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Nyheder2018juni15

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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

The neurons that rewrite traumatic memoriesNeuroscientists have located the cells that help reprogram long-lasting memories of traumatic experiences towards safety, a first in neuroscience.
17h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

JAK inhibitors associated with aggressive lymphomaAustrian researchers have discovered that a small number of patients taking targeted drugs known as Janus kinase (JAK) inhibitors to treat myelofibrosis may develop aggressive lymphomas.
13h
Ingeniøren

Passagerer er igen forsøgskaniner: Danmark går enegang med nye køreledningerDanmark har som det første land i verden købt et system med op til 110 meter mellem masterne til eltogenes køreledninger. Nu er første strækning midlertidigt lukket for eltog, og politikerne bander over ikke at være blevet informeret om den danske enegang.
17h

LATEST

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

PIM-2 protein kinase regulates T-cell activity differently than PIM-1 or PIM-3 isoformThe PIM-2 protein kinase negatively regulates T cell responses in transplantation and tumor immunity, while PIM-1 and PIM-3 are positive regulators, report Medical University of South Carolina investigators in The Journal of Clinical Investigation. Blocking PIM-2 in allogeneic bone marrow transplant dramatically accelerated graft-versus-host disease. In adoptive immunotherapy with autologous T cel
14min
The Atlantic

Mueller's Targets Keep Digging Deeper HolesGeorge Papadopoulos. Michael Flynn. Alexander van der Zwaan. Paul Manafort. Some of the most high-profile men caught up in the Russia investigation all have one thing in common: They’ve learned firsthand that the cover-up can also be a crime. All four men have either decided to cooperate with Special Counsel Robert Mueller or have been sent to jail—not because it was proven that any of them collu
14min
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Trump Says He Gave Kim Jong Un His Direct Number. Never Do That.If Trump actually followed White House protocol for secure calling, it's probably fine. But what are the odds?
17min
Big Think

Your brain on carbohydrates and fat? It's in love.Pizza? Doughnuts? They satisfy the brain's reward center like nothing else. Read More
28min
Big Think

Report: A minimum-wage job can’t pay the rent anywhere in U.S.A full-time minimum wage isn’t enough money to rent an averagely priced one-bedroom home anywhere in the U.S., according to an annual report issued this week by the National Low Income Housing Coalition. The report illustrates the stark reality facing low-income workers in the U.S. For … Read More
28min
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Orange, tea tree & eucalyptus oils sweeten diesel fumesWaste oil from orange, tea tree and eucalyptus essential oil production mixed with diesel provides a sweet-smelling biofuel blend with comparable performance to diesel-only fuel.
35min
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Oprah Winfrey to produce shows for AppleOprah Winfrey AppleTelevision personality Oprah Winfrey has agreed to produce shows for Apple as the iPhone maker prepares to make a push into original content.
35min
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Aqua satellite sees Tropical Depression Gaemi exit TaiwanTropical Depression Gaemi moved through Taiwan and was tracking to the northeast in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean on June 15. NASA's Aqua satellite provided a visible image of the storm that showed it as an elongated system.
35min
Blog » Languages » English

Eyewire Release Report 6/15/2018Happy Friday! To give you a comprehensive picture of everything new on Eyewire, here are all changes since the last report a few weeks ago. We have fixed a few bugs related to the notifications release, including out of order notifications when logging back in, duplicate notifications, clicking on notification chips failing to open the full message, a competition auto-enroll problem, a weird chat
38min
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

NASA finds Tropical Depression 04E's heaviest rains approaching Mexico's CoastTropical Depression 04E formed close to the coast of southwestern Mexico on June 14, and early the next day NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the region. Using infrared light, Aqua identified where the strongest storms were within 04E.
41min
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

NASA finds Tropical Depression Bud's rains over mainland MexicoTropical Depression Bud's rains were falling over western Mexico when NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead on June 15.
41min
Live Science

How Does Salmonella Get Into Cereal?Kellogg announced it is recalling boxes of its Honey Smacks cereal because the product is linked with an outbreak of Salmonella.
42min
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Volcano music could help scientists monitor eruptionsA volcano in Ecuador with a deep cylindrical crater might be the largest musical instrument on Earth, producing unique sounds scientists could use to monitor its activity.
53min
Science : NPR

Fear And Frustration Over EPA Move To Kill Chemical-Disaster ProtectionsThe EPA intends to block rules to prevent and respond to leaks, explosions and other disasters at chemical facilities and refineries around the U.S. That scares many people who live and work nearby. (Image credit: Stephen Maturen/Getty Images)
56min
Popular Science

The EPA might change the way it weighs human health against industry profitEnvironment Now's your chance to submit an official comment. The public has until July 13 to comment on how the Environmental Protection Agency balances it checkbooks.
59min
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Researchers complete milestone in international physics experiment in SwitzerlandResearchers at The University of Texas at Arlington have built prototypes for an aluminum electric field cage inside a particle detector for an international physics experiment conducted at the European Organization for Nuclear Research in Geneva, Switzerland.
59min
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Sounding rocket takes a second look at the SunTom Woods knows about space gunk.
59min
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Deformation control and mass transfer in the tunic of Halocynthia roretziIt has been previously reported that the tunic of Halocynthia roretzi, mainly composed of cellulose, is actively deformed with mass transfer by the mechanical stimuli. In this study, how the tunic deforms in response to the mechanical environment was investigated.
1h
Live Science

Meet the Extinct Cow with a 'Bulldog' SkullNobody would ever say to this cow, "Why the long face?"
1h
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Alleged Silk Road Adviser Roger Clark Extradited To the USRoger Clark allegedly served as Ross Ulbricht's Silk Road consigliere. Friday, the feds announced his extradition from Thailand.
1h
Live Science

Flying Spiders Test the Winds Before Sailing on Silk KitesHow do some spiders fly?
1h
Live Science

Stephen Hawking Buried Between Isaac Newton and Charles DarwinThe ashes of the towering figure in modern physics will be buried today (June 15) between two other science icons.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Study with implications for opioid crisis finds opioids raise risk of fracture nonunionDr. Robert Zura, Professor and Chair of Orthopaedic Surgery at LSU Health New Orleans School of Medicine, was part of a research team reporting that not only may opioid use increase the risk of bone fractures, but opioids may also impair healing. The authors also question their effectiveness in controlling pain.
1h
The Atlantic

Photos of the Week: World Cup, Skinny-Dippers, Urban ShepherdA wee Welsh bunny, trophy winners in Formula E and the French Open, animal rescue near the Fuego volcano in Guatemala, heavy rains in Manila, Eid al-Fitr celebrations in Indonesia, a skyscraper-scaling raccoon in Minnesota, a meeting between President Trump and Kim Jong Un in Singapore, Fashion Week in London, and much more.
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

NASA finds Tropical Depression Bud's rains over mainland MexicoTropical Depression Bud's rains were falling over western Mexico when NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead on June 15.
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Volcano music could help scientists monitor eruptionsA volcano in Ecuador with a deep cylindrical crater might be the largest musical instrument on Earth, producing unique sounds scientists could use to monitor its activity. New infrasound recordings of Cotopaxi volcano in central Ecuador show that after a sequence of eruptions in 2015, the volcano's crater changed shape. The deep narrow crater forced air to reverberate against the crater walls when
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

NASA finds Tropical Depression 04E's heaviest rains approaching Mexico's CoastTropical Depression 04E formed close to the coast of southwestern Mexico on June 14, and early the next day NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the region. Using infrared light, Aqua identified where the strongest storms were within 04E.
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

NASA's Aqua satellite sees Tropical Depression Gaemi exit TaiwanTropical Depression Gaemi moved through Taiwan and was tracking to the northeast in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean on June 15. NASA's Aqua satellite provided a visible image of the storm that showed it as an elongated system.
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Success is not just how you play your cards, but how you play your opponentsPoker-playing techniques can apply to strategies in many situations. Study can influence scientific approaches to negotiation
1h
Popular Science

These snakes slurp snails, and that's great for farmersAnimals Not all snakes are scary. Scientists are celebrating the discovery of five new species of snail-eating snakes in Ecuador. A modified jaw allows the snakes to scoop snails right out of the shell.
1h
Big Think

VR is the ultimate empathy machine. Can it help drive diversity?VR has been called the “empathy machine”, and it may provide a way to get the most from our efforts to achieve workplace diversity. Read More
1h
Feed: All Latest

Can Verizon Build a Strong Brand From the Bones of Yahoo and AOL?Verizon has united two faded names from internet 1.0 under its Oath brand. Now it needs a strategy.
1h
Big Think

Mapping the rats of Paris (to get rid of them)All big cities have rats, but Paris seems to have a more serious rodent problem than most. Read More
2h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New method makes weather forecasts right as rainMeteorologists have known for some time that rainfall forecasts have flaws, as failure to take into account factors such as evaporation can affect their accuracy. Now, researchers from the University of Missouri have developed a system that improves the precision of forecasts by accounting for evaporation in rainfall estimates, particularly for locations 30 miles or more from the nearest National
2h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Meat sensitivity spread by ticks linked to heart diseaseResearchers have linked sensitivity to an allergen in red meat — a sensitivity spread by tick bites — with a buildup of fatty plaque in the arteries of the heart. This buildup may increase the risk of heart attacks and stroke.
2h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Loving the sweet enemyFoods rich in fats and carbohydrates stimulate the reward system in the brain particularly strongly.
2h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New compound as effective as FDA-approved drugs against life-threatening infectionsPurdue University researchers have identified a new compound that in preliminary testing has shown itself to be as effective as antibiotics approved by the FDA to treat life-threatening infections while also appearing to be less susceptible to bacterial resistance.The compound has been potent against antibiotic-resistant pathogens such as MRSA, which is often found in hospitals and other health ca
2h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Greater levels of vitamin D associated with decreasing risk of breast cancerResearchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine suggest higher levels of vitamin D are associated with decreasing risk of breast cancer. Their epidemiological study is published in the June 15 online issue of PLOS ONE, in collaboration with Creighton University, Medical University of South Carolina and GrassrootsHealth, an Encinitas-based nonprofit organization that promotes v
2h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Squeezing light at the nanoscaleResearchers at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) have developed a new technique to squeeze infrared light into ultra-confined spaces, generating an intense, nanoscale antenna that could be used to detect single biomolecules.
2h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Electronic skin stretched to new limitsA metal carbide within a hydrogel composite senses, stretches and heals like human skin for use in medicine and robotics.
2h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New ID pictures of conducting polymers discover a surprise ABBA fanThe first ever detailed pictures of the structure of conjugated polymers have been produced by a research team led by Professor Giovanni Costantini at the University of Warwick.
2h
Live Science

Black Holes Could Actually Be Colliding WormholesThe echoes of colliding wormholes would look different than the signal from merging black holes.
2h
New on MIT Technology Review

Tencent and Alibaba’s mobile payment war shows how far China is ahead of the US
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Feed: All Latest

On the New Season of 'Queer Eye,' Learning Goes Both WaysSince the show's original Bravo incarnation, the conversation around gender and sexuality has evolved in fundamental ways—and in new episodes is refreshingly nuanced.
2h
Science : NPR

Credibility Concerns Lead NIH To End Study Of Alcohol's Health EffectsScientists and National Institutes of Health officials met with alcohol company executives and appeared to solicit money from them in violation of government policy. The NIH canceled the study. (Image credit: WIN-Initiative/Getty Images)
2h
Latest Headlines | Science News

The Large Hadron Collider is getting an upgradeRevamping the accelerator’s equipment will increase the rate of proton collisions.
2h
The Atlantic

A Battle Over Migration Is Threatening to Topple Angela MerkelGerman Chancellor Angela Merkel has so far withstood the battle over migration that has convulsed politics across Europe, most recently in Italy . But now, infighting threatens to tear apart her government just three months after it was formed. The CSU, a center-right party in the German state of Bavaria and a sister party of Merkel’s, sparked the latest round of fighting. The party’s leader, Int
2h
Scientific American Content: Global

Microsoft's Purchase of GitHub Leaves Some Scientists UneasyThey fear the online platform will become less open, but other researchers say the buyout could make GitHub more useful — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
2h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Electronic skin stretched to new limitsAn electrically conductive hydrogel that takes stretchability, self-healing and strain sensitivity to new limits has been developed at KAUST. "Our material outperforms all previously reported hydrogels and introduces new functionalities," says Husam Alshareef, professor of materials science and engineering.
2h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

New ID pictures of conducting polymers discover a surprise ABBA fanThe first ever detailed pictures of the structure of conjugated polymers have been produced by a research team led by Professor Giovanni Costantini at the University of Warwick.
2h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Squeezing light at the nanoscale—Ultra-confined light could detect harmful moleculesResearchers at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) have developed a new technique to squeeze infrared light into ultra-confined spaces, generating an intense, nanoscale antenna that could be used to detect single biomolecules.
2h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

When can ads intensify unhealthy cravings?Holistic thinkers are more likely to experience cravings for unhealthy food after seeing advertisements that show the product in the context of a situation.
2h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Florida's obesity rate may be higher than originally thought, new study findsFlorida's obesity rate may be higher than originally thought. A widely used national health survey puts the overall obesity rate in the state at 27.8 percent, but a new study based on an analysis of a robust clinical data repository shows a rate of 37.1 percent — nearly 10 percentage points higher.
2h
Popular Science

Apple and Pixar created a new file format for augmented reality on your phoneTechnology The new USDZ file format will make it easier than ever to look at AR objects in iOS. A simpler way to get a dancing hot dog on your phone.
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cognitive science

Distributed Cognition Is Why The Airline Industry Is Sticking To It's Old-School Flight Simulatorssubmitted by /u/scasner [link] [comments]
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Live Science

Hawaii Will Finally Force Companies to Say What Pesticides They’re SprayingA new law in Hawaii requires companies to disclose the mystery cocktail of pesticides they spray at secret sites.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Scientists discover how to control the 'excitation' of electronicsAn international team of scientists, including NUST MISIS's Professor Gotthard Seifert, have made an important step towards the control of excitonic effects in two-dimensional van der Waals heterostructures. In the future, this research will help to create electronics with more controlled properties. The research has been published in Nature Physics.
2h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

No difference in malignancy rates seen between tocilizumab and TNFi in patients with RAThe results of a study presented at the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR 2018) examined rates of malignancy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), excluding non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC), and found no difference between those newly treated with tocilizumab (TCZ) versus TNF inhibitors (TNFi).
2h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

American Academy of Ophthalmology reiterates long-standing guidance on LASIK educationThe American Academy of Ophthalmology, the world's leading professional association of eye physicians and surgeons, today reiterated its long-standing guidance for patients considering LASIK vision correction surgery.The possible complications from this elective procedure have long been known but have nevertheless garnered recent attention in the national media.
2h
The Atlantic

How Queer Is Queer Eye?It’s 2018—how is there a popular new TV show that portrays gay guys as sassy hairdressers, fashionistas, interior designers, platonic best friends, and underwear models who appear to mostly live off amuse-bouches ? A skeptic of “woke” culture might argue that the success of Netflix’s rebooted Queer Eye is a sign of latent hunger for the comfort of stereotypes. A sociologist might say we’re seeing
2h
Latest Headlines | Science News

Magnetic fields may be propping up the Pillars of CreationScientists made a map of the magnetic field within the Pillars of Creation, a star-forming area depicted in an iconic Hubble Space Telescope image.
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

To forecast winter rainfall in Los Angeles, look to New Zealand in the summerVariability in El Niño cycles was long considered a reliable tool for predicting winter precipitation in the Southwest United States, but its forecasting power has diminished in recent years.
3h
Scientific American Content: Global

Coral Reefs Keep Costly Waves at BayA new analysis found the flood protection benefits of coral reefs save the global economy $4 billion dollars a year. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Big Think

CDC: Sex and drug rates down among teens, suicidal thoughts upHealth hazards like depression, suicidal ideation, and sexual violence seem to be increasingly prevalent among U.S. teenagers, according to new CDC report. Read More
3h
NYT > Science

Major Study of Drinking Will Be Shut DownAn investigation at the National Institutes of Health concluded that the $100 million trial had been tainted by funding appeals to the alcohol industry.
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NYT > Science

Salmonella Outbreaks Affect Kellogg’s Honey Smacks Cereal and Cut MelonAs an outbreak that sickened dozens forced a recall of some cereal products this week, federal officials announced a separate outbreak linked to fruit has expanded to almost two dozen states.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Early, intensive treatment of RA offers long-term benefits, may normalise mortality ratesThe results of a 23-year, follow-up study presented today at the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR 2018) suggest early, intensive treatment of rheumatoid arthritis has long-term benefits including the normalization of mortality to levels consistent with the general population.
3h
Scientific American Content: Global

New European Rules May Give US Internet Users True Privacy Choices for the First TimeThe GDPR may offer a way forward that allows consumers to reclaim control of their information — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Atlantic

Why Can’t Democrats Give Trump Credit on North Korea?For congressional Democrats, it’s payback time. Ever since 2015, when Barack Obama struck a nuclear deal with Iran, prominent Republicans—including Donald Trump and his top foreign policy advisers—have accused Obama and his Democratic supporters of, in Mike Pompeo’s words, “ surrender .” They’ve accused Obama of signing a deal that doesn’t meaningfully restrain Iran’s nuclear ambitions and, by se
3h
Live Science

One of Psychology's Most Famous Experiments Was Deeply FlawedThe Stanford Prison Experiment — the infamous 1971 exercise in which regular college students placed in a mock prison suddenly transformed into aggressive guards and hysterical prisoners — was deeply flawed, a new investigation reveals.
3h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

NASA's record-breaking spacewoman retires as astronautNASA's record-breaking astronaut, Peggy Whitson, retired Friday less than a year after returning from her last and longest spaceflight.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Canakinumab shown to reduce rates of gout in atherosclerosis by more than halfThe results of a study presented today at the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR 2018) demonstrate that canakinumab significantly reduced the rate of gout by more than half compared to placebo, regardless of baseline serum urate level.
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Zoledronic acid has no effect on knee pain or bone marrow lesions in knee OA after two yearsThe results of a study presented today at the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR 2018) show that a one-yearly infusion of zoledronic acid (ZA) did not significantly reduce knee pain or bone marrow lesion (BML) size overall in knee osteoarthritis patients over two years. However, it may have symptomatic benefit in milder disease.
3h
Science | The Guardian

Stephen Hawking's ashes interred at Westminster AbbeyLuminaries from academia and science pay tribute to the late physicist’s incredible legacy “We remember Isaac Newton for answers,” said Prof Kip Thorne. “We remember Hawking for questions.” For 40 years, physicists have pondered the questions raised by Prof Stephen Hawking’s work, and perhaps his greatest legacy is not his remarkable discoveries, but the impact of his work on future theories of p
3h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Renault to stay in Iran despite US sanctions: CEOFrench carmaker Renault will maintain its presence in Iran while taking measures to avoid the risk of penalties for breaching renewed US sanctions, CEO Carlos Ghosn said Friday.
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Dagens Medicin

Otte ud af ti skiftede til biosimilær medicin uden problemer18 pct. af de gigtpatienter, der i 2016 blev skiftet fra original til biosimilær etanercept, stoppede efterfølgende med biosimilær behandling, viser dansk undersøgelse præsenteret på EULAR.
4h
Feed: All Latest

Huawei MediaPad M5 Review: 8.4-inch, 10.8-inch, and M5 ProAll three of Huawei's M5 Android tablets are worth your time, but which is best for you?
4h
Big Think

The chance to text with the dead via AI is creepy or wonderfulAn effort is underway in the AI community to develop posthumous avatars that can ease the pain of mourning. Not everyone thinks this is a good idea. Read More
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Latest Headlines | Science News

In 1968, scientists thought they were close to detecting gravity wavesDespite an unverified discovery in 1968, spacetime ripples remained elusive for nearly 50 years.
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Popular Science

Russia floats new nuclear power station—and new risksEnvironment As world-first platform makes its way east, international watchdogs raise concerns. The world’s first floating nuclear power station—a 21,500-metric-ton Russian vessel called the Akademik Lomonosov—is slowly making its way across the Arctic Ocean, on a…
4h
The Atlantic

Trump’s Remarkable Admission About DishonestyFor some reason, there remains a public debate about whether the president of the United States is honest or inclined toward autocracy. There’s a certain logic to this: Voters don’t want to believe they elected a chronic liar or a skeptic of democracy and rule of law, and the traditional conventions of press coverage prevent mainstream media from stating otherwise plainly. Yet on a regular basis,
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The Atlantic

Trump Always Wanted a Trade War—and Now He’s Got SeveralWhen President Donald Trump announced Friday that he would slap billions of dollars’ worth of tariffs on certain Chinese goods, he opened up another front in what’s becoming a global trade war—one whose main aggressor is the United States. And the variety of Trump’s targets, starting with U.S. allies whose trade policies resemble those of the United States, and continuing with China, which is alm
4h
The Atlantic

It’s Not About the RaccoonAs an inveterate raccoon junky, I ought to have been more excited about #MPRraccoon, the desperate, courageous youngster whose dramatic 25-story climb up a St. Paul, Minnesota, skyscraper transfixed the internet earlier this week. After all, one of my all-time favorite books is Rascal , Sterling North’s 1963 tale of his bandit-masked boyhood companion. I can riff about raccoons in indigenous myth
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Access to investigational medicines for terminally ill through expanded access programsA new study identified investigational medicines made available through expanded access programs for patients with life-threatening illnesses prior to approval from the US Food and Drug Administration to assess the timing and duration of investigational drug availability.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

What are rates of Legionnaires disease among VA patients?Rates of Legionnaires disease (LD) among US Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) patients with overnight stays at a VA facility decreased from 2014 to 2016, even though overall rates of LD among VA patients increased in the same period; 91 percent of the 491 LD cases in the VA surveillance system had no VA exposure or only outpatient VA exposure.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Diet quality among adults in SNAP food assistance programParticipants in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) showed less improvement over time in an indicator of a healthful diet than both income-eligible individuals who didn't participate in SNAP and higher-income individuals, although it is possible dietary trends among SNAP recipients may have been even worse if they didn't participate in the program.
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Quality of diet still poor for SNAP participantsA new Food-PRICE study finds persistent nutritional disparities within the food choices of those receiving assistance under the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) compared to those not receiving SNAP assistance.
5h
The Atlantic

How Trumpworld Is Spinning the FBI ReportIn a long-awaited report , the Justice Department’s inspector general concluded that the FBI’s handling of the Hillary Clinton email investigation was not influenced by political bias, and that any hostility certain officials may have felt toward then-candidate Donald Trump didn’t affect their handling of that probe. But for Trump and his allies, that may not matter: While the overarching report
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Future quantum technologies may exploit identical particle entanglementUsually when physicists perform quantum entanglement between particles—whether it be qubits, atoms, photons, electrons, etc.—the particles are distinguishable in some way. Only recently have physicists demonstrated the feasibility of generating entanglement between particles that are completely identical. Interestingly, this entanglement exists just because of the indistinguishability of the parti
5h
Scientific American Content: Global

Cities Look to "Virtual Power" to Reach Climate GoalsThe approach to buying renewable energy to offset electricity use was pioneered by major corporations — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Futurity.org

3 in 4 pediatricians now oppose spankingThree out of four pediatricians disapprove of spanking, research finds. The survey of pediatricians around the US finds that most think spanking seldom or never results in positive outcomes for kids. Catherine Taylor, an associate professor of Global Community Health and Behavioral Sciences at Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, surveyed sent a questionnaire to 1,500
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Land-based portion of massive East Antarctic ice sheet retreated little during past 8 million yearsLarge parts of the massive East Antarctic Ice Sheet did not retreat significantly during a time when atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations were similar to today's levels, according to a team of researchers funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF). The finding could have significant implications for global sea level rise.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New treatment lenebasum shows promise for diffuse cutaneous systemic sclerosis (dcSSc)The results of an open label extension of a phase II study presented today at the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR 2018) demonstrate that lenabasum continues to have acceptable safety and tolerability in diffuse cutaneous systemic sclerosis (dcSSc) with no severe or serious adverse events (AE).
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Opioid overdose responsible for over 500,000 years of life lost in OhioMore than 500,000 years of life expectancy were lost in Ohio during a seven-year period, according to a study conducted by The Ohio Alliance for Innovation in Population Health (OAIPH) — a collaborative initiative formed by Ohio University's College of Health Sciences and Professions and the University of Toledo's College of Health and Human Services.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Protein analysis may reveal new cancer treatment targetsResearchers have used lab technology called mass spectrometry to study the proteins expressed by human cancer cells.
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The Atlantic

The Long, Contentious History of the ‘Word Gap’ StudyBack in the 1990s, a team of researchers spent two and a half years visiting the homes of close to four dozen families with young children, starting when the kids were 7 months old. Equipped with tape recorders and notebooks, the researchers—led by two Kansas psychologists named Betty Hart and Todd Risley—spent an hour per week in each home, recording every word a child’s primary caregiver said t
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The US Should Pay Attention to Foreign Cambridge Analytica ProbesOpinion: The UK and Canada are uncovering the unsettling reach of Cambridge Analytica. So why aren't Americans interested?
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)

Four billion years of evolution in six minutes | Prosanta ChakrabartyDid humans evolve from monkeys or from fish? In this enlightening talk, ichthyologist and TED Fellow Prosanta Chakrabarty dispels some hardwired myths about evolution, encouraging us to remember that we're a small part of a complex, four-billion-year process — and not the end of the line. "We're not the goal of evolution," Chakrabarty says. "Think of us all as young leaves on this ancient and gig
5h
Dagens Medicin

Urinsyregigt øger risikoen for nogle kræftformerRisikoen for kræftformer som lever-, nyre- og bugspytkirtelkræft er forhøjet blandt patienter med urinsyregigt, viser stor dansk kohorteundersøgelse præsenteret på EULAR.
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Dagens Medicin

Fatigue fylder meget i psoriasispatienters livSundhedsprofessionelle skal blive bedre til at forholde sig til, at tilsyneladende velbehandlede psoriasisartrtitpatienter stadig døjer med store problemer med smerter og ekstrem træthed, siger seniorforsker Tanja Jørgensen, Parker Instituttet
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Non-coding DNA changes the genitals you're born withMale mice grow ovaries instead of testes if they are missing a small region of DNA that doesn't contain any genes — a finding that could help explain disorders of sex development in humans, at least half of which have an unknown genetic cause.
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The Atlantic

Maine Voters Overrule Their LeadersFor the past two years, Maine voters have been at war with their legislature and Governor Paul LePage over the way the state’s elections should be run. In 2016, Mainers approved the use of ranked-choice voting in a referendum, becoming the first state in the nation to adopt the so-called instant runoff method. The following year, however, the legislature voted to delay the new system for five yea
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The Atlantic

Radio Atlantic: Being Black in America Can Be Hazardous to Your HealthNationwide, black Americans live three years less than white Americans. In places with a history of segregation, that life-expectancy gap can be as much as twenty years. Staff writer Olga Khazan joins Matt Thompson, Alex Wagner, and Vann Newkirk to share the story of Kiarra Boulware, a young black woman from Baltimore whose struggles shed a light on how people living only a few miles apart have s
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The Atlantic

The Fight to Define Romans 13On Thursday, Attorney General Jeff Sessions defended the Trump administration’s policy of separating immigrant children from their families at the border by referencing the New Testament. “I would cite you to the Apostle Paul and his clear and wise command in Romans 13,” Sessions said, “to obey the laws of the government because God has ordained them for the purpose of order.” White House Press S
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Gene signatures and biomarkers predict onset of RA in at-risk individualsThe results of two studies presented today at the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR 2018) provide insight into molecular changes prior to the onset of arthritis which could inform future novel diagnostics and early therapeutic interventions.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

EU clears Comcast bid for Sky in takeover tussle with MurdochThe EU on Friday cleared US cable giant Comcast's bid for pan-European TV group Sky, paving the way for an epic multi-billion-dollar takeover tussle with Rupert Murdoch's 21st Century Fox.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Flying spiders sense meteorological conditions, use nanoscale fibers to float on the windSpiders take flight on the smallest of breezes by first sensing the wind, and then spinning out dozens of nanoscale fibers up to seven meters long, according to a new study.
6h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Foods combining fats and carbohydrates more rewarding than foods with just fats or carbsResearchers show that the reward center of the brain values foods high in both fat and carbohydrates — i.e., many processed foods — more than foods containing only fat or only carbs. A study of 206 adults supports the idea that these kinds of foods hijack our body's inborn signals governing food consumption.
6h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Microbe breaks 'universal' DNA rule by using two different translationsDNA is often referred to as the blueprint for life, however scientists have for the first time discovered a microbe that uses two different translations of the DNA code at random. This unexpected finding breaks what was thought to be a universal rule, since the proteins from this microbe cannot be fully predicted from the DNA sequence.
6h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Tripling the energy storage of lithium-ion batteriesScientists have synthesized a new cathode material from iron fluoride that surpasses the capacity limits of traditional lithium-ion batteries.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Dust clouds can explain puzzling features of active galactic nucleiMany large galaxies have a bright central region called an active galactic nucleus, powered by matter spiraling into a supermassive black hole. Gas clouds around the AGN emit light at characteristic wavelengths, but the complexity and variability of these emissions has been a longstanding puzzle. A new study explains these and other puzzling features of active galactic nuclei as the result of smal
6h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Distant moons may harbor lifeResearchers have identified more than 100 giant planets that potentially host moons capable of supporting life. Their work will guide the design of future telescopes that can detect these potential moons and look for tell-tale signs of life, called biosignatures, in their atmospheres.
6h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

What saved the West Antarctic Ice Sheet 10,000 years ago will not save it todayThe retreat of the West Antarctic ice masses after the last Ice Age was reversed surprisingly about 10,000 years ago, scientists found. The reason for the rebound is that, relieved from the weight of the retreating ice, the Earth crust lifted. This made the ice re-advance towards the ocean. Unfortunately, this mechanism is much to slow to prevent dangerous sea-level rise caused by West Antarctica'
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BBC News – Science & Environment

What a load of crocs!Wade Kelly's drone captured dozens of the reptiles on camera this week, sunbathing by the Daly River in Australia.
6h
Futurity.org

Not all Alzheimer’s damage is the sameResearchers have discovered that Alzheimer’s disease damages different types of brain cells depending on the genes involved. Alzheimer’s disease implicates multiple genes. Some are linked to early-onset Alzheimer’s, a condition that develops in one’s 30s, 40s, and 50s, while others are associated with the more common late-onset form of the disease. Eventually, all Alzheimer’s patients develop dem
6h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Frequency of joint replacements halved in rheumatoid arthritis patients between 1997-2010The results of two studies presented today at the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR 2018) investigate joint replacement procedures in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. The first study demonstrates that joint replacement procedures have significantly reduced in RA patients in the past decade and the second investigates the impact of biologic therapies on this change using the Britis
6h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

NSAIDs shown to have causal role in cardiovascular risk of patients with osteoarthritisThe results of a study presented today at the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR 2018) suggest that over two thirds of the increased cardiovascular risk associated with osteoarthritis is linked to the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).
6h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Germany wants EU-wide safety system for truck 'blind spots'Germany's transport minister wants trucks fitted with compulsory 'blind spot' safety systems to prevent pedestrians and cyclists from being killed by careless drivers.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Thailand to buy Airbus satellite as junta chief visits France: sourceThailand's junta chief will secure the purchase of a $215 million observation satellite from Airbus during his trip to France this month, a diplomatic source said Friday, as Europe re-engages with the kingdom following a chill in relations after a 2014 coup.
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Futurity.org

New dads could use a lot more parenting infoWhile a huge number of books and programs are available to help new moms before and after the birth of their child, the same can’t be said for fathers, according to a new study. Research suggests that men typically rely on women for parenting knowledge and thus could benefit from encouragement to participate directly in programs and health care visits, says Joyce Lee, the study’s lead author a do
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Futurity.org

Tiny frog trapped in amber is a crazy findAbout 99 million years ago in what’s now Myanmar, sap suddenly trapped a tiny juvenile frog with a beetle, perhaps its intended next meal. Unlucky for the frog, but lucky for science. An extinct species now named Electrorana limoae , it’s one of four fossils that provide the earliest direct evidence of frogs living in wet, tropical forests and are the oldest-known examples of frogs preserved in a
6h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Study finds less corruption in countries where more women are in governmentA greater representation of women in the government is bad news for corruption, according to a new study published in the Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization by researchers Chandan Jha of Le Moyne College and Sudipta Sarangi of Virginia Tech.
6h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

When the river runs highA massive world-wide study of dry riverbeds has found they're contributing more carbon emissions than previously thought, and this could help scientists better understand how to fight climate change.
6h
New Scientist – News

Mediterranean diet is still good for you but only if you’re richA landmark study that touted the benefits of the Mediterranean diet has been retracted, but eating more fresh fish and veg is still good for you, if you can afford it
6h
New on MIT Technology Review

A machine has figured out Rubik’s Cube all by itselfUnlike chess moves, changes to a Rubik’s Cube are hard to evaluate, which is why deep-learning machines haven’t been able to solve the puzzle on their own. Until now.
6h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Image: Mount Makalu, HimalayasMount Makalu in the Himalayas is pictured in this Copernicus Sentinel-2B image from 9 December 2017.
6h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Critical plant gene takes unexpected detour that could boost biofuel yieldsFor decades, biologists have believed a key enzyme in plants had one function—produce amino acids, which are vital to plant survival and also essential to human diets.
6h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Graphene makes its mark on gas separationGraphene Flagship researchers overcame the theoretical limiting performance of membranes in gas separation. This collaborative research from Graphene Flagship partners CNR, University of Bologna and Graphene-XT has potential applications in hydrogen purification and carbon capture and storage.
6h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Flatworms found to win most battles with harvestmenA trio of researchers with Universidade de São Paulo has documented evidence of flatworms and harvestmen engaging in battle in the forests of Brazil. In their paper published in the Journal of Zoology, M. S. Silva. R. H. Willemart and F. Carbayo describe what they observed in the wild and what they saw when they brought samples of the combatants into their lab.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

When emotional memories intrude, focusing on context could helpWhen negative memories intrude, focusing on the contextual details of the incident rather than the emotional fallout could help minimize cognitive disruption and redirect the brain's resources to the task at hand, suggests a new study.
6h
Ingeniøren

Efter forureningsrapport: Regionerne kan glæde sig til flere penge til jordrensningBåde Venstre, Socialdemokratiet og SF er klar til at afsætte flere penge til oprydning af forurenede grunde. Samtidig kalder SF ministeren i samråd for at presse på for hurtigt at få sat gang i oprydning.
6h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Better be safe than sorry: Economic optimization risks tipping of Earth system elements# While the concept of profit maximization can be successful in bringing down costs of greenhouse gas reductions…# … it does not suffice to avoid the tipping of critical elements in the Earth system.# Scientists used mathematical experiments to analyse three grand concepts of environmental policy.
6h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Scientists predict a new superhard material with unique propertiesAn international team of scientists have predicted a new superhard material that can be used in drilling, machine building and other fields. The new tungsten boride they discovered outperforms the widely used 'pobedit' ? a hard tungsten carbide and cobalt composite material with artificial diamond interspersing.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Blood biomarkers as a diagnostic tool for obstructive sleep apneaObstructive sleep apnea is a condition causing daytime tiredness which can significantly impact a patient's quality of life and increases the risk of cardiovascular disease and diabetes. It is a common, chronic disorder that affects thousands of patients, yet recent studies show that many sufferers remain undiagnosed.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Primates in perilPrimates are fascinating. They are intelligent, live in complex societies and are a vital part of the ecosystem. Lemurs, lorises, galagos, tarsiers, monkeys and apes are our closest biological relatives and just like them, humans are also primates. However, while the human population spread to all corners of the earth, many of our closest relatives are under serious threat.
6h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

How to calculate the carbon emissions from your daily commuteThe problem with carbon emissions is that they're invisible. Unlike other pollutants, greenhouse gases don't dirty the sidewalk or stink up the air. This makes them easy to forget about and hard to measure in our everyday lives. That's one of the reasons Romany Webb helped to create Map My Emissions, a website that calculates the impact of different forms of transportation.
6h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Researchers describe abundant marine life at the 'White Shark Café'In May 2018, an interdisciplinary group of researchers from Stanford University's Hopkins Marine Station, the Monterey Bay Aquarium, MBARI, the Schmidt Ocean Institute (SOI), and other organizations conducted a month-long research cruise to the "White Shark Café." Half way between California and Hawaii, this remote part of the Pacific Ocean is a gathering area for white sharks, and the researchers
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Research charts the way to more reliable carbon-based microelectronicsCarbon nanotubes – cylindrical formations of carbon atoms with incredible strength and electrical conductivity – hold great promise for creating new micron-scale low-power electronic devices.
6h
Popular Science

How to create a perfectly imperfect lawnDIY Make your yard beautiful—and environmentally-friendly, too. Let’s be real, no one actually likes mowing their lawn. We dig these alternative methods for making your yard both stunning and environmentally-friendly.
6h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Novel method for investigating pore geometry in rocksIn a fusion of mathematics and earth science, researchers in Japan proposed a novel method for characterizing pore geometry in rock, based on persistence diagram analysis and a newly proposed parameter, the distance parameter H. The method represents heterogeneity and differences in rock type more effectively than the conventional method based on velocity distribution, without requiring costly num
6h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Screening for aortic aneurysms in older men questionedScreening programs for aortic aneurysms in the abdomen is now being questioned in a study published in The Lancet. As the condition becomes less common, general ultrasound scans for 65-year-old men may do more harm than good, the researchers assert.
6h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

What's the minimum number of people you should send in a generational ship to Proxima Centauri?Humanity has long dreamed about sending humans to other planets, even before crewed spaceflight became a reality. And with the discovery of thousands exoplanets in recent decades, particularly those that orbit within neighboring star systems (like Proxima b), that dream seems closer than ever to becoming a reality. But of course, a lot of technical challenges need to be overcome before we can hope
7h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

New form of matter may lie just beyond the periodic tableCurrently, the heaviest element on the periodic table is oganesson, which has an atomic mass of 294 and was officially named in 2016. Like every element on the periodic table, nearly all of oganesson's mass comes from protons and neutrons (types of baryons) that are themselves made of three quarks each. A crucial feature of all known baryonic matter is that its quarks are bound together so tightly
7h
Scientific American Content: Global

Living with Neighborhood Violence May Shape Teens' BrainsResearchers say they have linked such exposures with downstream effects — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Ingeniøren

Bål til Sankthans forbydes i KøbenhavnGrundet den lange periode uden regn, er det blevet så tørt, at Hovedstadens Beredskab har nedlagt totalt afbrændingsforbud i hele København. Dermed er årets Sankthansbål aflyst.
7h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

To share or not to share?When are primary school children willing to share valuable resources with others and when are they not? A team of researchers from the University of Vienna lead by cognitive biologist Lisa Horn investigated this question in a controlled behavioural experiment. The motivation to share seems to be influenced by group dynamical and physiological factors, whereas friendship between the children seems
7h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Critical plant gene takes unexpected detour that could boost biofuel yieldsFor decades, biologists have believed a key enzyme in plants had one function — produce amino acids, which are vital to plant survival and also essential to human diets.But for Wellington Muchero, Meng Xie and their colleagues, this enzyme does more than advertised. They had run a series of experiments on poplar plants that consistently revealed mutations in a structure of the life-sustaining enz
7h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Camouflaged nanoparticles used to deliver killer protein to cancerA biomimetic nanosystem can deliver therapeutic proteins to selectively target cancerous tumors, according to a team of Penn State researchers.
7h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

When the river runs highA massive world-wide study of dry riverbeds has found they're contributing more carbon emissions than previously thought, and this could help scientists better understand how to fight climate change.
7h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

UM study confirms that bromeliads contribute to mosquito breeding in MiamiWith vector-borne diseases posing an increasing public health threat to communities in South Florida and elsewhere, a new study led by public health researchers at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine has revealed that ornamental bromeliad plants contribute to breeding of the Aedes aegypti mosquito–a key culprit for the Zika outbreak that hit Miami-Dade County and other areas of Flor
7h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Nearly 70 percent of undocumented Mexican immigrants report discriminationA new study from Rice University found that 69 percent of undocumented Mexicans living in high-risk neighborhoods near the California-Mexico border reported interpersonal discrimination due to being undocumented.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

To avoid humans, more wildlife now work the night shiftFor their first 100 million years on planet Earth, our mammal ancestors relied on the cover of darkness to escape their dinosaur predators and competitors. Only after the meteor-induced mass extinction of dinosaurs 66 million years ago could these nocturnal mammals explore the many wondrous opportunities available in the light of day.
7h
Dagens Medicin

Screening reducerer gigtpatienters risikofaktorer for hjerte-kar-sygdomEn halv times screeningssamtale om risikofaktorer for hjerte-kar-sygdom har positiv effekt på livsstil og helbred blandt de screenede gigtpatienter. Det viser en undersøgelse fra Gigthospitalet i Gråsten, som professor Jette Primdahl har præsenteret på EULAR.
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Dagens Medicin

Søvnproblemer er markør for udvikling af kroniske smerterTo nye studier giver indsigt i søvnens rolle og samspil med kroniske smerter.
7h
Dagens Medicin

Biologisk behandling gavner mænd mere end kvinderMandlige patienter med psoriasisartrithar markant højere udbytte af biologisk behandling. Forskere har ingen entydige forklaringer på, hvorfor kvinder har markant ringere respons på biologisk behandling.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

From metabolism to function—the extreme structural adaptations of photoreceptorsOne of the most puzzling aspects of cancer is how cells inevitably manage to reactivate precisely those few genes that can turn them into tumors. One example, discussed at length here yesterday, is the restoration of telomerase or alternative telmore repair enzymes that enable indefinite chromsome replication. Another example is the emergency drafting of backup hexokinases to kick off supplementar
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Researchers use metagenomics to discover thousands of new marine microorganismsWhile many students spend their spring break on a cruise ship, Elaina Graham chose a different kind of get-away. There was no swimming pool. No steel drum band. No all-you-can-eat buffet. Instead, her month-long voyage across the Atlantic was riddled with bacteria.
7h
New Scientist – News

Bacteria may survive temperatures hot enough to melt leadFew living things can cope with temperatures above 100°C, but a controversial study suggests some bacterial spores can withstand 420°C heat for over 30 minutes
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Science | The Guardian

Did dinosaurs get dandruff?Palaeontologists studying the evolution of dinosaurs’ skin and feathers think they did As a regular reader of this blog, you are well aware that dinosaurs had feathers (unless you are a certain film franchise). Dinosaurs were covered in patches of fuzz, proto-floof, shook their tail feathers, and in some cases displayed full-fledged plumage. Over the last decade, exceptionally preserved fossils a
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Exploring planetary plasma environments from your laptopA new database of plasma simulations, combined with observational data and powerful visualisation tools, is providing planetary scientists with an unprecedented way to explore some of the Solar System's most interesting plasma environments.
7h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Pancreatic cancer patients with BRCA mutation may benefit from targeted drugRachna Shroff, M.D., led a landmark study on the use of targeted drugs called PARP inhibitors in pancreatic cancer patients with BRCA mutations.
7h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Study finds less corruption in countries where more women are in governmentThe new research is the most comprehensive study on this topic and looks at the implications of the presence of women in other occupations as including the shares of women in the labor force, clerical positions, and decision making positions such as the CEOs and other managerial positions.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Warming oceans will affect sharks' brainsRising ocean temperatures due to climate change will not only be felt by smaller organisms like coral, but will also impact apex predators, according to new research.
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube

Family Bonding: Teutul Style | American ChopperIt was the best of times (golf with Bill Murray!)… it was the worst of times (a Daytona Bike Week washout). Relive some of the Teutuls' best examples of family bonding — the good, the bad and the ugly. #AmericanChopper – All New, Monday @10/9c Watch live and catch up on DiscoveryGO: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/american-chopper/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Jo
7h
Scientific American Content: Global

Dear DadA message of gratitude for Father's Day — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
7h
Ingeniøren

Rektor på IT-Universitetet: Slut med at tære på vores egenkapital – ellers lukker viTaxameterpengene dækker ikke de mange ekstra studerende, som ITU af egen drift har optaget som følge af de mange ansøgninger.
7h
Futurity.org

Playing with blocks gives kids 2 boosts before kindergartenSemi-structured block play among preschool-age children has the potential to improve two skills critical to kindergarten readiness, according a new study: math and executive functioning. “As an early childhood expert, I feel like I’m constantly being asked by parents and teachers, ‘What can I do with my child to support their school readiness skills?'” says Sara Schmitt, an assistant professor in
7h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Assessing what state in­sti­tu­tions can do to com­bat cy­ber­at­tacksWhen a cyberattack has been orchestrated by a state actor, people may be tempted to call it "war". After all, it's an attack waged on national infrastructures by a foreign power. But the term "cyber war" has been used so often for dramatic effect that I don't just want to warn against hype. It's also time to dampen expectations regarding the scope of governmental intervention.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Orange, tea tree and eucalyptus oils sweeten diesel fumesWaste oil from orange, tea tree and eucalyptus essential oil production mixed with diesel provides a sweet-smelling biofuel blend with comparable performance to diesel-only fuel.
7h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Fake Facebook account reveals how we fall for fake newsA fictitious Facebook account set up by a team of researchers at the University of Nottingham to mirror the sort of news feed users might encounter on their own Facebook pages has highlighted the difficulties in combating the spread of fake news, because of the way we assess news when it is presented via social media.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

A deep space communications hub in the desertWhen NASA engineers were looking for a place to build a network of large radio antennas in the 1950s, they knew they needed somewhere quiet. They were going to build a series of antennas with huge parabolic dishes and receivers that could detect extremely faint radio signals.
7h
Dagens Medicin

Leddegigt forbundet med øget risiko for hjerte-kar-sygdomSøskende til leddegigtpatienter har øget risiko for akut koronarsyndrom, og nyt studie tyder på en mulig genetisk sammenhæng mellem de to sygdomme
7h
Dagens Medicin

Gigtpatienter oplever ofte depression og angstTilfælde af depression og angst hænger sammen med sygdommens aktivitet ved tidlig leddegigt, viser ny forskning.
7h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Fat and carb combo creates stronger food cravingWhen fat and carbohydrates are combined in a single food they are more rewarding, calorie for calorie, than foods with either energy source alone, a Yale-led study published June 14 in the journal Cell Metabolism shows.
7h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

New algorithm can discover materials with unusual characteristics—including invisibilityMetamaterials are artificially engineered materials. Scientists create them by combining multiple elements from composite materials such as a metal and an electrical insulator. The result is an entirely new material with properties not found in nature. Engineers can then use these materials to create new devices or improve existing ones.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Researchers study lanternfly's potential to harm grapevinesThe spotted lanternfly is starting to sour the grape and wine industries in southeastern Pennsylvania, and research underway in Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences aims to spoil the invasive pest's party.
7h
Dana Foundation

Alzheimer’s and Brain Awareness MonthPhoto: Shutterstock Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a condition that many are familiar with because of its overwhelming impact and prevalence in the world. In the US, it is the sixth leading cause of death, with women making up almost two-thirds of those with the disease. While it is just one of many types of dementia, Alzheimer’s accounts for up to 80 percent of cases. In addition to Aphasia Awarene
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Camouflaged nanoparticles used to deliver killer protein to cancerA biomimetic nanosystem can deliver therapeutic proteins to selectively target cancerous tumors, according to a team of Penn State researchers.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Scientists refine 'Profile' of a fungal tree killerA team of Agricultural Research Service (ARS) and university scientists has identified two new species of fungi as the puzzling killer of hundreds of thousands of Hawaii's beloved 'ōhi'a trees.
8h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

A way to use underwater fiber-optic cables as seismic sensorsA team of researchers from the U.K., Italy and Malta has found a way to use fiber-optic cables already on the ocean floor as seismic detectors. In their paper published in the journal Science, the team describes how they made their discovery and how it would work.
8h
Ingeniøren

VIDEO: Her er de særlige, danske køreledningerDet viste sig meget besværligt at få adgang til sporene, så Ingeniøren stillede sig ud på jernbanebroer for at vise forskellen på de eksisterende køreledninger og den nye og stort set uprøvede teknik, som skal levere strømmen til togene på 1300 km dansk jernbane.
8h
BBC News – Science & Environment

Work starts to upgrade Large Hadron ColliderImprovements to the world's biggest particle smasher are designed to uncover new physics.
8h
Futurity.org

To get motivated, reward yourself now rather than laterImmediate rewards may boost motivation more than waiting to reward yourself until the end of a task, according to new research. In a new study, Kaitlin Woolley, assistant professor of marketing at Cornell University, found that giving people an immediate bonus for working on a task, rather than waiting until the end of the task to reward them, increased their interest and enjoyment in the task. P
8h
cognitive science

Computer program looks five minutes into the futuresubmitted by /u/trot-trot [link] [comments]
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Fish suffer stage fright?Archerfish, famed for their ability to hunt prey by shooting them down with jets of water, seem to suffer social inhibition, according to new research led by the University of St Andrews.
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Popular Science

Five things you might not know about the plague (not including the fact that it still exists)Health Because yes, you can still catch the Black Death. The plague—yes, that plague—is alive and well in the modern world. If this comes as a shock, well, you've come to the right place.
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Dagens Medicin

Fedme øger risiko for slidgigtHøjt BMI er forbundet med øget risikoen for slidgigt hos både børn og voksne.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Biological light sensor filmed in actionUsing X-ray laser technology, a team led by researchers of the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI has recorded one of the fastest processes in biology. In doing so, they produced a molecular movie that reveals how the light sensor retinal is activated in a protein molecule. Such reactions occur in numerous organisms that use the information or energy content of light – they enable certain bacteria to pro
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

eDNA analysis—a key to uncovering rare marine speciesThe days of searching the oceans around the world to find and study rare and endangered marine animals are not over. However, an emerging tool that can be used with just a sample of seawater may help scientists learn more about rare marine life than ever before. According to Ellen Pikitch, Ph.D., of Stony Brook University's School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences (SoMAS), this 21st Century tool
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

New technique that shows how a protein 'light switch' works may enhance biological researchSunlight is essential for all life, and living organisms have evolved to sense and respond to light. Dronpa is a protein "light switch" that can be turned on and off by light. A team of scientists led by Peter Tonge, a Professor in the Department of Chemistry at Stony Brook University, has discovered a way to use infrared spectroscopy to determine for the first time structure changes that occur in
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

A new experiment to understand dark matterIs dark matter a source of a yet unknown force in addition to gravity? The mysterious dark matter is little understood and trying to understand its properties is an important challenge in modern physics and astrophysics. Researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy in Bonn, Germany, have proposed a new experiment that makes use of super-dense stars to learn more about the interactio
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New Scientist – News

Being a feminist may subconsciously protect you from stereotypesNegative stereotypes can detrimentally change your behaviour. But a study suggests that feminists may be protected from the idea that women are worse at maths
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Researchers unlock how seaweed is digestedCattle on the Prairies are hundreds of kilometres from the coast and yet it's possible that seaweed could make its way into their diet as an additive.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Secrets of extinct cow with face like a bulldog revealedAn international team of scientists have used the latest genetic and anatomical techniques to study the remains of a cow with a short face like a bulldog that fascinated Charles Darwin when he first saw it in Argentina 180 years ago.
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Feed: All Latest

The Physics of the One Goal You *Won't* See at the 2018 FIFA World CupA soccer player rarely scores directly off a corner kick. It's called an Olympic goal, and when it does happen, it's usually an accident. Here's why.
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Feed: All Latest

E3 2018's Most Surprising Trends, From Calendar Shifts to the Rise of MMO-LitesThe giant videogame show is wrapping up, which means it's prediction time. Here's what we noticed.
8h
The Atlantic

The Terrible Stereotypes of Mother’s and Father’s Day CardsIn the lead-up to Mother’s and Father’s Day, the greeting-card aisle presents doors to two alternate universes. One is a wonderland of blooming flora and boats bobbing on tranquil lakes, where grateful baby animals snuggle their protective parents and everyone speaks in heartfelt but generic verse. The other is a cartoon dystopia where crudely drawn characters live out a stereotypical parenting f
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The Atlantic

Chasing the ‘Holy Grail’ of Baseball PerformanceI n the final regular-season game for the 1977 Los Angeles Dodgers, Dusty Baker hit a home run, giving him 30 for the season and making him the fourth Dodger to reach that milestone that year, a Major League Baseball record. As Baker rounded third, a rookie who had recently entered the game, Glenn Burke, approached the plate from the on-deck circle and, seized by joy, raised his hand high above h
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Why the tongue of the Pine Island Glacier suddenly shrankThe Pine Island Glacier in Western Antarctica is not only one of the fastest-flowing ice streams in the Southern Hemisphere; over the past 11 years, four major icebergs have calved from its floating tongue. In February 2017, researchers on board the German research icebreaker Polarstern successfully mapped an area of seafloor previously covered by shelf ice. A comparison of these new maps with sat
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Viden

Simon: Magiske svampe i bittesmå doser giver overskudKreativ, angstfri, problemløser. Sådan lyder oplevelserne efter indtagelse af små mængder psykedeliske stoffer. Nu skal danskledet forskning undersøge fænomenet.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Researchers develop molecular assembly method for cancer therapy and diagnosticsBiophysicists have developed a method for modifying the surface of micro- and nanoparticles—tiny structures measuring between a thousandth and a millionth of a millimeter —by covering them with biological molecules. Engineered in this way, the particles can serve as both therapeutic and diagnostic agents, delivering drugs to cancer cells.
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Nyheder – Forskning – Videnskab

Gymnasieformand og digital entreprenør i KU’s bestyrelseEt enigt udpegningsorgan har (på baggrund af Københavns Universitets indstillingsorgans…
8h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Football through the eyes of a computerFootball on TV: A pass to the left, a gap in the defence, an open striker at the edge of the penalty area. Suddenly, the picture freezes. Lines and diagrams appear between the players. An arrow indicates the trajectory of a safe pass to the open striker, others highlight possible goal-scoring trajectories. Such graphic analyses have become indispensable for professional football broadcasters. They
8h
Dagens Medicin

Beboers sikkerhed på socialpsykiatriske steder skal styrkesOmbudsmanden konkluderer efter 13 tilsynsbesøg på socialpsykiatriske steder, at beboernes sikkerhed skal forbedres. Det samme gælder samarbejdet ved sektorovergange.
8h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Is the energy-storing solar cell soon to be reality?Storing solar energy is the central challenge facing energy researchers. Alongside traditional solutions such as solar cells or batteries, creative chemical concepts for storing energy are paving the way for entirely new opportunities. Intramolecular reactions are making it possible to transform solar energy and store it in a singular molecule. This may form the basis for constructing energy-stori
8h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Proteins as a 'shuttle service' for targeted administration of medicationPrecise targeting of medicine is no longer a vision of the future. Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) has successfully developed proteins that function like a shuttle and release medication directly at the site where it is needed. The study could serve as a model and could enable targeted and tissue-specific administration of medication in future.
8h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Minimalist biostructures designed to create nanomaterialsResearchers of the Institute of Biotechnology and Biomedicine (IBB-UAB) have generated four peptides, molecules smaller than proteins, capable of self-assembling in a controlled manner to form nanomaterials. The research, published in the journal ACS Nano, was conducted by Salvador Ventura, Marta Díaz Caballero and Susanna Navarro (IBB-UAB), and included the collaboration of Isabel Fuentes and Fra
8h
The Atlantic

Extinguishing the Beacon of AmericaIn early May, I travelled to McAllen, Texas, to speak with U.S. Border Patrol about the current immigration crisis . It was a humid, overcast morning and Chris Cabrera, the agency’s spokesperson, stood on the banks of the Rio Grande as he explained the challenges posed by the current wave of illegal migrants, most of whom are refugees fleeing deadly violence and institutional failure in Central A
8h
The Atlantic

A World Cup Without Eduardo Galeano, Soccer’s Poet LaureateThe story goes that every four years, the great Uruguayan writer Eduardo Galeano hung a sign on his door that said “Closed for Soccer,” and didn’t emerge for a month—a month he spent watching the World Cup in his favorite chair and writing about it. Galeano, often called the poet laureate of football, wrote Soccer in Sun and Shadow as both a fanboy and a social critic of the game. Published in 19
8h
Dagens Medicin

Flere danskere overlever kræftNye tal viser, at stadig flere danskere lever både et og fem år efter, kræftdiagnosen er stillet. Der er særligt fremgang hos patienter med lunge-, tyk- og endetarmskræft.
9h
New Scientist – News

Underwater robot finds second world war bomber plane on seabedA Fairey Swordfish, a type of second world war bomber, was found off the coast of Malta using autonomous underwater robots that search the sea floor
9h
Science | The Guardian

Satellite constellations and space junk: Chips with Everything podcastJordan Erica Webber looks at what is currently happening in the world of space technology, including the burgeoning issue of space pollution Subscribe and review: Acast , Apple , Spotify , Soundcloud , Audioboom , Mixcloud . Join the discussion on Facebook , Twitter or email us at chipspodcast@theguardian.com. Neil Armstrong was the first person to set foot on the moon, but, of course, this was n
9h
Science | The Guardian

Epileptic boy 'in life-threatening state' after cannabis oil seizedMother of Billy Caldwell says he has been admitted to hospital due to seizures, after customs agents took his medicine Billy Caldwell, the 12-year-old boy who had his anti-epileptic medicine confiscated by the Home Office this week, has been admitted to hospital, with his mother saying his condition is life-threatening. “Billy has had back-to-back seizures today,” Charlotte Caldwell, said on Frid
9h
Feed: All Latest

Puerto Rico's Observatory Is Still Recovering From Hurricane MariaArecibo Observatory's 1,000-foot telescope was damaged in last year's storm, and the recovery money is only just beginning to flow in.
9h
Feed: All Latest

Four Reasons We Don’t Have Flying Cars—YetThe technological hurdles facing the development of aircraft for urban mobility systems like UberAIR are massive, but not insurmountable.
9h
Latest Headlines | Science News

Leaf-cutter ants pick up the pace when they sense rainLeaf-cutter ants struggle to carry wet leaves, so they run to avoid rain.
9h
The Atlantic

The Humans of The New York TimesIn 2004, in its inaugural State of the News Media report , the Project for Excellence in Journalism, the collective now known as the Pew Research Center’s Journalism Project, put its finger on one of the paradoxes of contemporary American journalism: “Journalists believe they are working in the public interest and are trying to be fair and independent in that cause,” the report noted. “This is th
9h
Scientific American Content: Global

The Standard Model (of Physics) at 50It has successfully predicted many particles, including the Higgs Boson, and has led to 55 Nobels so far, but there’s plenty it still can’t account for — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
9h
Science-Based Medicine

Anti-Vaccine Hotspots are Getting HotterMore parents are seeking to avoid childhood vaccinations in states that allow nonmedical exemptions. These "hotspots" of decreasing vaccination rates, some of which include large urban cities, are likely locations for future outbreaks of preventable disease.
9h
New on MIT Technology Review

This company tames killer robotsArtificial intelligence can turn the most dangerous industrial robots into helpful coworkers, and that could transform manufacturing.
9h
Viden

Stephen Hawking mindes: Hans stemme sendes ud i rummet med beskeden om “fred og håb”Den verdenskendte astrofysikers urne bliver nedsat mellem Newton og Darwin.
9h
Ingeniøren

Politi: Firmaet bag kikset silosprængning i Vordingborg slipper for sigtelserSprængningsfirmaet, der skulle nedlægge en silo i Vordingborg, fulgte alle anvisninger, viser rapport udarbejdet for politiet. Derfor rejser politiet ingen sag.
9h
Dagens Medicin

Genomcenter har ansat vicedirektørNationalt Genom Center har ansat Peter Løngreen som vicedirektør, der skal have ansvaret for centrets IT-infrastruktur.
9h
Scientific American Content: Global

That Vision Thing: New AI System Can Imagine What It Hasn't SeenScientists have developed machine-learning that can teach itself to visualize a three-dimensional scene from unobserved angles — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
9h
Science | The Guardian

£720m Large Hadron Collider upgrade 'could upend particle physics'Collider will be far more sensitive to anomalies that could lead to entirely new theories of the universe A massive project to supercharge the world’s largest particle collider launched on Friday in the hope that the beefed-up machine will reveal fresh insights into the nature of the universe. The 950m Swiss franc (£720m) mission will see heavy equipment, new buildings, access shafts and service
9h
Live Science

Your Gut Remembers Where You Had a Good MealWhen the gut can't talk to the brain, it might reduce your ability to find places
9h
Live Science

A Major Mediterranean Diet Study Was Retracted. But Do Docs Still Recommend It?A landmark study on the benefits of the Mediterranean diet for heart health had serious problems with its methods, the study's authors announced this week.
9h
Live Science

This Tick's Worst Day Ever Frozen in Time for 100 Million YearsAn ancient tick's worst day ever was preserved for eternity.
10h
Ingeniøren

Podcast: Derfor falder de helt nye køreledninger nedAtter en gang skal de danske togpassagerer være prøveklud – nu for en ny type køreledninger, der desværre har det med at falde ned. For første gang under en VM-slutrunde kommer dataanalytikere i år til at sende data direkte ned til trænerne på bænken.
10h
Ingeniøren

Danmarks nye køreledninger er kun testet på fire kilometer i UngarnSiemens kommer til Danmark med et næsten uafprøvet koncept til kørestrøm. Banedanmark ser ingen problemer, men kritikere påpeger, at master er et mærkeligt sted at spare.
10h
Ingeniøren

Banedanmark afviser at have gjort Danmark til forsøgslandVi har købt et godkendt system til en skarp pris, siger projektdirektøren om nye køreledninger.
10h
New Scientist – News

AI can detect early signs of Parkinson’s from brain scans aloneAn AI could identify signs of Parkinson’s from brain scans alone. One day it could be used to spot the disease before physical symptoms show
10h
Feed: All Latest

The 19th-Century Crank Who Tried to Tell Us About the MicrobiomeToday’s understanding of the importance of microbes to health was anticipated by a rival to Louis Pasteur.
10h
BBC News – Science & Environment

Ten ways to cut down on plastics at homeAuthor and activist Will McCallum gives us his top tips for eliminating plastics from our everyday lives.
10h
The Atlantic

The Disastrous Legal Implications of the Trump Foundation’s ActivitiesThe law governing the activity of charitable organizations can be complex, but on the question of whether 501(c)(3) charities can engage in political activity, it could not be more straightforward. They cannot. The IRS enforces an “absolute” prohibition on any intervention in political campaigns. Whether such an intervention has occurred depends on the facts and circumstances, and sometimes there
10h
BBC News – Science & Environment

Stars turn out for Stephen Hawking memorial at Westminster AbbeyAll corners of society attend a London service to pay tribute to the great Cambridge physicist.
10h
Science | The Guardian

Stephen Hawking's voice to be beamed into space at final sendoffMessage of peace will be broadcast into nearest black hole as physicist is laid to rest The voice of Stephen Hawking will be beamed into space in a message of peace and hope, his daughter said, as the British physicist is laid to rest on Friday during a service at Westminster Abbey. The scientist died in March, aged 76 , after a lifetime spent investigating the origins of the universe, the myster
10h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Quantum transfer at the push of a buttonIn new quantum information technologies, fragile quantum states have to be transferred between distant quantum bits. Researchers at ETH have now realized such a quantum transmission between two solid-state qubits at the push of a button.
11h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

CERN starts major upgrade to reap more data at atom smasherThe world's largest particle smasher is kicking off a major upgrade to churn out 10 times more data and help unlock the secrets of physics.
11h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Japan passes anti-plastic law but with no sanctions for pollutersA bill intended to reduce the volume of microplastics dumped into the ocean was approved by Japan's parliament on Friday, but it included no sanctions for failure to comply.
11h
Ingeniøren

Justitsminister kræver ekstern undersøgelse af politiets og PET's databaserPolitiets, PET’s og anklagemyndighedens it-systemer og databaser skal undersøges i ekstern undersøgelse.
11h
Ingeniøren

Måleklemmer og kunstig intelligens sparer energi i bygningenSæt klemmer uden på vandrør og elkabler uden indgriben, send data i skyen og få et bud på, hvor der kan spares. Sådan lyder planen fra et ungt, dansk firma.
11h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

The chances of detecting clumps in atomic nuclei are growingWhat do atomic nuclei really look like? Are the protons and neutrons they contain distributed chaotically? Or do they perhaps bind into alpha clusters, that is, clumps made up of two protons and two neutrons? In the case of several light nuclei, experimental confirmation of the individualism or family nature of nucleons will now be simpler, thanks to predictions presented by Polish physicists from
11h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Why don't most people become radicalised?To understand what leads people into violent extremism, scientists are turning the question on its head and asking why it is that most young people don't become radicalised.
11h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Brain matures faster due to childhood stressStress in early childhood leads to faster maturation of certain brain regions during adolescence. In contrast, stress experienced later in life leads to slower maturation of the adolescent brain. This is the outcome of a long-term study conducted by researchers of Radboud University in which 37 subjects have been monitored for almost 20 years. The findings will be published in Scientific Reports o
11h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

ICU telemedicine reduces interhospital ICU transfers of critically ill patientsA new study in the journal CHEST® examined transfers of ICU patients to acute care centers before and after the VA implemented its Tele-ICU program. Investigators found that hospitals using Tele-ICU support experienced a greater reduction in transfers of ICU patients to other facilities than hospitals that did not use the services. Additionally, mortality did not change when more patients were tre
11h
BBC News – Science & Environment

Kilauea volcano: Molten lava meets the seaThe Kilauea volcano has been pouring lava into the ocean off Hawaii, causing a hydrochloric acid mist.
11h
Science : NPR

As Nuclear Struggles, A New Generation Of Engineers Is Motivated By Climate ChangeThe number of people graduating with nuclear engineering degrees has more than tripled since 2001. Many say they are motivated by climate change. (Image credit: Jeff Brady/NPR)
11h
Ingeniøren

Regioner i ny kortlægning: Drikkevandet er truetEn ny rapport udpeger cirka 13.000 grunde i Danmark som steder, hvor grundvandet kan være truet af forurening. Og på 160 grunde er der behov for straks at gøre noget.
12h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Integrated lead discovery: An evolving toolboxA new SLAS Discovery review article by GlaxoSmithKline researchers in the US and UK offers an informative guide to the established and emerging tools available for early drug discovery and screening, and provides illustrative scenarios demonstrating considerations that drive decisions on choice of lead discovery tactics.
12h
NYT > Science

Mammals Go Nocturnal in Bid to Avoid HumansA study compiling research on species across the globe says mammals are changing their behavior in response to human disturbance.
12h
Ingeniøren

Forsvarets Efterretningstjeneste fortsætter ulovlig søgning på personerI Tilsynet med Efterretningstjenesternes årsrapport for 2017 fremgår det, at 20 procent af de undersøgte søgninger i rådata var ulovlige. Ifølge Forsvarets Efterretningstjenestes egen undersøgelse er andelen 6,8 procent.
12h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Rescued seahorse released into the wild in FloridaSwim free, Frito the tiny seahorse.
12h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Fitbit employees charged with having stolen trade secretsFitbit Jawbone EmployeesU.S. prosecutors have charged one current and five former employees of San Francisco-based Fitbit, Inc. with possessing trade secrets stolen from rival company Jawbone.
13h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

'Fortnite' frenzy reigns at E3 gaming expoThe Electronic Entertainment Expo (E3) wrapped up in Los Angeles on Thursday with the video game "Fortnite" knocking out other contenders to emerge as the star of a show which highlighted the surging interest in competitive eSports.
13h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Mexico jaguar population grows 20% in eight yearsMexico's population of wild jaguars has grown 20 percent in the past eight years, according to a study released Thursday, a bit of good news for an iconic species whose numbers have been declining.
13h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Snapchat aims to spread reach to other appsSnapchat messaging service on Thursday set out to spread its reach, and panache, to other smartphone apps with a software kit that promised to share little data about users.
13h
Ingeniøren

Forsker beregner dansk guldchance: 1,13 pctEn teknik, der normalt bruges inden for hydrologi forudsiger Danmarks chancer ved VM-slutrunden i Rusland. Lidet overraskende, er det tyskerne, der har de største vinderchancer.
13h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Hawking's voice to be beamed into space during memorialA message from late British astrophysics giant Stephen Hawking will be beamed towards the nearest black hole as his remains are laid to rest in London's Westminster Abbey on Friday.
13h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Children in India exhibit religious tolerance, study findsA new investigation of how children reason about religious rules reveals a remarkable level of acceptance of different religions' rules and practices.
13h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Chicago airport plan is one of many Musk dream projectsA newly announced project by billionaire innovator Elon Musk for a tunnel transit system that would carry travelers to and from Chicago O'Hare International Airport at up to 150 mph (241 kph) is just another project on a growing list of Musk dream projects.
13h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Strategic strikes by mantis shrimp smash shells selectivelyFor a tiny crustacean, Caribbean rock mantis shrimp (Neogonodactylus bredini) pack a ferocious punch. Bludgeoning the shells of snails and other crustaceans to gain access to the tasty snail within, mantis shrimp flick their cudgel-like claws at accelerations approaching those of a bullet exiting a gun. Yet, Rachel Crane from Stanford University, USA, explains that the ballistic shrimp is the odd
13h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Researchers can count on improved proteomics methodEvery cell in the body contains thousands of different protein molecules and they can change this composition whenever they are induced to perform a particular task or convert into a different cell type. Understanding how cells function depends on proteomics, the ability to measure all of the changes in a cell's protein components.
13h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Who is to blame for marine litter?Members of the public are more likely to blame the global marine litter crisis on retailers, industry and government, according to new research led by the University of Plymouth.
13h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

AT&T closes mega-merger with Time WarnerAT&T Time Warner JDWireless and broadband colossus AT&T on Thursday announced the close of its $85 billion merger with media-entertainment conglomerate Time Warner.
13h
Science | The Guardian

Is competition driving innovation or damaging scientific research? | Anonymous academicWhen a colleague with shaky data raced a competitor to be first to publish, I saw how the perverse incentives in research work There’s an oft-repeated phrase in the scientific world that “competition drives innovation”. This can definitely sometimes be true, but in my experience the reality most of the time is that competition can be hugely wasteful and damaging to research. Take our lab, where w
13h
Science : NPR

Stephen Hawking's Voice Is Being Broadcast Into SpaceThe late scientist's voice will be "beamed toward the nearest black hole," his daughter tells the British press. Hawking is being interred at Westminster Abbey on Friday. (Image credit: Jemal Countess/Getty Images)
13h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Gum disease may be a key initiator of rheumatoid arthritis related autoimmunityThe results of a study presented at the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR 2018) demonstrates increased levels of gum disease, and disease-causing bacteria, in individuals at risk of rheumatoid arthritis (RA).
14h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Rates of depression and anxiety may correlate with disease activity in early RAThe results of a study to be presented at the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR 2018) suggest that rates of anxiety and depression in patients with rheumatoid arthritis correlate with measures of disease activity over the first year following diagnosis.
14h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Obesity in childhood and adulthood shown to increase risk of knee and hip osteoarthritisThe results of a study to be presented at the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR 2018) suggest childhood and adult obesity increase the risk of developing hip osteoarthritis (OA) and knee OA but not hand OA.
14h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Studies provide new insights into the role of sleep in chronic painThe results of two studies presented today at the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR 2018) provide insight into the role of sleep in chronic pain. The first study demonstrates a predictive role of sleep problems for chronic pain and the second provides insight into chronic pain and sleep in adolescents.
14h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Study suggests siblings of people with RA are at increased risk of acute coronary syndromeThe results of a study presented today at the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR 2018) demonstrate an increased risk of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) in siblings of individuals with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), suggesting shared susceptibility between the two diseases.
14h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Obesity in women and current smoking in men predict lack of remission in early RAThe results of a study presented today at the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR 2018) report that obesity in women and current smoking in men were the strongest predictors of not achieving remission in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) within a year.
14h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Gout in the elderly linked to higher risk of dementiaThe results of a study presented today at the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR 2018) suggest that gout is associated with a 17-20 percent higher risk of dementia in the elderly.
14h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Why the tongue of the Pine Island Glacier suddenly shrankThe Pine Island Glacier in Western Antarctica is not only one of the fastest-flowing ice streams in the Southern Hemisphere; over the past 11 years, four major icebergs have calved from its floating tongue.
14h
Dagens Medicin

Her er de 100 mest magtfulde i sundhedsvæsenet i 2018Dagens Medicins Magtpanel har vurderet de mest indflydelsesrige personer i sundhedssektoren, og vi bringer listen med de 100, som fik højest magtscore.
14h
Dagens Medicin

Ekkoet efter BentANALYSE. Arven efter Bent Hansen er tung. Selv om hans arvtager er avanceret pænt, er regionerne for første gang siden deres oprettelse uden en eneste repræsentant i toppen af sundhedsvæsenets magthierarki.
14h
Dagens Medicin

Det sønderjyske åndehulSundhedsminister Ellen Trane Nørby adskiller håndfast det offentlige liv fra det private. Det kommer ikke nogen ved, om der er nullermænd derhjemme i stuen. Vi fik lirket en sprække i princippet og besøgte hende i to ellers lukkede rum – bagsædet af ministerbilen og kolonihavehuset i Sønderborg. På sporet af Ellen uden filter. Med håndsprit, mod hundelorte og afhængig af frihed.
14h
Dagens Medicin

Sir Fix-a-lotJakob Kjellberg har hænderne godt skruet på og sætter en ære i at få tingene til at fungere. Om det er på ødegården i Skåne eller i et sundhedsøkonomisk projekt, som skal løses inden for givne rammer. Han rummer en vis portion anarkisme og orker ikke de lange, seje processer. Han vil hellere ud og formidle.
14h
Dagens Medicin

Magtens spil er noget gøglHenrik Villadsen er ved at bygge Sjællands Universitetshospital op fysisk og organisatorisk, og opgaven trigger legobarnet og entreprenøren i ham. Han er en smule mere læge end økonom, og han hader middelmådighed. Villadsen ansætter gerne fandenivoldske personer, som kan hjælpe med at skabe en ny kultur og et tillokkende fagligt miljø. Selv vil han helst være den usynlige hånd, for han gider ikke
14h
Dagens Medicin

Den kedelige og den gode nyhedDe regionale topfolk bliver trynet af regeringen på årets magtliste, mens lægestanden holder stand.
14h
Dagens Medicin

Urologer udvikler laserteknik til at fjerne blæretumorer i ambulatorietUrologer på Herlev og Gentofte Hospital tester en ny laserteknik til at fjerne overfladiske blæretumorer. Teknikken er skånsom og kan formentlig spare ca. hver fjerde patient for operation.
14h
Dagens Medicin

Dr. Grønsvær er klar til kampThøger Persson Krogh er lægen, som vil spæne tværs over de russiske græsplæner, hvis de danske fodboldspillere får knubs i kampene om verdensmesterskabet. Her fortæller han om indholdet i lægetasken og lynhurtige beslutninger, som skal træffes, mens millioner kigger på ham.
14h
Dagens Medicin

Helt forkert at skrive psykiatri ud af KBUDet er ikke kun overraskende, men dybt bekymrende, at lægedækningsudvalget har anbefalet Sundhedsstyrelsen at ændre sammensætningen af KBU-forløbene, så psykiatrien ikke opgraderes, men i stedet helt skrives ud af yngre lægers KBU-forløb.
14h
Viden

Ikke helt selvkørende: Derfor kører Teslaer på autopilot galtEn undersøgelse har kortlagt, hvorfor Teslaers computerhjerner bliver forvirrede og risikerer at køre ind i andre biler.
15h
Ingeniøren

Leder: Vi vil hellere bede om et sporskifte end endnu en hæderspris
15h
Science | The Guardian

Soundscape ecology with Bernie Krause – Science Weekly podcastDo you know what noise a hungry sea anemone makes? Soundscape ecologist Bernie Krause does. Armed with over 5,000 hours of recordings, he takes Ian Sample on a journey through the natural world and demonstrates why sound is such a powerful tool for conservation Subscribe and review on Acast , Apple Podcasts , Soundcloud , Audioboom and Mixcloud . Join the discussion on Facebook and Twitter Do you
15h
The Guardian's Science Weekly

Soundscape ecology with Bernie Krause – Science Weekly podcastDo you know what noise a hungry sea anemone makes? Soundscape ecologist Bernie Krause does. Armed with over 5,000 hours of recordings, he takes Ian Sample on a journey through the natural world and demonstrates why sound is such a powerful tool for conservation
15h
Viden

Forskere afslører ny hemmelighed om sædcellerNyopdaget del af sædceller kan være mulig årsag til barnløshed.
15h
Science | The Guardian

Country diary: a powder puff of black feathers swirls down the streamHermitage Stream, Langstone, Hampshire: One agitated moorhen was corralling four skittish chicks on the far bank, while the other frantically zigzagged after a fifth As we walked alongside the Hermitage Stream , we noticed a day-old moorhen chick bobbing upside down beneath the replica wooden mill wheel, its oversized feet splayed to the sky. Without a second thought, my father climbed over the r
15h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Both quantity and quality of sleep affect cardiovascular risk factors in adolescentsA study from a research team led by a MassGeneral Hospital for Children physician finds that both the quantity and quality of sleep — the amount of time spent sleeping and the percentage of sleep that is undisturbed — in young adolescents have significant effects on aspects of cardiovascular health.
16h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Leading Antarctic experts offer two possible views of continent's futureThe next 10 years will be critical for the future of Antarctica, and choices made will have long-lasting consequences, says an international group of Antarctic research scientists. It lays out two different plausible future scenarios for the continent and its Southern Ocean over the next 50 years.
16h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Brain changes linked to sleep needWe've all experienced going to bed tired and waking up refreshed, yet how that happens at the molecular level remains a mystery. An international study sheds new light on the biochemistry of sleep need in the brain.
16h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Early birds less prone to depressionA study of 32,000 women found that those with an early chronotype, or sleep-wake preference, were significantly less likely to develop depression.
16h
Nyheder – Forskning – Videnskab

Copenhagen Health Science Partners fylder et årForskningspartnerskabet mellem KU og Region Hovedstaden, der parrer klinikere og laboratorieforskere…
16h
Dagens Medicin

Overbelægning – prioritering eller dårlig planlægningOverbelægning er en forudsigelig konsekvens af den måde, ressourcerne i sundhedsvæsenet prioriteres.
16h
Dagens Medicin

Valgkampbuket med skjulte tidslerLose og Astman fik en god debut som forhandlere, men de 800 mio. kr. til somatikken vil næppe kunne mærkes af det pressede personale i f.eks. akutmodtagelser og på medicinske afsnit. Og nok er toprocentkravet væk, men finansministeriets regnedrenge overgiver sig ikke lige. Regionerne må betale en pris.
16h
NeuWrite San Diego

Does imagination make us human?Do you take your coffee with milk? Would you like a slice of pizza? Oh hold on, that pizza will have to wait—someone is calling on the plastic phone on the kitchen wall. Who? Obviously my best friend Phoebe from down the street. Uh oh, now the coffee is cold. I’ll put on a fresh […]
17h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

This is what a stretchy circuit looks likeResearchers have made a new hybrid conductive material — part elastic polymer, part liquid metal — that can be bent and stretched at will. Circuits made with this material can take most two-dimensional shapes and are also non-toxic.
17h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Astronomers see distant eruption as black hole destroys starScientists get first direct images showing fast-moving jet of particles ejected as a supermassive black hole at the core of a galaxy shreds a passing star.
17h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Scientists have captured the elusive cell that can regenerate an entire flatwormResearchers have captured the one cell that is capable of regenerating an entire organism.
17h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

US smokers don't believe vaping is less harmful than smokingA growing proportion of US adults do not believe that e-cigarettes are less harmful than smoking, according to an analysis of the US Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health (PATH) study data from 2013 to 2015.
17h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Scientists identify enzyme responsible for vascular damage caused by aircraft noiseIn a recent study, scientists have identified an enzyme responsible for aircraft-related vascular damage. The researchers were also able to show that night-time noise has a particularly harmful effect and thus demand that night-time sleep be protected from noise.
17h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

AI-driven ultrafast technology visually identifies cells without imagesA team made of a scientific start-up company and academic researchers has invented a new cell identification and sorting system called Ghost Cytometry. The system combines a novel imaging technique with artificial intelligence to identify and sort cells with unprecedented high-throughput speed. The scientists leading the project hope that their method will be used to identify and sort cancer cells
18h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

DNA 'fossils' in fish, amphibians, and reptiles reveal deep diversity of retrovirusesRetroviruses, a broad category of viruses that infect humans and other vertebrates, have much greater diversity than previously thought, according to new research.
18h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Climate change has fish moving faster than regulations can keep upThe world's system for allocating fish stocks is being outpaced by the movement of fish species in response to climate change, according to a study undertaken by an international team of marine ecologists, fisheries and social scientists, and lawyers.
18h
Live Science

CRE Infection: Causes, Symptoms & TreatmentCRE are a type of bacteria that have become resistant to most antibiotics. Infections usually occur in health care settings.
18h
Scientific American Content: Global

Hippo Dung Fouls Up Freshwater FisheriesHippo poop is piling up in Tanzania’s freshwater fisheries—which is bad news for biodiversity, and deleterious for the dinnerplate. Jason G. Goldman reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
19h
Science : NPR

Looking Back: Reflecting On The Past To Understand The PresentSo often we get stuck in the past, rehashing what we should have done, and what we no longer have. But researchers say our obsession with the past can tell us something important about our future. (Image credit: Gpointstudio/Getty Images/Cultura RF)
19h
Ingeniøren

Bagsiden: Togetatens knaldsignaler – før og nuUgens signalværdier
20h
Ingeniøren

Bagsiden: Hastespørgsmål – hvad måler disse to oechslevægte?Ugens fremlysning
20h
New Scientist – News

DeepMind’s AI can ‘imagine’ a world based on a single pictureA neural network has taught itself to ‘imagine’ a scene from different viewpoints, including how shadows move and textures vary, based on just a single image
20h
New Scientist – News

Wild animals are turning nocturnal to keep away from humansDozens of species all around the world are abandoning the day and becoming more active at night, to avoid contact with humans
20h
New Scientist – News

Spiders can ‘fly’ because they make near-invisible paraglidersWe’ve finally solved the mystery of how even fairly big spiders can take to the skies, and it turns out it’s because they make flying machines that can barely be seen with the naked eye
20h
New Scientist – News

We’ve seen a gigantic black hole tear a star in half and eat itWe’ve gotten one of our best looks yet at a star being devoured by a black hole, thanks to astronomers who watched a decade-long meal
20h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Who is to blame for marine litter?Members of the public are more likely to blame the global marine litter crisis on retailers, industry and government, according to new research led by the University of Plymouth.
21h
Science | The Guardian

Inscribed seventh-century window ledge unearthed at TintagelFind adds to view that Cornish site was home to thriving trade port in early middle ages A seventh-century slate window ledge inscribed with an intriguing mix of Latin, Greek and Celtic words, names and symbols has been unearthed at Tintagel Castle in north Cornwall. The discovery adds weight to the view that the rugged coastal site, which is most often associated with the legend of King Arthur ,
21h
Latest Headlines | Science News

The number of teens who report having sex is downAbout 40 percent of high school students are having sex, the lowest amount in the last three decades.
21h
Feed: All Latest

Senators Demand Answers From Amazon on Echo's Snooping HabitsJeff Flake and Chris Coons sent Jeff Bezos a letter Thursday with nearly 30 questions about how the company handles user data and privacy.
21h
Futurity.org

New research debunks myths about multilingual studentsMultilingual students, who speak a language or more than one language other than English at home, have improved in reading and math achievement substantially since 2003, according to a new study. This new research debunks a common myth that multilingual students and English Learners have made little progress in academic achievement in recent years, and that US schools continue to fail these stude
21h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

The Lancet: Study questions the benefits of abdominal aortic aneurysm screening in menScreening for abdominal aortic aneurysm — swelling of the major artery in the abdomen, which can cause sudden death if it ruptures — may not substantially reduce deaths from the condition, according to a Swedish cohort study of more than 130,000 men published in The Lancet. The findings question the need for the screening, which is also conducted in the UK and US.
21h
Futurity.org

‘Holy grail’ robotic device draws and tests bloodResearchers have created an automated blood drawing and testing device that provides rapid results. It could potentially improve workflow in hospitals and other health-related institutions to allow health care practitioners to spend more time treating patients. “This device represents the holy grail in blood testing technology,” says Martin L. Yarmush, senior author of the study and chair and pro
21h
Futurity.org

Newly discovered molecule smashes the limits of insulationResearchers have discovered the most current-insulating molecule yet. The discovery has broken the widely accepted limit of insulation properties and has the potential to influence the future of electronics. “…current size limits for insulating materials can be broken.” “We have found an extremely current-insulating molecule, one that isn’t just the most insulating yet to be studied, but so insul
22h
Futurity.org

How water gets from the blood to the brainResearchers have discovered how water moves from the blood to the brain. Every day around half a liter of water moves from the blood to the brain through a thin tissue called the plexus choroideus, but exactly how this happens has been a mystery. In a new study in Nature Communications , researchers show for the first time with mice that osmosis does not control the transport, as many used to bel
22h
The Atlantic

The Atlantic Daily: On a Global ScaleWhat We’re Following IG Report: A newly released internal-watchdog report from the inspector general of the FBI states that no evidence has been found to support President Trump’s claims that the bureau was politically biased in its handling of the probe into Hillary Clinton’s use of a private email server. The report also condemns decisions by former FBI Director James Comey, whose announcements
22h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Rapid genetic testing can prevent hearing loss in newborns treated for sepsisMore than a million neonatal deaths worldwide each year are estimated to be due to sepsis. Many patients receive antibiotic therapy during their hospital stay, but babies with a specific genetic change can suffer irreversible hearing loss as a result. Now, a rapid test for distinguishing those infants who will have this adverse reaction to gentamicin has been developed.
22h
The Scientist RSS

Pressure Mounts for EPAs Scott Pruitt to QuitRepublicans and conservative media outlets are turning on the agency administrator as allegations of ethical misconduct and excessive spending pile up.
22h
Feed: All Latest

'Ninjabot' Reveals the Mantis Shrimp's Wily Snail-Hunting SchemeThe mantis shrimp wields one of the fiercest strikes on Earth. With the help of a robot, researchers show that the predator is a master strategist, too.
22h
Popular Science

Tropical frogs were alive 99 million years ago, and we have the amber to prove itAnimals Han Solo prefers carbonite, tropical frogs prefer amber. When it comes to fossilization, amber is the miracle material you’re dying to get submerged in. And now it's gifted us the discovery of one very old species of frog.
22h
The Atlantic

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: A Crack in the Trump FoundationWritten by Lena Felton ( @lenakfelton ) and Taylor Hosking ( @Taylor__Hosking ) Today in 5 Lines A new lawsuit filed by the New York attorney general alleges that the Donald J. Trump Foundation and its board of directors, including the president and his three eldest children, engaged in a years-long pattern of illegal behavior . Trump responded to the suit on Twitter, saying he wouldn’t settle th
22h
NYT > Science

Sex and Drugs Decline Among Teens, but Depression and Suicidal Thoughts GrowThe C.D.C.’s biannual survey of U.S. high school students also showed increases in bullying and declines in condom use.
22h
Popular Science

This AI can see people through walls. Here's how.Technology Besides artificial intelligence, you also need radio waves. Radio signals coupled with artificial intelligence have allowed researchers to do something fascinating: see people moving on the other side of a wall.
22h
Feed: All Latest

Elon Musk’s Boring Company Wins a Big Boring Contract in ChicagoPods in the tunnel will speed people to O’Hare Airport in less than 15 minutes.
23h

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