen og omgivelserne helt forskelligt.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Numbers of Maori and Pacific students training to be doctors and dentists skyrocketThere has been a significant increase in diversity of students entering the University of Otago's health professional programmes in recent years, especially among Maori and Pacific students and those from rural areas.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Yellow fever: A new method for testing vaccine safetyScientists from the Institut Pasteur, the CNRS and Sanofi Pasteur have recently developed a novel alternative method to animal testing that can be used to verify the safety of vaccines such as the yellow fever vaccine. This original approach is based on the development of an in cellulo device using a 3D culture model, the 'BBB-Minibrain.' A patent application has been filed by the Institut Pasteur
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Girls with high level of vitamin D have stronger musclesGirls are stronger with higher levels of vitamin D, but the association was not found in boys. These are the results from a new large study from the Odense Child Cohort, recently published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism. According to the study's first author, medical student Rada Faris Al-Jwadi, girls with low vitamin D have a 70 percent increased risk of being among the l
6h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Water fluoridation confirmed to prevent dental decay in US children and adolescentsThe fluoridation of America's drinking water was a great public health achievement in the twentieth century but there are few studies from the last three decades investigating the impact of water fluoridation on US dental health. A recent study 'Water fluoridation and dental caries in US children and adolescents,' published in the Journal of Dental Research, evaluated associations between the avai
6h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Human and artificial intelligence join forces to study complexity of the brainA team of scientists lead by Professor Stein Aerts (VIB-KU Leuven) is the first to map the gene expression of each individual brain cell during aging, though they started small: with the brain of a fruit fly. Their 'cell atlas' provides unprecedented insights into the workings of the brain as it ages.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Gene testing could identify men with prostate cancer who may benefit from immunotherapyScientists have identified a pattern of genetic changes that could pick out men with advanced prostate cancer who are likely to benefit from immunotherapy.Developing a genetic test to pick out these men could speed up the path of immunotherapy into use for prostate cancer patients.The research found that men whose tumors had a distinct pattern of genetic changes could be much more likely to benefi
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Certain eye conditions in children may affect performance on timed, standardized testsChildren with eye conditions commonly referred to as lazy eye and crossed eyes were slower at marking answers on multiple-choice answer forms typically used in timed, standardized tests.
6h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Are portable music players associated with hearing loss in children?The effect of portable music players on the hearing of children is unclear. A new study found that about one in seven children (9-11 years of age) showed signs of noise-induced hearing impairment, prior to exposure to known noise hazards such as club and concert attendance. Portable music players, used by 40 percent of 2,075 children in the study from the Netherlands, were associated with high-fre
6h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Scientists have captured the elusive cell that can regenerate an entire flatwormResearchers at the Stowers Institute for Medical Research have captured the one cell that is capable of regenerating an entire organism.
6h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Microbe breaks 'universal' DNA rule by using two different translationsDNA is often referred to as the blueprint for life, however scientists have for the first time discovered a microbe that uses two different translations of the DNA code at random. This unexpected finding breaks what was thought to be a universal rule, since the proteins from this microbe cannot be fully predicted from the DNA sequence.
6h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Agricultural intensification not a 'blueprint' for sustainable developmentNew research suggests that the combined social and ecological results of increased agricultural intensification in low and middle-income countries are not as positive as expected.The study, led by researchers from the University of East Anglia (UEA) and University of Copenhagen, is the first to bring together current knowledge on how agricultural intensification affects both the environment and hu
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
New evidence sheds light on how Parkinson's disease may happenResearchers at Baylor College of Medicine and Texas Children's Hospital have identified unexpected new key players in the development of an early onset form of Parkinson's disease called Parkinsonism.
6h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Key ocean fish can prevail with changes to farmed fish, livestock dietsA new study shows that if current aquaculture and agriculture practices remain unchanged into the future, wild forage fish populations likely will be overextended by the year 2050, and possibly sooner. However, making sensible changes in aquaculture and agriculture production would avoid reaching that threshold.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Without 'yoga and chardonnay' leukemia stem cells are stressed to deathUniversity of Colorado Cancer Center researchers nix leukemia stem cell (LSC) stress-relief pathway to kill LSCs without harming healthy blood stem cells, paving the way for new therapies targeting these most dangerous cancer cells.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
15
Naming rights for five new snail-sucking snake species auctioned to save forests in EcuadorFive new species of eye-catching snakes with curious eating habits were found to inhabit forests in Ecuador. With four of them already deemed at risk of extinction, the international research team decided to auction their naming rights and use the money to purchase and save the previously unprotected plot of land where some of these species dwell. Their study is published in the open access journa
6h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Researchers pinpoint new subtype of prostate cancerResearchers led by the University of Michigan Rogel Cancer Center have identified a new subtype of prostate cancer that occurs in about 7 percent of patients with advanced disease. This subset of tumors were responsive to immunotherapy treatment.
6h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Foods combining fats and carbohydrates more rewarding than foods with just fats or carbsResearchers show that the reward center of the brain values foods high in both fat and carbohydrates — i.e., many processed foods — more than foods containing only fat or only carbs. A study of 206 adults, to appear June 14 in the journal Cell Metabolism, supports the idea that these kinds of foods hijack our body's inborn signals governing food consumption.
6h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

The same characteristics can be acquired differently when it comes to neuronsDistinct molecular mechanisms can generate the same features in different neurons, a team of scientists has discovered. Its findings enhance our understanding of brain cell development.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
This is what a stretchy circuit looks likeResearchers in China have made a new hybrid conductive material — part elastic polymer, part liquid metal — that can be bent and stretched at will. Circuits made with this material can take most two-dimensional shapes and are also non-toxic. The work appears June 14 in the new interdisciplinary journal iScience.
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Popular Science
39
Contrary to most doomsday visions, climate change will probably make for smaller waves and calmer seasEnvironment Unfortunately, it's still going to suck. First thing’s first: Forget about the monster waves typically predicted in Day After Tomorrow-style doomsday scenarios.
6h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
14
Long suspected theory about the moon holds waterA team of Japanese scientists led by Masahiro Kayama of Tohoku University's Frontier Research Institute for Interdisciplinary Sciences, has discovered a mineral known as moganite in a lunar meteorite found in a hot desert in northwest Africa.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
5
Tracking down the mystery of entangled particles of lightBernese researchers have taken an important step towards new measurement methods such as quantum spectroscopy. In an experiment, they succeeded in uncovering part of the mystery surrounding the so-called "entangled photons" and gaining fine control on the measured correlations.
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The Scientist RSS

Laxative Causes Long-Term Changes to Mouse MicrobiomeAcute bouts of diarrhea could have lasting effects on the microbiota and host immune system activation, a mouse study suggests.
6h
Live Science
63
These Gourmet Snakes Prefer to Eat SnailsFive new species of snail-eating snakes were discovered in Ecuador.
6h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
87
Scientists have captured the elusive cell that can regenerate an entire flatwormResearchers at the Stowers Institute for Medical Research have captured the one cell that is capable of regenerating an entire organism. For over a century, scientists have witnessed the effects of this cellular marvel, which enables creatures such as the planarian flatworm to perform death-defying feats like regrowing a severed head. But until recently, they lacked the tools necessary to target a
6h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
11
Agricultural intensification not a 'blueprint' for sustainable developmentNew research suggests that the combined social and ecological results of increased agricultural intensification in low and middle-income countries are not as positive as expected.
6h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
100+
Microbe breaks 'universal' DNA rule by using two different translationsDNA is often referred to as the blueprint for life, however scientists have for the first time discovered a microbe that uses two different translations of the DNA code at random. This unexpected finding breaks what was thought to be a universal rule, since the proteins from this microbe cannot be fully predicted from the DNA sequence.
6h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Human and artificial intelligence join forces to study complexity of the brainA team of scientists lead by prof. Stein Aerts (VIB-KU Leuven) is the first to map the gene expression of each individual brain cell during aging in fruit flies. Their resulting "cell atlas" provides unprecedented insights into the workings of the brain as it ages. Published today in the scientific journal Cell, the atlas is heralded as an important first step in the development of techniques that
6h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
37
This is what a stretchy circuit looks likeResearchers in China have made a new hybrid conductive material—part elastic polymer, part liquid metal—that can be bent and stretched at will. Circuits made with this material can take most two-dimensional shapes and are also non-toxic. The work appears June 14 in the new interdisciplinary journal iScience.
6h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
Naming rights for five new snail-sucking snake species auctioned to save forests in EcuadorFive new species of eye-catching snakes with curious eating habits were found to dwell in forests in Ecuador. Their unusual taste for snails—a rather unusual diet among typical snakes—has even sculpted their jaws in such a way that they can suck the viscous slimy body of a snail right out of its shell.
6h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
6
Key ocean fish can prevail with changes to farmed fish, livestock dietsAnchovies, herring, sardines and other forage fish play an essential role in the food web as prey for seabirds, marine mammals and larger fish like salmon. When ground into fishmeal and oil, they are also a key food source for farmed seafood and land-based livestock such as pigs and poultry.
6h
Futurity.org
14
Cells in your ‘second brain’ set off intestinal inflammationNew research identifies an early cause of intestinal inflammation, which is one of the first stages of inflammatory bowel disease and irritable bowel syndrome. Those conditions afflict around 11 percent of the world’s population. “Within your intestines lies a ‘second brain’ called the enteric nervous system.” The discovery, featured in the current issue of Cellular and Molecular Gastroenterology
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BBC News – Science & Environment
100+
Prehistoric frogs in amber surface after 99 million yearsFrogs trapped in amber for 99 million years give clues to lost world. The four fossils were found in Myanmar.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
36
Swirling gases reveal baby planets in a young star’s diskA new technique pinpointed three planets forming around a young star about 330 light-years from Earth.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
3
Proteins as a 'shuttle service' for targeted administration of medicationMedication that reaches the spot where it's needed without placing strain on the rest of the body is no longer a vision of the future. Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) has successfully developed proteins that function like a shuttle and release medication directly in the place in the body where they are actually needed. The study could serve as a model and could enable targe
6h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Pharmacists intervention improves management of diseases among Syrian refugees in JordanAs global political conflicts continue, refugees are facing challenges such as the unavailability of proper medical care. Many of the Syrian refugees now living in Jordan are struggling with chronic diseases, placing tremendous strain on existing health and humanitarian resources as a result. A new study published in Research in Social and Administrative Pharmacy demonstrates that pharmacists can
6h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Quantum transfer at the push of a buttonIn the new quantum information technologies, fragile quantum states have to be transferred between distant quantum bits. Researchers at ETH have now realized such a quantum transmission between two solid-state qubits at the push of a button.
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Big Think
100+
A sucker for soccer? Here are seven maps to unlock the FIFA World Cup in RussiaSoccer is not a matter of life and death. It's much more important than that. And the FIFA World Cup even more so. Read More
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
47
One black hole or two? Dust clouds can explain puzzling features of active galactic nucleiResearchers at the University of California, Santa Cruz (UCSC), believe clouds of dust, rather than twin black holes, can explain the features found in active galactic nuclei (AGNs). The team publish their results today (14 June) in a paper in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
60
Realization of high-performance magnetic sensors due to magnetic vortex structuresMagnetic sensors play a key role in a variety of applications, such as speed and position sensing in the automotive industry or in biomedical applications. Within the framework of the Christian Doppler Laboratory "Advanced Magnetic Sensing and Materials" headed by Dieter Süss novel magnetic sensors have been realized that surpass conventional technologies in performance and accuracy in a cooperati
6h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
7
Short-term changes in Antarctica's ice shelves are key to predicting their long-term fateAntarctica's ice sheet contains enough ice to raise global sea levels by around 180 feet if it all melted. But dramatic, eye-catching changes to Antarctica's floating ice shelves, such as calving icebergs, are often highlighted in the news without a sense of long-term context or a clear connection to what is causing the changes.
6h
Ingeniøren
2
Ny Sprogøs vej fra kunstig ø til idyllisk natur20 år efter åbningen af vejforbindelsen over Sprogø har fokus på naturpleje givet plads til flere og flere forskellige fuglearter, blomster og insekter.
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Ingeniøren

Advarsel til VM-fans mod russisk hacking: Mobil og bærbar pc bør blive hjemmeSamtlige data – især personlige, identificerbare oplysninger – på smartphone, pc eller PDA kan tilgås af den russiske regering eller cyberkriminelle, lyder det fra amerikansk efterretningsenhed.
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)
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The incredible potential of flexible, soft robots | Giada GerboniRobots are designed for speed and precision — but their rigidity has often limited how they're used. In this illuminating talk, biomedical engineer Giada Gerboni shares the latest developments in "soft robotics," an emerging field that aims to create nimble machines that imitate nature, like a robotic octopus. Learn more about how these flexible structures could play a critical role in surgery, m
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Assimilation of FY-3 data at the Met OfficeChinese meteorological satellite data provide an increasingly important contribution to the global observing system, supporting weather and climate applications. In that context and as part of the Climate Science for Service Partnership China (CSSP China) the UK Met Office has been working in collaboration with the China Meteorological Administration-National Satellite Meteorological Center (CMA-N
6h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Cyber threats to connected carsConnected cars could be as vulnerable to so-called "cyber attack" as the smartphone in your hand or the personal computer on your desktop, according to a new study from the UK. "Connected cars are no different from other nodes on the internet of things and face many of the same generic cybersecurity threats," the team reports. They point out that the sheer number of putatively connected vehicles r
6h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
Study identifies key challenges when communicating potential policiesA team of Cambridge researchers sets out to define a new science for policy communications, with ambitions of finding the "Goldilocks zone" between too much and not enough information when informing both legislators and the public on complex issues.
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Science | The Guardian
59
Einstein was a genius of physics. But he wasn’t a saint | Philip BallThe row over racist remarks made by Einstein says more about the pedestals we put great scientists on than the man himself Was Albert Einstein racist? In pondering the disobliging remarks he made about Chinese and Japanese people in the private diaries he kept about his travels to east Asia in 1922-3, just published by Princeton University Press, it’s not a particularly helpful question. Related:
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
4
Minimalist biostructures designed to create nanomaterialsResearchers from the IBB-UAB fabricate four molecules of only seven amino acids with the ability to self-assemble and rapidly and inexpensively form nanomaterials for biomedical and nanotechnological purposes. Inspired on a type of natural assembly seen in amyloid fibers, four peptides were used to create one of the most resistant bionanomaterials described to date, nanocables and mini enzymes to
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Antarctic ice sheet mass loss has increasedAn international study involving scientists from TU Dresden delivers comprehensive facts.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
CLOVES Syndrome: Remarkable improvement in the health of 19 patients medical firstDr Guillaume Canaud at the Necker-Enfants Malades Hospital AP-HP, the Paris Descartes University, Inserm and his team recently demonstrated the efficacy of a novel medication in a cohort of 19 patients suffering from CLOVES Syndrome (Congenital Lipomatous Overgrowth, Vascular Malformation, Epidermal Naevi) or similar disorders. This study, published in the journal Nature, is an example of precisio
6h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Realization of high-performance magnetic sensors due to magnetic vortex structuresMagnetic sensors play a key role in a variety of applications, such as speed and position sensing in the automotive industry or in biomedical applications. Within the framework of the Christian Doppler Laboratory 'Advanced Magnetic Sensing and Materials' headed by Dieter Süss novel magnetic sensors have been realized that surpass conventional technologies in performance and accuracy in a cooperati
6h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Study identifies key challenges when communicating potential policiesA team of Cambridge researchers sets out to define a new science for policy communications, with ambitions of finding the 'Goldilocks zone' between too much and not enough information when informing both legislators and the public on complex issues.
6h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
New discovery about the brain's water system may prove beneficial in strokeWater is transported from the blood into the brain via an ion transporter, a new study on mice conducted at the University of Copenhagen reveals. If the mechanism can be targeted with medicine, it may prove relevant to all disorders involving increased intracranial pressure, including brain edema in connection with stroke as well as hydrocephalus, also called 'water in the head.'
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The Atlantic
500+
What’s Going On With New York’s Elite Public High Schools?New York City’s specialized high schools are a model of opportunity. They have stellar academic records, and, being public, they are free to attend. Their alumni tend to go on to elite colleges and prestigious careers. Together, the schools serve close to 18,000 students each year, and at eight of the nine schools, admission is determined based on how middle schoolers do on a standardized test. T
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The Atlantic
13
Is Trump Ready for a Global Outbreak?Pandemics are inherently political. Take, for example, the global effort that was required to eradicate smallpox in 1980. The immunization campaign, led by the World Health Organization, demanded international cooperation on an unprecedented scale. Should another pandemic break out, nations must be prepared to collaborate meaningfully in order to eradicate it. (Anyone who has played the board gam
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
20
Tobacco aside, e-cigarette flavorings may harm blood vesselsFlavoring chemicals widely used in e-cigarettes and other tobacco products may be toxic to the cells that line and regulate blood vessel function. The adverse effects observed with chemical flavor additives on endothelial cells could be early warning signs of future heart disease, researchers say.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
54
Allergen in red meat linked to heart diseaseA team of researchers says it has linked sensitivity to an allergen in red meat to the buildup of plaque in the arteries of the heart. While high saturated fat levels in red meat have long been known to contribute to heart disease for people in general, the new finding suggests that a subgroup of the population may be at heightened risk for a different reason — a food allergen.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
9
Plants open their pores and scientists strike goldPlants containing the element gold are already widely known. The flowering perennial plant alfafa, for example, has been cultivated by scientists to contain pure gold in its plant tissue. Now researchers have identified and investigated the characteristics of gold nanoparticles in two plant species growing in their natural environments.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
17
Endocrine-disrupting pesticides impair frog reproductionIn a new study, researchers have investigated how the endocrine-disrupting substance linuron affects reproduction in the West African clawed frog, Xenopus tropicalis. The scientists found that linuron, which is used as a pesticicide, impaired the males' fertility, and that tadpoles developed ovaries instead of testicles to a greater extent, which caused a female-biased sex ratio.
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The Atlantic
200+
Trump Takes His Party Back to the 1920sThe last few days—as President Donald Trump has savaged America’s allies over trade, demanded that they readmit Russia to the G7, and embraced North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un—make something clear: Cold War conservatism is dead. What’s replacing it resembles less the foreign-policy outlook that has animated conservatives since World War II than the sentiment that prevailed before it. In the 1920
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The Atlantic
9
Vernon Loeb To Join The Atlantic as Politics EditorWashington, D.C. (June 14, 2018)— The Atlantic has hired top newsroom editor Vernon Loeb to be its Politics Editor, editor in chief Jeffrey Goldberg and TheAtlantic.com editor Adrienne LaFrance announced today. Loeb will join The Atlantic in early July, at a time when it will continue to expand its coverage of Washington and double the size of its political reporting team. Loeb has spent his care
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
Musk company to build Chicago-to-O'Hare express transportChicago Elon Musk BCThe Boring Company, founded by Tesla CEO Elon Musk, has been selected to build a high-speed underground transportation system that it says will whisk passengers from downtown Chicago to O'Hare International Airport in mere minutes.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
The molecules that energize babies' heartsA metabolic process that provides heart muscle with energy fails to mature in newborns with thickened heart walls, according to a Japan-Canada research team.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
The chances of detecting clumps in atomic nuclei are growingWhat do atomic nuclei really look like? Are the protons and neutrons they contain distributed chaotically? Or do they perhaps bind into alpha clusters, that is, clumps made up of two protons and two neutrons? In the case of several light nuclei, experimental confirmation of the individualism or family nature of nucleons will now be simpler thanks to predictions presented by Polish physicists from
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Large international study links blood vitamin D levels to colorectal cancer riskA new study authored by scientists from more than 20 medical centers and organizations finds that higher circulating vitamin D concentrations are significantly associated with lower colorectal cancer risk.
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Ingeniøren

Danske Spil forudsiger churn: Vi gik efter en model, man kan forklareDanske Spil arbejder på at gøre mere og bedre brug af data, og her er en nyudviklet churnmodel et af nøgleområderne.
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NYT > Science
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Einstein the Anti-Racist? Not in His Travel DiariesThe celebrated physicist’s journal during an international tour of China, Japan and other countries in the 1920s displays a “clear hallmark of racism,” an editor said.
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Futurity.org
9
Posting prices may help both surgeons and patientsPublicly posting the price of tonsillectomies, uncomplicated births, and other common procedures can increase business, revenue, and patient satisfaction at outpatient surgery centers, according to a small study. “There’s a growing movement in the United States for transparent and fixed pricing for predictable services…” A report in the American Surgeon suggests that hospitals and other health ca
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
25
Ocean waves following sea ice loss trigger Antarctic ice shelf collapseStorm-driven ocean swells have triggered the catastrophic disintegration of Antarctic ice shelves in recent decades, according to new research published in Nature today.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
23
Amber fossils provide oldest evidence of frogs in wet, tropical forests99-million-year-old amber fossils from Myanmar provide the earliest evidence of frogs in wet, tropical forests.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
15
Long suspected theory about the moon holds waterScientists have discovered a mineral known as moganite in a lunar meteorite found in a hot desert in northwest Africa.
7h
Feed: All Latest
61
Boeing's $2 Million GoFly Challenge to Make Flying Fun AgainIn a Boeing-sponsored competition, teams designed personal flying machines that look more like jetpacks and flying motorbikes than the boring planes we use today.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Plants open their pores and scientists strike goldPlants containing the element gold are already widely known. The flowering perennial plant alfafa, for example, has been cultivated by scientists to contain pure gold in its plant tissue. Now researchers from the Sun Yat-sen University in China have identified and investigated the characteristics of gold nanoparticles in two plant species growing in their natural environments. The study, led by Xi
7h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Kaspersky freezes ties with Europol over calls for EU banRussian cybersecurity giant Kaspersky Lab said it has decided to put a halt to its work with several European anti-cybercrime initiatives, following a move in the European Parliament to ban its antivirus software.
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The Atlantic
18
Tag, You’re Not ItIf the cinema du Judd Apatow (films like The 40-Year-Old Virgin and Knocked Up ) was the beginning of a comedy-movie trend about goofy man-boys struggling to grow up, Tag has to represent some kind of ultimate nadir. I understand that many American men still have trouble processing and expressing their feelings in healthy ways. But this isn’t just a film about guys in their 40s struggling to have
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Popular Science
14
Explore the internet faster with these keyboard shortcutsDIY For major web browsers like Chrome, Firefox, Edge, and Safari. You already use keyboard shortcuts to navigate around your computer. But your web browser has its own key combos to help you explore the internet faster than ever.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Plants open their pores and scientists strike goldPlants containing the element gold are already widely known. The flowering perennial plant alfafa, for example, has been cultivated by scientists to contain pure gold in its plant tissue. Now researchers from the Sun Yat-sen University in China have identified and investigated the characteristics of gold nanoparticles in two plant species growing in their natural environments.
7h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Study finds music therapy brings effective pain relief for sickle cell patientsIn a randomized controlled trial, patients with sickle cell disease were assigned to one of three 20-minute conditions: a session with a music therapist, an iPod to listen to pre-selected music themselves, or no music at all. While passively listening to music improved mood, music therapy had a significantly stronger impact on aiding in pain management for patients actively engaged with a music th
7h
Big Think
13
Understanding the US-Mexican border: those are real people behind the statisticsFrancisco Cantu wanted to put faces to the statistics. So he became a Border Patrol agent. Read More
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Can watching pro sports on TV prevent crime?The entertainment provided by televised sporting events has a significant effect on crime in Chicago, reducing the number of violent, property and drug crime reports by as much as 25 percent during the hours of a given game, according to a study by the UC Davis Violence Prevention Research Program. The study published in the Journal of Sports Economics in May.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Why electronic surveillance monitoring may not reduce youth crimeLast week, the Victorian government announced a new surveillance monitoring scheme directed at young criminal offenders aged 16 and older.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
Researcher models present rainfall data to improve future forecasts of how extreme weather will affect urban livingThe weather-related effects of climate change will affect the next phase of urban living. We just need to know how and when.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
Mass slaughter of wedge-tailed eagles could have Australia-wide consequencesLast week it was revealed that at least 136 wedge-tailed eagles have been intentionally poisoned in East Gippsland, with concerns that more are yet to be found.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Tiny device takes big step in non-invasive fetal blood test technologyA small microfluidic device that can separate maternal and fetal cells is being developed to detect genetic abnormalities in early pregnancy through non-invasive blood tests.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
12
How microgrids could boost resilience in New OrleansDuring Hurricane Katrina and other severe storms that have hit New Orleans, power outages, flooding and wind damage combined to cut off people from clean drinking water, food, medical care, shelter, prescriptions and other vital services.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
29
Study shows how a gene helps plants manage their protein production in stressful timesThe lab of Federica Brandizzi is showing how a gene helps plants adjust protein production during stressful times. The study is in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
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Futurity.org
12
Earth’s biggest ice sheet survived the last warm periodThe largest ice sheet on Earth was stable throughout the last warm period in geologic time, indicating it should hold up as temperatures continue to rise, researchers say. The East Antarctic Ice Sheet is the world’s largest potential contributor to sea level rise (175 feet, if the whole thing melted). Unlike the Greenland and West Antarctic ice sheets, though, it’s been resistant to melting as co
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Ingeniøren

VIDEO: Ingeniørstuderendes undervandsrobot roses internationaltTre maskiningeniører fra Aarhus Universitet har vundet 2. pladsen i det uofficielle verdensmesterskab for robotdesign udviklet og bygget af studerende. Robotten Northrov er målrettet arktisk havforskning.
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Feed: All Latest
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Encrypted Messaging Apps Have Limitations You Should KnowAs recent events have shown, using an encrypted messaging app like WhatsApp or Signal is no privacy panacea.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
9
Toxic leftovers from gold mine found in snowshoe haresEven though it was closed decades ago, the Giant Mine on the outskirts of Yellowknife has left a long environmental legacy.
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Futurity.org
19
It’s time to rethink kids getting their tonsils outNew research on the long-term effects of removing tonsils and adenoids in childhood finds that the operations are associated with increased respiratory, infectious, and allergic diseases. For many people, having their tonsils removed is a childhood rite of passage. The operation, known as a tonsillectomy, is the one of the most common pediatric surgeries performed worldwide, with more than 530,00
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Ancient mammal ancestor found and identified in ChinaA team of researchers from China and the U.S. has identified a new ancient mammal ancestor recently found in a part of China. In their paper published in the journal Nature, the group describes the creature, which they have named Ambolestes zhoui, and where it fits in the ancestral tree.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
23
Antarctica has lost nearly 3 trillion tonnes of ice since 1992It can be easy to overlook the monstrous scale of the Antarctic ice sheet. Ice, thick enough in many places to bury mountains, covers a continent roughly the size of the US and Mexico combined. If it were all to melt, as it has in the past, global sea levels would rise by 58 metres. While this scenario is unlikely, Antarctica is so massive that just a small fraction of this ice melting would be en
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Study: Patients maintain muscle mass 5 years after surgically induced weight lossNewly published research provides important evidence supporting the long-term safety and viability of bariatric surgery.The study finds that muscle mass and fat-free mass (organs, bones, tissues) levels are maintained in the body following a rapid post-surgical weight loss. The finding dispels fears that gastric bypass surgery may result in a detrimental loss of muscle that continues for years aft
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Assimilation of FY-3 data at the Met OfficeThe close collaboration between the Met Office and the China Meteorological Administration-National Satellite Meteorological Center helped support China in generating high quality satellite data for weather and climate services.
7h
Big Think
39
Tesla trims 3,000 white collar jobs in an effort to finally appear profitableThe move comes on the heels of blue collar layoffs in October of last year, though it was a smaller number at around 700 people. Read More
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Dagens Medicin

Tilsyn i almen praksis: Behandling med afhængighedsskabende lægemidler er ikke på pladsFørste tilsyn i almen praksis viser få problemer af større betydning for patientsikkerheden. Dog lever mange praksisser, der har fået tilsyn, ikke op til krav til behandling med afhængighedsskabende medicin.
7h
Dagens Medicin

Her er lægerne med mest magtEn ny læge har fundet vej til listen over landets ti mest magtfulde læger. En liste der ellers er præget af en del gengangere.
7h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Harmonic oscillator's most 'classical-like' state exhibits nonclassical behaviorShowing just how blurry the boundary is between the quantum and classical worlds, physicists in a new study have theoretically demonstrated that a macroscopic oscillating object initially in a classical-like coherent state can exhibit nonclassical behavior—namely, it can violate the classical notion of realism by not having a single definite state at any given moment. Instead, the oscillator has o
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
9
How will people move as climate changes?In coming decades, climate change is expected to displace millions of people through sea level rise, crop failures, more frequent extreme weather and other impacts. But scientists are still struggling to accurately predict how many climate migrants there will be, and where they are likely to go. A new study published this week in the journal Environmental Research Letters seeks to address these qu
8h
Ingeniøren

Elgigantens moderselskab ramt af kæmpe sikkerhedsbrudDetailvirksomheden Dixons Carphone har opdaget en hændelse sidste år, hvor hackere forsøgte at kompromittere 5,9 mio. betalingskort.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Long suspected theory about the moon holds waterA team of Japanese scientists led by Masahiro Kayama of Tohoku University's has discovered a mineral known as moganite in a lunar meteorite found in a hot desert in northwest Africa.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Amber fossils provide oldest evidence of frogs in wet, tropical forests99-million-year-old amber fossils from Myanmar provide the earliest evidence of frogs in wet, tropical forests.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Network theory links behavioral information flow with contained epidemic outbreaksOver the last two decades, large-scale outbreaks of infectious diseases have resulted in high levels of morbidity, mortality, and overall economic burden for affected regions. As complex networks become increasingly popular tools of study, researchers are applying network theory to the field of epidemiology. In an article in the SIAM Journal on Applied Mathematics, researchers employ a concrete in
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Can watching pro sports on TV prevent crime?The entertainment provided by televised sporting events has a significant effect on crime in Chicago, reducing the number of violent, property and drug crime reports by as much as 25 percent during the hours of a given game, according to a study by the UC Davis Violence Prevention Research Program.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Women in communications earn less, experience negative company cultures and still face a glass ceilingFIU's Lillian Lodge Kopenhaver Center released the results of a national survey that found that women are more likely to be in middle management or junior level positions in the communication industries, while men dominate top management positions.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
A tango with tangled polymersWhile statisticians are driven by real-world problems, U of S mathematics professor Chris Soteros is motivated by the more esoteric behaviour of long-chain molecules, such as polymers and DNA, and the mathematical problems they pose.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Scientific sleuthing for reproducible resultsResearchers found traces of foreign, non-human genetic material in human blood samples. It turned out that it was not a groundbreaking scientific discovery, but mostly the result of contaminated laboratory materials. Scientists led by Associate Prof. Paul Wilmes of the Luxembourg Centre for Systems Biomedicine (LCSB) of the University of Luxembourg recently published an article about their unexpec
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Zinc plays vital role in animal and human fertility, can help scientists quickly diagnose infertilityInfertility affects about 20 percent of the U.S. population and can be incredibly costly; it also costs the livestock industry billions of dollars each year. Researchers at the University of Missouri have found that zinc plays a key role in promoting fertility in males, a discovery that has implications for improved in vitro fertilization and artificial insemination in livestock, and for human inf
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New Scientist – News
45
EU will limit the use of palm oil as car fuel but won’t stop itThe European Union will make only minor tweaks to “renewable” energy policies that are actually increasing greenhouse gas emissions and driving deforestation
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
11
Dancing with giants: dynamics of dwarf satellite galaxiesDwarf satellite galaxies in the Milky Way perform different dances than researchers initially expected. Marius Cautun from Durham University received a Marie Curie grant to unravel the mysteries of this orbital dance. October 1st 2018 he will start his research at the Leiden Observatory.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
Is it hard to breathe in your corner of Los Angeles County?A new USC analysis of air quality data shows sharply different levels of air pollution across the Los Angeles area, with Chinatown suffering from the unhealthiest air. Altadena had the lowest air pollution.
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67
Robots Might Not Take Your Job—But They Will Probably Make It BoringOpinion: "Good" automation assigns tasks that are dirty, dangerous, or dull to robots. But shifting responsibility often makes surrounding jobs less fulfilling.
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Snap Kit Will Let Other Apps Use Snapchat's Features, But Not Your DataSnapchat Facebook BitmojiWith the release of its new Snap Kit developer platform, Snap promises it will keep your data safe from prying third-party apps.
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Why Battle Royale Games Like 'Fortnite' Are Everywhere (It’s Not Just Money)Juggernaut franchises like 'Call of Duty' and 'Battlefield' are trying to capitalize on the success of Epic's phenomenon, but battle-royale games tap into something deeper than just skins and emotes.
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Vivobarefoot Primus Trail Swimrun Review: Wear AnywhereCongratulations! You’ve just found the perfect go-anywhere summer travel shoe.
8h
Dagens Medicin

Det bliver vanskeligt at nå målsætning om mindre tvang i psykiatrienAntallet af bæltefikseringer på psykiatriske hospitaler er faldet på landsplan, men det er ikke lykkedes at nedbringe den samlede tvang, viser ny rapport fra Sundhedsstyrelsen.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
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These newfound frogs have been trapped in amber for 99 million yearsTrapped in amber, 99-million-year-old frog fossils reveal the amphibians lived in a wet, tropical climate.
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The Scientist RSS
1
Opinion: Three-Parent EmbryosA Slippery Slope?The use of pronuclear transfer to treat infertility must first be backed by evidence it can work in cases where parents seek to avoid mitochondrial mutations.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
Network theory links behavioral information flow with contained epidemic outbreaksOver the last two decades, large-scale outbreaks of infectious diseases have resulted in high levels of morbidity, mortality, and overall economic burden for affected regions. As complex networks become increasingly popular tools of study, researchers are applying network theory to the field of epidemiology. Due to the plethora of disease-related data available from various media outlets, an indiv
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
100+
Amber fossils provide oldest evidence of frogs in wet, tropical forestsAbout 99 million years ago, a tiny juvenile frog in present-day Myanmar was suddenly trapped in sap with a beetle, perhaps its intended next meal.
8h
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
2
Relive American Chopper's Best Celebrity ChoppersWhat do Will Smith, Bill Murray and Jay Leno have in common? Choppers built by the Teutuls! Meet the masterpieces OCC and PJD turned out for these celebs. #AmericanChopper – All New, Monday @10/9c Watch live and catch up on DiscoveryGO: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/american-chopper/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discov
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Science-Based Medicine
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So-Called Alternative MedicineEdzard Ernst calls it "So-Called Alternative Medicine". This insider's view of SCAM is a new book from an prolific researcher and author.
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Scientific American Content: Global
6
The Introspection Illusion— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
8h
Ingeniøren

Industriens topchefer har fået et godt øje til DanmarkAntallet af teknologiledere, der er tilfredse med rammevilkårene for produktionsvirksomheder, er steget massivt de seneste seks år, viser en undersøgelse fra ATV. Største barriere er at få udenlandsk arbejdskraft.
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Ingeniøren

Kronik: I fremtiden er mobilitet noget, vi deles om
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Facebook news use declining, WhatsApp growing: studyNews consumption is increasingly shifting from social media like Facebook to messaging applications like WhatsApp, according to a study published Thursday which also found high levels of international public concern about fake news online.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
7
Delhi reels as summer smog catches Indian capital off guardAir pollution soared in New Delhi on Thursday to hazardous levels rarely seen outside winter months as sand blown from deserts enveloped the Indian capital in a once-in-a-decade phenomenon.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
UK says shut out of EU's Galileo sat-nav contractsBritain has been formally excluded from future contracts for the EU's Galileo satellite-navigation system, the government said on Thursday, condemning the decision as "completely unacceptable".
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
Spacewalking astronauts set up TV cameras for arriving shipsSpacewalking astronauts worked to set up TV cameras Thursday for new crew capsules set to arrive in coming months.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Robot vision makes solar cell manufacture more efficient"The price of solar-generated electricity continues to plummet, and the technology is taking over as the least expensive form of energy in more and more parts of the world," says solar cell researcher John Atle Bones at SINTEF.
9h
The Atlantic
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Florida, Full of DreadFlorida , the newest book from the transcendent writer Lauren Groff ( Arcadia, Fates and Furies ), isn’t a short-story collection so much as an ecosystem. Within its boundaries, panthers prowl, snakes abound, Spanish moss dangles “like armpit hair,” children are abandoned to turn strange and almost feral, and storms batter so hard they leave bruises. The line between humankind and nature blurs. G
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
Why 50,000 ships are so vulnerable to cyberattacksThe 50,000 ships sailing the sea at any one time have joined an ever-expanding list of objects that can be hacked. Cybersecurity experts recently displayed how easy it was to break into a ship's navigational equipment. This comes only a few years after researchers showed that they could fool the GPS of a super-yacht into altering course. Once upon a time objects such as cars, toasters and tugboats
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Grenfell: a year on, here's what we know went wrongThe Grenfell Tower fire resulted in the greatest loss of life from a fire in Britain since World War II. A year on, we know that the fire's rapid spread was at least partly due to the cladding that enveloped the building. Although a public inquiry is ongoing, and we're still waiting for the full results of forensic evidence, there is no doubt that changes are needed to prevent this catastrophe fro
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Popular Science
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Why plant protein is better for you than animal proteinHealth Sorry, steak fans. It’d be great if a burger-a-day diet was healthy. Don’t get me wrong—it’s not the worst. You’ve got protein in there and hopefully some veggies on top (and on the side)…
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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We must ensure new food retail technologies are not barriers to better healthImagine a world where smart pantries sense when you are running out of your favourite food and order more of it, without you lifting a finger. Where intelligent robots roam your grocery store, ever at your service. Where dynamic food pricing changes minute-to-minute depending on the weather outside, or what the store down the road is offering.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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New device to protect communities in Colombia from unsafe waterThe 'Water Monitoring in Colombian Vulnerable Communities in a Post-Conflict Scenario' project, financed by the Newton Fund Institutional Links, has developed a developed a low cost, portable and user-friendly multi-sensing device for detecting heavy metals and measuring physico-chemical parameters in water sources, which can easily be used by non-experts.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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The fake news detectorA story on Reddit asks, "Did Palestinians Recognize Texas as Part of Mexico?" The origin of the story might be dubious, but it doesn't prevent the "fake news" story from accumulating 1.5 million likes across multiple platforms in just four days. The fake news dilemma dates back centuries, according to Politico, but the advance of technology and the rise of social media, it's now at its zenith.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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New and improved way to find baby planetsNew work from an international team of astronomers including Carnegie's Jaehan Bae used archival radio telescope data to develop a new method for finding very young extrasolar planets. Their technique successfully confirmed the existence of two previously predicted Jupiter-mass planets around the star HD 163296. Their work is published by the Astrophysical Journal Letters.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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New Greenland telescope is up and runningGreenland can now brag about hosting a large, operational radio telescope, with a dish measuring 12 metres in diameter.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Native fish tell story of Australia's less arid pastDespite the odds, new research has shown how a tiny fish managed to find its way across the arid Australian continent – more than once.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
9
A volcanologist's view of KilaueaIn the late 1980s, geologist Thomas Wright oversaw the production of a volcano hazard map that would help guide zoning and land use decisions on the island of Hawaii.
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The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: Ear CandyScientists recorded three different types of narwhal sounds in East Greenland.
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Scientific American Content: Global
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Could Artificial Intelligence Take the Art out of Medicine?As health care becomes more complex, technological and data-driven, there’s a risk physicians will lose some of their autonomy — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Atlantic
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The Next Plague Is Coming. Is America Ready?Image above: Workers at the University of Nebraska Medical Center's biocontainment unit practicing safe procedure on a mannequin A t 6 o’clock in the morning, shortly after the sun spills over the horizon, the city of Kikwit doesn’t so much wake up as ignite. Loud music blares from car radios. Shops fly open along the main street. Dust-sprayed jeeps and motorcycles zoom eastward toward the town’s
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Feed: All Latest
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Volvo Is Using Luminar's Lidar to Build Self-Driving CarsVolvo Luminar LIDARThe automaker plans to use the startup's laser sensors to help its autonomous vehicles see and understand the world.
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Feed: All Latest
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Inside the Mad Lab That's Getting Robots to Walk and Jump Like UsTruly useful robots will have to be able to tackle everything humans can, so they've gotta have legs. Easier said than done, though.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
6
Study examines how corruption is concealed in ChinaWhen Chinese President Xi Jinping took office in 2012, he launched the most extensive anti-corruption drive since Maoist rule in China.
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Ingeniøren
1
Forsinket Femern-byggestart koster 45 millioner kronerFemern-selskabet kan nu sætte beløb på en betydelig del af den ekstraregning, som bliver udløst af den forsinkede byggestart. Den bliver betydeligt mindre, end selskabet selv havde frygtet.
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New Scientist – News
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Is research in jails the way to end wars over dietary guidance?US researchers say studies in prisons could firm up evidence on salt intake and health. The doubters will still doubt, say Mike Lean and Alastair Campbell
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New Scientist – News
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How authors are gaming Amazon’s algorithms with 3000-page booksAmazon pays authors in its Kindle Unlimited programme based on the number of pages people read, which is causing some writers to publish incredibly long books
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BBC News – Science & Environment
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Stephen Hawking's words will be beamed into spaceThe words of the renowned physicist have been set to music by composer Vangelis.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Probiotic bacteria can diagnose, prevent, and treat infectionsMIT engineers have developed a probiotic mix of natural and engineered bacteria to diagnose and treat cholera, an intestinal infection that causes severe dehydration.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Scientists predict a new superhard material with unique propertiesAn international team of scientists has reported a new superhard material that could be used in drilling, machine building and other fields. The new tungsten boride they discovered outperforms the widely used pobedit, a hard tungsten carbide and cobalt composite material with artificial diamond interspersing. The results of their study were published in the reputable scientific journal, the Journa
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
63
New research reveals British Isles buried under ice sheets 2.5 million years agoBreakthrough research has revealed the British Isles were repeatedly submerged under an ice sheet extending to the centre of the North Sea over a million years earlier than previously thought.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
7
Endocrine-disrupting pesticides impair frog reproductionIn a new study, researchers from Sweden and Britain have investigated how the endocrine-disrupting substance linuron affects reproduction in the West African clawed frog, Xenopus tropicalis. The scientists found that linuron, which is used as a pesticicide, impaired the males' fertility, and that tadpoles developed ovaries instead of testicles to a greater extent, which caused a female-biased sex
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
76
NASA encounters the perfect storm for scienceOne of the thickest dust storms ever observed on Mars has been spreading for the past week and a half. The storm has caused NASA's Opportunity rover to suspend science operations, but also offers a window for four other spacecraft to learn from the swirling dust.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Who's that selling steaks off a truck? It's AmazonDonna Brunswick drove to a Costco last month to pick up 2 pounds of raw flank steak—not at the wholesale club, but from a truck in the parking lot.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
Germany agrees to lease Israeli-made drones: manufacturerGermany has agreed a nine year deal worth over half a billion dollars to lease Israeli military reconnaissance drones capable of carrying missiles, the aircraft's manufacturers said Thursday.
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Dagens Medicin

Styrelse vil ændre farlig medicinadfærd på flere niveauerFlere forskellige indsatser er nødvendige, hvis livsfarlige fejldoseringer af gigtmedicin skal undgås, mener Styrelsen for Patientsikkerhed.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
92
'iPal' robot companion for China's lonely childrenIt speaks two languages, gives math lessons, tells jokes and interacts with children through the tablet screen in its chest—China's latest robot is the babysitter every parent needs.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
6
Study shows more people are afraid of scorpions than spiders"I hate spiders."
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
6
Coral-shaped nanoparticles built by design using engineered peptoidsResearchers have long worked to address a grand challenge in synthesis science: to design and synthesize bio-inspired functional materials that rival those found in biology. If we can learn how to mimic in vivo functions of natural proteins—such as how biomolecules (e.g., proteins) and inorganic salts interact to form teeth, bones, or shell minerals—researchers might be able to apply the discovery
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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The most distant radio galaxy discoveredAn international team of astronomers has detected a new high-redshift radio galaxy (HzRG). The newly identified HzRG, designated TGSS1530, was found at a redshift of 5.72, meaning that it is the most distant radio galaxy known to date. The finding is reported in a paper published June 4 on arXiv.org.
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Viden

I nat valgte EU at hæve de grønne ambitioner: Men ikke alle jublerLangstrakte forhandlinger om EU's grønne energikurs sluttede i nat.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
5
The future of AI needs hardware accelerators based on analog memory devicesImagine personalized Artificial Intelligence (AI), where your smartphone becomes more like an intelligent assistant – recognizing your voice even in a noisy room, understanding the context of different social situations or presenting only the information that's truly relevant to you, plucked out of the flood of data that arrives every day. Such capabilities might soon be within our reach – but get
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
Antarctic fungi found to be effective against citrus cankerA research team at the São Paulo State University's Bioscience Institute (IB-UNESP) in Rio Claro, Brazil, has identified 29 fungi with proven action against Xanthomonas citri, a bacterium responsible for citrus canker, an endemic disease in all citrus-producing countries. The origin of the fungi is surprising. They were isolated from samples of soil and marine sediment collected in Antarctica.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
Enigma of fatty acid metabolism solved—enzyme shape controls activityThe core components of all body fats are fatty acids. Their production is initiated by the enzyme ACC. Researchers at the University of Basel's Biozentrum have now demonstrated how ACC assembles into distinct filaments. As the researchers report in Nature, the type of filament formed controls the activity of the enzyme, and thus fatty acid production.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
8
Large-scale whaling in north Scandinavia may date back to 6th centuryThe intensive whaling that has pushed many species to the brink of extinction today may be several centuries older than previously assumed. This view is held by archaeologists from Uppsala and York, whose findings are presented in the European Journal of Archaeology.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
5
Indoor positioning using a wireless networkScientists from Kaunas University of Technology (KTU), Lithuania, have developed an innovative method for indoor positioning of people and things using wireless network. It localises a human being or an object within an accuracy of one meter, it works in any Wi-Fi-equipped device, and has multiple commercial applications.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Team develops novel micro-embossing equipment for precision optical microstructuresThe Hong Kong Polytechnic University (PolyU) has developed a novel micro-embossing device for manufacturing precision glass lenses with high image quality. The lenses have the resolution required for state-of-the-art optical instruments and devices in varied fields including astronomy, national defence, medical scanning, and consumer products such as cameras and mobile phones. The invention can em
10h
The Atlantic
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Has Trump Irreversibly Altered the GOP's Foreign Policy?In his sledgehammer assault against the cornerstone institutions of the Western alliance, Donald Trump is replaying one of the defining confrontations in the Republican Party’s history. Only this time, the outcome is being reversed—with potentially tumultuous implications for both the GOP and the future of American foreign policy. Trump is reprising the conflict between the Republican Party’s int
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Feed: All Latest
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The Bike Share War Is Shaking Up Seattle Like Nowhere ElseResidents are divided over whether the city's dockless bike share program is revolutionizing transit—or creating an unwieldy, dangerous mess.
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Feed: All Latest
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Can PJs and Sound Sleep Lead to a World Cup Victory?Under Armour equipped a Swiss star with ceramic bedsheets and sleep monitors to boost his performance
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Scientific American Content: Global
68
The Science of ElectionsIf we want to protect the integrity of scientific inquiry, we must protect democracy — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Live Science
45
Will Mars Rover Survive Fierce Dust Storm?NASA's long-lived Opportunity Mars rover is weathering a monster dust storm that has plunged its environs into permanent darkness.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Scientists can make skillful seasonal forecasts of summer temperature in western ChinaSurface air temperature (SAT) is an important hydrological and climatic variable in western China. In contrast to the monsoon regions in eastern China, most regions in western China are arid, semi-arid or subject to snow cover. Thus, variations of SAT in summer in western China are key in connection with heat waves, the hydrological cycle, ecosystems and agriculture. The ability to predict SAT ski
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Study reveals simple chemical process that may have led to the origin of life on EarthResearch led by Kuhan Chandru and Jim Cleaves from the Earth-Life Science Institute at Tokyo Institute of Technology, Japan, has shown that reactions of alpha-hydroxy acids, similar to the alpha-amino acids that make up modern proteins, form large polymers easily under conditions presumed prevalent on early Earth. These alpha-hydroxy acid polymers may have aided in the formation of living systems
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Observing the cell's protein factories during self-assemblyBerlin-based researchers have produced snapshots of cellular ribosomes. Their findings could set us on the path towards a new class of antibiotics. The study—a basic science study conducted by researchers from Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin and the Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics—has been published in Molecular Cell.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Using organic waste to fight soil contamination by heavy metalsScientists from Skoltech's Center for Computational and Data-Intensive Science and Engineering (CDISE) in Russia and the Czech University of Life Sciences in Prague have refined the in-situ remediation technology for soils contaminated with heavy metals. The researchers experimentally established the type and concentration of the agent which, when introduced into contaminated soil, significantly i
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Live Science
21
Is Running on the Beach Bad for Your Body?The beach may seem like an inviting place to run on a cool summer morning, but is running on the sand good for your body?
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Live Science
18
Will You Catch the Flu? The Answer Could Be in Your BloodThere may be a way to predict whether you'll catch the flu.
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Scientific American Content: Global
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Friends of Friends Can Reveal Hidden Information about a PersonStanford scientist Johan Ugander explains his research on dissimilarities in social networks — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Live Science
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What's Up with This 'Half-Fish, Half-Bird' in China?When fishers recently hauled up their catch from a river in the province of Guizhou in southern China, they weren't expecting to come face-to-face with a fish that had a bird's head.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
3
A maestro that conducts the invasiveness of glioblastoma tumorsGlioblastoma is the most severe form of brain cancer in adults. The aggressiveness of this cancer is largely due to its ability to invade surrounding brain tissue, making the tumor difficult to remove by surgery. Now, a research team led by Diogo Castro, from Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciencia (IGC, Portugal), discovered a genetic program that controls the invasiveness of this form of cancer. This re
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Ingeniøren
11
Pollen og varme forsinker kystbanetogHver sæson sin plage. Kystbanen har været ramt af forsinkelser igennem sommeren, det skyldes blandt andet høj varme og pollen, som påvirker togenes trækkraft.
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NYT > Science
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Asteroids and Adversaries: Challenging What NASA Knows About Space RocksTwo years ago, NASA dismissed and mocked an amateur’s criticisms of its asteroids database. Now Nathan Myhrvold is back, and his papers have passed peer review.
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BBC News – Science & Environment
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Einstein's travel diaries reveal racist stereotypesXenophobic comments are found in private journals from the physicist's 1920s tour of Asia.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
NIH-supported researchers find link between allergen in red meat and heart diseaseA team of researchers says it has linked sensitivity to an allergen in red meat to the buildup of plaque in the arteries of the heart. While high saturated fat levels in red meat have long been known to contribute to heart disease for people in general, the new finding suggests that a subgroup of the population may be at heightened risk for a different reason — a food allergen.
12h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Flavored electronic cigarettes linked to possible cardiovascular diseaseCould flavored electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) cause bodily harm?There has been a rapid rise in e-cigarette use, partially due to flavoring additives in tobacco products and perception of less harm than traditional combustible cigarettes. Numerous studies have been done on the risks of e-cigarettes to lungs, but the risk to blood vessels and how flavorings can affect the body are largely unkn
12h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
4
Endocrine-disrupting pesticides impair frog reproductionIn a new study, researchers from Sweden and Britain have investigated how the endocrine-disrupting substance linuron affects reproduction in the West African clawed frog, Xenopus tropicalis. The scientists found that linuron, which is used as a pesticicide, impaired the males' fertility, and that tadpoles developed ovaries instead of testicles to a greater extent, which caused a female-biased sex
12h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Scientists show that drugs targeting tumor metabolism will not stop Natural Killer cellsThe scientists discovered that while glutamine is a key fuel for many tumors, it is not so for natural killer cells. This highlights the therapeutic potential for targeting glutamine metabolism to treat cancer as any drugs that do this will not hinder our cancer-killing NK cells.
12h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Mainz scientists identify enzyme responsible for vascular damage caused by aircraft noiseIn a recent study, scientists at the Department of Cardiology at the University Medical Center of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) have identified an enzyme responsible for aircraft-related vascular damage. The researchers were also able to show that night-time noise has a particularly harmful effect and thus demand that night-time sleep be protected from noise.
12h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Tobacco aside, e-cigarette flavorings may harm blood vesselsFlavoring chemicals widely used in e-cigarettes and other tobacco products may be toxic to the cells that line and regulate blood vessel function. The adverse effects observed with chemical flavor additives on endothelial cells could be early warning signs of future heart disease, researchers say.
12h
Ingeniøren
50
Slut med palmeolie i tanken og solcelle-forhindringer: EU klar med spilleregler for VETidligt i morges blev forhandlere i EU enige om et nyt direktiv for vedvarende energi gældende til 2030. Palmeolie skal helt udfases og medlemslandene må ikke længere lægge hindringer i vejen for private borgere, som ønsker at sælge solcelle-el til nettet.
12h
Ingeniøren
6
Minister kræver undersøgelse af nye jyske højspændingskablerEnergi-, forsynings- og klimaminister, Lars Chr. Lilleholt kræver en undersøgelse af planen om at anlægge nye, jyske højspændingskabler, efter gamle kabler er blevet gravet ned. Det kommer til at forsinke projektet.
12h
New Scientist – News
39
Battle royale: mucus-squirting worms vs spike-wielding arachnidsIn the forests of Brazil, pitched gladiatorial contests are being fought between flatworms armed with digestive slime and spider-like arachnids with body-chopping spikes
12h
Science : NPR
300+
Looking To History To Combat WildfiresAfter decades of modern fire prevention some forests are much thicker than they've been historically. New research offers a guide to thinning that could keep wildfires smaller and shorter. (Image credit: Denver Water Department archives and Paula Fornwalt/U.S. Forest Service)
12h
The Atlantic
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About That Movie Trailer Donald Trump Gave Kim Jong Un“A Story of Opportunity for North Korea,” the four-minute movie trailer that Donald Trump showed Kim Jong Un when the two leaders met this week in Singapore, is a prime example of the new, quintessentially Trumpian ideas that the president is implementing to try and finally resolve the old challenge of denuclearizing North Korea. But there’s one main problem with it. (I’m setting aside the fact t
12h
Ingeniøren

Sensorer skal være digitale stationsvagterTidligere kunne stationsvagter bruge sanserne til at afgøre, om der var behov for reparation eller udskiftning på elektriske anlæg. Energinet er i gang med et projekt, hvor man med sensorer får en digital stationsvagt.
13h
Ingeniøren

Kom bag om signalprojektet med Ingeniørens prisvindende journalisterIngeniørens afsløring af problemerne med det projekt, der skal sikre nye signaler på hele Danmarks jernbanenet, er netop blevet hædret med den fineste journalistpris for danske specialmedier, Anders Bording-prisen. Journalisterne Steffen McGhie og Magnus Bredsdorff fortæller om det store gravearb…
13h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
9
US court confirms danger posed by 'sound cannons'A New York appeals court on Wednesday upheld a lower court's ruling that two police officers' use of a "sound cannon" was an unconstitutional abuse of force.
14h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

How Fox's businesses would match up with Disney and ComcastCompeting bids from Comcast and Disney for the bulk of Twenty-First Century Fox come as the media landscape changes and companies get more involved in both creating and distributing content.
14h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Comcast-Disney fight highlights shifting media landscapeThat didn't take long.
14h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
British engine maker Rolls-Royce cuts 4,600 jobsRolls-Royce plans to axe 4,600 mainly British management roles by 2020 to further slash costs, the UK maker of plane engines announced on Thursday.
14h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
15
Samsung joins global pledge to increase renewable energy useSamsung Electronics Co., the world's biggest smartphone maker, joined on Thursday a growing list of companies that are promising to increase their use of solar and other renewable energy to help curb global warming.
14h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Apple closing iPhone security gap used by law enforcementApple is closing a security gap that allowed outsiders to pry personal information from locked iPhones without a password, a change that will thwart law enforcement agencies that have been exploiting the vulnerability to collect evidence in criminal investigations.
14h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
29
Fair classroom practices disarm threat of evaluation retaliationWhile tuition inflation presents a challenge for many college-bound students, an area of growing concern for many universities is 'grade inflation' — in part caused when instructors grade more leniently to discourage students from retaliating by giving low teaching evaluations. Researchers say instructors can stop worrying about evaluation revenge as long as they use practices in the classroom th
14h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
7
Narwhals' acoustic behavior described using audio taggingThe clicking, buzzing and calling behavioral patterns of elusive East Greenland narwhals have been described thanks to in-depth recordings.
14h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
14
Ammonia distribution in Earth's upper atmosphereA new study helps clarify how ammonia is present in Earth's upper atmosphere. Using computer modeling, the researchers found ammonia molecules trapped in liquid cloud droplets are released during convection where these particles freeze and subsequently collide in the upper atmosphere.
14h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Lentils significantly reduce blood glucose levelsReplacing potatoes or rice with pulses can lower your blood glucose levels by more than 20 per cent, according to a new study. Researchers found that swapping out half of a portion of these starchy side dishes for lentils can significantly improve your body's response to the carbohydrates. Replacing half a serving of rice with lentils caused blood glucose to drop by up to 20 per cent. Replacing po
14h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Cannabis does not increase suicidal behavior in psychiatric patientsResearchers have found there is no significant association between cannabis use and suicidal behavior in people with psychiatric disorders. The study findings contrast with pre-existing data that shows the drug is linked to an increased chance of suicidal behavior in the general population.
14h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
14
Adolescents who consume diet high in saturated fats may develop poor stress skillsAdolescents who consume a diet high in saturated fats may develop poor stress coping skills, signs of post-traumatic stress disorder as adults.
14h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
11
Automated robotic device for faster blood testingResearchers have created an automated blood drawing and testing device that provides rapid results, potentially improving the workflow in hospitals and other health-related institutions to allow health care practitioners to spend more time treating patients.
14h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
2
High-protein corn also resistant to parasitic weedIn sub-Saharan Africa, 20 to 80% of corn yields may be lost because of a semi-parasitic plant, Striga. In areas infested with Striga, farmers may even lose their entire crops. In a new study, researchers from southern Africa identified several varieties of corn resistant or tolerant to Striga. Importantly, these varieties also have improved nutritional content, particularly protein.
14h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
31
Bone mass may suffer when teenage girls binge drinkTeenage girls who regularly binge drink may fail to reach their peak bone mass, according to a new study.
15h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
3
Floridians took Zika threat more seriously than rest of US — but still most did nothingThreatened by the mosquito-borne Zika virus in 2016, Florida residents felt more susceptible than others in the United States to getting the virus, were more knowledgeable about it, and were more likely to support taking community action against it. Floridians were nearly twice as likely as non-Floridians to say they took steps to protect themselves from Zika. Even so, fewer than half of Floridian
15h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
2
Observing the cell's protein factories during self-assemblyResearchers have produced snapshots of the 'protein factories' of the cell. Their findings could set us on the path towards a new class of antibiotics.
15h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
3
Tracking energy flow in large moleculesScientists have developed a novel and unambiguous way to track energy flow in polyatomic molecules at ultrashort timescales.
15h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
1
No link found between oral antifungal drug and stillbirthNew research does not support a suggested link between treatment with the oral antifungal drug fluconazole during pregnancy and an increased risk of stillbirth.
15h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
10
Large fenced reserves an effective way to bring wolves back to ScotlandResearch indicates that for wolves to be effective at directly reducing red deer numbers and allowing nature to recover in the Scottish Highlands they may need to be reintroduced to very large fenced reserve.
15h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
1
Network biology reveals pathogen targets in the model plant Arabidopsis thalianaUsing systems biology, researchers successfully identified previously unknown protein targets of plant pathogens in the flowering plant Arabidopsis thaliana, employing some of the same methods used to analyze social networks or biological networks. Their theoretical framework, they say, could help analyze other interactions between species to reveal pathogen contact points.
15h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
6
How 'gatekeepers' to a cell's nucleus let genetic instructions pass throughResearchers have revealed how the human nuclear pore complex is involved in the flow of genetic information.
15h
Ingeniøren
28
SDU vil være centrum for fodboldanalytikereDBU’s dataanalytiker efterlyser uddannelse, for lige nu kradser dansk fodbold kun i overfladen af big data. SDU vil inddrage både idrætsforskere og ingeniører om en uddannelse, der også kan trække på droneteknologi.
15h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
27
Short gamma-ray bursts do follow binary neutron star mergersResearchers have confirmed that last fall's union of two neutron stars did in fact cause a short gamma-ray burst.
15h
Viden
1
Voldsom sandstorm rammer lille robot-bil på MarsNASA har mistet kontakten med gammel robot-bil under den værste sandstorm, som har raset på planeten i 15 år.
15h
Ingeniøren

Efter massive tillidsproblemer: schweizere skal kigge Kaspersky efter i sømmeneDer skal nye boller på suppen, hvis tilliden til antivirusselskaber skal genetableres, lyder det i kor fra branchen.
16h
Viden
7
Orkaner bliver langsommere – og det er rigtigt dårligt nytDe sidste syv årtier er bevægelseshastigheden i orkaner faldet, viser ny undersøgelse. Det giver større ødelæggelser.
16h
Viden
100+
Østersøen viser os klimaforandringernes konsekvenserØstersøen kan fungere som en tidsmaskine, der kan vise os fremtidens klimaforandrede havområder. Det bør udnyttes, mener forskere.
17h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
3
UNC study: Tdap vaccine given during pregnancy reduces occurrence of infant pertussisA study led by UNC's Sylvia Becker-Dreps, M.D., M.P.H., reviewed more than 675,000 pregnancies in the US to determine if the Tdap vaccine given to a mother will reduce the chances of her child developing pertussis during the first 18 months of life. The results show a decrease in overall cases of pertussis, and most notably, in pertussis hospitalization in infants whose mothers were immunized duri
17h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Parents see cancer prevention potential as best reason for HPV vaccinationParents of adolescents believed that the potential to prevent certain types of cancer is the best reason for their children to receive the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, whereas other reasons health care providers often give were far less persuasive.
17h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Bone mass may suffer when teenage girls binge drinkTeenage girls who regularly binge drink may fail to reach their peak bone mass, according to a new study published in the Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs.
17h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
3
Markers, erasers, and germs, oh my!A thorough, terminal cleaning of hospital rooms between patients is essential for eliminating environmental contamination, and a checklist is a standard tool to guide the cleaning staff. But new research presented at the APIC 45th Annual Conference offers an important reminder that the checklist is only as good as the list itself.
17h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Parent cleansing paramount prior to skin-to-skin careNeonatal intensive care units increasingly encourage meaningful touch and skin-to-skin care — aka 'kangaroo care' — between parents and premature babies to aid the babies' development. But a Michigan children's hospital practicing skin-to-skin care noticed an unwanted side effect in 2016 — a spike in Staphylococcus aureus (SA) infections among newborns.
17h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Pre-delivery risk factors associated with C-section infectionsHaving a prior cesarean section (C-section), smoking, illicit drug use, and obesity increase the likelihood of developing an infection during a C-section delivery, according to new research presented at the 45th Annual Conference of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC).
17h
Science : NPR
2K
U.S. Suicide Rates Are Rising Faster Among Women Than MenYou can help prevent suicide, researchers say, by knowing the signs and reaching out. More boys and men in the U.S. take their own lives than women and girls, but that difference has narrowed. (Image credit: Veronica Grech/Getty Images)
17h
Science | The Guardian
67
Women with heart disease are dismissed, and it's killing them | Nikki StampIt’s time to challenge centuries of bad science, social norms and a lack of women in medicine and research Hysteria was an ancient term used to describe uncontrollable emotions, resulting in the admission of many women to asylums for symptoms such as a “tendency to cause trouble”. The source of the alleged insanity was said to come from the uterus, thus the treatment in some cases was a hysterect
17h
Ingeniøren
41
Fodbolden flyver på big dataMillioner af datapunkter gør nationerne klar til VM. Vi dribler gennem de teknologiske muligheder.
18h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
26
US painkiller restriction linked to 'significant' increase in illicit online drug tradingThe US Drug Enforcement Administration's decision to restrict prescription drugs containing hydrocodone (a popular opioid painkiller) was associated with a 'significant' increase in illicit trading of opioids through online markets, finds a study published by The BMJ today.
19h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
12
No clear evidence that nicotine 'preloading' helps smokers to quitThere is insufficient evidence to show that using nicotine patches for four weeks before a quit attempt (known as 'preloading') improves long-term smoking abstinence, finds a new trial.
19h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
21
Ancient agricultural activity caused lasting environmental changesAgricultural activity by humans more than 2,000 years ago had a more significant and lasting impact on the environment than previously thought.
19h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
69
One thing you'll find in the obits of many long-living peopleA new nationwide study of obituaries has found that people with religious affiliations lived nearly four years longer than those with no ties to religion.
19h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
27
Magnetic 3D-printed structures crawl, roll, and jumpEngineers have created soft, 3D-printed structures whose movements can be controlled with a wave of a magnet, much like marionettes without the strings. The menagerie of structures that can be magnetically manipulated includes a smooth ring that wrinkles up, a long tube that squeezes shut, a sheet that folds itself, and a spider-like 'grabber' that can crawl, roll, jump, and snap together fast eno
19h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
73
For 100 million years, amber freezes a tableau of tick's worst day everThis is the first time this kind of interaction between ticks and spiders has been documented in the fossil record. Even though ticks aren't a typical staple of spider diets, spiders can occasionally prey on ticks in modern ecosystems.
19h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
23
Scientists discover biomarker for flu susceptibilityResearchers have found a way to predict whether someone exposed to the flu virus is likely to become ill. They used a computational approach to pinpoint a blood-based genetic biomarker to determine an individual's susceptibility to the disease.
19h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
15
Eczema: Flipping the switch on itchResearchers have pinpointed a particular neuropeptide associated with transmitting itch signals in mice with atopic dermatitis. The work sheds further light on the pathways involved in transmitting itch sensations from the peripheral (skin) to the central (spinal cord) nervous system.
19h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
13
Stress test to predict how diatoms will react to ocean acidificationResearchers have shown that diatoms can withstand population collapse in an acidified environment by conserving valuable energy normally used for carbon dioxide consumption.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
13
Deadly fungus found for first time in critically endangered amphibian speciesA fungal pathogen which has led to the extinction of entire species in South America has been recorded for the first time in critically endangered amphibians in India.
19h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
11
Old Man River's unique chemical signatureHuman activity greatly impacts the natural chemistry of the largest river in North America — the Mississippi River. In a new, large-scale study, geologists have identified a unique chemical signature in the river.
19h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
100
Digital devices during family time could exacerbate bad behaviorParents who spend a lot of time on their phones or watching television during family activities such as meals, playtime, and bedtime could influence their long-term relationships with their children. This is according to researchers who say so called 'technoference' can lead children to show more frustration, hyperactivity, whining, sulking or tantrums.
19h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
52
Computer program looks five minutes into the futureScientists have developed software that can look minutes into the future: The program learns the typical sequence of actions, such as cooking, from video sequences. Then it can predict in new situations what the chef will do at which point in time.
19h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
37
Novel microplate 3D bioprinting platform for muscle & tendon tissue engineeringNew research describes the development of a novel screening platform with automated production of 3D muscle- and tendon-like tissues using 3D bioprinting.
19h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
12
Original habitat is best, but restoration still makes a big differenceA new study presents some of the best evidence to date that restoration efforts in Missouri's Ozark Highlands make a difference for nesting songbirds that breed there. Recent studies support that these efforts are making a positive impact on the ecosystem and increasing the survival of bird species that breed there.
19h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
30
People recall information better through virtual realityResearchers conducted one of the first in-depth analyses on whether people learn better through virtual, immersive environments, as opposed to more traditional platforms like a two-dimensional desktop computer or hand-held tablet. The researchers found that people remember information better if it is presented to them in a virtual environment.
20h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
7
Carrying standby antibiotics encourages travelers to careless antibiotic useTravelers carrying standby antibiotics take them more often than those traveling without such drugs, shows a recent study. Having antibiotics packed in the bags allows their use — against recommendations — also for mild and moderate diarrhea.
20h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
15
Platform uses artificial intelligence to diagnose Zika and other pathogensMethod created in Brazil combines mass spectrometry analysis of blood serum with an algorithm that recognizes patterns associated with diseases from various origins. Adoption of machine learning technique allows the program to adapt itself to possible viral mutations.
20h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
15
Content of service members' art linked to their trauma levelsA new study found that military service members recovering from PTSD who still identified as a member of a unit have lower levels of psychological injuries.
20h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
8
Needle release optimal treatment for Viking diseaseThe various treatments for 'Viking disease' are coming under closer scrutiny. Research shows that crooked fingers can be straightened just as well with needle release as with the substantially more expensive commonly used drug.
20h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
19
New mechanism by which Alzheimer's disease spreads through the brain discoveredThe waste-disposal system in a cell can spread harmful protein aggregates between neurons in the brain in Alzheimer's disease. The spread can be reduced in experiments in cultivated cells. The discovery may help the development of new diagnostic methods, and may eventually lead to new drugs that can stop or reduce the progression of disease.
20h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
17
Neuronal activity sheds light on the origin of consciousnessA new study identifies and measures the neural activity associated with a new conscious experience. It takes researchers a step closer to solving the mystery of consciousness.
20h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
16
Attacking bacteria with shark skin-inspired surfacesSharks are often the subject of TV specials or news stories focusing on their attacks on humans. But scientists are finding that sharks could inspire a new type of surface that would attack bacteria, helping humans instead of hurting them. Researchers have designed a coating that is infused with antimicrobial agents and has the patterned diamond-like texture of shark skin.
20h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
19
Large-scale whaling in north Scandinavia may date back to 6th centuryThe intensive whaling that has pushed many species to the brink of extinction today may be several centuries older than previously assumed.
20h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
19
Mediterranean-style eating with lean, unprocessed red meat improves heart disease riskAdopting a Mediterranean-style eating pattern improves heart health, with or without reducing red meat intake, if the red meat consumed is lean and unprocessed, according to a new nutrition study.
20h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
13
E- textiles control home appliances with the swipe of a fingerElectronic textiles could allow a person to control household appliances or computers from a distance simply by touching a wristband or other item of clothing — something that could be particularly helpful for those with limited mobility. Now researchers, have developed a new type of e-textile that is self-powered, highly sensitive and washable. A video of an e-wristband in action is available.
20h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
13
Magnetic treatment could help remove 'off-flavor' from winesFrom vine to wine, grapes undergo a remarkable transformation. But sometimes this makeover results in vino that doesn't taste quite right. Scientists now report that they have found a way to use tiny magnetic particles to remove off-tasting substances in cabernet sauvignon without altering its desired bouquet. Eventually, they say this technique could help remove unwanted flavors from other wines.
20h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
25
To forecast winter rainfall in the Southwest, look to New Zealand in the summerScientists have discovered an atmospheric teleconnection that allows them to accurately predict winter precipitation in the southwestern United States by measuring summer sea surface temperatures near New Zealand.
20h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
9
Conformity trumps riskiness in social fishResearchers have discovered that more sociable fish suppress their own personality when they are with a partner.
20h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
10
Clever bees can identify different flowers by patterns of scentNew research has revealed that bumblebees can tell flowers apart by patterns of scent.
20h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
3
Multilingual students have improved in academic achievement since 2003Multilingual students, who speak a language or more than one language other than English at home, have improved in reading and math achievement substantially since 2003, finds a new study.
20h
BBC News – Science & Environment
100+
Mars Opportunity: Rover 'should ride out storm'Nasa says it is concerned but hopeful that a veteran robot rover can survive a big dust storm.
20h
The Scientist RSS

Even in the Bronze Age, Humans Altered Soil ChemistryAncient bones from Ireland reveal that farming has changed nitrogen composition in land for the last 3,000 years.
20h
The Scientist RSS

US State Department Names New Science EnvoysThe five high-profile scientists are charged with helping strengthen international cooperation.
20h
Science | The Guardian
300+
Mars mega-storm threatens Nasa rover after 14-year missionExperts have no idea what the landscape, or the Opportunity, will look like after storm raging across a quarter of the planet Nasa’s Mars rover Opportunity has been knocked out by a gigantic dust storm that is enveloping the red planet and blotting out the sun. Officials said on Wednesday they were hopeful the rover would survive the storm, which already covers a quarter of Mars and is expected t
20h
cognitive science
1
When Overtaxed Working Memory Knocks Your Brain Out of Syncsubmitted by /u/burtzev [link] [comments]
21h
Futurity.org
3
Bias and other barriers keep people from getting anti-HIV drugMultiple barriers may stop high-risk individuals from getting access to an HIV drug that can reduce the subsequent risk of infection, according to a new research review. Researchers outlined solutions that would help overcome barriers that make it harder for underserved populations to access pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP). The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported that nearly 40,00
22h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Study unmasks scale of patient doctor divideA study has estimated that around three million Britons — or 7.6 percent of the country — believe they have experienced a harmful or potentially harmful but preventable problem in primary healthcare.
22h
BBC News – Science & Environment
95
Antarctic ice sheets: Four things you need to knowWith Antarctica shedding ice at an accelerating rate, here's what you need to know about continent's ice sheet.
22h
BBC News – Science & Environment
300+
Saiga antelopes: the Ice Age survivors now in perilScientists hope to save the saiga, a Central Asian antelope which survived the Ice Age, but is now in peril.
22h
Science | The Guardian
37
Social media firms 'must share child mental health costs'NHS boss Simon Stevens warns of double epidemic of child mental health and obesity Social media firms must share the burden with the health service as it battles mental health issues in young people, the head of NHS England has said. Setting out the health service’s key priorities for the future as it marks its 70th year, Simon Stevens, the body’s chief executive, warned of a “double epidemic aff
22h
Futurity.org
4
Dwarf planet may host more organic stuff than scientists thoughtA new analysis suggests that patches on the surface of the dwarf planet Ceres may contain a much higher abundance of organic material than originally thought. …because life as we know it can’t exist without organic material, scientists are interested in how it’s distributed through the solar system. Last year, scientists with NASA’s Dawn mission announced the detection of organic material—carbon-
22h
Big Think
100+
Einstein gets it right again: His 'elevator' thought experiment is proven correctPhysicists prove a core part of the theory of general relativity by using the whole Earth and the most precise clocks ever. Read More
22h
Scientific American Content: Global
47
A Litmus Test for Bad BreathResearchers engineered a portable device that detects even the tiniest trace of hydrogen sulfide—one of the primary offenders in bad breath. Karen Hopkin reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
22h
Futurity.org
3
Despite risks, many Americans want cancer screeningsA large proportion of Americans opt for cancer screening even if the potential harms outweigh the risks. Researchers believe that clinicians and oncologists could develop better communications tools and provide reassurance to patients—who may think testing will reduce their chances of dying from cancer—in better ways. “…many people did not believe, even hypothetically, that screening might not sa
22h
New on MIT Technology Review
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Apple is closing a loophole that lets police hack into iPhones
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Futurity.org
1
Small groups narrow math gap for low-income kidsTeaching low-income, minority kindergartners math in small groups helps with learning and can help bridge the divide with higher-income peers, according to new research. For a new study , researchers evaluated kindergarten students in the one-year math enrichment High 5s program in 24 low-income elementary schools in New York City. The findings show that kids who participated in the program recei
22h
Futurity.org
2
Future medical tests could use bits of RNAScientists have devised an improved method for isolating and identifying tiny fragments of RNA in human blood products. The achievement could lead to powerful new ways to diagnose and track a wide range of medical conditions, say the researchers. On top of that, in the course of the project, they discovered that one of their study participants had a highly unusual concentration of RNA in his bloo
22h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

UK urgently needs a joined up approach to recruitment of international doctorsThe UK urgently needs a joined up and strategic approach to the recruitment of international health professionals, argue experts in The BMJ today.
22h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

US painkiller restriction linked to 'significant' increase in illicit online drug tradingThe US Drug Enforcement Administration's decision to restrict prescription drugs containing hydrocodone (a popular opioid painkiller) was associated with a 'significant' increase in illicit trading of opioids through online markets, finds a study published by The BMJ today.
22h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Women's basic rights under threat from Trump gag rule, warn expertsThe Trump administration is mounting a ferocious attack on abortion rights with plans for a domestic gag rule on abortion counselling and provision, warn experts in The BMJ today.
22h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

No clear evidence that nicotine 'preloading' helps smokers to quitThere is insufficient evidence to show that using nicotine patches for four weeks before a quit attempt (known as 'preloading') improves long-term smoking abstinence, finds a trial published by The BMJ this week.
22h
Futurity.org
1
Little nectar ‘worlds’ show how species live togetherNew research unravels the relative importance of two theories about how species coexist. Picture, for example, a sticky drop of nectar clinging to the tip of a hummingbird’s beak that drips into the next flower the bird visits. With that subtle change, the microbes within that drop are now in a new environment, teeming with other microbes. This is a small example of species forced to live togethe
22h
Futurity.org
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Model predicts how 2 drugs interact to avoid internal bleedingScientists have developed a prediction model to guide dosage adjustments of rivaroxaban, an oral blood thinner, in renal-impaired patients taking amiodarone. The work may help reduce the risk of internal bleeding. Patients often need to consume different medications to manage their illness. However, these pharmaceutical drugs may interact with each another when taken together. While some of these
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